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Undergraduate Business Administration Program

Milton L. Cofield, Ph.D., Executive Director
Tepper School, Room 141
miltonc@andrew.cmu.edu

The Tepper School program in undergraduate business education is intended for students interested in an undergraduate management educational experience that is broad and based upon the liberal arts, quantitative studies and analytical reasoning as its foundation. Such a program is both intellectually strong and flexible enough to accommodate the interests of students with diverse goals, ranging from beginning a career to graduate study.

The curriculum is designed around a central core of courses in the liberal arts, the functional areas of business, economics, mathematics and computing course requirements. To this is added a requirement for in-depth study in one of the core functional business areas such as finance, information systems, marketing, entrepreneurship or manufacturing management. Finally, the curriculum requires all students to have a minor in the curricula of another college in order to obtain the additional breadth and flexibility that promotes confidence in one's knowledge and its benefits for a lifetime. We believe this curriculum structure is that needed for those who will be leaders in the increasingly global business and political environment in which organizations of the future will pursue their goals.

Our curriculum prepares students to begin their professional careers in all areas of management and they do so in some of the world's leading service, manufacturing, and governmental organizations. Many go on to graduate study in economics, finance, law, and policy studies at leading universities in the world.

In addition to the major in Business Administration, we offer the opportunity for a minor or second major to students in other programs of the university. If you are seriously interested in management education in an environment that offers the best undergraduate experience, please contact the undergraduate Business Administration academic advisors in the Tepper School of Business.

B.S. Degree in Business Administration

To receive the B.S. degree in Business Administration, students must complete at least 364 units, consisting of the Business Core, as well as Breadth, Track and Minor requirements.

Functional Business Core Requirements

111 Units

70-100Global Business9
70-122Introduction to Accounting9
70-201Professional and Service Projects9
70-311Organizational Behavior9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-340Business Communications9
70-345Business Presentations9
70-371Operations Management9
70-381Marketing I9
70-391Finance9
70-401Management Game12
70-451Management Information Systems9

Economics Core Requirements

27 Units

73-100Principles of Economics9
73-230Intermediate Microeconomics9
73-240Intermediate Macroeconomics9

Mathematics/Computing Core Requirements

59 Units

15-110Principles of Computing10
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-256Multivariate Analysis 19
21-257Models and Methods for Optimization 29
70-207Probability and Statistics for Business Applications9
70-208Regression Analysis9
99-101/102Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3

1 or 21-259 Calculus in Three Dimensions

2 or 21-292 Operations Research I

Breadth Requirements

63 Units

Students must complete seven breadth requirements with one course for each. Two are first-year requirements (Writing and Global Histories). 

First-Year Courses
18 units
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
79-104Global Histories9
Distributional Courses
45 units

One course is required in each category listed below. For a list of course to choose from in each category, please see the Breadth Requirements page at the Undergraduate Business Administration website.

  1. Science & Technology
  2. Cognition, Choice & Behavior
  3. Political & Social Institutions
  4. Creative Production & Reflection
  5. Cultural Analysis

Track Requirements

54 Units

A program track provides a comprehensive focus of additional courses (both required and elective) that the student must complete in order to obtain in-depth knowledge of a particular functional area of management expertise. Students must complete one of the following tracks.

  • Business Technology
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Finance
  • General Management
  • Graphic Media Management
  • International Management
  • Manufacturing Management and Consulting
  • Marketing
Business Technology Track
REQUIRED COURSES Units
15-121Introduction to Data Structures10
70-453Business Technology for Consulting9
70-455Modern Data Management9
70-465Strategic Information Technology9
ELECTIVE COURSES - choose two (at least one must be a full-semester course):
70-339Information Technology for Finance9
70-443Digital Marketing and Social Media Strategy9
70-449Social, Economic and Information Networks9
70-488Interactive Marketing6
70-643Publishing on the World Wide Web9
36-315Statistical Graphics and Visualization9
Entrepreneurship Track
REQUIRED COURSES Units
70-415Introduction to Entrepreneurship9
or 70-414 Entrepreneurship for Engineers
or 70-420 Entrepreneurship for Scientists
or 70-421 Entrepreneurship for Computer Scientists
70-395Funding Entrepreneurial Ventures9
or 70-397 Introduction to Entrepreneurial Finance
70-416New Venture Creation9
70-481Marketing Research9
ELECTIVE COURSES - choose two:
70-321Negotiation and Conflict Resolution9
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
70-393Open Innovation6
70-419Entrepreneurship Practicum: The Apprentice9
70-430International Management9
70-438Commercialization and Innovation9
70-495Corporate Finance9
70-496Entrepreneurial Finance: Valuation & Deal6
Finance Track
REQUIRED COURSES Units
70-492Investment Analysis9
70-495Corporate Finance9
ELECTIVE COURSES - choose four:
21-270Introduction to Mathematical Finance9
21-370Discrete Time Finance9
21-420Continuous-Time Finance9
70-339Information Technology for Finance9
70-398International Finance9
70-496Entrepreneurial Finance: Valuation & Deal6
70-497Derivative Securities9
73-359Benefit-Cost Analysis9
73-372International Money and Finance9
73-392Financial Economics9
General Management Track

General Management is a self-defined track consisting of six courses. It is appropriate for students who wish to combine two or more areas; to design a concentration that is not covered by a formally defined track. Students selecting this track should discuss their study plan with the track advisor by the middle of the junior year.

Graphic Media Management Track
REQUIRED COURSES Units
70-160Graphic Media Management9
ELECTIVE COURSES - choose five:
70-194Publishing Management in the Information Age9
70-481Marketing Research9
70-635Desktop Publishing9
70-637Interactive Media Design Management9
70-641Color Reproduction and Management9
70-643Publishing on the World Wide Web9
70-650Independent Study: Graphic Communications ManagementVar.
International Management Track
REQUIRED COURSES Units
70-342Managing Across Cultures *9
70-365International Trade and International Law *9
70-430International Management *9
70-480International Marketing *9
70-508Independent Study in International Management
(This involves cultural preparation for the experience abroad)
Var.

