BXA Intercollege Degree Programs

M. Stephanie Murray, Senior Associate Dean of Interdisciplinary Initiatives
Location: Hall of the Arts 211
www.cmu.edu/interdisciplinary

Mission Statement

The BXA Intercollege Degree Programs are designed for students who want to turn talent and passion into viable professions for the future through a challenging academic curriculum. BXA students pursue their goals with the help of multifaceted advising, innovative pedagogical strategies and a focus on the impact arts have on technology and vice versa. 

The goal of the Bachelor of Computer Science and Arts (BCSA), the Bachelor of Engineering Studies and Arts (BESA), the Bachelor of Humanities and Arts (BHA), the Bachelor of Science and Arts (BSA) and the additional major in Engineering and Arts (EA), housed under the BXA Intercollege Degree Programs, is to allow a select group of students who demonstrate interest and accomplishment in the fine arts and computer science, engineering, humanities, social sciences or natural sciences to explore beyond the traditional academic major, or integrate more than one field of study across disciplines. These programs foster the creativity of students who explore innovative approaches to the academic environments of two colleges. By merging the components in the arts and computer science, engineering, natural sciences or humanities into an interdisciplinary/multidisciplinary study, a unique, complex product is born. BXA students produce new information, challenging questions and innovative theory. BXA students are models of independence, motivation and well-rounded scholarship as humanists, scientists and artists at the same time. 

In the context of the Carnegie Mellon University environment, the BXA Intercollege Degree Programs hold a special role. BXA provides access to five strong colleges that offer specialized training with expert faculty and researchers. The BXA Programs challenge students to utilize those resources as they explore and develop their own approach to interdisciplinary studies in the fine arts and computer science, engineering, humanities and social sciences, or the natural and mathematical sciences.

BXA students balance courses in their CFA concentration with courses in their academic concentration, as well as BXA-specific courses. These BXA-specific courses give students the opportunity to integrate their areas of concentration by focusing on interdisciplinary approaches and arts-based research techniques. The curricula in the concentration areas provide students with a solid disciplinary foundation upon which they can draw for interdisciplinary projects. 

A BXA intercollege degree prepares students for graduate study and careers in an enormous variety of fields, including traditional graduate training in the arts as well as academic areas, positions in arts and education non-profits such as museums and foundations, and technical positions with media and technology companies.

Program Objectives

The skills developed by BXA students span the creative, the technical, the academic and the practical. The objective of the BXA Intercollege Degree Programs is to prepare graduates for careers in which they will draw on their creative and academic skills to create, educate, communicate and innovate across disciplines. 

Students who complete the BXA curriculum will graduate with the following skills:

  • Foundational knowledge and technical expertise in the CFA concentration area and the DC/ENG/MCS/SCS concentration area
  • Ability to describe the connections between these concentrations and how the student integrates them
  • Ability to communicate ideas textually, visually and orally
  • Knowledge of how the concentration disciplines intersect with history, society and culture from local and global perspectives
  • Ability to use cognitive, behavioral and ethical dimensions within the concentration disciplines to make decisions on individual and social levels
  • Experience in engaging in art research to produce new knowledge both within the CFA concentration and the DC/ENG/MCS/SCS concentration
  • Experience in designing, researching and completing a large-scale, object-based project that integrates both areas of concentration

Bachelor of Computer Science and Arts Degree Program

The Bachelor of Computer Science and Arts (BCSA) intercollege degree program combines the strengths of the College of Fine Arts (CFA) and the School of Computer Science (SCS). This degree provides an ideal technical, critical and conceptual foundation for students interested in pursuing fields that comprehensively meld technology and the arts, such as game design, computer animation, computer music, recording technologies, interactive stagecraft, robotic art and other emerging media. Students choose their arts concentration from the following schools in CFA: Architecture, Art, Design, Drama or Music. Students choose their computer science concentration established by the School of Computer Science.

The BCSA curriculum has three main components: general education requirements, fine arts concentration requirements and computer science concentration requirements. Each student's course of study is structured so they can complete this rigorous program in four years.

Students receive extensive advising support. The academic advisors in the BXA Intercollege Degree Programs are the primary advisors and liaisons between CFA and SCS. Each student has two additional academic advisors: an advisor in the admitting school of CFA to guide their focus in the arts and an advisor in SCS to guide their focus in computer science.


BCSA Curriculum

Units
I. BCSA General Education121
II. SCS Concentration113
III. CFA Concentration108-114
IV. Free Electives32-38
Total BCSA Degree Requirements380

BCSA General Education

(15 courses, 121 units minimum)

  • Writing (1 course, 9 units, 76-101 required)

  • Mathematics (2 courses, 19 units minimum, 21-122 and either 21-259 or 21-241 required), Probability (1 course, 9 units minimum)

  • Science & Engineering (2 courses, 18 units minimum)

  • Economic, Political, & Social Institutions OR Cognition, Choice & Behavior (1 course, 9 units minimum)

  • Two additional courses from Dietrich or CFA (2 course, 18 units minimum)

  • University Requirement (1 course, 3 units, 99-101 required)

  • BXA Required Courses (5 courses, 36 units, 52-19052-29152-39252-40152-402)

Writing (1 course, 9 units)

Broadly considered, language is a tool used to communicate, as well as a way to organize non-visual and non-mathematical thinking. This requirement focuses on the social nature of language and the ways in which writing constitutes thinking.

76-101Interpretation and Argument9
or 76-102 Advanced First Year Writing: Special Topics
or 76-106
76-107
76-108
Writing about Literature, Art and Culture
and Writing about Data
and Writing about Public Problems
All undergraduate students must complete the First-Year Writing requirement—the Department of English does not accept any Advanced Placement exemptions. This requirement can be completed in two different ways. Enroll in one of two full-semester courses 101 or 102 (by invitation only), 9 units, or enroll in two of three half-semester mini courses (back-to-back within a single semester) 106/107/108, 4.5 + 4.5 units. Course options and topics: www.cmu.edu/hss/english/first_year/index.html
Mathematics & Probability (3 courses, 28 units minimum)

Choose two mathematics courses (19 units minimum):

21-122Integration and Approximation10
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
or 21-241 Matrices and Linear Transformations

Choose one probability course(s) (9 units minimum):

15-259Probability and Computing12
21-325Probability9
36-218Probability Theory for Computer Scientists9
36-225-36-226Introduction to Probability Theory - Introduction to Statistical Inference18
Science & Engineering (2 courses, 18 units minimum)

Choose two science courses from differing departments or one science and one engineering course from the following list:

02-223Personalized Medicine: Understanding Your Own Genome9
03-121Modern Biology9
03-125Evolution9
03-132Basic Science to Modern Medicine9
03-133Neurobiology of Disease9
06-100Introduction to Chemical Engineering12
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
09-217Organic Chemistry I9
09-225Climate Change: Chemistry, Physics and Planetary Science9
12-100Exploring CEE: Infrastructure and Environment in a Changing World12
12-201Geology9
18-100Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering12
24-101Fundamentals of Mechanical Engineering12
24-291-24-381Environmental Systems on a Changing Planet - Environmental Systems on a Changing Planet: Science Engineering Addendum12
24-358Culinary Mechanics9
27-215Thermodynamics of Materials12
33-114Physics of Musical Sound9
33-120Science and Science Fiction9
33-121Physics I for Science Students12
42-101Introduction to Biomedical Engineering12
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
Economic, Political & Social Institutions OR Cognition, Choice & Behavior (1 course from either category, 9 units minimum)
Economic, Political & Social Institutions

This requirement explores the processes by which institutions organize individual preferences and actions into collective outcomes.

19-101Introduction to Engineering and Public Policy12
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society *9
66-221Topics of Law: Introduction to Intellectual Property Law9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-364Business Law *9
73-102Principles of Microeconomics9
73-103Principles of Macroeconomics *9
79-101Making History: How to Think About the Past (and Present)9
79-189History of Democracy: Thinking Beyond the Self9
79-244Women in American History9
79-299Introduction to the History of Science9
79-300History of American Public Policy9
79-310U. S. Business History: 1870 to the Present9
79-320Women, Politics, and Protest9
79-321Documenting Human Rights9
79-331Body Politics: Women and Health in America9
79-383The History of Capitalism9
80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-324Philosophy of Economics9
80-335Social and Political Philosophy9
84-104Decision Processes in American Political Institutions9
84-110Foundations of Political Economy9
84-275Comparative Politics9
84-310International Political Economy *9
84-322Nonviolent Conflict and Revolution9
84-324The Future of Democracy9
84-326Theories of International Relations9
84-352Representation and Voting Rights9
84-362Diplomacy and Statecraft9
84-365The Politics of Fake News and Misinformation9
84-380US Grand Strategy9
84-386The Privatization of Force9
84-389Terrorism and Insurgency9
84-390Social Media, Technology, and Conflict9
84-393Legislative Decision Making: US Congress9
84-402Judicial Politics and Behavior9
84-405The Future of Warfare9
88-281Topics in Law: 1st Amendment9
88-284Topics of Law: The Bill of Rights9
Cognition, Choice, and Behavior

This requirement explores the process of thinking, decision making, and behavior in the context of the individual.

70-311Organizational Behavior *9
80-101Dangerous Ideas in Science and Society9
80-130Introduction to Ethics9
80-150Nature of Reason9
80-180Nature of Language9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-270Problems of Mind and Body: Meaning and Doing9
80-271Mind and Body: The Objective and the Subjective9
80-275Metaphysics9
80-330Ethical Theory9
85-102Introduction to Psychology9
85-104Psychopathology9
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
85-213Human Information Processing and Artificial Intelligence *9
85-221Principles of Child Development9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-251Personality9
85-370Perception9
85-408Visual Cognition *9
85-421Language and Thought *9
88-120Reason, Passion and Cognition9
88-230Human Intelligence and Human Stupidity9

* Indicates co-requisites and/or prerequisites required.

Additional Dietrich College Courses (2 courses, 18 units minimum)

Complete two non-technical courses. Consult with your BXA advisor to determine the best courses to fulfill this requirement. 

University Requirement (1 course, 3 units)

This is a mini-course, pass/no pass, to be completed in the first semester or online in the summer prior to the first semester.

99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
BXA Required Courses (5 courses, 36 units)

BXA-specific courses give students the opportunity to integrate their areas of concentration by focusing on interdisciplinary approaches and arts-based research techniques.

52-190BXA Seminar I: Building the Wunderkammer -Spring, Freshman (mini-4)4.5
52-291BXA Seminar II: Transferring Knowledge -Spring, Sophomore (mini-3)4.5
52-392BXA Seminar III: Deconstructing Disciplines9
52-401BXA Seminar IV: Capstone Project Research9
52-402BXA Seminar V: Capstone Project Production9

School of Computer Science Concentration

Computer Science Concentration

(11courses, 113 units minimum)

Prerequisite
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
Computer Science Core Requirements (5 courses, 56 units)
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
15-150Principles of Functional Programming10
15-210Parallel and Sequential Data Structures and Algorithms12
15-213Introduction to Computer Systems12
15-251Great Ideas in Theoretical Computer Science12
Concepts of Mathematics (1 course, 12 units)
21-127Concepts of Mathematics
(co-requisite for 15-122; prerequisite for 15-150)
12

Note: First-year BCSA students may opt for 15-151 if offered, in place of 21-127.

Applications Courses or CS Electives (5 courses, 45 units minimum)

Choose a minimum of five courses from SCS beyond the core requirements, 200-level or higher, not including 02-201, 02-223, 02-25002-261, 15-351, 16-223, 17-200, 17-333, 17-562. Listed below are suggested choices for these electives. Consult with the CS advisor if interested in courses not listed.

05-391Designing Human Centered Software12
05-418Design Educational Games12
10-335Art and Machine Learning12
11-291Applied Computational Intelligence Lab9
11-344Machine Learning in Practice12
11-411Natural Language Processing12
15-281Artificial Intelligence: Representation and Problem Solving12
15-322Introduction to Computer Music9
15-323Computer Music Systems and Information Processing9
15-365Experimental Animation12
15-388Practical Data Science9
15-415Database Applications12
15-451Algorithm Design and Analysis12
15-458Discrete Differential Geometry12
15-462Computer Graphics12
15-463Computational Photography12
15-464Technical Animation12
15-465Animation Art and Technology12
15-466Computer Game Programming12
15-494Cognitive Robotics: The Future of Robot Toys12
16-264Humanoids12
16-362Mobile Robot Algorithms Laboratory12
16-374IDeATe: Art of Robotic Special Effects12
16-384Robot Kinematics and Dynamics12
16-385Computer Vision12
16-423Designing Computer Vision Apps12
16-455IDeATe: Human-Machine Virtuosity12
16-465Game Engine Programming10
16-467Human Robot Interaction12
17-214Principles of Software Construction: Objects, Design, and Concurrency12
17-313Foundations of Software Engineering12
17-356Software Engineering for Startups12
17-437Web Application Development12

COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS CONCENTRATION 

(number of courses vary, 108-114 units minimum)

BCSA students choose one of the following concentrations:

  • Architecture (108 units)
  • Art (114 units)
  • Design (108 units)
  • Drama (108 units)
  • Music (108 units)
Architecture Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Architecture Required Courses (7 courses, 52 units minimum)
48-100Architecture Design Studio: POIESIS STUDIO 1 -Fall, Freshman or Sophomore year10-15
or 48-095 Spatial Concepts for Non-Architecture Majors
62-122Digital Media I -Fall, Freshman year6
62-125Drawing I -Fall, Freshman year6
62-123Digital Media II -Spring, Freshman year6
62-126Drawing II -Spring, Freshman year6
48-240History of World Architecture, I -Spring, Freshman year9
48-241Modern Architecture -Fall, Sophomore year9
Architecture Electives (56 units minimum)

A minimum of 56 additional Architecture units must be approved by the Architecture advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Art Concentration

(114 units minimum)

First-Year Seminar (1 course, 6 units)
60-104Foundations: Art First-Year Seminar6
Foundation Studios (3 courses, 30 units)

Complete three courses:

60-110Foundations: Time-Based Media10
60-120Foundations: Digital Media10
60-131Foundations: Sculpture10
60-135Foundations: Expanded Media Sculpture10
60-150Foundations: Drawing10
60-170Foundations: Paint/Print10
Intermediate Studios (3 courses, 30 units)

Complete three courses:

60-2xxIntermediate Studio Elective10
60-2xxIntermediate Studio Elective10
60-2xxIntermediate Studio Elective10
Advanced Studios (3 courses, 30 units)

Students may take courses in any media area (ETB, SIS, CP or DP3). They may take all courses in one media area if a focus is desired. With approval from the Art advisor, BXA students can take an additional intermediate studio in lieu of an advanced studio to increase breadth.

Complete three courses:

60-401/402Senior Studio10
60-403Senior Critique Seminar10
Advanced Electronic and Time-Based Work (ETB) (course numbers 60-410 through 60-429) *10
Advanced Sculpture, Installation and Site-Work (SIS) (course numbers 60-430 through 60-447) *10
Advanced Contextual Practice (CP) (course numbers 60-448 through 60-449) *10
Advanced Drawing, Painting, Print Media and Photography (DP3) (course numbers 60-450 through 60-498) *10
60-499Studio Independent Study
(one only)
10

* Courses offered intermittently; speak with a BXA advisor to determine course availability.

Critical Studies (2 courses, 18 units)
60-105Cultural History of the Visual Arts -Spring9
60-3xxCritical Studies Elective9
Review Requirement (2 required reviews, 0 units)

A review is required at the end of the sophomore and senior years. Pass/no pass only.

60-200Sophomore Review -Spring0
60-400Senior Review -Spring0
Design Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Design Required Courses (16 courses, 98 units)
51-101Studio: Survey of Design -Fall, First-year10
51-121Visualizing -Fall, First-year10
51-175Design Studies: Place -Fall, First-year (mini-1)5
51-177Design Studies: Histories -Fall, First-year (mini-2)5
51-102Design Lab -Spring, First-year10
51-122Collaborative Visualizing -Spring, First-year10
51-176Design Studies: Futures -Spring, First-year (mini-3)5
51-178Design Studies: Experience -Spring, First-year (mini-4)5
51-277Design Studies: Systems -Fall, Sophomore year (mini-1)5
51-279Design Studies: Cultures -Fall, Sophomore year (mini-2)5
51-282Design Studies: Persuasion -Spring, Sophomore year (mini-3)5
51-284Design Studies: Power -Spring, Sophomore year (mini-4)5
Choose Two Studios -Fall, Sophomore year:4.5+4.5
51-225Communications Studio I: Understanding Form & Context4.5
or 51-245 Products Studio I: Understanding Form & Context
or 51-265 Environments Studio I: Understanding Form & Context
Choose Two Corresponding Labs -Fall, Sophomore year:4.5+4.5
51-227Prototyping Lab I: Communications4.5
or 51-247 Prototyping Lab I: Products
or 51-267 Prototyping Lab I: Environments
Design Electives (10 units)

A minimum of 10 additional Design units must be approved by the Design advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Drama Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Options available in the following areas: 1) Design, 2) Directing, 3) Dramaturgy, 4) Production Technology and Management

Required Courses for All Concentration Options (5 courses, 20 units)
54-175-54-176Conservatory Hour-Conservatory Hour
(1 unit each)
2
54-177Foundations of Drama I6
54-281Foundations of Drama II
(prerequisite: 54-177)
6
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism6
54-362Anti-Racist & Equitable Practices in Theater
(optional)
6

Work with Drama Faculty Option Coordinator to Approve Concentration Option (88 units minimum).

Design Required Courses (2 courses, 26 units)
54-151-54-152Stagecraft-Stagecraft
(13 units + 13 units)
26

A minimum of 62 additional Design units must be approved by the Design faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Directing Required Courses (10 courses, 64 units)
54-121-54-122Directing I: A Director's Mindset - Directing I: A Director's Preparation18
54-221-54-222Directing II: In the Studio - Directing II: In The Room18
54-159-54-159Production Practicum-Production Practicum
(two times)
12
54-517Director's Colloquium
(four times)
16

A minimum of 24 additional Directing units must be approved by the Directing faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Dramaturgy Required Courses (9 courses, 53 units minimum)
54-109Dramaturgy 1: Approaches to Text9
54-184Dramaturgy 2: Introduction to Production Dramaturgy9
54-121Directing I: A Director's Mindset9
54-159-54-159Production Practicum-Production Practicum
(two times)
12
54-200-54-200Dramaturgy Forum-Dramaturgy Forum -Fall (minimum of two; every semester it is offered while enrolled)2
54-xxxDramaturgy 3, 4, 5 or 6 (minimum of two; all four if enrolled as BXA for six semesters or more)18

A minimum of 29 additional Dramaturgy units must be approved by the Dramaturgy faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Production Technology and Management Required Courses (2 courses, 26 units)
54-151-54-152Stagecraft-Stagecraft
(13 units + 13 units)
26

A minimum of 62 additional PTM units must be approved by the PTM faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Music Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Options available in the following areas: 1) Audio Recording & Production, 2) Composition, 2) Music Performance (instrumental, organ, piano, voice), 4) Sound Theory & Practice

Required Course for All Concentration Options (1 course, 9 units)
57-152Harmony I9
or 57-149 Basic Harmony I

Work with Music Advisor to Approve Concentration Option (99 units minimum).

Audio Recording & Production Required Courses (7 courses, 40 units)
57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
or 57-171 Introduction to Music Technology (self-paced)
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
57-337Sound Recording6
57-338Sound Editing and Mastering6
57-438Multitrack Recording9

Choose 59 units from:

57-153Harmony II9
or 57-150 Basic Harmony II
57-182Solfege II3
or 57-186 Advanced Solfege II
15-104Introduction to Computing for Creative Practice10
15-322Introduction to Computer Music9
18-090Twisted Signals: Multimedia Processing for the Arts10
33-114Physics of Musical Sound9
54-166Introduction to Sound Design for Theatre6
54-275History of Sound Design3
54-666Production Audio6
57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-344Experimental Sound Synthesis9
57-358Introduction to Electronic Music
(with instructor permission as space allows)
9
57-421Exploded Ensemble6
57-427Advanced Seminar in Film Musicology9
57-478Survey of Historical Recording6
57-622Independent Study in Sound Recording Production3
60-131Foundations: Sculpture10
60-210Electronic Media Studio: Introduction to Interactivity10

Note: Students completing an IDeATe minor may double-count up to two of the IDeATe minor courses towards the Audio Recording & Production concentration.

Composition Required Courses (12 courses, 76 units)
57-161Eurhythmics I
(recommended co-requisite: 57-181)
3
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
57-49xBXA Studio (4 semesters) 36
57-xxxMajor Ensemble (4 semesters) 24

A minimum of 23 additional Music units must be approved by the Music advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Music Performance Required Courses (12 courses, 76 units)
57-161Eurhythmics I
(recommended co-requisite: 57-181)
3
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
57-49xBXA Studio (4 semesters) 36
57-xxxMajor Ensemble (4 semesters) 24

A minimum of 23 additional Music units must be approved by the Music advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Sound Theory & Practice Required Courses (7 courses, 47 units)
57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
or 57-171 Introduction to Music Technology (self-paced)
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
18-090Twisted Signals: Multimedia Processing for the Arts10
57-911Music Since 19459
57-616Independent Study in Sound Studies9
Choose 52 units from:
57-153Harmony II9
or 57-150 Basic Harmony II
57-182Solfege II3
or 57-186 Advanced Solfege II
15-104Introduction to Computing for Creative Practice10
15-322Introduction to Computer Music
(prerequisite: 15-112)
9
33-114Physics of Musical Sound9
57-337Sound Recording6
57-343Music, Technology, and Culture9
57-344Experimental Sound Synthesis9
57-347Electronic and Computer Music
(prerequisite: 57-101 or 57-171)
6
57-358Introduction to Electronic Music
(with instructor permission as space allows)
9
57-421Exploded Ensemble6
57-438Multitrack Recording9
57-478Survey of Historical Recording6
60-131Foundations: Sculpture10
60-210Electronic Media Studio: Introduction to Interactivity10

Note: Students completing an IDeATe minor may double-count up to two of the IDeATe minor courses towards the Sound Theory & Practice concentration.