* These requirements may be met by comparable courses taken abroad, subject to approval by the Track Advisor.
 

ELECTIVE COURSES - choose two: Units
70-398International Finance9
79-20520th Century Europe9
79-221Development and Democracy in Latin America9
79-233The United States and the Middle East since 19459
79-278Rights to Representation: Indigenous People and their Media9
79-279Comparative Study of Nationalism Case Studies: USA, Arabia, South Africa9
79-290States/Stateless Societies and Nationalism in West Africa6
79-291Globalization in East African History6
79-307Religion and Politics in the Middle East9
79-381Petrocultures: How Oil Changed the World9
88-205Comparative Politics9
88-326Theories of International Relations9
Other courses, as approved by the Track Advisor

EXPERIENCE ABROAD

The International Management track requires at least one semester of study abroad, or a substantial internship abroad (e.g., one summer or one semester), or both. Study abroad programs should provide substantial immersion in the culture. Contact the Track Advisor for assistance.
 

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT

Students mut demonstrate conversational proficiency in a language other than English, to the satisfaction of the Track Advisor. (This may be, but is not necessarily, the same language used during the experience abroad.) Proficiency may be demonstrated in several ways, including:

  • Long-term residence in a country that requires knowledge of the language (normally the case for international students).
  • Language courses, normally including at least one intensive course that lasts several weeks. A few semesters of high school or college study do not necessarily satisfy the requirement.
  • Successful completion of at least one semester of courses taught in the language in a country where it is spoken, or employment that requires conversational knowledge of the language.
Manufacturing Management and Consulting Track
REQUIRED COURSES Units
70-453Business Technology for Consulting9
70-460Mathematical Models for Consulting9
70-471Supply Chain Management9
Choose at least one course from the following list.
70-374Forecasting and Data Mining6
70-462Stochastic Modeling and Simulations9
70-474Quality Management and Productivity9
70-476Service Operations Management9
Choose up to two courses from the following list, for a total of three electives.
24-341Manufacturing Sciences
(There are several prerequisites, some of which may be negotiable. If you would like to take this course, please consult the Manufacturing Track advisor as early as possible.)
9
70-449Social, Economic and Information Networks9
70-455Modern Data Management9

* All mathematics, statistics, economics, and computer science prerequisites for these courses should be satisfied by required BA courses, namely 21-120/21-256, 70-207/70-208, and 73-240.

Marketing Track
REQUIRED COURSES Units
70-481Marketing Research9
ELECTIVE COURSES - choose three:
70-449Social, Economic and Information Networks9
70-471Supply Chain Management9
70-480International Marketing9
70-483Advertising and Marketing Communications9
70-485Product and Brand Management9
70-487Customer Management Using Probability Models6
70-488Interactive Marketing6
70-374Forecasting and Data Mining6
...and up to 18 units from the following list, totaling five courses.
70-160Graphic Media Management9
70-443Digital Marketing and Social Media Strategy9
70-637Interactive Media Design Management9
73-365Firms, Market Structures, and Strategy9
85-241Social Psychology9
88-302Behavioral Decision Making9

Minor Requirement

54 Units

All business students are required to complete a minor in another department. Students may select any minor offered at Carnegie Mellon to fulfill this requirement. Minors that blend well with the business curriculum include: Psychology, Statistics, Economics, Communication Design, and Policy & Management. Students should consult the undergraduate catalog regarding the specific requirements of any minor and should meet with their advisor to discuss their choice.

Suggested Course Plan

What follows is a suggested course plan for Business Administration students. Be careful to observe any pre- and co-requisite requirements for each course.

First Year
Fall Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
70-100Global Business9
73-100Principles of Economics9
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
xx-xxxBreadth course9
99-101/102Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
 49
Spring Units
21-256Multivariate Analysis9
73-230Intermediate Microeconomics9
79-104Global Histories9
15-110Principles of Computing10
xx-xxxBreadth course9
 46
Sophomore Year
Fall Units
21-257Models and Methods for Optimization 3,69
73-240Intermediate Macroeconomics9
70-207Probability and Statistics for Business Applications9
70-122Introduction to Accounting9
xx-xxxBreadth course9
 45
Spring Units
70-208Regression Analysis9
70-311Organizational Behavior9
70-340Business Communications9
xx-xxxMinor Course9
xx-xxxBreadth course9
 45

3 or 21-292 Operations Research I, offered in spring semesters only

Junior Year
Fall Units
70-371Operations Management9
70-381Marketing I9
70-391Finance9
70-451Management Information Systems9
xx-xxxBreadth Course9
 45
Spring Units
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-345Business Presentations9
70-451Management Information Systems9
70-xxxTrack Course9
70-xxxTrack Course9
 45
Senior Year
Fall Units
70-xxxTrack Course9
70-xxxTrack Course9
xx-xxxMinor Course9
xx-xxxMinor Course9
70-201Professional and Service Projects9
 45
Spring Units
70-401Management Game12
70-xxxTrack Course9
70-xxxTrack Course9
xx-xxxMinor Course9
xx-xxxMinor Course9
 48
364Total units required:

Bachelor of Science in Computational Finance

The Bachelor of Science in Computational Finance is an Intercollege Program. Students who pursue Computational Finance as their primary major may elect to have either the Mellon College of Science (MCS) or the Tepper School of Business (Tepper) as their home college. The coursework required for the major is the same in either case, with the exception of the breadth component requirement and those of the functional business core.

Tepper School Students must complete the breadth requirements of the Business Administration Program. Additionally, they must complete the Functional Business Core. The complete sequence of courses for this major may be found in the Inter-college Programs section of the catalog.

Students who are thinking of the BSCF major should meet with an academic advisor in the Tepper School as soon as their interest is firm in order to make sure they are completing the correct sequence of courses.

Additional Major in Business Administration

Students may apply to be admitted to the study of an additional major in Business Administration in their junior year. Applications will be accepted two weeks prior to Spring & Fall Registration week.

The decision to accept a student into the additional major will be based upon a variety of factors including:

  • An overall GPA of 3.25 or greater;
  • Having completed or being currently enrolled in all of the mathematics & statistics, economics, and computing requirements of the Business Administration degree prior to submitting an application for admission to the additional major;
  • The extent of completion of the business administration functional core course requirements;
  • The availability of admission enrollment spaces in the graduating class year for which the student is applying.

Acceptance in the additional major is subject to the University policy which states that the ability to satisfy the requirements for an additional major cannot be guaranteed for any student and will be based upon course availability and the time the student is willing to invest to satisfy all of the requirements of the additional major. In some cases this might require more than 8 semesters of undergraduate study.

The student seeking an additional major in Business Administration is required to complete all of the requirements listed below without substitution:

Additional Major Course Requirements

Mathematics and Statistics

Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10-20
or 21-111
  & 21-112
Calculus I
   and Calculus II
21-256Multivariate Analysis9
or 21-259 Calculus in Three Dimensions
21-257Models and Methods for Optimization9
or 21-292 Operations Research I
70-207Probability and Statistics for Business Applications9
or 36-201 Statistical Reasoning and Practice
70-208Regression Analysis9
or 36-202 Statistical Methods
 46-56

Computing

99-101/102Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
15-110Principles of Computing10

Economics

73-100Principles of Economics9
73-230Intermediate Microeconomics9
73-240Intermediate Macroeconomics9

Business

Units
70-122Introduction to Accounting9
70-311Organizational Behavior9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-345Business Presentations9
70-371Operations Management9
70-381Marketing I9
70-391Finance9
70-451Management Information Systems 49
70-401Management Game12
70-3xx/4xx Electives (2)18
 102

4 Students in Information Systems and Computer Science cannot take 70-451; they may select another 70-4xx course from the Business Technology track.

Minor in Business Administration 

The minor in business administration requires a total of six courses or 54 units of which two courses must be 70-381 Marketing I and 73-100 Principles of Economics . The remaining four courses can be chosen from any offered in the department (70-xxx, with the exception of the statistics courses 70-207 and 70-208). Some of the most common choices that have been made are from the following list:

(A Total of 54 units or 6 courses):
73-100Principles of Economics
(required)
9
70-122Introduction to Accounting9
70-311Organizational Behavior9
70-371Operations Management9
70-381Marketing I
(required)
9
70-391Finance9
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
70-430International Management9
70-451Management Information Systems 59
70-480International Marketing9
70-481Marketing Research9
70-483Advertising and Marketing Communications9
 108

5 Students in Information Systems and Computer Science cannot take 70-451; they may select another 70-4xx course from the Business Technology track.

Some courses have prerequisites that might include specific mathematics or other BA courses. These may be found in the course descriptions and should be discussed with an advisor.

Students may declare the minor at any point after their freshman year by completing the minor declaration form. The form is available online at the undergraduate Business Administration website.

Minor in Business Administration (CIT Students Only)

Only students in the Carnegie Institute of Technology are permitted to meet the Business Administration minor requirements by completing the following selection of six courses:

Five required courses:
73-100Principles of Economics9
70-371Operations Management9
70-471Supply Chain Management9
21-292Operations Research I9
or 21-257 Models and Methods for Optimization
70-460Mathematical Models for Consulting9
or 70-474 Quality Management and Productivity
One Engineering Project Management course:
06-421Chemical Process Systems Design12
12-411Project Management for Construction9
18-510Sensor Systems Design12
18-525Integrated Circuit Design Project12
18-540Rapid Prototyping of Computer Systems12
18-545Advanced Digital Design Project12
18-549Embedded Systems Design12
18-551Digital Communication and Signal Processing Systems Design12
18-578Mechatronic Design12
19-451-19-452EPP Projects-EPP Projects24
24-370Engineering Design I: Methods and Skills12
27-399Professional Development II1
42-402BME Design Project9

Business Administration Policies 

Transfer Students

The undergraduate business administration program accepts students for transfer admission from any academic institution outside of Carnegie Mellon University on a limited basis. External transfer is limited to students who have just completed their first year of study in another institution. Students interested in transfer should contact Carnegie Mellon's Office of Admission.

Current Carnegie Mellon University students who are in other colleges may seek to transfer into the undergraduate business administration program also on a limited basis. Freshman students will not be considered for transfer until their Spring mid-semester grades for their first year of study have been posted.

All other current students may apply for transfer by completing the Transfer Application that is found online in the undergraduate business program pages of the Tepper School website. Students may apply for transfer two times in each academic year at the mid-semester of the Fall and Spring terms. Successful transfer is limited by both space and academic performance criteria. Students may be denied transfer if their academic performance prior to seeking transfer indicates that they will be unable to complete degree requirements in a timely way or if they have serious academic performance deficiencies.

Transfer of Course Credit

Students may receive credit for a maximum of three courses (27 units) of course work taken at other institutions and only provided they have received prior approval to take these courses for degree credit. Students seeking an additional major may only receive credit for a maximum of two courses (18 units), and those completing a minor may only receive credit for one course (9 units) through transferred credit. No transferred credit will be awarded for any course in which the grade received is less than a B.

Students receiving 36 units or more of AP/IB/Cambridge credit towards their degree requirements will not be eligible to transfer any additional coursework unless it is for an approved study abroad experience. Credit for college courses taken prior to enrolling at Carnegie Mellon will be at the discretion of the department.

No courses taken online will be accepted for transfer credit.