Free Electives

(approximately 4 courses, 32-38 units minimum)

Take any Carnegie Mellon course. A maximum of 9 units of physical education and/or military science may be counted toward this requirement.

Bachelor of Engineering Studies and Arts Degree Program

The Bachelor of Engineering Studies and Arts (BESA) intercollege degree program combines the strengths of the College of Fine Arts (CFA) and the College of Engineering (ENG). This degree is tailored for students seeking to apply knowledge from duel fields to advance maker culture in novel and creative ways. Students choose their arts concentration from the following schools in CFA: Architecture, Art, Design, Drama or Music. Students choose their engineering studies concentration established by the College of Engineering. Options within the concentration include: biomedical engineering, chemical engineering, civil & environmental engineering, electrical & computer engineering, materials science & engineering or mechanical engineering.

The BESA curriculum has three main components: general education requirements, fine arts concentration requirements and engineering studies concentration requirements. Each student's course of study is structured so they can complete this rigorous program in four years.

Students receive extensive advising support. The academic advisors in the BXA Intercollege Degree Programs are the primary advisors and liaisons between CFA and ENG. Each student has two additional academic advisors: an advisor in the admitting school of CFA to guide their focus in the arts and an advisor in ENG to guide their focus in engineering studies.


BESA Curriculum

Units
I. BESA General Education92
II. ENG Concentration93-120
III. CFA Concentration108-114
IV. Free Electives54-87
Total BESA Degree Requirements380

BESA GENERAL EDUCATION

(11 courses, 92 units minimum)

  • Writing (1 course, 9 units, 76-101 required)

  • Mathematics (2 courses, 20 units, 21-120 and 21-122 required)

  • Science and Technology (2 courses, 24 units, 15-112 and 33-141 required)

  • University Requirement (1 course, 3 units, 99-101 required)

  • BXA Required Courses (5 courses, 36 units, 52-19052-29152-39252-40152-402)

Writing (1 course, 9 units)
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
or 76-102 Advanced First Year Writing: Special Topics
or 76-106
76-107
76-108
Writing about Literature, Art and Culture
and Writing about Data
and Writing about Public Problems
All undergraduate students must complete the First-Year Writing requirement—the Department of English does not accept any Advanced Placement exemptions. This requirement can be completed in two different ways. Enroll in one of two full-semester courses 101 or 102 (by invitation only), 9 units, or enroll in two of three half-semester mini courses (back-to-back within a single semester) 106/107/108, 4.5 + 4.5 units. Course options and topics: www.cmu.edu/hss/english/first_year/index.html
Mathematics (2 courses, 20 units)
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration and Approximation10
Science and Technology (2 courses, 24 units)
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
33-141Physics I for Engineering Students12
BXA Required Courses (5 courses, 36 units)

BXA-specific courses give students the opportunity to integrate their areas of concentration by focusing on interdisciplinary approaches and arts-based research techniques.

52-190BXA Seminar I: Building the Wunderkammer -Spring, Freshman (mini-4)4.5
52-291BXA Seminar II: Transferring Knowledge -Spring, Sophomore (mini-3)4.5
52-392BXA Seminar III: Deconstructing Disciplines9
52-401BXA Seminar IV: Capstone Project Research9
52-402BXA Seminar V: Capstone Project Production9


College of Engineering Concentration

(number of courses vary, 93-120 units)

BESA students declare one of the following concentrations, through consultation with their BXA advisor and the ENG concentration advisors. A completed ENG Concentration Declaration form must be approved by the concentration advisor and submitted to the BXA office, by spring mid-semester break of the student's first year.

  • Biomedical Engineering (93 units)
  • Chemical Engineering (102 units)
  • Civil Engineering (99 units)
  • Electrical & Computer Engineering (120 units)
  • Environmental Engineering (95 units)
  • Materials Science & Engineering (99 units)
  • Mechanical Engineering (105 units)
Biomedical Engineering Concentration

(93 units minimum)

Mathematics & Science Prerequisites
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus -(Gen Ed)10
21-122Integration and Approximation -(Gen Ed)10
21-254Linear Algebra and Vector Calculus for Engineers11
21-260Differential Equations9
15-110Principles of Computing10
33-141Physics I for Engineering Students -(Gen Ed)12
33-142Physics II for Engineering and Physics Students12
03-121Modern Biology9
Biomedical Engineering Courses (7 courses, 66 units)
42-101Introduction to Biomedical Engineering -Freshman year12
xx-xxx2nd Introduction to Engineering course, student’s choice12
42-202Physiology -Sophomore year; prereq: 03-121/03-1519
42-203Biomedical Engineering Laboratory -Sophomore year; prereq: 42-101, 03-121/03-1519
42-302Biomedical Engineering Systems Modeling and Analysis -Junior year; prereq: 06-262/18-202/21-2609
42-401Foundation of BME Design -Fall, Senior year; prereq: 42-1016
42-402BME Design Project -Spring, Senior year9
Electives (3 courses, 27 units minimum)

Choose 3 elective courses in BME tracks and/or ENG with prerequisites in consultation with the concentration advisor.

Chemical Engineering

(102 units minimum)

Mathematics & Science Prerequisites
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus -(Gen Ed)10
21-122Integration and Approximation -(Gen Ed)10
21-254Linear Algebra and Vector Calculus for Engineers -Fall, Sophomore year11
15-110Principles of Computing10
33-141Physics I for Engineering Students -(Gen Ed)12
33-142Physics II for Engineering and Physics Students12
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
Chemical Engineering Courses (7 courses, 75 units)
06-100Introduction to Chemical Engineering -Freshman year; co-req: 09-105, 21-12012
xx-xxx2nd Introduction to Engineering course, student’s choice12
06-223Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics -Fall, Sophomore year; prereq: 06-100, 33-121/33-141/ 33-15112
06-261Fluid Mechanics -Spring, Sophomore year; prereq: 06-223, 21-2549
06-262Mathematical Methods of Chemical Engineering -Spring, Sophomore year; prereq: 06-223, 21-25412
06-323Heat and Mass Transfer -Fall, Junior year; prereq: 06-261, 06-262/21-260, 33-122/33-142/33-1529
06-363Transport Process Laboratory -Spring, Junior year; prereq: 06-261, 06-3239
Electives (3 courses, 27 units minimum)

Choose 27 units from the following ChemE and/or ENG courses with prerequisites in consultation with the concentration advisor:

06-310Molecular Foundations of Chemical Engineering -Fall, Junior year; prereq: 06-223, 09-1069
06-325Numerical Methods and Machine Learning for Chemical Engineering -Fall, Junior year; prereq: 06-262, 15-110/15-1126
06-326Optimization Modeling and Algorithms -Fall, Junior year; prereq: 06-2626
06-364Chemical Reaction Engineering -Spring, Junior year; prereq: 06-310, 06-3239
06-607Physical Chemistry of Colloids and Surfaces -Senior year9
06-609Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules -Fall, Senior year9
27-xxxMaterials Science course9

Note: With advisor approval, electives can instead be other ChemE/ENG courses as long as they are taken in proper order to follow the required prerequisites, not allowing 06-421.

Civil Engineering

(99 units minimum)

Mathematics & Science Prerequisites
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus -(Gen Ed)10
21-122Integration and Approximation -(Gen Ed)10
21-254Linear Algebra and Vector Calculus for Engineers11
21-260Differential Equations9
15-110Principles of Computing10
33-141Physics I for Engineering Students -(Gen Ed)12
33-142Physics II for Engineering and Physics Students12
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
or 09-111 Nanolegos: Chemical Building Blocks
Civil Engineering Courses (9 courses, 72 units)
12-100Exploring CEE: Infrastructure and Environment in a Changing World -Freshman year; co-req: 21-120, 33-14112
xx-xxx2nd Introduction to Engineering course, student’s choice12
12-200CEE Challenges: Design in a Changing World -Fall, Sophomore year; prereq: 12-1009
12-212Statics -Fall, Sophomore year; co-req: 12-100, 21-122, 33-1419
12-233CEE Infrastructure Systems in Action -Fall, Sophomore year; prereq: 12-1002
12-231Solid Mechanics -Spring, Sophomore year; prereq: 12-2129
12-234Sensing and Data Acquisition for Engineering Systems -Spring, Sophomore year4
12-271Computation and Data Science for Civil & Environmental Engineering -Spring, Sophomore year; prereq: 15-110/15-112, 21-120, 21-122, 33-1419
27-357Introduction to Materials Selection -Spring, Junior year6
Electives (3 courses, 27 units minimum)

Choose 27 units from the following CivE courses with prerequisites in consultation with the concentration advisor:

12-201Geology -Sophomore year9
12-301CEE Projects: Integrating the Built, Natural and Information Environments -Fall, Junior year; prereq: 12-200, 12-2719
12-335Soil Mechanics -Fall, Junior year; prereq: 12-231, 33-142; co-req: 12-3559
12-355Fluid Mechanics -Fall, Junior year; prereq: 21-2609
12-356Fluid Mechanics Lab -Fall, Junior year; co-req: 12-3552
12-351Environmental Engineering -Spring, Junior year; prereq: 09-105/09-111; co-req: 21-2609
12-635Structural Analysis -Fall, Senior year; prereq: 12-23112
12-631Structural Design -Spring, Senior year: prereq: 12-231; co-req: 27-357, 12-35812
Electrical & Computer Engineering

(120 units minimum)

Mathematics & Science Prerequisites
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus -(Gen Ed)10
21-122Integration and Approximation -(Gen Ed)10
21-127Concepts of Mathematics12
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
33-141Physics I for Engineering Students -(Gen Ed)12
33-142Physics II for Engineering and Physics Students12
Electrical & Computer Engineering Courses (7 courses, 84 units)
18-100Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering -Freshman year; co-req: 21-12012
xx-xxx2nd Introduction to Engineering course, student’s choice12
18-202Mathematical Foundations of Electrical Engineering -Sophomore year; prereq: 21-12212
18-213Introduction to Computer Systems -Sophomore year; prereq: 15-12212
18-220Electronic Devices and Analog Circuits -Sophomore year; prereq: 18-100; co-req: 33-14212
18-240Structure and Design of Digital Systems -Sophomore year; prereq: 18-10012
18-290Signals and Systems -Sophomore year; prereq: 18-10012
Electives (3 courses, 36 units minimum)

Choose 3 elective courses 18-3xx and above. At least 2 courses should be Area Courses from 1 of the 5 Areas within ECE and 1 course may be an additional Area Course from a second Area, a Coverage Course or ENG with prerequisites in consultation with the concentration advisor.

Environmental Engineering

(95 units minimum)

Mathematics & Science Prerequisites
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus -(Gen Ed)10
21-122Integration and Approximation -(Gen Ed)10
21-254Linear Algebra and Vector Calculus for Engineers11
21-260Differential Equations9
15-110Principles of Computing10
33-141Physics I for Engineering Students -(Gen Ed)12
33-142Physics II for Engineering and Physics Students12
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
or 09-111 Nanolegos: Chemical Building Blocks
Environmental Engineering Courses (10 courses, 77 units)
12-100Exploring CEE: Infrastructure and Environment in a Changing World -Freshman year; co-req: 21-120, 33-14112
xx-xxx2nd Introduction to Engineering course, student’s choice12
12-200CEE Challenges: Design in a Changing World -Fall, Sophomore year; prereq: 12-1009
12-221Environmental Chemistry and Thermodynamics -Fall, Sophomore year; prereq: 09-105/09-1119
12-222Environmental Chemistry Laboratory -Fall, Sophomore year; co-req: 09-101, 12-2213
12-271Computation and Data Science for Civil & Environmental Engineering -Spring, Sophomore year; prereq: 15-110/15-112, 21-120, 21-122, 33-1419
12-351Environmental Engineering -Spring, Junior year; prereq: 09-105/09-111; co-req: 21-2609
12-352Environmental Engineering Lab -Spring, Junior year; co-req: 12-3513
12-355Fluid Mechanics -Fall, Junior year; prereq: 21-2609
12-356Fluid Mechanics Lab -Fall, Junior year; co-req: 12-3552
Electives (2 courses, 18 units minimum)

Choose 18 units from the following EE courses with prerequisites in consultation with the concentration advisor:

12-201Geology -Sophomore year9
12-301CEE Projects: Integrating the Built, Natural and Information Environments -Fall, Junior year; prereq: 12-200 and 12-2719
12-353Environmental Biology and Ecology -Spring, Junior year9
12-612Intro to Sustainable Engineering -Fall, Senior year9
12-657Water Resource Systems Engineering -Spring, Senior year; prereq: 12-355; co-req: 12-3519
03-121Modern Biology9
Materials Science & Engineering

(99 units minimum)

Mathematics & Science Prerequisites
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus -(Gen Ed)10
21-122Integration and Approximation -(Gen Ed)10
21-254Linear Algebra and Vector Calculus for Engineers11
21-260Differential Equations9
15-110Principles of Computing10
33-141Physics I for Engineering Students -(Gen Ed)12
33-142Physics II for Engineering and Physics Students12
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
Materials Science & Engineering Courses (8 courses, 72 units)
27-100Engineering the Materials of the Future -Freshman year; co-req: 21-120, 33-14112
xx-xxx2nd Introduction to Engineering course, student’s choice12
27-211Structure of Materials (Minor Option) -Fall, Sophomore year *6
27-212Defects in Materials (Minor Option) -Spring, Sophomore year *6
27-215Thermodynamics of Materials -Fall, Sophomore year; co-req: 27-100, 21-25912
27-216Transport in Materials -Spring, Sophomore year; prereq: 27-2159
27-227Phase Relations and Diagrams (Minor Option) -Spring, Sophomore year *9
27-357Introduction to Materials Selection -Spring, Sophomore year6

* In consultation with the concentrations advisor, students may choose to complete the version of the course with lab component.

Electives (3 courses, 27 units minimum)

Choose 3 elective courses in MSE and/or ENG with prerequisites in consultation with the concentration advisor.

Mechanical Engineering

(105 units minimum)

Mathematics & Science Prerequisites
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus -Freshman year (Gen Ed)10
21-122Integration and Approximation -Freshman year (Gen Ed)10
21-254Linear Algebra and Vector Calculus for Engineers11
21-260Differential Equations9
15-110Principles of Computing -(Gen Ed)10
33-141Physics I for Engineering Students -Freshman year (Gen Ed)12
33-142Physics II for Engineering and Physics Students -Freshman year12

Note: The BESA Gen Ed Science and Technology requirement can be filled with either 15-110 or 15-112. Students may start taking MechE Courses upon completion of Calculus I, Calculus II and Physics I.

Mechanical Engineering Courses (7 courses, 60 units)
24-101Fundamentals of Mechanical Engineering -Freshman year; co-req: 21-120, 33-14112
xx-xxx2nd Introduction to Engineering course, student’s choice12
24-200Maker Series: Intro to Manual Machining -Sophomore year1
24-251Electronics for Sensing and Actuation -Sophomore year; co-req: 15-110/15-112; co-req: 33-1423
24-261Mechanics I: 2D Design -Fall, Sophomore year; prereq: 21-122, 33-151/33-141/ 33-121/33-10610
24-262Mechanics II: 3D Design -Spring, Sophomore year; prereq: 33-106/33-141/33-151, 24-26110
24-370Mechanical Design: Methods and Application -Fall, Junior year; prereq: 24-200, 24-202, 24-26212
Electives (45 units minimum)

Choose 5 elective courses. At least 3 courses should be in MechE and 2 courses may be ENG with prerequisites in consultation with the concentration advisor.


COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS CONCENTRATION 

(number of courses vary, 108-114 units minimum)

BESA students choose one of the following concentrations:

  • Architecture (108 units)
  • Art (114 units)
  • Design (108 units)
  • Drama (108 units)
  • Music (108 units)
Architecture Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Architecture Required Courses (7 courses, 52 units minimum)
48-100Architecture Design Studio: POIESIS STUDIO 1 -Fall, Freshman or Sophomore year10-15
or 48-095 Spatial Concepts for Non-Architecture Majors
62-122Digital Media I -Fall, Freshman year6
62-125Drawing I -Fall, Freshman year6
62-123Digital Media II -Spring, Freshman year6
62-126Drawing II -Spring, Freshman year6
48-240History of World Architecture, I -Spring, Freshman year9
48-241Modern Architecture -Fall, Sophomore year9
Architecture Electives (56 units minimum)

A minimum of 56 additional Architecture units must be approved by the Architecture advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Art Concentration

(114 units minimum)

First-Year Seminar (1 course, 6 units)
60-104Foundations: Art First-Year Seminar6
Foundation Studios (3 courses, 30 units)

Complete three courses:

60-110Foundations: Time-Based Media10
60-120Foundations: Digital Media10
60-131Foundations: Sculpture10
60-135Foundations: Expanded Media Sculpture10
60-150Foundations: Drawing10
60-170Foundations: Paint/Print10
Intermediate Studios (3 courses, 30 units)

Complete three courses:

60-2xxIntermediate Studio Elective10
60-2xxIntermediate Studio Elective10
60-2xxIntermediate Studio Elective10
Advanced Studios (3 courses, 30 units)

Students may take courses in any media area (ETB, SIS, CP or DP3). They may take all courses in one media area if a focus is desired. With approval from the Art advisor, BXA students can take an additional intermediate studio in lieu of an advanced studio to increase breadth.

Complete three courses:

60-401/402Senior Studio10
60-403Senior Critique Seminar10
Advanced Electronic and Time-Based Work (ETB) (course numbers 60-410 through 60-429) *10
Advanced Sculpture, Installation and Site-Work (SIS) (course numbers 60-430 through 60-447) *10
Advanced Contextual Practice (CP) (course numbers 60-448 through 60-449) *10
Advanced Drawing, Painting, Print Media and Photography (DP3) (course numbers 60-450 through 60-498) *10
60-499Studio Independent Study
(one only)
10

* Courses offered intermittently; speak with a BXA advisor to determine course availability.

Critical Studies (2 courses, 18 units)
60-105Cultural History of the Visual Arts -Spring9
60-3xxCritical Studies Elective9
Review Requirement (2 required reviews, 0 units)

A review is required at the end of the sophomore and senior years. Pass/no pass only.

60-200Sophomore Review -Spring0
60-400Senior Review -Spring0
Design Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Design Required Courses (16 courses, 98 units)
51-101Studio: Survey of Design -Fall, First-year10
51-121Visualizing -Fall, First-year10
51-175Design Studies: Place -Fall, First-year (mini-1)5
51-177Design Studies: Histories -Fall, First-year (mini-2)5
51-102Design Lab -Spring, First-year10
51-122Collaborative Visualizing -Spring, First-year10
51-176Design Studies: Futures -Spring, First-year (mini-3)5
51-178Design Studies: Experience -Spring, First-year (mini-4)5
51-277Design Studies: Systems -Fall, Sophomore year (mini-1)5
51-279Design Studies: Cultures -Fall, Sophomore year (mini-2)5
51-282Design Studies: Persuasion -Spring, Sophomore year (mini-3)5
51-284Design Studies: Power -Spring, Sophomore year (mini-4)5
Choose Two Studios -Fall, Sophomore year:4.5+4.5
51-225Communications Studio I: Understanding Form & Context4.5
or 51-245 Products Studio I: Understanding Form & Context
or 51-265 Environments Studio I: Understanding Form & Context
Choose Two Corresponding Labs -Fall, Sophomore year:4.5+4.5
51-227Prototyping Lab I: Communications4.5
or 51-247 Prototyping Lab I: Products
or 51-267 Prototyping Lab I: Environments
Design Electives (10 units)

A minimum of 10 additional Design units must be approved by the Design advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Drama Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Options available in the following areas: 1) Design, 2) Directing, 3) Dramaturgy, 4) Production Technology and Management

Required Courses for All Concentration Options (5 courses, 20 units)
54-175-54-176Conservatory Hour-Conservatory Hour
(1 unit each)
2
54-177Foundations of Drama I6
54-281Foundations of Drama II
(prerequisite: 54-177)
6
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism6
54-362Anti-Racist & Equitable Practices in Theater
(optional)
6

Work with Drama Faculty Option Coordinator to Approve Concentration Option (88 units minimum).

Design Required Courses (2 courses, 26 units)
54-151-54-152Stagecraft-Stagecraft
(13 units + 13 units)
26

A minimum of 62 additional Design units must be approved by the Design faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Directing Required Courses (10 courses, 64 units)
54-121-54-122Directing I: A Director's Mindset - Directing I: A Director's Preparation18
54-221-54-222Directing II: In the Studio - Directing II: In The Room18
54-159-54-159Production Practicum-Production Practicum
(two times)
12
54-517Director's Colloquium
(four times)
16

A minimum of 24 additional Directing units must be approved by the Directing faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Dramaturgy Required Courses (9 courses, 53 units minimum)
54-109Dramaturgy 1: Approaches to Text9
54-184Dramaturgy 2: Introduction to Production Dramaturgy9
54-121Directing I: A Director's Mindset9
54-159-54-159Production Practicum-Production Practicum
(two times)
12
54-200-54-200Dramaturgy Forum-Dramaturgy Forum -Fall (minimum of two; every semester it is offered while enrolled)2
54-xxxDramaturgy 3, 4, 5 or 6 (minimum of two; all four if enrolled as BXA for six semesters or more)18

A minimum of 29 additional Dramaturgy units must be approved by the Dramaturgy faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Production Technology and Management Required Courses (2 courses, 26 units)
54-151-54-152Stagecraft-Stagecraft
(13 units + 13 units)
26

A minimum of 62 additional PTM units must be approved by the PTM faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Music Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Options available in the following areas: 1) Audio Recording & Production, 2) Composition, 2) Music Performance (instrumental, organ, piano, voice), 4) Sound Theory & Practice

Required Course for All Concentration Options (1 course, 9 units)
57-152Harmony I9
or 57-149 Basic Harmony I

Work with Music Advisor to Approve Concentration Option (99 units minimum).