Students who have transferred into Business Administration from another institution will have used their allocation of transfer credit and will not be permitted to transfer any additional future course credit from outside Carnegie Mellon.

Pass/Fail

Students may use a maximum of 9 units Pass/Fail credit towards their graduation requirement. This does not include the course 99-101/102, Computing@Carnegie Mellon.

Academic Advising

Students are required to meet with their advisor at least once each semester to ensure that they are making normal progress towards their degree. An appointment for advising may be scheduled at any time by sending a request to uba@andrew.cmu.edu.

Dean's List

Students who receive a semester QPA of 3.50 or higher (with at least 45 factorable units and receiving no incompletes) will be placed on the Dean's List for that semester.

The College Honors Program

Students with outstanding records (minimum QPA of 3.75) and with at least 270 units of credit are invited to undertake an honor's thesis project under the direction of a faculty member for 18 units of credit. Students meeting these criteria are highly encouraged to consider the honor's thesis option. For more information about the honor's thesis, please see the course description for 70-500 or contact their advisor.

Graduation Requirements

In order to graduate with the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, students must meet all requirements specified for the program with a cumulative QPA of at least 2.00 and 364 earned units.

Students must also meet all university residence requirements and all financial obligations to the university before being awarded a degree. It is the student's responsibility to make certain they meet all of the requirements for graduation by consulting with our advising staff on a regular basis.