Audio Recording & Production Required Courses (7 courses, 40 units)
57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
or 57-171 Introduction to Music Technology (self-paced)
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
57-337Sound Recording6
57-338Sound Editing and Mastering6
57-438Multitrack Recording9

Choose 59 units from:

57-153Harmony II9
or 57-150 Basic Harmony II
57-182Solfege II3
or 57-186 Advanced Solfege II
15-104Introduction to Computing for Creative Practice10
15-322Introduction to Computer Music9
18-090Twisted Signals: Multimedia Processing for the Arts10
33-114Physics of Musical Sound9
54-166Introduction to Sound Design for Theatre6
54-275History of Sound Design3
54-666Production Audio6
57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-344Experimental Sound Synthesis9
57-358Introduction to Electronic Music
(with instructor permission as space allows)
9
57-421Exploded Ensemble6
57-427Advanced Seminar in Film Musicology9
57-478Survey of Historical Recording6
57-622Independent Study in Sound Recording Production3
60-131Foundations: Sculpture10
60-210Electronic Media Studio: Introduction to Interactivity10

Note: Students completing an IDeATe minor may double-count up to two of the IDeATe minor courses towards the Audio Recording & Production concentration.

Composition Required Courses (12 courses, 76 units)
57-161Eurhythmics I
(recommended co-requisite: 57-181)
3
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
57-49xBXA Studio (4 semesters) 36
57-xxxMajor Ensemble (4 semesters) 24

A minimum of 23 additional Music units must be approved by the Music advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Music Performance Required Courses (12 courses, 76 units)
57-161Eurhythmics I
(recommended co-requisite: 57-181)
3
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
57-49xBXA Studio (4 semesters) 36
57-xxxMajor Ensemble (4 semesters) 24

A minimum of 23 additional Music units must be approved by the Music advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Sound Theory & Practice Required Courses (7 courses, 47 units)
57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
or 57-171 Introduction to Music Technology (self-paced)
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
18-090Twisted Signals: Multimedia Processing for the Arts10
57-911Music Since 19459
57-616Independent Study in Sound Studies9
Choose 52 units from:
57-153Harmony II9
or 57-150 Basic Harmony II
57-182Solfege II3
or 57-186 Advanced Solfege II
15-104Introduction to Computing for Creative Practice10
15-322Introduction to Computer Music
(prerequisite: 15-112)
9
33-114Physics of Musical Sound9
57-337Sound Recording6
57-343Music, Technology, and Culture9
57-344Experimental Sound Synthesis9
57-347Electronic and Computer Music
(prerequisite: 57-101 or 57-171)
6
57-358Introduction to Electronic Music
(with instructor permission as space allows)
9
57-421Exploded Ensemble6
57-438Multitrack Recording9
57-478Survey of Historical Recording6
60-131Foundations: Sculpture10
60-210Electronic Media Studio: Introduction to Interactivity10

Note: Students completing an IDeATe minor may double-count up to two of the IDeATe minor courses towards the Sound Theory & Practice concentration.


FREE ELECTIVES

(approximately 6-10 courses, 54-87 units minimum)

Take any Carnegie Mellon course. A maximum of 9 units of physical education and/or military science may be counted toward this requirement.

Bachelor of Humanities and Arts Degree Program

The Bachelor of Humanities and Arts (BHA) intercollege degree program combines the strengths of the College of Fine Arts (CFA) and the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences (DC). This degree is designed for academically and artistically talented students who want to develop their interest in the fine arts, while also pursuing studies in the humanities and social/behavioral sciences. Students choose their fine arts concentration from the following schools in CFA: Architecture, Art, Design, Drama or Music. Students choose their humanities and social sciences concentration from the subject areas offered by DC. The most important aspect of the BHA program is for students to blend their interests and to explore the connections between their chosen disciplines. The program also provides enough flexibility for students to broaden or deepen their concentrations and to explore other areas in which they may be interested. 

The BHA curriculum has three main components: general education requirements, fine arts concentration requirements and humanities/social sciences concentration requirements. Students must complete an array of courses defined by their chosen concentrations. Each student's course of study is unique, based on their background and interests, and course availability in the respective colleges.

Students receive extensive advising support. The academic advisors in the BXA Intercollege Degree Programs are the primary advisors and liaisons between CFA and DC. Each student has two additional academic advisors: an advisor in the admitting school of CFA to guide their focus in the arts and an advisor in DC to guide their focus in the humanities or social/behavioral sciences.


BHA Curriculum

Units
I. BHA General Education111
II. DC Concentration81
III. CFA Concentration108-114
IV. Free Electives72-78
Total BHA Degree Requirements378

BHA General Education

(14 courses, 111 units minimum)

  • Communicating: Language and Interpretations (3 courses, 27 units minimum, 76-101 required, two approved modern language courses required)
  • Reflecting: Societies and Cultures (1 course, 9 units, 79-145 or 79-189 required)
  • Modeling: Mathematics and Experiments (1 course, 9 units minimum)
  • Deciding: Social Sciences and Values (3 courses, 27 units minimum, 36-200 required)
  • University Requirement (1 course, 3 units, 99-101 required)
  • BXA Required Courses (5 courses, 36 units, 52-19052-29152-39252-40152-402)
Communicating: Language and Interpretations (3 courses, 27 units minimum)

Courses in this category give special attention to the study of language as interpretation, expression and argument within and across multiple discourses. Students examine language for its internal logics and structures.

76-101Interpretation and Argument9
or 76-102 Advanced First Year Writing: Special Topics
or 76-106
76-107
76-108
Writing about Literature, Art and Culture
and Writing about Data
and Writing about Public Problems
All undergraduate students must complete the First-Year Writing requirement—the Department of English does not accept any Advanced Placement exemptions. This requirement can be completed in two different ways. Enroll in one of two full-semester courses 101 or 102 (by invitation only), 9 units, or enroll in two of three half-semester mini courses (back-to-back within a single semester) 106/107/108, 4.5 + 4.5 units. Course options and topics: www.cmu.edu/hss/english/first_year/index.html
82-xxxModern Languages18
Complete two courses taught in a language offered by the Department of Modern Languages. A wide selection of courses are offered in Arabic Studies, Chinese Studies, French and Francophone Studies, German Studies, Hispanic Studies, Japanese Studies and Russian Studies. Students must complete two courses in the same language. Languages taught at other institutions are also acceptable (with advisor approval).
Reflecting: Societies and Cultures (1 course, 9 units)

This category emphasizes the study of history, society and culture from local and global perspectives.

79-145Genocide and Weapons of Mass Destruction9
or 79-189 History of Democracy: Thinking Beyond the Self
Modeling: Mathematics and Experiments (1 course, 9 units minimum)

Courses in this category stress the interplay of mathematical (formal) theories and experimental work. Some courses investigate the internal structure of theories, whereas others use them as models for producing real-world knowledge. Such models may be drawn from a variety of disciplines including the natural sciences, but also, for example, psychology and computer science. The interactions between theorizing and experimenting (observing) can be understood within an intellectual framework that invites comparative assessment. Select one course from the following course options:

Mathematics
21-111Calculus I10
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-127Concepts of Mathematics12
80-210Logic and Proofs9
80-211Logic and Mathematical Inquiry9
Natural Science
03-121Modern Biology9
03-125Evolution9
03-132Basic Science to Modern Medicine9
03-133Neurobiology of Disease9
03-161Molecules to Mind9
09-103Atoms, Molecules and Chemical Change9
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
12-201Geology9
33-104Experimental Physics9
33-114Physics of Musical Sound9
33-115Physics for Future Presidents9
33-124Introduction to Astronomy9
Other Courses
05-413Human Factors9
15-104Introduction to Computing for Creative Practice10
15-110Principles of Computing10
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
33-120Science and Science Fiction9
80-220Philosophy of Science9
80-226Revolutions in Science9
80-312Mathematical Revolutions9
84-265Political Science Research Methods9
85-370Perception9
88-275Bubbles: Data Science for Human Minds9
Deciding: Social Sciences and Values (3 courses, 27 units minimum)

The theme of this category is the exploration of cognitive, behavioral and ethical dimensions of decision-making on both the individual and social level. Making decisions requires a broad understanding of human rationality and social interaction. Some courses examine the critical collection and analysis of data for achieving such an understanding, whereas others emphasize the historical development of policies and values, which form the matrix for decision-making.

36-200Reasoning with Data -REQUIRED9
05-292IDeATe: Learning in Museums12
73-102Principles of Microeconomics9
80-130Introduction to Ethics9
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-208Critical Thinking9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-270Problems of Mind and Body: Meaning and Doing9
80-271Mind and Body: The Objective and the Subjective9
80-305Decision Theory9
80-330Ethical Theory9
80-348Health, Human Rights, and International Development9
80-405Game Theory9
80-447Global Justice9
84-104Decision Processes in American Political Institutions9
84-369Decision Science for International Relations9
85-102Introduction to Psychology9
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-221Principles of Child Development9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-251Personality9
85-261Psychopathology9
88-120Reason, Passion and Cognition9
University Requirement (1 course, 3 units)

This is a mini-course, pass/no pass, to be completed in the first semester or online prior to the first semester.

99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
BXA Required Courses (5 courses, 36 units)

BXA-specific courses give students the opportunity to integrate their areas of concentration by focusing on interdisciplinary approaches and arts-based research techniques.

52-190BXA Seminar I: Building the Wunderkammer -Spring, Freshman (mini-4)4.5
52-291BXA Seminar II: Transferring Knowledge -Spring, Sophomore (mini-3)4.5
52-392BXA Seminar III: Deconstructing Disciplines9
52-401BXA Seminar IV: Capstone Project Research9
52-402BXA Seminar V: Capstone Project Production9

Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences Concentrations

(9 courses, 81 units minimum)

BHA students declare an 81-unit DC concentration based on existing DC programs, through consultation with their BXA advisor and the DC concentration advisors. A completed DC Concentration Declaration form must be approved by the concentration advisor and submitted to the BXA office, by spring mid-semester break of the student's sophomore year. Note: The BHA Environmental & Sustainability Studies concentration requires additional coursework beyond 81 units.

Curriculum for many BHA DC concentration options are outlined below, though this list is not exhaustive of all concentrations possible in DC.

BHA students who are admitted as freshmen are undeclared until they have met with a concentration advisor and have submitted their signed Declaration form. BHA students who are admitted through internal transfer must have chosen a DC concentration at the time of their application (which serves as declaration). All BHA students wishing to change their DC concentration at any time following the initial declaration must meet with the advisor of their intended concentration area to complete a new Declaration form, which will be reviewed during the internal transfer application period.

Anthropology Concentration

(81 units minimum)

The BHA concentration in Anthropology offers students training in ethnographic methods and in theoretical understandings of culture. Students examine the evolution, depth, and complexities of ethnography, and explore notions of “culture” in diverse settings, over time and across space. In today’s world, students are increasingly aware of the importance of developing a sophisticated approach to culture and its articulation with changes in the domains of the arts, technology, economics, and politics. The BHA concentration in Anthropology provides students with the tools to link artistic practices to various aspects of globalization. It is highly recommended that Anthropology students study abroad in some capacity.
There are three required courses for the concentration: Introduction to Anthropology (79-201) and Global Studies Research Seminar (79-400), and one Methods course which may be satisfied by rotating options each semester. Students also choose 6 regional/topical courses (51 units). Demonstrating intermediate to advanced level proficiency in a language other than English is also crucial component of the concentration in Anthropology; all students are required to take at least two upper level (intermediate or above) language courses to satisfy this language pre-requisite requirement (which is in addition to required concentration courses).

Language Proficiency Requirement

Demonstrating intermediate to advanced level proficiency in a language other than English is a crucial component of the concentration in Anthropology. Normally this requirement can be satisfied by successfully completing a course conducted in the second language at the 300-level or above for French, German, Italian, or Spanish, or the fourth semester (Intermediate II) level or above for Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, or Russian. Comparable proficiency for other languages can be considered. Additional advanced cultural, historical, and literary study in the second language is strongly recommended. If needed these courses may be counted toward the BHA General Education Communicating: Language and Interpretations category.

Anthropology Required Introductory and Capstone Courses (2 courses, 21 units)

Students must earn a final grade of "C" or better for these courses to count toward the concentration.

79-201Introduction to Anthropology9
79-400Global Studies Research Seminar12
Required Anthropological Methods Course (1 course, 9 units)

Students must take one course in ethnographic, archaeological, or other anthropological methods selecting from the list below. Other courses may fulfill these requirements, with permission of the concentration advisor.

79-275Introduction to Global Studies9
79-379Extreme Ethnography9
79-380Hostile Environments: The Politics of Pollution in Global Perspective9
Anthropological Perspectives (6 courses, 51 units minimum)

Students gain knowledge of specialized theoretical and regional topics by choosing 51 units (typically six courses) selecting from the list below.

57-306World Music9
79-203The Other Europe: The Habsburgs, Communism, & Central/Eastern Europe, 1740-19909
79-211Modern Southeast Asia: Colonialism, Capitalism, and Cultural Exchange9
79-219Hong Kong, Taiwan and the Idea of "China"6
79-223Mexico: From the Aztec Empire to the Drug War9
79-224Mayan America9
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China: From the Birth of Mao ... to Now9
79-264Tibet and China: History and Propaganda6
79-275Introduction to Global Studies9
79-276Beyond the Border6
79-278How (Not) to Change the World9
79-280Coffee and Capitalism9
79-313"Unwanted": Refugees, Asylum Seekers, and Patterns of Global Migration6
79-314The Politics and Culture of Memory9
79-315Thirsty Planet: The Politics of Water in Global Perspective9
79-317Art, Anthropology, and Empire9
79-334Climate Change and Climate Justice: Global Perspectives6
79-342Introduction to Science and Technology Studies9
79-368Un-natural Disasters: Societies and Environmental Hazards in Global Perspective6
79-377Food, Culture, and Power: A History of Eating9
79-379Extreme Ethnography9
79-380Hostile Environments: The Politics of Pollution in Global Perspective9

Note: Courses that count toward this category may be taken at another university, and the units transferred to the BHA concentration under the guidance of the concentration advisor.

Behavioral Economics, Policy & Organizations Concentration

(81 units minimum)

Students in BEPO—the first and only major of its kind—will be uniquely trained in the integration of Economics and Psychology and will have a solid grounding in quantitative methods. The core includes courses in economics, psychology, behavioral economics, and quantitative methods. SDS offers the largest selection of behavioral economics courses anywhere in the world. Applied projects in courses will teach students how to collect original data, design field and laboratory experiments, analyze data, and develop interventions to improve economic outcomes and decisions. Students will be well equipped to enter a wide range of professions and graduate degree programs.

Quantitative Methods (3 courses, 27 units)
36-202Methods for Statistics & Data Science9
88-251Empirical Research Methods9
88-252Causal Inference in the Field9
Economics Courses (2 courses, 18 units)
73-102Principles of Microeconomics9
73-158Markets, Models, and Math9
or 73-230 Intermediate Microeconomics
or 73-328 Health Economics
or 73-347 Game Theory Applications for Economics and Business
or 73-348 Behavioral Economics
or 73-359 Benefit-Cost Analysis
or 73-408 Law and Economics
or 73-421 Emerging Markets
or 73-427 Sustainability, Energy, and Environmental Economics
or 88-221 Analytical Foundations of Public Policy
Psychology Courses (2 courses, 18 units)
88-120Reason, Passion and Cognition
(freshman or sophomore year)
9
88-302Behavioral Decision Making9
Behavioral Economics Courses (2 courses, 18 units)
88-360Behavioral Economics
(prerequisite: 21-111)
9
88-367Behavioral Economics in the Wild9
Chinese Studies Concentration

(81 units minimum)

A BHA concentration in Chinese Studies promotes not just language proficiency but also an understanding of Chinese culture. Students who arrive at Carnegie Mellon with previous language study and/or who have high Advanced Placement, an International Baccalaureate, a Cambridge GCE Advanced level or internal placement exam scores will be able to begin taking courses in the concentration earlier in their undergraduate program. In all cases, progress in the concentration will be accelerated by study abroad, which is recommended for all students.

Prerequisites

Intermediate level proficiency in Chinese. This is equivalent to the completion of three courses (two at the 100-level and one at the 200-level) or exemption based on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, Cambridge GCE Advanced level or Carnegie Mellon internal placement test scores.

Core Courses in Chinese Studies (4 courses, 36 units minimum)
82-232Intermediate Chinese II *12
or 82-235 Fables, Legends and Stories from Ancient Chinese Civilization
82-331Reading Into a New China I: Population, Youth, Marriage, & Housing9
82-332Reading Into a New China II: Transportation, Education, Pop Culture, & Health9
82-333Chinese Language and Culture9

*Students who place out of 82-232/82-235 must take a minimum of 9 additional units chosen from Chinese Studies Electives at the 400-level.

Core Courses in Modern Languages (1 course, 9 units)

Complete one course.

82-280Billingual & Bicultural Experiences in the US9
82-282Interpreting Global Texts & Cultures9
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-284Multicultural Pittsburgh: VR Storytelling9
82-285Podcasting: Language and Culture Through Storytelling9
82-286Cultural Complexities9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Topics in Second Language Acquisition9
82-480Translation Technologies9

Note: In consultation with the concentration advisor, students may substitute a Modern Languages course elective with one related to language analysis, language learning, or acquisition of language and culture from the listings in Chinese Studies or from another department. Examples: 80-180 Nature of Language, 85-421 Language and Thought. In addition, students may choose to take 82-580 Senior Seminar in Modern Languages (3 units). The selected course may not double count in the Electives category.

Core Courses in Chinese History & Society (1 course, 9 units)

Complete one course in consultation with the concentration advisor.

79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China: From the Birth of Mao ... to Now9
79-309The Chinese Revolution Through Film (1949-2000)9
82-138Comparative China: Perceptions Through Youtube & TikTok9
82-230Cultural Topics in Chinese Studies6
82-234Topics in Chinese History9
82-238Topics in Chinese Culture9
82-333Chinese Language and Culture
(must be a different section than the one used for the core requirements)
9
Chinese Studies and Interdisciplinary Electives (3 courses, 27 units minimum)

Complete two courses from Chinese Studies Electives and one course from Interdisciplinary Electives in consultation with the concentration advisor.

Chinese Studies Electives:
82-334Structure of Chinese9
82-335Chinese Culture Through Legends and Folktales9
82-337Mandarin Chinese for Oral Communication I9
82-338Mandarin Chinese for Oral Communication II9
82-339Business Language & Culture in China I9
82-340Business Language & Culture in China II9
82-431China and the West9
82-432Chinese Popular Culture: A Game of Learning *9
82-433Topics in Contemporary Culture of China *9
82-434Studies in Chinese Traditions *9
82-436Introduction to Classical Chinese9
82-439Modern China Through LiteratureVar.
82-440Studies in Chinese Literature & Culture9
82-505Undergraduate InternshipVar.
82-531/532Special Topics in Chinese Studies
(independent studies) *
Var.
82-533Cultural Topics in Chinese Studies *6

* Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

Interdisciplinary Electives:

This list is compiled from possibilities such as but not limited to the following. Students should consult SIO and the concentration advisor for the most up to date interdisciplinary electives appropriate for the Chinese Studies curriculum. Courses may be suggested to the concentration advisor for approval as a substitute. Note that not all courses are offered each semester.

Business
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
70-365International Trade and International Law9
70-430International Management9
English
76-318Communicating in the Global Marketplace9
76-339Topics in Film and Media9
History
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China: From the Birth of Mao ... to Now9
79-309The Chinese Revolution Through Film (1949-2000)9
Institute for Politics and Strategy (Choose in consultation with the concentration advisor.)
84-310International Political Economy9
84-326Theories of International Relations9
84-362Diplomacy and Statecraft9
84-369Decision Science for International Relations9
84-370Nuclear Security & Arms Control9
84-380US Grand Strategy9
84-388Concepts of War and Cyber War6
84-405The Future of Warfare9
Modern Languages
82-137Chinese Calligraphy: Culture and Skills9
82-138Comparative China: Perceptions Through Youtube & TikTok *9
82-139Topics in Chinese Language, Culture and Society *6
82-230Cultural Topics in Chinese Studies *6
82-234Topics in Chinese History *9
82-238Topics in Chinese Culture9
82-280Billingual & Bicultural Experiences in the US9
82-282Interpreting Global Texts & Cultures9
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-284Multicultural Pittsburgh: VR Storytelling9
82-285Podcasting: Language and Culture Through Storytelling9
82-286Cultural Complexities9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Topics in Second Language Acquisition9
82-480Translation Technologies9
Philosophy
80-180Nature of Language9
80-276Philosophy of Religion9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
Psychology
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-421Language and Thought9

* Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

Cognitive Neuroscience Concentration

(81 units minimum)

Cognitive neuroscience is a science concerned with discovering biological bases of psychological functions. It addresses questions of how behavior is produced by neural circuits of the brain and also how those neural circuits are in turn influenced by behavioral experiences. Students with a concentration in Cognitive Neuroscience are expected to learn about existing findings within the field and also to become proficient in how to conduct and analyze scientific investigations directed toward understanding the biological basis of behavior. This includes observing behavior, formulating hypotheses, designing experiments to test these hypotheses, running experiments, performing statistical analyses and writing reports.

Introductory and Survey Coursework (4 courses, 36 units)
03-121Modern Biology9
03-363Systems Neuroscience9
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-213 Human Information Processing and Artificial Intelligence
Research Methods Training (2 course, 18 units)
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral & Social Sciences9
or 85-309 Statistical Concepts and Methods for Behavioral and Social Science
85-314Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods *9

* 85-310 Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology may be substituted if necessary.

Distribution Requirements (3 courses, 27 units)

Complete three courses with at least one from each category below.

Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience:

15-386Neural Computation9
15-883Computational Models of Neural Systems12
36-746Statistical Methods for Neuroscience and Psychology12
85-345Meaning in Mind and Brain9
85-407How the Brain Makes Meaning9
85-412Cognitive Modeling9
85-414Cognitive Neuropsychology9
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing9
85-429Cognitive Brain Imaging9

Cognitive Neuroscience Electives:

03-133Neurobiology of Disease9
03-362Cellular Neuroscience9
03-364Developmental Neuroscience9
85-356Expertise: The cognitive (neuro)science of mastering almost any skill9
85-370Perception9
85-385Auditory Perception: Sense of Sound9
85-406Autism: Psychological and Neuroscience Perspectives9
85-408Visual Cognition9
85-435Biologically Intelligent Exploration9
85-442Health Psychology9
85-443Social Factors and Well-Being9
85-501Stress, Coping and Well-Being9
Cognitive Science Concentration

(81 units minimum)

The field of cognitive science has grown out of increasingly active interaction among psychology, linguistics, artificial intelligence, philosophy, and neuroscience. All of these fields share the goal of understanding intelligence. By combining these diverse perspectives, students of cognitive science are able to understand cognition at a deep level. Because this concentration is administered by the Psychology Department, it focuses on human cognition and the experimental study of the human mind as illuminated by the techniques of the above disciplines.

Prerequisite Courses
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10-20
or 21-111
21-112
Calculus I
and Calculus II
21-127Concepts of Mathematics12
Statistics Course (1 course, 9 units)
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral & Social Sciences9
or 85-309 Statistical Concepts and Methods for Behavioral and Social Science
Computational/Cognitive Modeling Core (3 courses, 29 units minimum)

Complete two of the following courses:

15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
15-150Principles of Functional Programming10
15-251Great Ideas in Theoretical Computer Science12

Plus one of the following courses:

85-412Cognitive Modeling9
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing9
85-426Learning in Humans and Machines9
85-435Biologically Intelligent Exploration9
Cognitive Psychology Core (4 courses, 36 units)
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-213 Human Information Processing and Artificial Intelligence
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-311 Modern Research Methods: Cumulative Science, Big Data, and Meta-Analysis
or 85-314 Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods

Plus two of the following (one of which must be 85-3xx or 85-4xx):

85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
or 85-106 Animal Minds
85-359Introduction to Music Cognition Research9
85-360Origins of Intelligence9
85-370Perception9
85-395Applications of Cognitive Science9
85-407How the Brain Makes Meaning9
85-408Visual Cognition9
85-414Cognitive Neuropsychology9
85-421Language and Thought9
80-310Formal Logic9
80-314Causal Discovery, Statistics, and Machine Learning9
80-315Modal Logic9
80-381Meaning in Language9
80-383Language in Use9
05-413Human Factors9
11-344Machine Learning in Practice12
Cognitive Science Elective (1 course, 9 units)

Choose one elective in consultation with your concentration advisor.

Creative Writing Concentration

(81 units minimum)

In the Creative Writing concentration, BHA students develop their talents in writing fiction, poetry and other imaginative forms. While studying with faculty members who are practicing poets and prose writers, students read widely in literature, explore the resources of their imaginations, sharpen their critical and verbal skills and develop a professional attitude toward their writing. The Creative Writing program is based on a conservatory model, made up of faculty and students who have an intense commitment to their work.

Students in the Creative Writing concentration are required to take two of the introductory Survey of Forms courses, ideally in their sophomore year. Choices include Poetry (76-265), Fiction (76-260), Screenwriting (76-269) and Nonfiction (76-261). In order to proceed into the upper level courses in the concentration (and in each of the genres), students must do well in these introductory courses (receive a grade of A or B). After completing the Survey of Forms courses, students take four workshops in fiction, poetry, screenwriting or nonfiction. At least two of the workshops must be taken in a single genre. In the writing workshops, students develop their critical and verbal abilities through close writing and analysis of poems, stories and other literary forms. Their work is critiqued and evaluated by peers and the faculty.

Survey of Forms Courses (2 courses, 18 units)
76-260Introduction to Writing Fiction9
76-261Introduction to Writing Creative Nonfiction9
76-265Introduction to Writing Poetry9
76-269Introduction to Screenwriting9

Note: A student must receive a grade of A or B in the Survey of Forms class in a specific genre in order to be eligible to enroll in a workshop of that genre. A student who receives a grade of C in a Survey of Forms course may enroll in a related workshop only with the permission of the workshop professor. A student who receives a D or R in Survey of Forms may not take a workshop in that genre.

Creative Writing Workshops (4 courses, 36 units)

Complete four Creative Writing workshops, at least two in a single genre. Workshops in all genres may be taken more than once for credit.

76-365Beginning Poetry Workshop9
76-366Essay Writing Workshop9
76-460Beginning Fiction Workshop9
76-462Advanced Fiction Workshop9
76-464Creative Nonfiction Workshop9
76-465Advanced Poetry Workshop9
76-469Screenwriting Workshop9
English Electives (3 courses, 27 units)

Complete three courses (27 units minimum) from the English Department’s offerings. Reading in Forms classes are recommended, as is 76-306 Editing and Publishing (note: this course is invitation only). Please consult the list of courses published each semester by the Department for current offerings. Students should discuss curriculum choices with the concentration advisor to determine the best electives for their focus in Creative Writing.

Cybersecurity & International Conflict

(81 units minimum)

The BHA concentration in cybersecurity and international conflict analyzes the role of cyber warfare and cybersecurity in international politics—past, present, and future. Cyber attacks by nation-states and their proxies have the potential to reshape how wars are fought in the twenty-first century. As such, the complexity and policy challenge of cyber-engagements is immense and altogether without precedent. The concentration addresses the role of deterrence, dissuasion, and attribution in cyber conflict, while also studying the nuances of key components of modern warfare—from the security dilemma to escalation management.

Courses in this concentration focus on the existing gaps in our understanding of cybersecurity and international conflict, such as whether or not cyberspace is offense or defense dominant and which factors are most important in determining the answer to this, and other relevant questions, including how nation-states, their primary adversaries, and a bevy of nonstate actors engage online and in the virtual and information environments. Accordingly, the concentration exposes students to basic technology concepts, methods of attack and defense, potential strategy and goals for cyber-engagement, and response and forensics for cyber-engagements.

Alongside conventional methods of warfare, cybersecurity has rapidly developed into a centerpiece of state’s ability to project power and impose its will in order to achieve its national priorities and strategic objectives. As the United States and other emerging cyber powers craft and implement doctrine in this nascent domain, there is likely to be a rapid increase in activity, from efforts to disrupt the online activities of global terrorist networks like the Islamic State to near daily raids on foreign networks designed to cripple states’ cyberweapons before they can be deployed.

In the shifting landscape of cyber capabilities, how will laws, authorities, and policies keep pace? What are the implications and consequences of actions that may be considered “short of war” by some countries but “above the threshold” of conflict by others? Will a more aggressive defensive posture with respect to cybersecurity inadvertently increase the risk of conflict with states that sponsor malicious hacking groups? What is the proper balance between offense and defense in cybersecurity and how are cyber operations best integrated into a country’s overall military strategy?

Unlike other kinds of conflicts, the attribution of attacks presents significant challenges. Indeed, in many cases, it can be difficult to determine whether the attacker is a nation-state, a nonstate actor, a criminal gang, or a lone hacktivist. Investigators must combine technical and traditional methods to identify potentially responsible parties and to understand their intent. If the aggressor’s identity cannot be confirmed, how can a counterattack be launched? Some attackers may seek to mount “false flag” attacks and deception, for example, that misdirect defenders to counter-attack in the wrong direction. Additionally, what are appropriate responses to attacks made on civil infrastructure and private business operations, such as in the areas of financial services, transportation, energy, entertainment, and health care? In other words, what are the appropriate rules of engagement for national systems, infrastructural systems, businesses, and individuals? When, for example, is a counterattack or a “kinetic” response permissible?

These questions have major implications for the study of war and peace. More than at any time in the past, those who seek to start war may be harder to find and their motives more difficult to discern. The cybersecurity and international conflict concentration outlined herein tackles the social-scientific dimensions of cybersecurity with a focus on the implications of the cyber age for modern statecraft, warfare, elections (local, state, and national), and politics, more generally.

Foundational Courses (2 courses, 18 units)
84-275Comparative Politics9
84-326Theories of International Relations9
Core Courses (3 courses, 24 units)
84-387Technology and Policy of Cyber War9
84-388Concepts of War and Cyber War6
84-405The Future of Warfare9
Electives (4-5 courses, 39 units minimum)

At least two courses (18 units) must be taken from the Institute for Politics and Strategy and have an 84-number.

16-735Ethics and Robotics12
17-200Ethics and Policy Issues in Computing9
17-303Cryptocurrencies, Blockchains and Applications9
17-331Information Security, Privacy, and Policy12
17-333Privacy Policy, Law, and Technology9
17-334Usable Privacy and Security9
17-702Current Topics in Privacy Seminar3
79-301History of Surveillance: From the Plantation to Data Capitalism6
79-302Killer Robots:The Ethics, Law, and Politics of Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems6
80-249AI, Society, and Humanity9
84-200Security War Game Simulation6
84-312Terrorism in Sub-Saharan Africa6
84-319Civil-Military Relations9
84-323War and Peace in the Contemporary Middle East9
84-325Contemporary American Foreign Policy9
84-327Repression and Control in Dictatorships9
84-328Military Strategy and Doctrine9
84-370Nuclear Security & Arms Control9
84-372Space and National Security9
84-373Emerging Technologies and the Law9
84-380US Grand Strategy9
84-383Cyber Policy as National Policy6
84-386The Privatization of Force9
84-389Terrorism and Insurgency9
84-390Social Media, Technology, and Conflict9
95-444Cybersecurity Policy and Governance I6
Decision Science Concentration

(81 units minimum)

Decision Science is grounded in theories and methods drawn from psychology, economics, philosophy, statistics, and management science. Courses in the BHA concentration in Decision Science cover the three aspects of decision science: (a) normative analysis, creating formal models of rational choice; (b) descriptive research, studying how cognitive, emotional, social, and institutional factors affect judgment and choice, and (c) prescriptive interventions, seeking to improve judgment and decision making. In addition to gaining a broad education in the principles of judgment and decision making, students with a concentration in Decision Science gain broadly applicable skills in research design and analysis. They also have the chance to think about and discuss decision making in many different areas.

Disciplinary Perspectives (5 courses, 48 units)
73-102Principles of Microeconomics9
85-102Introduction to Psychology9
88-120Reason, Passion and Cognition
(freshman or sophomore year)
9
88-223Decision Analysis12
88-302Behavioral Decision Making9
Research Methods (2 courses, 18 units)
36-202Methods for Statistics & Data Science9
or 36-309 Experimental Design for Behavioral & Social Sciences
or 85-309 Statistical Concepts and Methods for Behavioral and Social Science
88-251Empirical Research Methods9
Electives (2 courses, 18 units minimum)

Complete at least 18 units from the following categories of courses. The selected courses may be from one category or from any combination of categories. Note that not all elective courses are offered every year. At least one of these courses (9 units) must be a Department of Social and Decision Sciences course (88-xxx).

Biological and Behavioral Aspects of Decision Making:
85-350Psychology of Prejudice9
85-352Evolutionary Psychology9
85-363Attention, Its Development and Disorders9
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-377Attitudes and Persuasion9
85-442Health Psychology9
85-443Social Factors and Well-Being9
85-444Relationships9
85-446Psychology of Gender9
88-230Human Intelligence and Human Stupidity9
88-231Thinking in Person vs. Thinking Online9
88-312Decision Models and Games9
88-342The Neuroscience of Decision Making9
88-355Social Brains: Neural Bases of Social Perception and Cognition9
88-360Behavioral Economics9
88-365Behavioral Economics and Public Policy9
88-372Social and Emotional Brain9
88-380Dynamic Decisions9
Managerial and Organizational Aspects of Decision Making:
70-311Organizational Behavior9
70-381Marketing I9
70-443Digital Marketing and Social Media Strategy9
70-460Mathematical Models for Consulting9
88-150Managing Decisions9
88-221Analytical Foundations of Public Policy9
88-406Behavioral Economics @ Work9
88-418Negotiation: Strategies and Behavioral Insights9
88-419International Negotiation9
88-444Public Policy and Regulations9
88-451/452Policy Analysis Senior Project12
Philosophical and Ethical Perspectives on Decision Making:
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
80-208Critical Thinking9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-246Moral Psychology9
80-249AI, Society, and Humanity9
80-271Mind and Body: The Objective and the Subjective9
80-305Decision Theory9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
80-324Philosophy of Economics9
88-275Bubbles: Data Science for Human Minds9
Economic and Statistical Methods for Decision Science:
70-374Data Mining & Business Analytics9
70-455Data Management Fundamentals9
70-460Mathematical Models for Consulting9
73-265Economics and Data Science9
73-347Game Theory Applications for Economics and Business9
80-405Game Theory9
88-255Strategic Decision Making9
88-300Programming and Data Analysis for Social Scientists9
88-360Behavioral Economics9
88-367Behavioral Economics in the Wild9
Decision Science and Public Policy:
84-364Comparative Presidential Behavior: Leadership, Personality, and Decision Making9
84-369Decision Science for International Relations9
88-221Analytical Foundations of Public Policy9
88-344Systems Analysis: Environmental Policy9
88-365Behavioral Economics and Public Policy9
88-366Behavioral Economics of Poverty and Development9
88-405Risk Perception and Communication9
88-435Decision Science and Policy9
88-444Public Policy and Regulations9
88-451/452Policy Analysis Senior Project12
Research Methods for Decision Science:
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
70-460Mathematical Models for Consulting9
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
85-314Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods9
88-252Causal Inference in the Field9
88-388Psychological Models of Decision Making9
Economics Concentration 

(81 units minimum)

The BHA concentration in Economics provides a solid understanding of economic theory and quantitative economic analysis. The core disciplinary sequences in economic theory and quantitative analysis are combined with calculus and data analysis to provide students with knowledge and skills that allow for creative problem-solving.

Mathematics Prerequisites

These courses are not counted as part of your DC Concentration. It may be used to satisfy general education or free elective requirements.

21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-256Multivariate Analysis9
Economic Theory Requirements (4 courses, 36 units)
73-102Principles of Microeconomics *9
73-103Principles of Macroeconomics9
73-230Intermediate Microeconomics9
73-240Intermediate Macroeconomics9

* Students who place out of 73-102 based on the economics placement exam will receive a prereq waiver for 73-102 and are waived from taking 73-102.

Quantitative Analysis Requirements (2 courses, 18 units)

These courses require 36-200 Reasoning with Data as a pre-requisite; 36-200 fulfills a general education Deciding requirement, as well.

73-265Economics and Data Science9
73-274Econometrics I9
Advanced Economics Electives (2 courses, 18 units)

Students must take two advanced elective courses. Advanced elective courses are those numbered 73-300 through 73-495, as well as courses designated by the program offered by other departments/programs. Additionally, students may work with their economics advisor to structure alternative sets of courses to meet these requirements based on their particular interests, subject to course availability.

Senior Work (1 course, 9 units)
73-497Senior Project9
Environmental & Sustainability Studies Concentration

(93 units minimum)

The BHA concentration in Environmental & Sustainability Studies (ESS) focuses on human-environment interactions from a multitude of disciplinary perspectives. The curriculum draws on the expertise of faculty across several Carnegie Mellon colleges in order to provide students with the interdisciplinary background and skills necessary to understand environmental problems and the means to mitigate them. The curriculum is designed to help students apply social and scientific perspectives to environmental problems; to distinguish among scientific methods for evaluating environmental problems; to identify and assess sources of environmental data; and to identify environmental justice issues within the context of proposed policy solutions.

Core Courses (3 course, 27 units)
24/09-291Environmental Systems on a Changing Planet9
79-336Introduction to Environmental Ideas9
66-506Senior Capstone
(Interdisciplinary Research: Capstone in ESS)
9
Earth and Environmental Science (1 course, 9 units)

Choose one course from the list below.

03-140Ecology and Environmental Science9
33-115Physics for Future Presidents9
Global Course (1 course, 3 units)
99-xxxEach semester, a new course is offered on Global themes, in partnership with University of Pittsburgh’s Global Studies Center.3
Political Economy (1 course, 9 units minimum)

Choose one course from the list below.

19-101Introduction to Engineering and Public Policy12
79-300History of American Public Policy9
84-110Foundations of Political Economy9
84-313International Organizations and Law9
84-325Contemporary American Foreign Policy9
88-344Systems Analysis: Environmental Policy9
Electives (5 courses, 45 units minimum)

Choose three DC Electives and two MCS/ENG Electives in consultation with the concentration advisor.

DC Electives:
76-241Introduction to Gender Studies9
76-291Getting Heard/Making a Difference9
76-354Watchdog Journalism9
76-395Science Writing *9
76-450Law, Culture, and the Humanities9
79-201Introduction to Anthropology9
79-275Introduction to Global Studies9
79-278How (Not) to Change the World9
79-288Bananas, Baseball, and Borders: Latin America and the United States9
79-297Technology and Work9
79-331Body Politics: Women and Health in America9
79-372The Rise and Fall of Pittsburgh Steel6
79-377Food, Culture, and Power: A History of Eating9
79-379Extreme Ethnography9
79-383The History of Capitalism9
79-386A Tale of Two Epidemics: Influenza 1918 and Covid 199
80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
84-110Foundations of Political Economy9
84-275Comparative Politics9
84-325Contemporary American Foreign Policy9
85-241Social Psychology9
MCS/ENG Electives:
12-201Geology9
19-101Introduction to Engineering and Public Policy12
19-425Sustainable Energy for the Developing World9
27-505Exploration of Everyday Materials9
03-140Ecology and Environmental Science9

* Additional prerequisite

Ethics, History, & Public Policy Concentration

(81 units minimum)

The BHA concentration in Ethics, History, & Public Policy (EHPP) provides students with a rigorous, interdisciplinary humanistic and social-scientific education. The concentration in EHPP encourages the development of a broad technical skill set that will benefit students in whatever career they ultimately choose to pursue. Students with a concentration in EHPP learn how to analyze and construct arguments; to evaluate evidentiary statements; to persuade people to agree with their particular claims; to conduct research under time and resource constraints; and to craft policies that address real world problems in a way that is sensitive both to history and competing sets of values. Comprised of courses in the departments of History, Philosophy, Economics and Decision Science, the BHA concentration in EHPP encourages specialization, internship experiences and research in a wide range of policy areas.

Foundations of Public Policy Requirement (1 course, 9 units)

Choose one 9-unit course from the list below.

73-102Principles of Microeconomics9
84-104Decision Processes in American Political Institutions9
84-110Foundations of Political Economy9
History Core (3 courses, 27 units)

Choose one 9-unit course from each category below. (Students must earn a final grade of "C" or better for these courses to count toward the concentration).

Policy History:
79-300History of American Public Policy9
U.S. History:
79-204American Environmental History9
79-212Jim Crow America9
79-231American Civil Rights Movement: From Garveyism to Black Power9
79-240Development of American Culture9
79-242African American History: Reconstruction to the Present9
79-244Women in American History9
79-245Capitalism and Individualism in American Culture9
79-248U.S. Constitution & the Presidency9
79-24920th Century U.S. History9
79-320Women, Politics, and Protest9
Non-U.S. History:
79-202Flesh and Spirit: Early Modern Europe, 1400-17509
79-203The Other Europe: The Habsburgs, Communism, & Central/Eastern Europe, 1740-19909
79-20520th Century Europe9
79-211Modern Southeast Asia: Colonialism, Capitalism, and Cultural Exchange9
79-223Mexico: From the Aztec Empire to the Drug War9
79-226African History: Earliest Times to 17809
79-227Modern Africa: The Slave Trade to the End of Apartheid9
79-229The Origins of the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict, 1880-19489
79-230Arab-Israeli Conflict Since 19489
79-237Comparative Slavery9
79-260Nazi Germany9
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China: From the Birth of Mao ... to Now9
79-264Tibet and China: History and Propaganda6
79-265Russian History: Game of Thrones9
79-266Russian History and Revolutionary Socialism9
79-268World War I: The Twentieth Century's First Catastrophe9
79-307Religion and Politics in the Middle East9
Philosophy Core (3 courses, 27 units)

Choose one course from three of the four categories below. No more than 9 units at the 100-level may be counted toward this requirement.

Ethics:
80-130Introduction to Ethics9
80-330Ethical Theory9
Political Philosophy:
80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-335Social and Political Philosophy9
Foundations of Social Science:
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-324Philosophy of Economics9
Applied Philosophy:
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-249AI, Society, and Humanity9
80-336Philosophy of Law9
80-348Health, Human Rights, and International Development9
80-447Global Justice9
Elective Courses (2 courses, 18 units)

Choose any two courses from any of the following categories.

Engineering and Public Policy:
19-424Energy and the Environment9
Business:
70-311Organizational Behavior9
70-321Negotiation and Conflict Resolution9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-364Business Law9
70-365International Trade and International Law9
70-430International Management9
Economics:
73-352Public Economics9
73-359Benefit-Cost Analysis9
73-365Firms, Market Structures, and Strategy9
73-408Law and Economics9
73-476American Economic History9
English:
76-492Rhetoric of Public Policy9
History:
79-145Genocide and Weapons of Mass Destruction9
79-189History of Democracy: Thinking Beyond the Self9
79-206Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Europe9
79-233The United States and the Middle East since 19459
79-234Technology and Society9
79-242African American History: Reconstruction to the Present9
79-247African Americans, Imprisonment, and the Carceral State9
79-250Voting Rights: An Unexpected History9
79-267The Soviet Union in World War II: Military, Political, and Social History9
79-280Coffee and Capitalism9
79-288Bananas, Baseball, and Borders: Latin America and the United States9
79-291Innovation and Entertainment: A Business History of American Popular Culture9
79-298Guns in American History: Culture, Violence, and Politics6
79-299Introduction to the History of Science9
79-301History of Surveillance: From the Plantation to Data Capitalism6
79-302Killer Robots:The Ethics, Law, and Politics of Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems6
79-303Pittsburgh and the Transformation of Modern Urban America6
79-305Moneyball Nation: Data in American Life9
79-310U. S. Business History: 1870 to the Present9
79-315Thirsty Planet: The Politics of Water in Global Perspective9
79-320Women, Politics, and Protest9
79-322Stalin and the Great Terror9
79-325U.S. Gay and Lesbian History6
79-330Medicine and Society: Health, Healers, and Hospitals9
79-331Body Politics: Women and Health in America9
79-334Climate Change and Climate Justice: Global Perspectives6
79-336Introduction to Environmental Ideas9
79-338History of Education in America9
79-339Juvenile Delinquency & Film: From Soul of Youth (1920) to West Side Story (1961)6
79-340Juvenile Delinquency & Film: From "Boyz N the Hood"(1991) to "The Wire"(2002-08)6
79-342Introduction to Science and Technology Studies9
79-343Education, Democracy, and Civil Rights9
79-359Truth, Lies, and Propaganda: A Historical Inquiry9
79-370Technology in the United States9
79-371African American Urban History9
79-381Energy and Empire: How Fossil Fuels Changed the World9
79-397Environmental and Public Health Crises in the City6
Philosophy:
80-130Introduction to Ethics9
80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-256Modern Moral Philosophy9
80-305Decision Theory9
80-330Ethical Theory9
80-335Social and Political Philosophy9
80-336Philosophy of Law9
80-405Game Theory9
80-447Global Justice9
Institute for Politics and Strategy:
84-310International Political Economy9
84-380US Grand Strategy9
84-393Legislative Decision Making: US Congress9
84-402Judicial Politics and Behavior9
Social and Decision Sciences:
88-223Decision Analysis12
88-281Topics in Law: 1st Amendment9
88-284Topics of Law: The Bill of Rights9
88-444Public Policy and Regulations9

Note: Other elective courses may be approved at the discretion of the EHPP concentration advisor. A list of these courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Film & Visual Media Concentration

(81 units minimum)

The BHA concentration in Film & Visual Media trains students through a combination of coursework in visual media, film history and analysis, screenwriting, and production of film and other visual media. This concentration offers a comprehensive education in film and visual media, from theoretical framing and historical-cultural contextualization to training skills in both creating and analyzing film, and developing a complex blend of creative, professional and technical competencies. CMU's Department of English is an ideal home for the Film & Visual Media concentration due to the department’s combination of creative writers, film and media studies scholars, film makers, digital humanities and visual communication researchers.

Introductory Courses (2 courses, 18 units)
76-239Introduction to Film Studies9
76-310Advanced Studies in Film and Media9
Production Course (1 course, 9 units)
76-292Introduction to Film Production9
Screenwriting Course (1 course, 9 units)
76-269Introduction to Screenwriting9
Topics in Film & Visual Media Studies (2 courses, 18 units)

Options include but are not limited to:

76-278Japanese Film and Literature: The Art of Storytelling9
76-312Crime and Justice in American Film9
76-339Topics in Film and Media
(Can be taken more than once.)
9
76-353Transnational Feminisms: Fiction and Film9
76-367Fact Into Film: Translating History into Cinema9
76-377Shakespeare on Film9
76-438The Wire: Crime, Realism, and Long-Form TV9
76-439Seminar in Film9
76-448Shakespeare on Film9
76-449Race and Media9
79-225West African History in Film9
79-306Fact into Film: Translating History into Cinema9
79-308Crime and Justice in American Film9
79-319India Through Film6
79-326Shall We Dance? Culture, Politics, and Movement in the 20th Century6
79-339Juvenile Delinquency & Film: From Soul of Youth (1920) to West Side Story (1961)6
82-215Arab Culture Through Dialogues, Film, and Literature9
82-278Japanese Film and Literature: The Art of Storytelling9
82-284Multicultural Pittsburgh: VR Storytelling9
Courses in Film Production, Screenwriting, Digital Media, Literature & Culture, and/or Film & Visual Media Studies (3 courses, 27 units)

Students may take an additional three Dietrich College courses for a minimum of 27 units of courses offered in the categories listed above. Because there are dozens of options available, including many of the courses listed above, please consult with the Department of concentration advisor for guidance.

French & Francophone Studies Concentration

(81 units minimum)

A BHA concentration in French & Francophone Studies promotes not just language proficiency but also an understanding of French and francophone cultures. Students who arrive at Carnegie Mellon with previous language study and/or who have high Advanced Placement, an International Baccalaureate, a Cambridge GCE Advanced level or internal placement exam scores will be able to begin taking courses in the concentration earlier in their undergraduate program. In all cases, progress in the concentration will be accelerated by study abroad, which is recommended for all students.

Prerequisites

Intermediate level proficiency in French. This is equivalent to the completion of four courses (two at the 100-level and two at the 200-level) or exemption based on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, Cambridge GCE Advanced level or Carnegie Mellon internal placement test scores.

Core Courses in French & Francophone Studies (3 courses, 27 units)
82-303French & Francophone Cultures9
82-304French & Francophone Sociolinguistics9
82-3xxor 82-4xx9

Note: 82-303 or 82-304 can be repeated with a different topic. A 400-level course may be substituted with the concentration advisor’s approval.

Core Courses in Modern Languages (1 course, 9 units)

Complete one course.

82-280Billingual & Bicultural Experiences in the US9
82-282Interpreting Global Texts & Cultures9
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-284Multicultural Pittsburgh: VR Storytelling9
82-285Podcasting: Language and Culture Through Storytelling9
82-286Cultural Complexities9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Topics in Second Language Acquisition9
82-480Translation Technologies9

Note: In consultation with the concentration advisor, students may substitute a Modern Languages course elective with one related to language analysis, language learning, or acquisition of language and culture from the listings in French & Francophone Studies or from another department. Examples: 80-180 Nature of Language, 85-421 Language and Thought. In addition, students may choose to take 82-580 Senior Seminar in Modern Languages (3 units). The selected course may not double count in the Electives category.

French & Francophone Studies and Interdisciplinary Electives (5 courses, 45 units minimum)

Complete four courses from French & Francophone Electives and one course from Interdisciplinary Electives or three courses from French & Francophone Electives and two courses from Interdisciplinary Electives in consultation with the concentration advisor.

French & Francophone Studies Electives:
82-415/416Topics in French and Francophone Studies *9
82-501/502Special Topics in French & Francophone Studies *Var.
82-505Undergraduate InternshipVar.

* Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

Interdisciplinary Electives:

This list is compiled from possibilities such as but not limited to the following. Students should consult SIO and the concentration advisor for the most up to date interdisciplinary electives appropriate for the French & Francophone Studies curriculum. Courses may be suggested to the concentration advisor for approval as a substitute. Note that not all courses are offered each semester.

English
76-239Introduction to Film Studies9
76-318Communicating in the Global Marketplace9
76-385Introduction to Discourse Analysis9
76-386Language & Culture9
History
79-202Flesh and Spirit: Early Modern Europe, 1400-17509
79-20520th Century Europe9
79-227Modern Africa: The Slave Trade to the End of Apartheid9
79-275Introduction to Global Studies9
79-350Early Christianity9
79-385Out of Africa: The Making of the African Diaspora9
Institute for Politics and Strategy (Choose in consultation with the concentration advisor.)
84-265Political Science Research Methods9
84-275Comparative Politics9
84-313International Organizations and Law9
84-322Nonviolent Conflict and Revolution9
84-324The Future of Democracy9
84-326Theories of International Relations9
84-362Diplomacy and Statecraft9
84-364Comparative Presidential Behavior: Leadership, Personality, and Decision Making9
Modern Languages
82-227Germany & the European Union9
82-280Billingual & Bicultural Experiences in the US9
82-282Interpreting Global Texts & Cultures9
82-284Multicultural Pittsburgh: VR Storytelling9
82-285Podcasting: Language and Culture Through Storytelling9
82-288Everyday Learning: Designing Learning Exp in Times of Unrest & Uncertainty9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Topics in Second Language Acquisition9
82-480Translation Technologies9
Philosophy
80-180Nature of Language9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-282Phonetics and Phonology I9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
80-381Meaning in Language9
Psychology
85-241Social Psychology9
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-421Language and Thought9
German Studies Concentration 

(81 units minimum)

A BHA concentration in German Studies promotes not just language proficiency but also an understanding of German culture. Students who arrive at Carnegie Mellon with previous language study and/or who have high Advanced Placement, an International Baccalaureate, a Cambridge GCE Advanced level or internal placement exam scores will be able to begin taking courses in the concentration earlier in their undergraduate program. In all cases, progress in the concentration will be accelerated by study abroad, which is recommended for all students.

Prerequisites

Intermediate level proficiency in German. This is equivalent to the completion of four courses (two at the 100-level and two at the 200-level) or exemption based on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, Cambridge GCE Advanced level or Carnegie Mellon internal placement test scores.

Core Courses in German Studies (5 courses, 45 units)
82-221Intermediate German I9
82-222Intermediate German II9
82-320Contemporary Society in Germany, Austria and Switzerland9
82-323Germany, Austria and Switzerland in the 20th Century9
82-327The Emergence of the German Speaking World9

Note: If students have already completed the equivalent of the 200-level courses prior to arriving at Carnegie Mellon, they may take 400-level courses with approval from the concentration advisor. 400-level courses may also be substituted for the 300-level courses with the approval of the concentration advisor.  

Core Courses in Modern Languages (1 course, 9 units)

Complete one course.

82-280Billingual & Bicultural Experiences in the US9
82-282Interpreting Global Texts & Cultures9
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-284Multicultural Pittsburgh: VR Storytelling9
82-285Podcasting: Language and Culture Through Storytelling9
82-286Cultural Complexities9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Topics in Second Language Acquisition9
82-480Translation Technologies9

Note: In consultation with the concentration advisor, students may substitute a Modern Languages course elective with one related to language analysis, language learning, or acquisition of language and culture from the listings in German Studies or from another department. Examples: 80-180 Nature of Language, 85-421 Language and Thought. In addition, students may choose to take 82-580 Senior Seminar in Modern Languages (3 units). The selected course may not double count in the Electives category.

German Studies and Interdisciplinary Electives (3 courses, 27 units minimum)

Complete two courses from German Studies Electives and one course from Interdisciplinary Electives or one course from German Studies Electives and two courses from Interdisciplinary Electives in consultation with the concentration advisor.

German Studies Electives:
82-420The Crucible of Modernity:Vienna 19009
82-425/426Topics in German Literature and Culture *9
82-427Nazi and Resistance Culture9
82-428History of German Film9
82-429German Reading and Translation Workshop: German in Today's World9
82-505Undergraduate InternshipVar.
82-521/522Special Topics in German Studies *Var.

* Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

Interdisciplinary Electives:

This list is compiled from possibilities such as but not limited to the following. Students should consult SIO and the concentration advisor for the most up to date interdisciplinary electives appropriate for the German Studies curriculum. Courses may be suggested to the concentration advisor for approval as a substitute. Note that not all courses are offered each semester.

English
76-239Introduction to Film Studies9
76-386Language & Culture9
76-387Writing in the Disciplines6
76-483Corpus Analysis in Rhetoric9
History
79-20520th Century Europe9
79-256Sex, Guns, Rock, and Skinheads: Youth Rebellion in Europe, 1960-19909
79-257Germany and the Second World War9
Institute for Politics and Strategy (Choose in consultation with the concentration advisor.)
84-310International Political Economy9
84-326Theories of International Relations9
84-362Diplomacy and Statecraft9
Modern Languages
82-227Germany & the European Union9
82-280Billingual & Bicultural Experiences in the US9
82-282Interpreting Global Texts & Cultures9
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-284Multicultural Pittsburgh: VR Storytelling9
82-285Podcasting: Language and Culture Through Storytelling9
82-286Cultural Complexities9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Topics in Second Language Acquisition9
82-427Nazi and Resistance Culture9
82-428History of German Film9
82-480Translation Technologies9
Philosophy
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-180Nature of Language9
80-251Modern Philosophy9
80-253Continental Philosophy9
80-256Modern Moral Philosophy9
80-275Metaphysics9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
Psychology
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-421Language and Thought9
Global Studies Concentration 

(81 units minimum)

The BHA concentration in Global Studies is designed for students interested in humanistic approaches to understanding past and present processes of globalization. Participating faculty in the departments of History, Modern Languages and English conduct research in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East and the Pacific. The rigorous yet flexible Global Studies curriculum combines anthropology, history, literary and cultural studies, and advanced language training in order to help students make sense of complex interactions among global processes, regional and local cultures, and societal structures. BHA concentration students in Global Studies develop a broad understanding of their prospects and responsibilities as citizens of the world confronting challenging contemporary problems.

There are two required courses for the concentration: Introduction to Global Studies (79-275) and Global Studies Research Seminar (79-400). Students also choose among several courses focused on theory, research methods, transnational histories, and regional/national histories and cultures.

In addition to coursework at Carnegie Mellon, BHA students with a concentration in Global Studies are encouraged to incorporate a semester of study abroad into their course of study in order to immerse themselves in society different from their own with unfamiliar cultural practices, language and history.

Students should consult frequently with the BHA advisor and the Global Studies concentration advisor who will help students to craft a coherent course of study on specific topics and/or regions that may lead to the capstone research project (79-400 Global Studies Research Seminar ), the BXA capstone project (52-401 and 52-402) or a Dietrich College senior honors thesis. The concentration advisor will also work with students to connect their academic interests and their participation in student organizations and/or organizations based in Pittsburgh with transnational reach.

Global Studies Introductory and Capstone Courses (2 courses, 21 units)

Students must earn a final grade of "C" or better for these courses to count toward the concentration.

79-275Introduction to Global Studies9
79-400Global Studies Research Seminar12
Language Proficiency Requirement

Gaining skills in more languages is a crucial component of the major in Global Studies. Students will pursue at least three semesters of language study, no matter the level. That is, students could take three introductory courses in three different languages, or three different level courses in the same language, or two different level courses in Language 1 and a third course in Language 2.

If students already know a language at an advanced level, they will take a test to certify those language skills. If they pass the test, they will need to take at least two semesters of language study, focused on a language different from the one they were tested on.

Please see the Modern Languages section of the schedule of classes.

Theoretical and Topical Core Courses (2 courses, 18 units)

To gain a solid foundation in the theories, methods, and analytical topics underpinning the concentration in Global Studies, students select 18 units (typically two courses) from the core courses listed below. Students must earn a final grade of "C" or better in these courses to fulfill the theoretical and topical core course requirement.

79-201Introduction to Anthropology9
79-211Modern Southeast Asia: Colonialism, Capitalism, and Cultural Exchange9
79-278How (Not) to Change the World9
79-280Coffee and Capitalism9
79-289Animal Planet: An Environmental History of People and Animals9
79-314The Politics and Culture of Memory9
79-315Thirsty Planet: The Politics of Water in Global Perspective9
79-317Art, Anthropology, and Empire9
79-318Sustainable Social Change: History and Practice9
79-377Food, Culture, and Power: A History of Eating9
79-379Extreme Ethnography9
79-380Hostile Environments: The Politics of Pollution in Global Perspective9
79-381Energy and Empire: How Fossil Fuels Changed the World9
79-383The History of Capitalism9
Transnational, Global, and Regional Courses (3 courses, 27 units)

To gain insight into how complex transnational and global processes shape and are affected by local, national and regional dynamics, students will select 27 units (typically three courses) from any subcategories below.

Transnational and Global Courses:
76-337Intersectional Feminism9
76-384Race, Nation, and the Enemy9
79-224Mayan America9
79-233The United States and the Middle East since 19459
79-237Comparative Slavery9
79-270Anti-Semitism Then and Now: Perspectives from the Middle Ages to the Present6
79-273Jews and Muslims in History9
79-276Beyond the Border6
79-280Coffee and Capitalism9
79-282Europe and the World Since 18009
79-283Hungry World: Food and Famine in Global Perspective9
79-288Bananas, Baseball, and Borders: Latin America and the United States9
79-313"Unwanted": Refugees, Asylum Seekers, and Patterns of Global Migration6
79-350Early Christianity9
79-368Un-natural Disasters: Societies and Environmental Hazards in Global Perspective6
79-385Out of Africa: The Making of the African Diaspora9
79-386A Tale of Two Epidemics: Influenza 1918 and Covid 199
79-510Global Studies Guided Reading3
80-348Health, Human Rights, and International Development9
80-447Global Justice9
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-304French & Francophone Sociolinguistics9
82-345Introduction to Hispanic Literary and Cultural Studies9
84-322Nonviolent Conflict and Revolution9
84-326Theories of International Relations9
84-370Nuclear Security & Arms Control9
84-389Terrorism and Insurgency9
Regional Courses:
Africa
79-225West African History in Film9
79-226African History: Earliest Times to 17809
79-227Modern Africa: The Slave Trade to the End of Apartheid9
79-290The Slave Passage: From West Africa to the Americas6
Eastern and Southern Asia and the Pacific
79-211Modern Southeast Asia: Colonialism, Capitalism, and Cultural Exchange9
79-264Tibet and China: History and Propaganda6
88-411Rise of the Asian Economies9
Europe
79-202Flesh and Spirit: Early Modern Europe, 1400-17509
79-203The Other Europe: The Habsburgs, Communism, & Central/Eastern Europe, 1740-19909
79-20520th Century Europe9
79-208Witchcraft and Witch-Hunting9
79-268World War I: The Twentieth Century's First Catastrophe9
79-270Anti-Semitism Then and Now: Perspectives from the Middle Ages to the Present6
82-320Contemporary Society in Germany, Austria and Switzerland9
82-415Topics in French and Francophone Studies9
82-441Studies in Peninsular Literature and Culture9
The Middle East
79-229The Origins of the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict, 1880-19489
79-230Arab-Israeli Conflict Since 19489
79-307Religion and Politics in the Middle East9
79-398Documenting the 1967 Arab-Israeli War9
82-215Arab Culture Through Dialogues, Film, and Literature9
84-323War and Peace in the Contemporary Middle East9
The Americas
79-223Mexico: From the Aztec Empire to the Drug War9
82-245New Directions in Hispanic Studies9
82-343Latin America: Language and Culture9
82-451Studies in Latin American Literature and Culture9
82-455Topics in Hispanic Studies9
82-456Topics in Hispanic Studies9
84-308Political Economy of Latin America9
Electives (2 courses, 15 units minimum)

Students are required to take an additional 15 units (typically two courses) of electives, selected from one or both of the subcategories below. "Theoretical and Topical Core Courses" and "Transnational, Global, and Regional Courses" listed above that are not used to fulfill those requirements may be counted as electives in addition to the courses listed below.

Global Studies offers students the opportunity to gain credit for a 9 unit elective while gaining first-hand experience interning with Pittsburgh-based organizations that work across borders. 79-506 Global Studies Internship is offered every semester and students should register for the course after consulting with the concentration advisor. The concentration advisor will assist students with matching their interests to local organizations and identifying an on-site supervisor available to collaborate in the ongoing and final evaluation of the student's work.

Thematic Courses:
57-306World Music9
70-365International Trade and International Law9
76-241Introduction to Gender Studies9
76-449Race and Media9
76-450Law, Culture, and the Humanities9
76-468Space and Mobilities9
79-101Making History: How to Think About the Past (and Present)9
79-204American Environmental History9
79-281Introduction to Religion9
79-316Photography, the First 100 Years, 1839-19399
79-324#MeToo: Naming and Resisting Gender Violence6
79-330Medicine and Society: Health, Healers, and Hospitals9
79-343Education, Democracy, and Civil Rights9
79-397Environmental and Public Health Crises in the City6
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-335Social and Political Philosophy9
82-215Arab Culture Through Dialogues, Film, and Literature9
82-541Special Topics in Hispanic StudiesVar.
84-275Comparative Politics9
84-310International Political Economy9
84-318Politics of Developing Nations9
84-362Diplomacy and Statecraft9
Nation-based Courses:
79-216Genghis Khan and the Mongol Empire3
79-256Sex, Guns, Rock, and Skinheads: Youth Rebellion in Europe, 1960-19909
79-257Germany and the Second World War9
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China: From the Birth of Mao ... to Now9
79-263Mao and the Chinese Cultural Revolution9
79-265Russian History: Game of Thrones9
79-266Russian History and Revolutionary Socialism9
79-267The Soviet Union in World War II: Military, Political, and Social History9
79-269Russian History: From Socialism to Capitalism9
79-309The Chinese Revolution Through Film (1949-2000)9
79-319India Through Film6
79-320Women, Politics, and Protest9
79-322Stalin and the Great Terror9
79-331Body Politics: Women and Health in America9
82-253Korean Culture Through Film9
82-254World of Korea, Then and Now9
82-273Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture9
82-278Japanese Film and Literature: The Art of Storytelling9
82-293Russian Cinema: From the Bolshevik Revolution to Putin's Russia9
82-29419th Century Russian Masterpieces9
82-303French & Francophone Cultures9
82-305French in its Social Contexts9
82-333Chinese Language and CultureVar.
82-342Spain: Language and Culture9
82-344U.S. Latinos: Language and Culture9
82-361Italian Language and Culture I9
82-420The Crucible of Modernity:Vienna 19009
82-425Topics in German Literature and Culture9
82-427Nazi and Resistance Culture9
82-428History of German Film9
82-433Topics in Contemporary Culture of China9
82-434Studies in Chinese Traditions9
82-440Studies in Chinese Literature & Culture9
82-473Topics in Japanese Studies9
Hispanic Studies Concentration

(81 units minimum)

A BHA concentration in Hispanic Studies promotes not just language proficiency but also an understanding of its varied cultures. Students who arrive at Carnegie Mellon with previous language study and/or who have high Advanced Placement, an International Baccalaureate, a Cambridge GCE Advanced level or internal placement exam scores will be able to begin taking courses in the concentration earlier in their undergraduate program. In all cases, progress in the concentration will be accelerated by study abroad, which is recommended for all students.

Prerequisites

Intermediate level proficiency in Spanish. This is equivalent to the completion of four courses (two at the 100-level and two at the 200-level) or exemption based on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, Cambridge GCE Advanced level or Carnegie Mellon internal placement test scores.