Full-Time Faculty

MUSTAFA AKAN, Associate Professor of Operations Management – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.LAURENCE ALES, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.KATHARINE ANDERSON, Assistant Professor of Economics and Entrepreneurship – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.JAY APT, Professor of Technology; Director, Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.LINDA ARGOTE, David M. Kirr and Barbara A. Kirr Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory; Director, Center for Organizational Learning, Innovation and Performance – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.BRANDY L. AVEN, Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.EGON BALAS, University Professor of Industrial Administration and Applied Mathematics; Thomas Lord Professor of Operations Research – D.Sc.Ec., University of Brussels; D.U. (Math), University of Paris; Carnegie Mellon, 1968–.ILKER BAYBARS, Dean, Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar; Deputy Dean Emeritus, Tepper School of Business; George Leland Bach Chair; Professor of Operations Management – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.ANDREW BIRD, Assistant Professor of Accounting – Ph.D., University of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.PETER BOATWRIGHT, Carnegie Bosch Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.ARTHUR A. BONI, The John R. Thorne Distinguished Career Professor of Entrepreneurship – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.STEPHEN M. CALABRESE, Visiting Associate Professor of Economics, Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.SOO-HAENG CHO, Associate Professor of Operations Management – Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.ROSALIND M. CHOW, Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.MILTON L. COFIELD, Executive Director, B.S. Administration Program; Teaching Professor of Business Management – Ph.D., University of Illinois; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.TAYA R. COHEN, Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory – Ph.D., University North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.GERARD P. CORNUEJOLS, IBM University Professor of Operations Research – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.CARLOS CORONA, Assistant Professor of Accounting – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.W. ROBERT DALTON, Associate Teaching Professor of Economics, Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Missouri; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.ROBERT M. DAMMON, Dean; Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.JULIA G. DEEMS, Assistant Teaching Professor of Business Management Communication – M.A. English, The Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.TIMOTHY P. DERDENGER, Assistant Professor of Economics and Strategy – Ph.D., University of Southern California; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.KENNETH B. DUNN, Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., Purdue University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.S. THOMAS EMERSON, David T. and Lindsay J. Morgenthaler Distinguished Career Professor of Entrepreneurship - Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar – Ph.D., Rice University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.DENNIS N. EPPLE, Thomas Lord University Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.MARK FICHMAN, Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1980–.JEFFREY GALAK, Associate Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., New York University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.WOLFGANG GATTERBAUER, Assistant Professor in Information Systems – Ph.D., Vienna University of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.ANISHA GHOSH, Assistant Professor of Finance – Ph.D., London School of Economics; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.BRENT GLOVER, Assistant Professor of Finance – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.JONATHAN C. GLOVER, Richard M. Cyert Professor of Management and Economics – Ph.D., The Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.MARVIN GOODFRIEND, Friends of Allan Meltzer Professorship; Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Brown University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.RICHARD C. GREEN, Richard M. and Margaret S. Cyert Chair; Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.W. MICHAEL GRIFFIN, Executive Director, Green Design Institute; Associate Research Professor, Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Institute of Technology and Tepper School of Business – Ph.D., University of Rhode Island; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.JOACHIM RYOHEI GROEGER, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., London School of Economics; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.ISA E. HAFALIR, Associate Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.OLIVER HAHL, Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior and Strategy – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.DALE HERSHEY, Associate Teaching Professor of Law, Emeritus – LL.B., Harvard Law School; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.GEOFFREY HITCH, Assistant Teaching Professor of Acting and Business Communications – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.BURTON HOLLIFIELD, PNC Professor of Finance; Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.JOHN HOOKER, T. Jerome Holleran Professor of Business Ethics and Social Responsibility; Professor of Operations Research; Director, Center for International Corporate Responsibility – Ph.D., Vanderbilt University; University of Tennessee; Carnegie Mellon, 1984 –.GUOFANG HUANG, Assistant Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., John Hopkins University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.YUJI IJIRI, R. M. Trueblood University Professor of Accounting and Economics, Emeritus – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.JOSEPH B. KADANE, Leonard J. Savage University Professor of Statistics and Social Sciences, Emeritus – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.KARAM KANG, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D. , University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.STEPHEN A. KAROLYI, Assistant Professor Finance and Accounting – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.SHAM KEKRE, Associate Teaching Professor of Production and Operations Management - Carnegie Mellon University- Qatar – Ph.D., University of Rochester; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.SUNDER KEKRE, Director, PNC Center for Financial Services Innovation; Bosch Professor of Operations Management – Ph.D., University of Rochester; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.ONUR KESTEN, Associate Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Rochester; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.FATMA KILINC-KARZAN, Assistant Professor of Operations Research – Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.TAE WAN KIM, Assistant Professor of Ethics – Ph.D. , University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.CLAUDIA A. KIRKPATRICK, Associate Teaching Professor of Business Management Communication, Emerita – D.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.DAVID KRACKHARDT, Professor of Organizations, H. John Heinz III College and Joint Appointment at Tepper School of Business – Ph.D., University of California, Irvine; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.ROBERT E. KRAUT, Herbert A. Simon Professor of Human-Computer Interaction, School of Computer Science and Joint Appointment at Tepper School of Business – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.YAROSLAV KRYUKOV, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.LARS-ALEXANDER KUEHN, Associate Professor of Finance – Ph.D., University of British Columbia; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.ALEXEY KUSHNIR, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.FINN KYDLAND, The Richard P. Simmons Distinguished Professorship; University Professor of Economics; Nobel Laureate (2004) – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.DAVID L. LAMONT, Associate Teaching Professor; Director, Management Games – M.S.I.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.REBECCA LESSEM, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.JING LI, Assistant Professor of Accounting – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.PIERRE JINGHONG LIANG, Associate Professor of Accounting – Ph.D., University of Florida; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.FRANCOIS MARGOT, Professor of Operations Research – Ph.D., Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.JOHN H. MATHER, Executive Director, Masters Programs; Teaching Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., University of Arizona; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.DAVID S. MAWHINNEY, Associate Teaching Professor; Director, Donald H. Jones Center for Entrepreneurship; Assistant Teaching Professor of Entrepreneurship – MBA, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.BENNETT T. MCCALLUM, H. J. Heinz Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Rice University; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.J. PATRICK MCGINNIS, Assistant Teaching Professor of Business Management Communication – M.A., Pittsburg State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.ALLAN H. MELTZER, The Allan H. Meltzer University Professor of Political Economy – Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 1957–.ROBERT A. MILLER, Richard M. Cyert and Morris DeGroot Professorship in Economics and Statistics – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.ROBERT T. MONROE, Director, FlexMBA Program; Associate Teaching Professor, Information Technology and Computer Science – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.ALAN MONTGOMERY, Associate Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.TRIDAS MUKHOPADHYAY, Deloitte Consulting Professor of e-Business; Professor in Information Systems, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.MILDRED S. MYERS, Teaching Professor of Business Management Communications, Emerita – D.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.JOHN R. O'BRIEN, Associate Professor of Accounting and Experimental Economics – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 1984 (Leave of Absence: AY 2013-14)–.CHRISTOPHER OLIVOLA, Assistant Professor Marketing – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.EMILIO OSAMBELA, Assistant Professor of Finance – Ph.D., Swiss Finance Institute and Universite de Lausanne; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.JAVIER F. PENA, Bajaj Family Chair in Operations Research; Professor of Operations Research – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.NICOLAS PETROSKY-NADEAU, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Quebec; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.EVELYN M. PIERCE, Associate Teaching Professor of Business Management Communication – M.F.A., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.RONALD PLACONE, Assistant Teaching Professor of Business Communications – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.R. RAVI, Andris A.Andris A. Zoltners Professor of Business; Rohet Tolani Distinguished Professor; Professor of Operations Research and Computer Science – Ph.D., Brown University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.DENISE M. ROUSSEAU, H. J. Heinz II University Professor of Organizational Behavior and Public Policy, Heinz College and Joint Appointment at Tepper School of Business – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1994–.BRYAN R. ROUTLEDGE, Associate Professor of Finance – Ph.D., University of British Columbia; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.STEFANO SACCHETTO, Assistant Professor of Finance – Ph.D., London Business School; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.ALAN SCHELLER-WOLF, Professor of Operations Management; Head, Ph.D. Program – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.NICOLA SECOMANDI, Associate Professor of Operations Management – Ph.D., University of Houston; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.DUANE J. SEPPI, BNY Mellon Professor of Finance; Head, Master of Science in Computational Finance Program – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.PATRICK W. SILEO, Associate Dean, Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar; Associate Teaching Professor of Economics and Finance - Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.PARAM VIR SINGH, Associate Professor of Business Technologies; Carnegie Bosch Junior Chair in Information Sciences – Ph.D., University of Washington, Seattle; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.MARVIN A. SIRBU, Professor of Engineering and Public Policy, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Institute of Technology and Joint Appointment at Tepper School of Business – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.CHRISTOPHER SLEET, Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.MICHAEL D. SMITH, Professor of Information Technology and Marketing – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.FALLAW B. SOWELL, Associate Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Duke University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.CHESTER S. SPATT, Pamela R. and Kenneth B. Dunn Professor of Finance – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.STEPHEN E. SPEAR, Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.KANNAN SRINIVASAN, Rohet Tolani DisH. J. Heinz II Professor of Management, Marketing, and Information Systems – Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.ANTHONY P. STANTON, Teaching Professor of Graphic Media Management; Director, Graphic Media Management Program – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.JACK DOUGLAS STECHER, Assistant Professor of Accounting – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.AUSTIN SUDBURY, Assistant Professor of Accounting – Ph.D., Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.SRIDHAR R. TAYUR, The Ford Distinguished Research Chair; Professor of Operations Management – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.CHRISTOPHER I. TELMER, Associate Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., Queen's University at Kingston (Canada); Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.MICHAEL A. TRICK, Senior Associate Dean, Faculty and Research; Harry B. and James H. Higgins Professor of Operations Research – Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.DAVID E. TUNGATE, Associate Teaching Professor of Law – LL.B., University of Illinois School of Law; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.WILLEM-JAN VAN HOEVE, Associate Professor of Operations Research – Ph.D., University of Amsterdam; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.STEPHEN VARGO, Assistant Teaching Professor, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.SHU LIN WEE, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.LAURIE R. WEINGART, Senior Associate Dean, Education; Carnegie Bosch Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.GEORGE M. WHITE, Associate Teaching Professor of Entrepreneurship - Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., University of Oregon; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.JEFFREY R. WILLIAMS, Professor of Business Strategy – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.ANITA WILLIAMS WOOLLEY, Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.SEVIN YELTEKIN, Associate Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.M. BUMIN YENMEZ, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.RICHARD O. YOUNG, Teaching Professor of Business Management Communication – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.ARIEL ZETLIN-JONES, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D. , University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.KAIFU ZHANG, Assistant Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., INSEAD; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.