Core Courses in Hispanic Studies (3 courses, 27 units)

Complete two courses.

82-342Spain: Language and Culture9
82-343Latin America: Language and Culture9
82-344U.S. Latinos: Language and Culture9
Complete required course.
82-345Introduction to Hispanic Literary and Cultural Studies9
Core Courses in Modern Languages  (1 course, 9 units)

Complete one course.

82-280Billingual & Bicultural Experiences in the US9
82-282Interpreting Global Texts & Cultures9
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-284Multicultural Pittsburgh: VR Storytelling9
82-285Podcasting: Language and Culture Through Storytelling9
82-286Cultural Complexities9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Topics in Second Language Acquisition9
82-480Translation Technologies9

Note: In consultation with the concentration advisor, students may substitute a Modern Languages course elective with one related to language analysis, language learning, or acquisition of language and culture from the listings in Hispanic Studies or from another department. Examples: 80-180 Nature of Language, 85-421 Language and Thought. In addition, students may choose to take 82-580 Senior Seminar in Modern Languages (3 units). The selected course may not double count in the Electives category.

Hispanic Studies and Interdisciplinary Electives (5 courses, 45 units)

Complete five courses from Hispanic Studies Electives or four courses from Hispanic Studies Electives and one course from Interdisciplinary Electives in consultation with the concentration advisor.

Hispanic Studies Electives:
82-441Studies in Peninsular Literature and Culture *9
82-443Spanish Reading and Translation Workshop9
82-444The Structure of Spanish9
82-451Studies in Latin American Literature and Culture *9
82-455/456Topics in Hispanic Studies *9
82-506Hispanic Studies Internship *Var.
82-541/542Special Topics in Hispanic Studies *Var.

* Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

Interdisciplinary Electives:

This list is compiled from possibilities such as but not limited to the following. Students should consult SIO and the concentration advisor for the most up to date interdisciplinary electives appropriate for the Hispanic Studies curriculum. Courses may be suggested to the concentration advisor for approval as a substitute. Note that not all courses are offered each semester.

History
79-223Mexico: From the Aztec Empire to the Drug War9
79-224Mayan America9
79-237Comparative Slavery9
79-276Beyond the Border6
79-288Bananas, Baseball, and Borders: Latin America and the United States9
Institute for Policy and Strategy (Choose in consultation with the concentration advisor.)
84-308Political Economy of Latin America9
Modern Languages
82-245New Directions in Hispanic Studies9
82-247The Hispanic World: History, Culture and Globalization9
82-249Hispanic Language & Cultures for the Professions9
82-280Billingual & Bicultural Experiences in the US9
82-281Contextual Thinking9
82-282Interpreting Global Texts & Cultures9
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-284Multicultural Pittsburgh: VR Storytelling9
82-285Podcasting: Language and Culture Through Storytelling9
82-286Cultural Complexities9
82-299Equity & Justice9
82-388Topics in Second Language Acquisition9
82-480Translation Technologies9
Philosophy
80-180Nature of Language9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-285Natural Language Syntax9
80-286Words and Word Formation: Introduction to Morphology9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
80-381Meaning in Language9
Psychology
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-421Language and Thought9
Humanities Analytics Concentration

(81 units minimum)

The human experience that is traditionally at the core of a humanities education is being dramatically transformed by the emergence of big data, digital platforms, computational thinking, and digital connectivity. Spurred by such developments, the concentration in Humanities Analytics (HumAn), offered by the Department of English, trains students in the processes involved in analyzing, digitizing, quantifying and visualizing different types of humanities and cultural phenomena, including printed books, manuscripts, historical records, art, music and film. The HumAn concentration trains students to work with cultural objects (like texts, film, historical records, etc.) but also to turn words and images into data; to move from one cultural object (like a Victorian novel, for instance) to a corpus consisting of tens of thousands of other novels published in the same period, and to combine close reading with distant reading (aggregating and analyzing massive amounts of data) for maximum insight and accuracy.

Students will develop a broad technical understanding of state-of-the-art computer-assisted methods for humanistic study, such as: social network analysis, text analysis and data mining, topic modeling, classification techniques and visualization. Students will also investigate the histories and historical contexts of such methods, learning to consider their applicability in specific domains. Finally, students will learn to turn a critical eye on the corpora and infrastructures that increasingly underpin humanistic research.

Required Courses (5 courses, 45 units)
76-275Introduction to Critical Writing9
76-380Methods in Humanities Analytics9

Three core courses from the following list:

76-314Data Stories9
76-388Coding for Humanists9
76-425Rhetoric, Science, and the Public Sphere9
76-429Introduction to Digital Humanities9
88-275Bubbles: Data Science for Human Minds9
88-300Programming and Data Analysis for Social Scientists9
Electives (4 courses, 36 units minimum)

Choose four courses from the following categories. One course must come from List A, two from List B, and the fourth in consultation with your Humanities Analytics advisor.  

List A: One elective course relevant to digital and analytics methods (at least 9 units):

05-391Designing Human Centered Software12
05-434/11-344Machine Learning in Practice12
11-411Natural Language Processing12
11-441/741Machine Learning for Text and Graph-based Mining
(Course is very mathematical, and is therefore appropriate only to students with such a preparation.)
9
15-104Introduction to Computing for Creative Practice10
15-110Principles of Computing10
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
16-223IDeATe Portal: Creative Kinetic Systems10
16-385Computer Vision12
17-340Green Computing9
17-450Crafting Software12
17-562Law of Computer Technology9
18-090Twisted Signals: Multimedia Processing for the Arts10
36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice9
36-202Methods for Statistics & Data Science9
36-204Discovering the Data Universe3
36-226Introduction to Statistical Inference9
36-311Statistical Analysis of Networks9
36-315Statistical Graphics and Visualization9
36-350Statistical Computing9
36-462Special Topics: Methods of Statistical Learning9
48-095Spatial Concepts for Non-Architecture Majors10
48-120Digital Media I6
51-229Digital Photographic Imaging9
53-451Research Issues in Game Development: Designing for XR12
60/62-142Digital Photography I10
62-150IDeATe Portal: Introduction to Media Synthesis and Analysis10

List B: Two elective courses relevant to broad humanities expertise (at least 18 units):

76-210Banned Books9
76-245Shakespeare's Dark Plays9
76-247Shakespeare: Comedies and Romances9
76-325Intertextuality9
76-339Topics in Film and Media9
76-373Argument9
76-476Rhetoric of Science9
79-200Introduction to Historical Research & Writing9
79-234Technology and Society9
79-305Moneyball Nation: Data in American Life9
80-180Nature of Language9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-381Meaning in Language9
80-383Language in Use9
82-282Interpreting Global Texts & Cultures9
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-480Translation Technologies9

Note: Additional courses not on List A or List B may also be approved as electives; new courses are added every semester so please speak with Humanities Analytics advisor.

Information Systems Concentration

(81 units minimum)

Did you enjoy computer science or more technical courses in high school, but are mostly interested in the practical and social applications of technology? Do you have a passion for business and want to use advanced technology to change how companies work? Do you want to learn how data and technology can be harnessed for social good?

The BHA concentration in Information Systems combines aspects of computer science, information technology, and business management to provide you with an uncommonly well-rounded portfolio. You will be uniquely positioned for an impactful career in an increasingly digitized and connected world and able to adapt to rapid evolution across industries.

In addition to building a solid foundation in computing, communications, and software development, you will also study social sciences and organizational theory to develop "big picture" critical thinking and understand the human impacts of technological change. This blend prepares you to take a leading role in our digital future.

Students must earn a final grade of "C" or better for these courses to count toward the concentration.

Mathematics and Computer Science Prerequisite Courses
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
15-121Introduction to Data Structures10
or 15-122 Principles of Imperative Computation
Choose one:
21-112Calculus II10
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-127Concepts of Mathematics12
21-240Matrix Algebra with Applications10
Information Systems Professional Core (8 courses, 76 units)
67-200Information Systems Research Colloquium -Fall1
67-250The Information Systems Milieux -Spring9
67-262Database Design and Development -Fall9
67-272Application Design and Development -Spring12
67-373Information Systems Consulting Project -Spring12
05-391Designing Human Centered Software12
or 05-410 User-Centered Research and Evaluation
or 05-452 Service Design
17-313Foundations of Software Engineering12
95-422Managing Digital Transformation9
IS Breadth Category (1-2 courses, 6 units minimum)

Choose one-two courses from any of the three IS Breadth categories (Professional Communication, Quantitative Analysis and Innovation & Entrepreneurship).

Professional Communications:

Information systems professionals communicate with a wide range of people in most organizations and often facilitate communications between diverse groups of stakeholders. Consequently, the most successful professionals typically are those with strong communication skills. These courses help students see that the structure and presentation of information affects how well (and how easily) it can be understood and used.

05-317Design of Artificial Intelligence Products12
36-315Statistical Graphics and Visualization9
51-261Design Center: Communication Design Fundmntls: IxD for Communications9
or 51-262 Design Center: CD Fundamentals: Design for Interactions for Communications
67-202The Softer Side of Software6
67-265Design Fundamentals: Shaping Interactions and Experiences9
67-338Information & Grid Design9
70-321Negotiation and Conflict Resolution9
70-340Business Communications9
76-327Equity & Communication9
84-250Writing for Political Science and Policy9
88-418Negotiation: Strategies and Behavioral Insights9
88-419International Negotiation9
88/70-341Team Dynamics and Leadership9
Quantitative Analysis and Research Methods:

This area focuses on decision making and data analysis—essential to development of useful information systems. This area exposes students to analytic methods in the social sciences and quantitative methods for approaching complex methods.

36-202Methods for Statistics & Data Science9
36-225Introduction to Probability Theory9
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral & Social Sciences9
36-315Statistical Graphics and Visualization9
36-401Modern Regression9
36-402Advanced Methods for Data Analysis9
36/70-208Regression Analysis9
67-285Across the Universe from Intelligent Agents to Users9
67-364Practical Data Science9
80-305Decision Theory9
88-223Decision Analysis12
88-251Empirical Research Methods9
88-252Causal Inference in the Field9
Innovation and Entrepreneurship:

The focus of this area is to apply disciplined techniques to generate ideas that have value in a market, and bring them through design, feasibility testing, and frequent revision, towards a potential launch.

05-470Digital Service Innovation12
17-356Software Engineering for Startups12
67-443Mobile Application Design and Development12
94-491Hacking for Defense/ Homeland Security12
International Relations & Politics Concentration

(81 units minimum)

Offered through the Institute for Politics and Strategy (IPS), the International Relations and Politics (IRP) BHA concentration analyzes the role of politics at the national, regional, international, and transnational levels; examines political and institutional arrangements within and among these levels; and investigates current issues relevant to the field of international relations.

The IRP concentration studies the ways in which leaders construct foreign and national security policy; the impact of domestic and international forces on states’ security and economic policies; and the significance of alliances, coalitions, and international institutions for world politics. The concentration emphasizes the importance of political institutions (domestic and comparative), decision making by leaders in shaping policy, and contemporary challenges to the international system. 

Thinking systematically about international and domestic politics is the core objective of the IRP concentration. To this end, the concentration has required courses in statistics that help to sharpen students’ ability to undertake scientific analysis in the required substantive and historical courses. The concentration is rooted in the discipline of political science but also utilizes the interdisciplinary strengths of decision science, economics, and political history. Thus, students pursuing this major will use the analytic tools of game theory, economic and statistical analysis, qualitative analysis, rational choice theory, and theories of behavioral decision making as they study alliances, coalitions, institutions, and political strategy.

A rich set of electives allows students to investigate issues of national security strategy, cybersecurity and international conflict, military strategy, economic policy, representation and voting rights, climate change, political psychology, grand strategy, and the effects of culture and society on the international and domestic systems.

Recognizing the influence of language and culture on politics, students are required to complete the intermediate (200) level, or its equivalent, in a modern language other than English. Advanced-level study is strongly encouraged.

Prerequisite
84-110Foundations of Political Economy9
or 73-102 Principles of Microeconomics
or 73-103 Principles of Macroeconomics
Core Courses (7 courses, 60 units)
84-104Decision Processes in American Political Institutions9
84-250Writing for Political Science and Policy9
84-265Political Science Research Methods9
84-275Comparative Politics9
84-326Theories of International Relations9
84-450Policy Seminar6
36-202Methods for Statistics & Data Science9
Language Requirement

BHA IRP students are required to complete the intermediate (200) level or the equivalent in a modern language other than English. The language requirement may be satisfied by the BHA General Education Modern Languages requirement if the 200-level is reached. Advanced level study is strongly encouraged.

Electives (3 courses, 21 units minimum)

International Relations and Politics BHA students must take 21 units (three courses) from the elective lists below. At least two courses must be from the Institute for Politics and Strategy (84-xxx).

Grand Strategy and Political Institutions
66-221Topics of Law: Introduction to Intellectual Property Law9
79-301History of Surveillance: From the Plantation to Data Capitalism6
79-302Killer Robots:The Ethics, Law, and Politics of Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems6
80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
80-335Social and Political Philosophy9
84-200Security War Game Simulation6
84-304In the News: Analysis of Current Events6
84-312Terrorism in Sub-Saharan Africa6
84-319Civil-Military Relations9
84-322Nonviolent Conflict and Revolution9
84-323War and Peace in the Contemporary Middle East9
84-324The Future of Democracy9
84-325Contemporary American Foreign Policy9
84-327Repression and Control in Dictatorships9
84-328Military Strategy and Doctrine9
84-329Military Strategic Theory6
84-352Representation and Voting Rights9
84-362Diplomacy and Statecraft9
84-363Comparative Legal Systems9
84-364Comparative Presidential Behavior: Leadership, Personality, and Decision Making9
84-365The Politics of Fake News and Misinformation9
84-366The American Presidency9
84-369Decision Science for International Relations9
84-370Nuclear Security & Arms Control9
84-372Space and National Security9
84-373Emerging Technologies and the Law9
84-380US Grand Strategy9
84-383Cyber Policy as National Policy6
84-386The Privatization of Force9
84-387Technology and Policy of Cyber War9
84-388Concepts of War and Cyber War6
84-389Terrorism and Insurgency9
84-390Social Media, Technology, and Conflict9
84-393Legislative Decision Making: US Congress9
84-402Judicial Politics and Behavior9
84-405The Future of Warfare9
84-421Advanced Topics in American Politics9
88-281Topics in Law: 1st Amendment9
88-284Topics of Law: The Bill of Rights9
Economics and Society
19-452EPP Projects II12
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
70-365International Trade and International Law9
70-430International Management9
73-328Health Economics12
73-332Political Economy9
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-249AI, Society, and Humanity9
80-348Health, Human Rights, and International Development9
80-447Global Justice9
84-307Economic and Political History of Contemporary China9
84-308Political Economy of Latin America9
84-310International Political Economy9
84-313International Organizations and Law9
84-315Political Economy of International Migration9
84-316Political Economy of Transatlantic Partnership9
84-318Politics of Developing Nations9
88-411Rise of the Asian Economies9
International Cultures
76-318Communicating in the Global Marketplace9
76-386Language & Culture9
79-203The Other Europe: The Habsburgs, Communism, & Central/Eastern Europe, 1740-19909
79-20520th Century Europe9
79-223Mexico: From the Aztec Empire to the Drug War9
79-224Mayan America9
79-227Modern Africa: The Slave Trade to the End of Apartheid9
79-229The Origins of the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict, 1880-19489
79-230Arab-Israeli Conflict Since 19489
79-233The United States and the Middle East since 19459
79-257Germany and the Second World War9
79-262Modern China: From the Birth of Mao ... to Now9
79-264Tibet and China: History and Propaganda6
79-265Russian History: Game of Thrones9
79-266Russian History and Revolutionary Socialism9
79-267The Soviet Union in World War II: Military, Political, and Social History9
79-275Introduction to Global Studies9
79-288Bananas, Baseball, and Borders: Latin America and the United States9
79-307Religion and Politics in the Middle East9
79-313"Unwanted": Refugees, Asylum Seekers, and Patterns of Global Migration6
79-314The Politics and Culture of Memory9
79-318Sustainable Social Change: History and Practice9
79-320Women, Politics, and Protest9
79-338History of Education in America9
79-342Introduction to Science and Technology Studies9
79-343Education, Democracy, and Civil Rights9
79-377Food, Culture, and Power: A History of Eating9
79-381Energy and Empire: How Fossil Fuels Changed the World9
79-385Out of Africa: The Making of the African Diaspora9
79-398Documenting the 1967 Arab-Israeli War9
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
300 or 400-level language course
Japanese Studies Concentration

(81 units minimum)

A BHA concentration in Japanese Studies promotes not just language proficiency but also an understanding of Japanese culture. Students who arrive at Carnegie Mellon with previous language study and/or who have high Advanced Placement, an International Baccalaureate, a Cambridge GCE Advanced level or internal placement exam scores will be able to begin taking courses in the concentration earlier in their undergraduate program. In all cases, progress in the concentration will be accelerated by study abroad, which is recommended for all students.

Prerequisites

Low-intermediate level proficiency in Japanese. This is equivalent to the completion of three courses (two at the 100-level and one at the 200-level) or exemption based on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, a Cambridge GCE Advanced level or Carnegie Mellon internal placement test scores.

Core Courses in Japanese Studies (4 courses, 39 units)
82-272Intermediate Japanese II *12
82-273Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture9
82-371Advanced Japanese I9
82-372Advanced Japanese II9

* Students who place out of 82-272 Intermediate Japanese II must take 12 units chosen from the Japanese Studies and Interdisciplinary Electives category below.

Core Courses in Modern Languages (1 course, 9 units)

Complete one course.

82-280Billingual & Bicultural Experiences in the US9
82-282Interpreting Global Texts & Cultures9
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-284Multicultural Pittsburgh: VR Storytelling9
82-285Podcasting: Language and Culture Through Storytelling9
82-286Cultural Complexities9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Topics in Second Language Acquisition9
82-480Translation Technologies9

Note: In consultation with the concentration advisor, students may substitute a Modern Languages course elective with one related to language analysis, language learning or acquisition of language and culture from the listings in Japanese Studies or from another department. Examples: 80-180 Nature of Language, 85-421 Language and Thought. In addition, students may choose to take 82-580 Senior Seminar in Modern Languages (3 units). The selected course may not double count in the Electives category.

Japanese Studies and Interdisciplinary Electives (4 courses, 33 units minimum)

Complete three courses from Japanese Studies Electives and one course from Interdisciplinary Electives or two courses from Japanese Studies Electives and two courses from Interdisciplinary Electives in consultation with the concentration advisor. With permission of the concentration advisor, students are encouraged to complete at least one Japanese history course that qualifies for Japanese Studies and Interdisciplinary Electives at the University of Pittsburgh, one in Japan when they study abroad or in a summer program at any other university.

Japanese Studies Electives
82-373Structure of the Japanese Language9
82-374Issues in Japanese Technology & Society9
82-473/474Topics in Japanese Studies *9
82-505Undergraduate InternshipVar.
82-571/572Special Topics in Japanese Studies *Var.

* Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

Interdisciplinary Electives

This list is compiled from possibilities such as but not limited to the following. Students should consult SIO and concentration advisor for the most up to date interdisciplinary electives appropriate for the Japanese Studies curriculum. Courses may be suggested to the concentration advisor for approval as a substitute. Note that not all courses are offered each semester. 

English
76-239Introduction to Film Studies9
History
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China: From the Birth of Mao ... to Now9
79-275Introduction to Global Studies9
Institute for Politics and Strategy (Choose in consultation with the concentration advisor.)
84-310International Political Economy9
84-326Theories of International Relations9
84-362Diplomacy and Statecraft9
84-369Decision Science for International Relations9
84-370Nuclear Security & Arms Control9
84-380US Grand Strategy9
84-388Concepts of War and Cyber War6
84-405The Future of Warfare9
Modern Languages
82-234Topics in Chinese History9
82-278Japanese Film and Literature: The Art of Storytelling9
82-279Anime - Visual Interplay between Japan and the World9
82-280Billingual & Bicultural Experiences in the US9
82-282Interpreting Global Texts & Cultures9
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-284Multicultural Pittsburgh: VR Storytelling9
82-285Podcasting: Language and Culture Through Storytelling9
82-286Cultural Complexities9
82-373Structure of the Japanese Language9
82-374Issues in Japanese Technology & Society9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Topics in Second Language Acquisition9
82-480Translation Technologies9
Philosophy
80-180Nature of Language9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
Psychology
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-421Language and Thought9
Linguistics Concentration

(81 units minimum)

The BHA concentration in Linguistics combines courses from the departments of English, Modern Languages, Philosophy and Psychology and the Language Technologies Institute. Linguistics is the study of human language, and it encompasses a broad spectrum of research questions, approaches and methodologies. Some linguists are concerned with the cognitive aspects of language learning, production and comprehension; some are concerned with language as a social and cultural phenomenon; others engage in the analysis of linguistic form and meaning, some from a functional and others from a formal perspective. There are also computational approaches to linguistics with both applied and theoretical goals.

Introductory Course (1 course, 9 units)
80-180Nature of Language9
Linguistics Core (2 courses, 18 units)

Take one course each in two of the following three areas.

Sounds:
80-282Phonetics and Phonology I9
Structure:
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-285Natural Language Syntax9
Meaning:
80-381Meaning in Language9
80-383Language in Use9
Extended Core (3 courses, 27 units)

Choose three courses from Extended Core or additional courses from the Linguistics Core above.