Visiting Faculty

SERRA BORANBAY-AKAN, Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.ROBERT C. BLATTBERG, Executive Director, Center for Marketing Technology and Information; Timothy W. McQuire Distinguished Service Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.EMIN CIVI, Visiting Associate Professor, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Celal Bayar University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.BENJAMIN COLLIER, Visiting Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.BILLIE MORROW DAVIS, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Economics – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.FANY DECLERCK, Visiting Professor of Finance – Ph.D., University of Lille; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.MOHAMMAD DELASAY, Post-Doctoral Fellow in Operations Management – Ph.D., University of Alberta; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.FUAD FAROOQI, Visiting Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Richard Ivey School of Business; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.STARLING HUNTER, Visiting Associate Teaching Professor, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Duke University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.THOMAS G. RUCHTI, Visiting Assistant Professor of Accounting – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.PETER STUETTGEN, Visiting Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.C. SCOTT WYATT, Visiting Assistant Teaching Professor of Business Communications – Ph.D., University of Minnesota, Twin Cities; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.

Adjunct Faculty

RICHARD L. BRYANT, Adjunct Professor of Business; Executive Director, Master of Science in Computational Finance Program – M.B.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.LLOYD CORDER, Adjunct Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.WILLIAM COURTWRIGHT, Adjunct Professor of Entrepreneurship – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.TIM CUNNINGHAM, Adjunct Professor of Entrepreneurship – M.A., University of California, Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.CHRIS CYNKAR, Adjunct Professor of Entrepreneurship – M.S.I.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.ROBERT DALEY, Adjunct Professor of Marketing – M.B.A., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.L. FRANK DEMMLER, Adjunct Professor of Entrepreneurship – M.B.A., University of California at Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.ROB DILLON, Adjunct Professor of Graphic Media Management – B.A., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.CLIFFORD T. EARLY, Adjunct Professor of Law – J.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.TAYO FABUSUYI, Adjunct Professor of Economics – M.Phil., Oxford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.CAROL B. GOLDBURG, Executive Director, Undergraduate Economics Program; Adjunct Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.ELIF INCEKARA HAFALIR, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.ELAINE HYDER, Adjunct Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.ROBERT E. KELLEY, Adjunct Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory – Ph.D., Colorado State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.JOHN R. LANKFORD, Executive Director, Executive Education; Adjunct Professor of Marketing – M.B.A., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.HARSH MANGLIK, Executive in Residence and Adjunct Professor of Management – M.S.I.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.MELISSA MURPHY, Adjunct Professor of Marketing – B.A., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.DAVID RAMIREZ, Adjunct Professor of Business Management – M.B.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.JAMES H. ROBERTS, Adjunct Professor of Law – J.D., Syracuse University School of Law; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.PETER J. ROMAN, Adjunct Professor of Marketing – B.S., Providence College; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.FREDERICK H. RUETER, Adjunct Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.JOEL STERN, Distinguished Adjunct Professor of Finance – M.B.A., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.

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Full-Time Faculty

MUSTAFA AKAN, Associate Professor of Operations Management – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.LAURENCE ALES, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.KATHARINE ANDERSON, Assistant Professor of Economics and Entrepreneurship – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.JAY APT, Professor of Technology; Director, Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.LINDA ARGOTE, David M. Kirr and Barbara A. Kirr Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory; Director, Center for Organizational Learning, Innovation and Performance – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.BRANDY L. AVEN, Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.EGON BALAS, University Professor of Industrial Administration and Applied Mathematics; Thomas Lord Professor of Operations Research – D.Sc.Ec., University of Brussels; D.U. (Math), University of Paris; Carnegie Mellon, 1968–.ILKER BAYBARS, Dean, Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar; Deputy Dean Emeritus, Tepper School of Business; George Leland Bach Chair; Professor of Operations Management – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.ANDREW BIRD, Assistant Professor of Accounting – Ph.D., University of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.PETER BOATWRIGHT, Carnegie Bosch Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.ARTHUR A. BONI, The John R. Thorne Distinguished Career Professor of Entrepreneurship – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.STEPHEN M. CALABRESE, Visiting Associate Professor of Economics, Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.SOO-HAENG CHO, Associate Professor of Operations Management – Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.ROSALIND M. CHOW, Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.MILTON L. COFIELD, Executive Director, B.S. Administration Program; Teaching Professor of Business Management – Ph.D., University of Illinois; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.TAYA R. COHEN, Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory – Ph.D., University North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.GERARD P. CORNUEJOLS, IBM University Professor of Operations Research – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.CARLOS CORONA, Assistant Professor of Accounting – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.W. ROBERT DALTON, Associate Teaching Professor of Economics, Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Missouri; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.ROBERT M. DAMMON, Dean; Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.JULIA G. DEEMS, Assistant Teaching Professor of Business Management Communication – M.A. English, The Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.TIMOTHY P. DERDENGER, Assistant Professor of Economics and Strategy – Ph.D., University of Southern California; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.KENNETH B. DUNN, Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., Purdue University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.S. THOMAS EMERSON, David T. and Lindsay J. Morgenthaler Distinguished Career Professor of Entrepreneurship - Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar – Ph.D., Rice University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.DENNIS N. EPPLE, Thomas Lord University Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.MARK FICHMAN, Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1980–.JEFFREY GALAK, Associate Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., New York University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.WOLFGANG GATTERBAUER, Assistant Professor in Information Systems – Ph.D., Vienna University of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.ANISHA GHOSH, Assistant Professor of Finance – Ph.D., London School of Economics; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.BRENT GLOVER, Assistant Professor of Finance – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.JONATHAN C. GLOVER, Richard M. Cyert Professor of Management and Economics – Ph.D., The Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.MARVIN GOODFRIEND, Friends of Allan Meltzer Professorship; Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Brown University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.RICHARD C. GREEN, Richard M. and Margaret S. Cyert Chair; Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.W. MICHAEL GRIFFIN, Executive Director, Green Design Institute; Associate Research Professor, Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Institute of Technology and Tepper School of Business – Ph.D., University of Rhode Island; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.JOACHIM RYOHEI GROEGER, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., London School of Economics; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.ISA E. HAFALIR, Associate Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.OLIVER HAHL, Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior and Strategy – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.DALE HERSHEY, Associate Teaching Professor of Law, Emeritus – LL.B., Harvard Law School; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.GEOFFREY HITCH, Assistant Teaching Professor of Acting and Business Communications – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.BURTON HOLLIFIELD, PNC Professor of Finance; Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.JOHN HOOKER, T. Jerome Holleran Professor of Business Ethics and Social Responsibility; Professor of Operations Research; Director, Center for International Corporate Responsibility – Ph.D., Vanderbilt University; University of Tennessee; Carnegie Mellon, 1984 –.GUOFANG HUANG, Assistant Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., John Hopkins University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.YUJI IJIRI, R. M. Trueblood University Professor of Accounting and Economics, Emeritus – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.JOSEPH B. KADANE, Leonard J. Savage University Professor of Statistics and Social Sciences, Emeritus – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.KARAM KANG, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D. , University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.STEPHEN A. KAROLYI, Assistant Professor Finance and Accounting – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.SHAM KEKRE, Associate Teaching Professor of Production and Operations Management - Carnegie Mellon University- Qatar – Ph.D., University of Rochester; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.SUNDER KEKRE, Director, PNC Center for Financial Services Innovation; Bosch Professor of Operations Management – Ph.D., University of Rochester; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.ONUR KESTEN, Associate Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Rochester; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.FATMA KILINC-KARZAN, Assistant Professor of Operations Research – Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.TAE WAN KIM, Assistant Professor of Ethics – Ph.D. , University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.CLAUDIA A. KIRKPATRICK, Associate Teaching Professor of Business Management Communication, Emerita – D.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.DAVID KRACKHARDT, Professor of Organizations, H. John Heinz III College and Joint Appointment at Tepper School of Business – Ph.D., University of California, Irvine; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.ROBERT E. KRAUT, Herbert A. Simon Professor of Human-Computer Interaction, School of Computer Science and Joint Appointment at Tepper School of Business – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.YAROSLAV KRYUKOV, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.LARS-ALEXANDER KUEHN, Associate Professor of Finance – Ph.D., University of British Columbia; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.ALEXEY KUSHNIR, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.FINN KYDLAND, The Richard P. Simmons Distinguished Professorship; University Professor of Economics; Nobel Laureate (2004) – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.DAVID L. LAMONT, Associate Teaching Professor; Director, Management Games – M.S.I.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.REBECCA LESSEM, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.JING LI, Assistant Professor of Accounting – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.PIERRE JINGHONG LIANG, Associate Professor of Accounting – Ph.D., University of Florida; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.FRANCOIS MARGOT, Professor of Operations Research – Ph.D., Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.JOHN H. MATHER, Executive Director, Masters Programs; Teaching Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., University of Arizona; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.DAVID S. MAWHINNEY, Associate Teaching Professor; Director, Donald H. Jones Center for Entrepreneurship; Assistant Teaching Professor of Entrepreneurship – MBA, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.BENNETT T. MCCALLUM, H. J. Heinz Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Rice University; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.J. PATRICK MCGINNIS, Assistant Teaching Professor of Business Management Communication – M.A., Pittsburg State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.ALLAN H. MELTZER, The Allan H. Meltzer University Professor of Political Economy – Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 1957–.ROBERT A. MILLER, Richard M. Cyert and Morris DeGroot Professorship in Economics and Statistics – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.ROBERT T. MONROE, Director, FlexMBA Program; Associate Teaching Professor, Information Technology and Computer Science – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.ALAN MONTGOMERY, Associate Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.TRIDAS MUKHOPADHYAY, Deloitte Consulting Professor of e-Business; Professor in Information Systems, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.MILDRED S. MYERS, Teaching Professor of Business Management Communications, Emerita – D.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.JOHN R. O'BRIEN, Associate Professor of Accounting and Experimental Economics – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 1984 (Leave of Absence: AY 2013-14)–.CHRISTOPHER OLIVOLA, Assistant Professor Marketing – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.EMILIO OSAMBELA, Assistant Professor of Finance – Ph.D., Swiss Finance Institute and Universite de Lausanne; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.JAVIER F. PENA, Bajaj Family Chair in Operations Research; Professor of Operations Research – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.NICOLAS PETROSKY-NADEAU, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Quebec; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.EVELYN M. PIERCE, Associate Teaching Professor of Business Management Communication – M.F.A., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.RONALD PLACONE, Assistant Teaching Professor of Business Communications – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.R. RAVI, Andris A.Andris A. Zoltners Professor of Business; Rohet Tolani Distinguished Professor; Professor of Operations Research and Computer Science – Ph.D., Brown University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.DENISE M. ROUSSEAU, H. J. Heinz II University Professor of Organizational Behavior and Public Policy, Heinz College and Joint Appointment at Tepper School of Business – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1994–.BRYAN R. ROUTLEDGE, Associate Professor of Finance – Ph.D., University of British Columbia; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.STEFANO SACCHETTO, Assistant Professor of Finance – Ph.D., London Business School; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.ALAN SCHELLER-WOLF, Professor of Operations Management; Head, Ph.D. Program – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.NICOLA SECOMANDI, Associate Professor of Operations Management – Ph.D., University of Houston; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.DUANE J. SEPPI, BNY Mellon Professor of Finance; Head, Master of Science in Computational Finance Program – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.PATRICK W. SILEO, Associate Dean, Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar; Associate Teaching Professor of Economics and Finance - Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.PARAM VIR SINGH, Associate Professor of Business Technologies; Carnegie Bosch Junior Chair in Information Sciences – Ph.D., University of Washington, Seattle; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.MARVIN A. SIRBU, Professor of Engineering and Public Policy, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Institute of Technology and Joint Appointment at Tepper School of Business – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.CHRISTOPHER SLEET, Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.MICHAEL D. SMITH, Professor of Information Technology and Marketing – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.FALLAW B. SOWELL, Associate Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Duke University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.CHESTER S. SPATT, Pamela R. and Kenneth B. Dunn Professor of Finance – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.STEPHEN E. SPEAR, Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.KANNAN SRINIVASAN, Rohet Tolani DisH. J. Heinz II Professor of Management, Marketing, and Information Systems – Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.ANTHONY P. STANTON, Teaching Professor of Graphic Media Management; Director, Graphic Media Management Program – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.JACK DOUGLAS STECHER, Assistant Professor of Accounting – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.AUSTIN SUDBURY, Assistant Professor of Accounting – Ph.D., Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.SRIDHAR R. TAYUR, The Ford Distinguished Research Chair; Professor of Operations Management – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.CHRISTOPHER I. TELMER, Associate Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., Queen's University at Kingston (Canada); Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.MICHAEL A. TRICK, Senior Associate Dean, Faculty and Research; Harry B. and James H. Higgins Professor of Operations Research – Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.DAVID E. TUNGATE, Associate Teaching Professor of Law – LL.B., University of Illinois School of Law; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.WILLEM-JAN VAN HOEVE, Associate Professor of Operations Research – Ph.D., University of Amsterdam; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.STEPHEN VARGO, Assistant Teaching Professor, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.SHU LIN WEE, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.LAURIE R. WEINGART, Senior Associate Dean, Education; Carnegie Bosch Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.GEORGE M. WHITE, Associate Teaching Professor of Entrepreneurship - Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., University of Oregon; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.JEFFREY R. WILLIAMS, Professor of Business Strategy – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.ANITA WILLIAMS WOOLLEY, Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.SEVIN YELTEKIN, Associate Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.M. BUMIN YENMEZ, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.RICHARD O. YOUNG, Teaching Professor of Business Management Communication – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.ARIEL ZETLIN-JONES, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D. , University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.KAIFU ZHANG, Assistant Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., INSEAD; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.