80-283It Matters How You Say It9
80-284Invented Languages9
80-286Words and Word Formation: Introduction to Morphology9
80-287Language Variation and Change9
80-288Intonation: Transcription and Analysis9
80-382Phonetics and Phonology II9
80-384Linguistics of Turkic Languages9
80-385Linguistics of Germanic Languages9
80-388Linguistic Typology: Diversity and Universals9
80-488Acoustics of Human Speech: Theory, Data, and Analysis9

Elective Courses (3 courses, 27 units)

Take three additional electives. These can be additional courses from the Core or Extended Core courses listed above, the electives list below, or any other course which must be approved by the concentration advisor as a linguistics elective. Listed below are the additional electives taught on a regular basis. Additional appropriate courses are offered irregularly or on a one-off basis. The concentration advisor will provide students with a list of possible electives each semester, and will assist students in selecting electives that are consistent with their goals and interests. A list of these courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Philosophy:
80-380Philosophy of Language9
80-484Language and Thought9
English:
76-318Communicating in the Global Marketplace9
76-325Intertextuality9
76-389Rhetorical Grammar9
Modern Languages:
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-305French in its Social Contexts9
82-373Structure of the Japanese Language9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-585Topics in Second Language Acquisition9
82-304French & Francophone Sociolinguistics9
Psychology:
85-354Infant Language Development9
85-421Language and Thought9
Language Technologies Institute:
11-411Natural Language Processing12
11-423ConLanging: Lrng. Ling. & Lang Tech via Constru Artif. Lang.12
11-492Speech Processing12
11-422Grammar Formalisims9
Literature & Culture Concentration

(81 units minimum)

The BHA concentration in Literature & Culture teaches students how to read, interpret and write persuasively about novels, poems, plays and other imaginative works across a variety of genres and media forms. Along with teaching students the analytical skills and methodological tools to interpret these works, this major teaches the importance of understanding imaginative works within their cultural and historical contexts. In addition, the concentration is designed to train students in strong professional and academic skills like critical thinking, inductive reasoning and persuasive argumentation that are applicable to other fields of study and a variety of career paths.

Prerequisite Course

Choose one course:

76-260Introduction to Writing Fiction9
76-261Introduction to Writing Creative Nonfiction9
76-265Introduction to Writing Poetry9
76-269Introduction to Screenwriting9
Required Introductory Courses (2 courses, 18 units)
76-245Shakespeare's Dark Plays9
or 76-247 Shakespeare: Comedies and Romances
76-275Introduction to Critical Writing9
200-Level Literature & Culture Course (1 course, 9 units)

Course options include but are not limited to the following:

76-207Special Topics in Literature & Culture9
76-210Banned Books9
76-217Literature & Culture of the 20th and 21st Century9
76-221Books You Should Have Read By Now9
76-223Contemporary Black Literature9
76-230Literature & Culture in the 19th Century9
76-232Introduction to Black Literature9
76-233Literature and Culture in the Renaissance9
76-238What Was the Hip-Hop Generation?9
76-245Shakespeare's Dark Plays
(if not taken as Required Introductory Course)
9
76-247Shakespeare: Comedies and Romances
(if not taken as Required Introductory Course)
9
76-290Literature & Culture in the 20th Century9
300-Level Course (1 course, 9 units)

Course options include but are not limited to the following:

76-310Advanced Studies in Film and Media9
76-314Data Stories9
76-316Topics in Literature: Watching HBO's The Watchmen9
76-317Contemporary American Fiction9
76-337Intersectional Feminism
(if not taken for the Theory Course requirement)
9
76-339Topics in Film and Media9
76-343Rise of the American Novel9
76-350Critical Theories about Literature
(if not taken for the Theory Course requirement)
9
76-352Music, Technology, and Culture9
76-353Transnational Feminisms: Fiction and Film9
76-367Fact Into Film: Translating History into Cinema9
76-376History of Critical Ideas (if not taken for the Theory Course requirement)9
76-388Coding for Humanists9
400-Level Course (1 course, 9 units)

Course options include but are not limited to the following:

76-407Topics in Literary & Cultural Studies9
76-408Culture and Globalization9
76-429Introduction to Digital Humanities9
76-439Seminar in Film9
76-440Postcolonial Theory: Diaspora and Transnationalism9
76-446Revenge Tragedy9
76-448Shakespeare on Film9
76-449Race and Media9
76-452Generations and Culture9
76-467Crime Fiction and Film9
Theory Course (1 course, 9 units)

Course options include but are not limited to the following:

76-337Intersectional Feminism
(if not taken as a 300-Level Course)
9
76-350Critical Theories about Literature
(if not taken as a 300-Level Course)
9
76-376History of Critical Ideas (if not taken for the Theory Course requirement)9
Rhetoric Course (1 course, 9 units)

Course options include but are not limited to the following:

76-318Communicating in the Global Marketplace9
76-319Environmental Rhetoric9
76-351Rhetorical Invention9
76-355Leadership, Dialogue, and Change9
76-359User Experience Methods for Documents9
76-373Argument9
76-378Literacy: Educational Theory and Community Practice9
76-384Race, Nation, and the Enemy9
76-388Coding for Humanists9
76-389Rhetorical Grammar9
76-396Non-Profit Message Creation9
76-415Mediated Power and Propaganda9
76-418Rhetoric and the Body9
76-457Rhetorical Invention9
76-475Law, Performance, and Identity9
76-476Rhetoric of Science9
76-484Discourse Analysis9
76-485The New Public Sphere9
76-486Argument Theory9
76-491Rhetorical Analysis9
76-492Rhetoric of Public Policy9
76-496Research Methods in Rhetoric & Writing Studies
(permission required from instructor)
9
English Elective Courses (2 courses, 18 units)

Complete two additional courses from the English Department’s offerings. One course must be at the 300-level, and one must be at the 400-level. Electives may include any courses offered by the English Department from any specialization area, with the exception of creative writing workshops.

Logic & Computation Concentration

(81 units minimum)

Students in the program take a common core of courses in logic, methodology, and computer science, together with an associated seminar in their senior year. The individual focus is achieved by selecting a sequence of four advanced and closely related courses. It is in this area of focus (or specialization) that students write their senior thesis under the supervision of a faculty member.

The resulting education in logic, analytic philosophy, mathematics, statistics and computer science enables students to pursue professional careers or graduate study. The analytic and communication skills developed in the major support a wide range of career choices, including those among the fields of technology, business and law. Fields of graduate study for which students are well prepared include, for example, computer science, cognitive science, philosophy, logic and linguistics.

Prerequisites
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
21-127Concepts of Mathematics12
Logic & Computation Core (6 courses, 56 units)
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
15-150Principles of Functional Programming10
80-150Nature of Reason9
80-211Logic and Mathematical Inquiry9
80-310Formal Logic9
80-311Undecidability and Incompleteness9
Logic & Computation Electives (3 courses, 25 units minimum)

Bearing in mind prerequisites, Logic & Computation students must complete three advanced courses in areas that use logical and computational tools, such as philosophy, computer science, linguistics, mathematical logic, psychology or statistics. The sequence of courses, mostly at the 300-level, must be selected in consultation with the concentration advisor.

Philosophy Concentration

(81 units minimum)

The BHA Concentration in in Philosophy provides students with a broad humanities education and sharpens their analytical skills. We encourage, but do not require, students to choose a thematic concentration through their electives. Sample curricula emphasizing Pre-Law, Metaphysics and Epistemology, Ethics and Social Philosophy, and Philosophy of Mind are suggested below. However, alternative emphases can be proposed and approved by the concentration advisor.

In any of the areas listed, substitutions of courses that cohere with a student’s interest may be allowed with approval from the concentration advisor.

Introduction to Philosophy (1 course, 9 units)
80-100Introduction to Philosophy9
Area 1: Values and Normative Theory (1 course, 9 units)
80-130Introduction to Ethics9
80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-246Moral Psychology9
80-249AI, Society, and Humanity9
80-330Ethical Theory9
80-335Social and Political Philosophy9
80-336Philosophy of Law9
80-348Health, Human Rights, and International Development9
80-447Global Justice9
Area 2: Philosophy of Mind/Language/Metaphysics (1 course, 9 units)
80-180Nature of Language9
80-270Problems of Mind and Body: Meaning and Doing9
80-271Mind and Body: The Objective and the Subjective9
80-276Philosophy of Religion9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-282Phonetics and Phonology I9
80-283It Matters How You Say It9
80-284Invented Languages9
80-285Natural Language Syntax9
80-286Words and Word Formation: Introduction to Morphology9
80-287Language Variation and Change9
80-288Intonation: Transcription and Analysis9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
80-381Meaning in Language9
80-382Phonetics and Phonology II9
80-383Language in Use9
80-384Linguistics of Turkic Languages9
80-385Linguistics of Germanic Languages9
80-388Linguistic Typology: Diversity and Universals9
80-580Seminar on the Philosophy of Language9
Area 3: Logic/Philosophy of Mathematics (1 course, 9 units)
80-210Logic and Proofs9
80-211Logic and Mathematical Inquiry9
80-212Arguments and Logical Analysis9
80-310Formal Logic9
80-311Undecidability and Incompleteness9
80-312Mathematical Revolutions9
80-314Causal Discovery, Statistics, and Machine Learning9
80-315Modal Logic9
80-411Proof Theory9
80-413Category Theory9
80-419Interactive Theorem Proving9
80-514Categorical Logic9
80-518Seminar on Topics in Logic9
Area 4: Epistemology/Metaphysics (1 course, 9 units)
80-150Nature of Reason9
80-201Knowledge and Justified Belief9
80-208Critical Thinking9
80-220Philosophy of Science9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-226Revolutions in Science9
80-305Decision Theory9
80-324Philosophy of Economics9
80-326Epistemology of Machine Learning9
80-405Game Theory9
80-516Causality and Machine Learning9
80-521Seminar on Formal Epistemology: Belief and Evidence9
Area 5: History of Philosophy (1 course, 9 units)
80-150Nature of Reason9
80-226Revolutions in Science9
80-250Ancient Philosophy9
80-251Modern Philosophy9
80-252Kant9
80-253Continental Philosophy9
80-254Analytic Philosophy9
80-255Pragmatism9
80-256Modern Moral Philosophy9
80-257Nietzsche9
80-261Experience, Reason, and Truth9
80-358Hume9
Area 6: Electives (3 courses, 27 units)

Three other philosophy courses, or appropriate courses from other departments, with the permission of the concentration advisor.

Policy & Management Concentration

(81 units minimum)

The Policy & Management concentration prepares students for key decision-making and management roles in government, non-profit organizations and business. The concentration emphasizes analytical approaches to decision making, practical management skills and empirical techniques necessary for graduates to excel in the public and private sectors. The multidisciplinary curriculum merges frontier knowledge on the ideals of decision making, policy and data analysis, as well as the realities of individual behavior within various institutional settings that must be confronted if high-quality outcomes are to be attained.

The Policy & Management concentration provides an excellent combination of theoretical and practical skills for students who intend to seek managerial positions. Because of its strong analytic orientation, it is also an excellent concentration for those who intend to go on to professional school programs in law, business or public policy. It is also an appropriate choice for students pursuing graduate degrees in economics, political science or decision science.

Policy Core (2 courses, 18 units)                                                                                                                                                                                                          

The Policy Core gives students applied economic training and policy analysis experience. Students will gain an analytical understanding of some of the biggest domestic and global economic policy challenges, and gain an appreciation of the economic analysis of complex decisions, as well as the trade-off between economic and political-based decision making.

73-102Principles of Microeconomics9
88-221Analytical Foundations of Public Policy9
Management Core (3 courses, 30 units)                                                                                                                                                                                                         

The Management Core focuses on real-world applications of decision making. Students will develop an understanding of effective negotiation strategies and tactics, and identify the barriers and the psychological factors that may prevent decision-makers from reaching wise agreements. The courses provide systematic methods for dealing with the complexities that make decisions difficult, ranging from incorporating issues of risk and uncertainty in decision making to dealing with choices that have mutually conflicting objectives. For example, a business or government agency may need to decide on a policy for mitigating the uncertain impacts of air pollution while simultaneously trying to minimize the costs of such a policy on manufacturing. A firm might want to consider the uncertain reductions in security dangers from alternative policies to protect against terrorism.

88-150Managing Decisions9
or 88-255 Strategic Decision Making
88-223Decision Analysis12
88-418Negotiation: Strategies and Behavioral Insights9
or 88-419 International Negotiation
Empirical Core (3 courses, 27 units)                                                                                                                                                                                                        

The Empirical Core focuses on key methods for collecting and analyzing data that are needed to make informed decisions. Students learn to use interviews, surveys, experiments and econometric methods to enhance their ability to test existing, and design new policies. Students will create statistical models to address questions asked in conceptual, computational and data-driven investigations.

36-202Methods for Statistics & Data Science9
88-251Empirical Research Methods9
88-252Causal Inference in the Field9
or 88-275 Bubbles: Data Science for Human Minds
Senior Project (1 course, 12 units)                                                                                                                                                                                                       

The required Senior Project course gives students hands-on experience in a policy-related area. Students work in teams to apply the research and analytical methods learned in their other courses to a real-world problem.

88-451/452Policy Analysis Senior Project12
Politics & Public Policy Concentration

(81 units minimum)

Rooted in the discipline of political science, the concentration in Politics and Public Policy investigates US public policy issues and other matters of domestic politics while providing students hands-on and practical learning experiences. Students pursuing the Politics and Public Policy concentration must participate in the Carnegie Mellon University Washington Semester Program (CMU/WSP) for one semester during their undergraduate experience.

The CMU/WSP, sponsored by the university's Institute for Politics and Strategy (IPS), is a semester-long program in which students live, intern, and take CMU classes in Washington, DC. Undergraduates from any course of study at the university may participate in the program. Students earn 48 units for the Carnegie Mellon University Washington Semester Program, interning about twenty-four hours per week in any sector or field of interest within Washington, DC, while taking classes taught by Carnegie Mellon faculty.

From embassies to nongovernmental organizations, think tanks to advocacy organizations, government agencies to congressional offices, and consulting firms to media outlets, Washington, DC, is the center for many political, international relations, and public policy activities. Students in the program come into direct contact with political, business, and community leaders and learn about the most pressing policy issues of the day.

Through this experiential learning program, CMU/WSP participants develop professional and networking skills, explore how coursework connects to the real world, learn to give and receive constructive feedback in the workplace and classroom, and intentionally reflect on their learning and growth. Every CMU/WSP student is paired with a Washington, DC- based alumni mentor to share career advice and tips about life in DC. IPS also sponsors events and policy-oriented opportunities in Washington for students participating in the program to further enrich their experience and enhance their understanding of how Washington functions as a hub of international and policy decision making.

Foundation Courses (2 courses, 18 units)                                                                                                                                                                                                          

Students must complete the following course:

84-104Decision Processes in American Political Institutions9

Students must complete one of the following courses:

84-275Comparative Politics9
or 84-326 Theories of International Relations
Economics Course (1 course, 9 units)

Students must complete one of the following courses:

84-110Foundations of Political Economy9
or 73-102 Principles of Microeconomics
or 73-103 Principles of Macroeconomics
CMU/WSP Core Seminars (3 courses, 24 units)

Students must take the following courses while participating in the CMU/WSP:

84-360CMU/WSP: Internship Seminar12
84-450Policy Seminar6
84-451Policy Seminar II6
CMU/WSP Elective Seminars (3 course, 24 units minimum)

Students must take 24 units from the below list of elective seminars offered in the CMU/WSP. Offerings vary by semester:

84-330The Shading of Democracy: The Influence of Race on American Politics6
84-331Money, Media, and the Power of Data in Decisionmaking6
84-332Effects of US Policy on Businesses: Perspectives of Asian Americans6
84-333Power and Levers for Change in Washington, DC12
84-334The History and Practice of Economic Statecraft6
84-335Intelligence and Policy6
84-336Implementing Public Policy: From Good Idea To Reality12
84-337Biomedical Science Research, Policy, and Governance6
84-338Political News Coverage in the Era of Trump, Twitter, and "Fake News"6
84-339Seminar in Public Policy Research12
84-340Making Change: How Organized Interests Work in Washington12
84-343Language and Power: How to Understand and Use Political Speech6
84-346Legal Issues in Public Administration6
84-348Advocacy, Policy and Practice6
American Politics Elective (1 course, 6 units minimum)

Students must take one course from the below list of electives taught in Pittsburgh.

84-304In the News: Analysis of Current Events6
84-325Contemporary American Foreign Policy9
84-352Representation and Voting Rights9
84-366The American Presidency9
84-380US Grand Strategy9
84-393Legislative Decision Making: US Congress9
84-402Judicial Politics and Behavior9
84-421Advanced Topics in American Politics9
Professional Writing Concentration

(81 units minimum)

Professional Writing combines liberal and professional education with a strong foundation in rhetorical studies. The concentration in Professional Writing has a strong career orientation and is specifically designed to prepare students for successful careers as writers and communications specialists in a range of fields: publishing, government, journalism, the non-profit sector, education, public and media relations, corporate communications, advocacy writing and the arts. The concentration is designed to develop articulate and reflective communications professionals with both the skills needed to enter and negotiate current work contexts (including writing for the web and other digital media) and the analytic and problem-solving skills needed to understand and keep pace with cultural and technological change.

Prerequisite English Elective                                                                                                                                                                                                          

Students with a concentration in Professional Writing must complete one perquisite course from the English Department’s offerings, which focuses on the relationships between texts and their cultural and historical contexts. The course must be at or above the 200 level. 76-270 Writing for the Professions, and 76-271 Introduction to Professional and Technical Writing may not count as English electives. Appropriate courses are advertised every semester in the English department’s “What Counts for What” publication.

Foundation Courses (5 courses, 39 units)
76-26xIntroduction to Writing (Nonfiction, Fiction, Poetry or Screenwriting)9
76-271Introduction to Professional and Technical Writing9
76-300Professional Seminar3
76-373Argument9
76-390Style9
Rhetoric/Language Studies Course (1 course, 9 units)

Students with a concentration in Professional Writing complete one course from designated Rhetoric courses offered and advertised each semester by the English Department. Rhetoric courses focus on understanding the role of language and language practices in both personal and professional contexts. Courses emphasize the relationships between texts and their contexts and pay particular attention to textual features, meaning, processes of reading and writing, and the ways in which language practices vary over time and across situations and cultures. The courses also equip students with explicit techniques for analyzing, understanding and exploring language practices. The Rhetoric/Language Studies courses may also be taken as part of the concentration requirements for three additional, Advanced Writing/Rhetoric courses and include but are not limited to the following list.

76-319Environmental Rhetoric9
76-325Intertextuality9
76-351Rhetorical Invention9
76-359User Experience Methods for Documents9
76-360Literary Journalism Workshop9
76-384Race, Nation, and the Enemy9
76-388Coding for Humanists9
76-389Rhetorical Grammar9
76-395Science Writing9
76-396Non-Profit Message Creation9
76-415Mediated Power and Propaganda9
76-474Software Documentation9
76-476Rhetoric of Science9
76-494Healthcare Communications9
Advanced Writing/Rhetoric Courses (3 courses, 27 units minimum)

Students with a concentration in Professional Writing complete three Advanced Writing/Rhetoric courses at the 300- or 400-level at a minimum of 27 units, as some courses are only six units, while others are variable units. Options for these courses include all of the Rhetoric/Language Studies courses listed above plus the writing-focused courses listed below. Additional courses that fulfill these requirements are advertised on a semester-by-semester basis. For help in choosing which of the possible options are most appropriate for various professional goals – journalism, writing for new media, editing and publishing, public relations/corporate communications, or science and technical writing – consult your English Department advisor. All students with a concentration in PW, regardless of their career focus, are encouraged to take 76-391 Document & Information Design and 76-487 Web Design to extend their skills in writing for print to include information design for digital media. Both courses focus on the role of the writer in these specializations and provide lab instruction in the relevant software and related computer skills.

Courses include but are not limited to:

76-301InternshipVar.
76-302Communication Support Tutoring Practicum6
76-314Data Stories9
76-319Environmental Rhetoric9
76-351Rhetorical Invention9
76-354Watchdog Journalism9
76-359User Experience Methods for Documents9
76-360Literary Journalism Workshop9
76-372News Writing9
76-378Literacy: Educational Theory and Community Practice9
76-380Methods in Humanities Analytics9
76-388Coding for Humanists9
76-389Rhetorical Grammar9
76-391Document & Information Design9
76-395Science Writing9
76-396Non-Profit Message Creation9
76-415Mediated Power and Propaganda9
76-418Rhetoric and the Body9
76-420The Cognition of Reading and Writing: Introduction to a Social/Cognitive Process9
76-425Rhetoric, Science, and the Public Sphere9
76-457Rhetorical Invention9
76-464Creative Nonfiction Workshop9
76-474Software Documentation9
76-475Law, Performance, and Identity9
76-476Rhetoric of Science9
76-481Introduction to Multimedia Design12
76-484Discourse Analysis9
76-485The New Public Sphere9
76-487Web Design12
76-492Rhetoric of Public Policy9
76-494Healthcare Communications9
76-496Research Methods in Rhetoric & Writing Studies
(instructor permission required)
9
English Elective (1 course, 6 units minimum)

Students with a concentration in Professional Writing complete one additional course from the English Department’s offerings. This course should be one that focuses on the relationships between texts and their cultural and historical contexts. Courses in literature, cultural studies, rhetoric and media studies that meet this requirement are advertised on a semester-by-semester basis. The English Elective may be any course offered by the Department with the exception of 76-270 Writing for the Professions, which is designed for non-majors and overlap with 76-271 Introduction to Professional and Technical Writing.

Psychology Concentration

(81 units minimum)

Psychology is a science that embraces both biological and social sciences. It is a science concerned with establishing principles and laws regarding the ways in which people think, feel, and behave through the scientific study of human behavior. Students with a concentration in Psychology are expected not only to learn about findings already established by psychologists, but also to become proficient in the investigation and analysis of behavior. This includes observing behavior, formulating hypotheses, designing experiments to test these hypotheses, running experiments, performing statistical analyses and writing reports.

Breadth Courses (4 courses, 36 units)

To gain familiarity with the breadth of the field of Psychology, students take 85-102 Introduction to Psychology and three survey courses.

Required Intro Course:
85-102Introduction to Psychology9
Survey Courses:
85-104Psychopathology9
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-213 Human Information Processing and Artificial Intelligence
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-221Principles of Child Development9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-251Personality9
Research Methods and Statistics (2 courses, 18 units)

Students complete one course in Research Methods (9 units). The corresponding survey course is a prerequisite for this course.