Visiting Faculty

SERRA BORANBAY-AKAN, Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.ROBERT C. BLATTBERG, Executive Director, Center for Marketing Technology and Information; Timothy W. McQuire Distinguished Service Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.EMIN CIVI, Visiting Associate Professor, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Celal Bayar University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.BENJAMIN COLLIER, Visiting Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.BILLIE MORROW DAVIS, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Economics – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.FANY DECLERCK, Visiting Professor of Finance – Ph.D., University of Lille; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.MOHAMMAD DELASAY, Post-Doctoral Fellow in Operations Management – Ph.D., University of Alberta; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.FUAD FAROOQI, Visiting Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Richard Ivey School of Business; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.STARLING HUNTER, Visiting Associate Teaching Professor, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Duke University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.THOMAS G. RUCHTI, Visiting Assistant Professor of Accounting – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.PETER STUETTGEN, Visiting Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.C. SCOTT WYATT, Visiting Assistant Teaching Professor of Business Communications – Ph.D., University of Minnesota, Twin Cities; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.

Adjunct Faculty

RICHARD L. BRYANT, Adjunct Professor of Business; Executive Director, Master of Science in Computational Finance Program – M.B.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.LLOYD CORDER, Adjunct Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.WILLIAM COURTWRIGHT, Adjunct Professor of Entrepreneurship – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.TIM CUNNINGHAM, Adjunct Professor of Entrepreneurship – M.A., University of California, Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.CHRIS CYNKAR, Adjunct Professor of Entrepreneurship – M.S.I.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.ROBERT DALEY, Adjunct Professor of Marketing – M.B.A., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.L. FRANK DEMMLER, Adjunct Professor of Entrepreneurship – M.B.A., University of California at Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.ROB DILLON, Adjunct Professor of Graphic Media Management – B.A., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.CLIFFORD T. EARLY, Adjunct Professor of Law – J.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.TAYO FABUSUYI, Adjunct Professor of Economics – M.Phil., Oxford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.CAROL B. GOLDBURG, Executive Director, Undergraduate Economics Program; Adjunct Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.ELIF INCEKARA HAFALIR, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.ELAINE HYDER, Adjunct Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.ROBERT E. KELLEY, Adjunct Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory – Ph.D., Colorado State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.JOHN R. LANKFORD, Executive Director, Executive Education; Adjunct Professor of Marketing – M.B.A., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.HARSH MANGLIK, Executive in Residence and Adjunct Professor of Management – M.S.I.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.MELISSA MURPHY, Adjunct Professor of Marketing – B.A., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.DAVID RAMIREZ, Adjunct Professor of Business Management – M.B.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.JAMES H. ROBERTS, Adjunct Professor of Law – J.D., Syracuse University School of Law; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.PETER J. ROMAN, Adjunct Professor of Marketing – B.S., Providence College; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.FREDERICK H. RUETER, Adjunct Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.JOEL STERN, Distinguished Adjunct Professor of Finance – M.B.A., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.