85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
85-314Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods9
85-320Research Methods in Developmental Psychology9
85-330Analytic Research Methods9
85-340Research Methods in Social Psychology9

The following Statistics course is a prerequisite for all the Research Methods courses. This Statistics course counts toward the Psychology concentration.

36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral & Social Sciences -Fall9
or 85-309 Statistical Concepts and Methods for Behavioral and Social Science
Advanced Courses (3 courses, 27 units)

Complete any three advanced courses or seminars in Psychology numbered higher than 85-349. (excepting 85-480, 85-482, 85-484, 85-506, 85-507, 85-508).

Russian Studies Concentration

(81 units minimum)

A BHA concentration in Russian Studies promotes not just language proficiency but also an understanding of Russian culture. Students who arrive at Carnegie Mellon with previous language study and/or who have high Advanced Placement, an International Baccalaureate, a Cambridge GCE Advanced level or internal placement exam scores will be able to begin taking courses in the concentration earlier in their undergraduate program. In all cases, progress in the concentration will be accelerated by study abroad, which is recommended for all students.

Prerequisites

Intermediate level proficiency in Russian. This is equivalent to the completion of three courses (two at the 100-level and one at the 200-level) or exemption based on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, Cambridge GCE Advanced level or Carnegie Mellon internal placement test scores.

Core Courses in Russian Studies (3 courses, 33 units)
82-292Intermediate Russian II12
82-29419th Century Russian Masterpieces
(12 units)
Var.
or 82-295 20th Century Russian Masterpieces
79-265Russian History: Game of Thrones9
or 79-266 Russian History and Revolutionary Socialism
Core Courses in Modern Languages (1 course, 9 units)

Complete one course.

82-280Billingual & Bicultural Experiences in the US9
82-282Interpreting Global Texts & Cultures9
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-284Multicultural Pittsburgh: VR Storytelling9
82-285Podcasting: Language and Culture Through Storytelling9
82-286Cultural Complexities9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Topics in Second Language Acquisition9
82-480Translation Technologies9

Note:  In consultation with the concentration advisor, students may substitute a Modern Languages course elective with one related to language analysis, language learning, or acquisition of language and culture from the listings in Russian Studies or from another department. Examples: 80-180 Nature of Language, 85-421 Language and Thought. In addition, students may choose to take 82-580 Senior Seminar in Modern Languages (3 units). The selected course may not double count in the Electives category.

Russian Studies and Interdisciplinary Electives (5 courses, 39 units minimum)

Complete two courses from Russian Studies Electives or one course from Russian Studies Electives and one course from Interdisciplinary Electives in consultation with the concentration advisor.

Russian Studies Electives:
82-293Russian Cinema: From the Bolshevik Revolution to Putin's RussiaVar.
82-391Advanced Russian I - Berlin, Paris, New York, Harbin9
82-392Advanced Russian II: Great Short Works9
82-394Russian for Heritage Speakers: Babushka's Russia & Beyond9
82-397Radicals, Heretics, Hackers: Russian Outlaws in History, Literature, and FilmVar.
82-599Russian Studies Thesis9

* Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

Interdisciplinary Electives:

This list is compiled from possibilities such as but not limited to the following. Students should consult SIO and the concentration advisor for the most up to date interdisciplinary electives appropriate for the Russian Studies curriculum. Courses may be suggested to the concentration advisor for approval as a substitute. Note that not all courses are offered each semester.

English
76-239Introduction to Film Studies9
History
79-20520th Century Europe9
79-267The Soviet Union in World War II: Military, Political, and Social History9
79-322Stalin and the Great Terror9
Institute for Politics and Strategy (Choose in consultation with the concentration advisor.)
84-380US Grand Strategy9
84-405The Future of Warfare9
Modern Languages
82-208Eastern Europe: Society and Culture9
82-280Billingual & Bicultural Experiences in the US9
82-282Interpreting Global Texts & Cultures9
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-284Multicultural Pittsburgh: VR Storytelling9
82-285Podcasting: Language and Culture Through Storytelling9
82-286Cultural Complexities9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Topics in Second Language Acquisition9
82-480Translation Technologies9
Philosophy
80-180Nature of Language9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
Psychology
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-421Language and Thought9

* Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

Social & Political History Concentration

(81 units minimum)

The BHA concentration in Social & Political History focuses on new ways to understand the past and new ways to use what we know, as well as on connections between past and present and on how historical knowledge facilitates understanding of social, cultural and policy change. The History concentration emphasizes empirical methods and conceptual analysis, as well as specific research skills relevant to many types of jobs and further professional training. The History concentration combines a structured sequence of courses, training in research methods, theoretical concepts, and analytical writing skills, plus a considerable array of electives.

The BHA concentration in Social & Political History emphasizes broad-based, cumulative knowledge and interpretive skills in the study of the past. Offerings at the 200- and 300-level are designed to allow maximum flexibility in meeting requirements and maximum choice in focusing on particular themes, places, or eras. Upper-level courses aim to give students majoring in History more time together in smaller classes and more experience working with primary and secondary sources. The senior capstone seminar, Historical Research Seminar, provides training and experience in conducting original research and in interpretive, analytical writing—skills that prepare graduates for professional careers as well as for graduate or law school.

Required History Courses (2 courses, 21 units)

Students must earn a final grade of “C” or better for these courses to count toward the concentration.

79-200Introduction to Historical Research & Writing -Sophomore or Junior year9
79-420Historical Research Seminar -Fall, Senior year12
Required Survey Courses (2 courses, 18 units)
79-202Flesh and Spirit: Early Modern Europe, 1400-17509
79-203The Other Europe: The Habsburgs, Communism, & Central/Eastern Europe, 1740-19909
79-204American Environmental History9
79-20520th Century Europe9
79-206Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Europe9
79-211Modern Southeast Asia: Colonialism, Capitalism, and Cultural Exchange9
79-212Jim Crow America9
79-223Mexico: From the Aztec Empire to the Drug War9
79-225West African History in Film9
79-226African History: Earliest Times to 17809
79-227Modern Africa: The Slave Trade to the End of Apartheid9
79-229The Origins of the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict, 1880-19489
79-230Arab-Israeli Conflict Since 19489
79-231American Civil Rights Movement: From Garveyism to Black Power9
79-233The United States and the Middle East since 19459
79-240Development of American Culture9
79-241African American History: Africa to the Civil War9
79-242African American History: Reconstruction to the Present9
79-244Women in American History9
79-245Capitalism and Individualism in American Culture9
79-248U.S. Constitution & the Presidency9
79-24920th Century U.S. History9
79-250Voting Rights: An Unexpected History9
79-260Nazi Germany9
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China: From the Birth of Mao ... to Now9
79-265Russian History: Game of Thrones9
79-266Russian History and Revolutionary Socialism9
79-269Russian History: From Socialism to Capitalism9
79-282Europe and the World Since 18009
79-288Bananas, Baseball, and Borders: Latin America and the United States9
79-291Innovation and Entertainment: A Business History of American Popular Culture9
79-299Introduction to the History of Science9
79-307Religion and Politics in the Middle East9
79-320Women, Politics, and Protest9
Social & Political History Elective Courses (5 courses, 42 units minimum)

A minimum of 42 additional History units must be approved with the History advisor. Any History courses not fulfilling another major requirement may be chosen as an elective. Any History (79-xxx) class can count as an SPH elective except for 79-198, 79-200, 79-400, 79-420, 79-449, 79-491). See the History Department website (www.cmu.edu/dietrich/history) or contact the History advisor for the most current elective offerings.

Students may satisfy the elective requirements in SPH with up to 27 units of the following courses offered by other departments in Dietrich College:

73-476American Economic History9
76-230Literature & Culture in the 19th Century9
76-239Introduction to Film Studies9
76-295Russian Cinema: From the Bolshevik Revolution to Putin's Russia9
76-449Race and Media9
80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-226Revolutions in Science9
80-335Social and Political Philosophy9
82-208Eastern Europe: Society and Culture9
82-245New Directions in Hispanic Studies9
82-247The Hispanic World: History, Culture and Globalization9
82-293Russian Cinema: From the Bolshevik Revolution to Putin's Russia9
82-327The Emergence of the German Speaking World9
82-420The Crucible of Modernity:Vienna 19009
82-427Nazi and Resistance Culture9
84-275Comparative Politics9
84-308Political Economy of Latin America9
84-322Nonviolent Conflict and Revolution9
84-324The Future of Democracy9
84-325Contemporary American Foreign Policy9
84-362Diplomacy and Statecraft9
84-364Comparative Presidential Behavior: Leadership, Personality, and Decision Making9
84-366The American Presidency9
84-380US Grand Strategy9
84-386The Privatization of Force9
84-389Terrorism and Insurgency9
85-380In Search of Mind: The History of Psychology9
88-281Topics in Law: 1st Amendment9
88-284Topics of Law: The Bill of Rights9
Statistics Concentration

(81 units minimum)

In the BHA concentration in Statistics, students develop and master a wide array of skills in computing, mathematics, statistical theory, and the interpretation and display of complex data. In addition, students with a BHA concentration in Statistics gain experience in applying statistical tools to real problems in other fields and learn the nuances of interdisciplinary collaboration.

Mathematics Prerequisites

These courses are not counted as part of your DC Concentration. They may be used to satisfy general education or free elective requirements.

21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-256Multivariate Analysis9
or 21-259 Calculus in Three Dimensions
21-240Matrix Algebra with Applications10
or 21-241 Matrices and Linear Transformations
or 21-242 Matrix Theory

Note: 21-240, 21-241, 21-242 must be completed before taking 36-401 Modern Regression. 21-241 and 21-242 are intended only for students with a very strong mathematical background.

Statistics Core (6 courses, 54 units)

36-202Methods for Statistics & Data Science9
or 36-290 Introduction to Statistical Research Methodology
36-235Probability and Statistical Inference I -(recommended)9
or 36-225 Introduction to Probability Theory
36-236Probability and Statistical Inference II -(recommended)9
or 36-226 Introduction to Statistical Inference
36-350Statistical Computing9
36-401Modern Regression9
36-402Advanced Methods for Data Analysis9
Special Topics and Electives (3 courses, 27 units)

Students must take a total of three courses from Special Topics (numbered 36-46x) and Statistics Electives listed below. Students will consult with the concentration advisor to select the Special Topics and Electives courses that best fit for their areas of interest.

36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
36-311Statistical Analysis of Networks9
36-313Statistics of Inequality and Discrimination9
36-315Statistical Graphics and Visualization9
36-318Introduction to Causal Inference9
36-46xSpecial Topics (topics and offerings vary)9
36-490Undergraduate Research9
36-493Sports Analytics Capstone9
36-497Corporate Capstone Project9
Statistics & Machine Learning Concentration

(81 units minimum)

In the BHA concentration in Statistics & Machine Learning, develop and master a wide array of skills in computing, mathematics, statistical theory, and the interpretation and display of complex data. In addition, students with a BHA concentration in Statistics & Machine Learning gain experience in applying statistical tools to real problems in other fields and learn the nuances of interdisciplinary collaboration. This program is geared towards students interested in statistical computation, data science or “Big Data” problems.

Mathematics and Computer Science Prerequisites

These five courses are not counted as part of your DC Concentration. They may be used to satisfy general education or free elective requirements.

21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-127Concepts of Mathematics12
21-256Multivariate Analysis9
or 21-259 Calculus in Three Dimensions
21-240Matrix Algebra with Applications10
or 21-241 Matrices and Linear Transformations
or 21-242 Matrix Theory
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12

Note: 21-24021-24121-242 must be completed before taking 36-401 Modern Regression21-241 and 21-242 are intended only for students with a very strong mathematical background.

Statistics Core (5 courses, 45 units)
36-235Probability and Statistical Inference I -(recommended)9
or 36-225 Introduction to Probability Theory
36-236Probability and Statistical Inference II -(recommended)9
or 36-226 Introduction to Statistical Inference
36-350Statistical Computing9
36-401Modern Regression9
36-402Advanced Methods for Data Analysis9
Data Analysis Electives (1 course, 9 units)

Students must take one course from the Statistics Electives listed below. Students will consult with the concentration advisor to select the Special Topics and Electives courses that best fit for their areas of interest.

36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
36-311Statistical Analysis of Networks9
36-313Statistics of Inequality and Discrimination9
36-315Statistical Graphics and Visualization9
36-46xSpecial Topics (topics and offerings vary)9
36-490Undergraduate Research9
36-493Sports Analytics Capstone9
36-497Corporate Capstone Project9
Machine Learning Core (2 courses, 22 units)
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation -(C or higher)10
10-301Introduction to Machine Learning (Undergrad)12
Machine Learning Elective (1 course, 9 units minimum)

Students must take one course from the ML Electives listed below. Students will consult with the Statistics & Machine Learning advisor to choose an elective that best fits their area of interest. This course may have additional pre-requisites. Keep in mind this is not an exhaustive list and other applicable courses can be reviewed to be approved as an ML elective – please speak with the concentration advisor about this.

05-434/11-344Machine Learning in Practice12
10-403/703Deep Reinforcement Learning & Control12
10-405/605Machine Learning with Large Datasets (Undergraduate)12
10-417Intermediate Deep Learning12
10-418Machine Learning for Structured Data12
10-707Advanced Deep Learning12
11-411Natural Language Processing12
11-441Machine Learning for Text and Graph-based Mining9
11-485Introduction to Deep Learning9
11-661/761Language and Statistics12
15-281Artificial Intelligence: Representation and Problem Solving12
15-386Neural Computation9
15-387Computational Perception9
16-311Introduction to Robotics12
16-385/720Computer Vision12
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing9
Technical Writing Concentration

(81 units minimum)

The concentration in Technical Writing is specifically designed to prepare students for successful careers involving scientific, technical, and computer-related communication, including writing and designing for digital media. Technical communicators develop and design web sites, explain science and technology to the public, develop print and multimedia materials, develop information management systems, design and deliver corporate training, and develop support systems for consumer products ranging from software for word processing or personal finances to complex data management systems. The Technical Writing concentration includes with a common core of foundation courses in print and on-line communication as well as a set of prerequisites in math, statistics and computer programming.

Students with a Technical Writing concentration take two Theory/Specialization courses specific to either the Technical Communication (TC) or the Scientific and Medical Communication (SMC) track. In addition, students in the SMC track take two courses in the natural sciences or engineering relevant to their areas of interest, while TC students take two electives in management, technology and social issues.

Prerequisite Courses
21-111Calculus I10
or 21-112 Calculus II
or 21-120 Differential and Integral Calculus
or 21-127 Concepts of Mathematics
15-110Principles of Computing
(recommended for SMC-track students)
10
or 15-112 Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science
(recommended for TC-track students)
Technical Writing Core Courses (6 courses, 54 units)
76-26xIntroduction to Writing (Nonfiction, Fiction, Poetry or Screenwriting)9
76-271Introduction to Professional and Technical Writing9
76-300Professional Seminar3
76-390Style9
76-391Document & Information Design9
76-487Web Design12
Theory/Specialization Courses (2 courses, 18 units minimum)

Complete two courses to deepen your area of specialty in Technical Communication or Scientific and Medical Communication. One course must be chosen from among courses designated as Recommended Options. Check with the English department each semester for additional options.

Recommended Options:
76-319Environmental Rhetoric9
76-359User Experience Methods for Documents9
76-395Science Writing9
76-397Instructional Text Design9
76-425Rhetoric, Science, and the Public Sphere9
76-474Software Documentation9
76-476Rhetoric of Science9
76-481Introduction to Multimedia Design12
76-491Rhetorical Analysis9
76-494Healthcare Communications9
Additional Options include but are not limited to the following:
76-301InternshipVar.
76-302Communication Support Tutoring Practicum6
76-318Communicating in the Global Marketplace9
76-319Environmental Rhetoric9
76-325Intertextuality9
76-351Rhetorical Invention9
76-355Leadership, Dialogue, and Change9
76-359User Experience Methods for Documents9
76-360Literary Journalism Workshop9
76-372News Writing9
76-378Literacy: Educational Theory and Community Practice9
76-389Rhetorical Grammar9
76-391Document & Information Design9
76-395Science Writing9
76-396Non-Profit Message Creation9
76-420The Cognition of Reading and Writing: Introduction to a Social/Cognitive Process9
76-425Rhetoric, Science, and the Public Sphere9
76-474Software Documentation9
76-475Law, Performance, and Identity9
76-476Rhetoric of Science9
76-481Introduction to Multimedia Design12
76-484Discourse Analysis9
76-487Web Design12
39-605Engineering Design Projects12
Electives (1 course, 9 units)

Students with a Technical Writing concentration take one course outside of English to deepen their area of specialty in their track. Typically, students in the SMC track select courses in the natural sciences, computer science, math or statistics, or (for example) healthcare-related courses in the Heinz School. Students in the TC track typically select courses from business, design, psychology, and social and decision sciences, or HCI. Students should work with the concentration advisor to select courses that are meaningful for their track.


COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS CONCENTRATION 

(number of courses vary, 108-114 units minimum)

BHA students choose one of the following concentrations:

  • Architecture (108 units)
  • Art (114 units)
  • Design (108 units)
  • Drama (108 units)
  • Music (108 units)
Architecture Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Architecture Required Courses (7 courses, 52 units minimum)
48-100Architecture Design Studio: POIESIS STUDIO 1 -Fall, Freshman or Sophomore year10-15
or 48-095 Spatial Concepts for Non-Architecture Majors
62-122Digital Media I -Fall, Freshman year6
62-125Drawing I -Fall, Freshman year6
62-123Digital Media II -Spring, Freshman year6
62-126Drawing II -Spring, Freshman year6
48-240History of World Architecture, I -Spring, Freshman year9
48-241Modern Architecture -Fall, Sophomore year9
Architecture Electives (56 units minimum)

A minimum of 56 additional Architecture units must be approved by the Architecture advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Art Concentration

(114 units minimum)

First-Year Seminar (1 course, 6 units)
60-104Foundations: Art First-Year Seminar6
Foundation Studios (3 courses, 30 units)

Complete three courses:

60-110Foundations: Time-Based Media10
60-120Foundations: Digital Media10
60-131Foundations: Sculpture10
60-135Foundations: Expanded Media Sculpture10
60-150Foundations: Drawing10
60-170Foundations: Paint/Print10
Intermediate Studios (3 courses, 30 units)

Complete three courses:

60-2xxIntermediate Studio Elective10
60-2xxIntermediate Studio Elective10
60-2xxIntermediate Studio Elective10
Advanced Studios (3 courses, 30 units)

Students may take courses in any media area (ETB, SIS, CP or DP3). They may take all courses in one media area if a focus is desired. With approval from the Art advisor, BXA students can take an additional intermediate studio in lieu of an advanced studio to increase breadth.

Complete three courses:

60-401/402Senior Studio10
60-403Senior Critique Seminar10
Advanced Electronic and Time-Based Work (ETB) (course numbers 60-410 through 60-429) *10
Advanced Sculpture, Installation and Site-Work (SIS) (course numbers 60-430 through 60-447) *10
Advanced Contextual Practice (CP) (course numbers 60-448 through 60-449) *10
Advanced Drawing, Painting, Print Media and Photography (DP3) (course numbers 60-450 through 60-498) *10
60-499Studio Independent Study
(one only)
10

* Courses offered intermittently; speak with a BXA advisor to determine course availability.

Critical Studies (2 courses, 18 units)
60-105Cultural History of the Visual Arts -Spring9
60-3xxCritical Studies Elective9
Review Requirement (2 required reviews, 0 units)

A review is required at the end of the sophomore and senior years. Pass/no pass only.

60-200Sophomore Review -Spring0
60-400Senior Review -Spring0
Design Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Design Required Courses (16 courses, 98 units)
51-101Studio: Survey of Design -Fall, First-year10
51-121Visualizing -Fall, First-year10
51-175Design Studies: Place -Fall, First-year (mini-1)5
51-177Design Studies: Histories -Fall, First-year (mini-2)5
51-102Design Lab -Spring, First-year10
51-122Collaborative Visualizing -Spring, First-year10
51-176Design Studies: Futures -Spring, First-year (mini-3)5
51-178Design Studies: Experience -Spring, First-year (mini-4)5
51-277Design Studies: Systems -Fall, Sophomore year (mini-1)5
51-279Design Studies: Cultures -Fall, Sophomore year (mini-2)5
51-282Design Studies: Persuasion -Spring, Sophomore year (mini-3)5
51-284Design Studies: Power -Spring, Sophomore year (mini-4)5
Choose Two Studios -Fall, Sophomore year:4.5+4.5
51-225Communications Studio I: Understanding Form & Context4.5
or 51-245 Products Studio I: Understanding Form & Context
or 51-265 Environments Studio I: Understanding Form & Context
Choose Two Corresponding Labs -Fall, Sophomore year:4.5+4.5
51-227Prototyping Lab I: Communications4.5
or 51-247 Prototyping Lab I: Products
or 51-267 Prototyping Lab I: Environments
Design Electives (10 units)

A minimum of 10 additional Design units must be approved by the Design advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Drama Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Options available in the following areas: 1) Design, 2) Directing, 3) Dramaturgy, 4) Production Technology and Management

Required Courses for All Concentration Options (5 courses, 20 units)
54-175-54-176Conservatory Hour-Conservatory Hour
(1 unit each)
2
54-177Foundations of Drama I6
54-281Foundations of Drama II
(prerequisite: 54-177)
6
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism6
54-362Anti-Racist & Equitable Practices in Theater
(optional)
6

Work with Drama Faculty Option Coordinator to Approve Concentration Option (88 units minimum).

Design Required Courses (2 courses, 26 units)
54-151-54-152Stagecraft-Stagecraft
(13 units + 13 units)
26

A minimum of 62 additional Design units must be approved by the Design faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Directing Required Courses (10 courses, 64 units)
54-121-54-122Directing I: A Director's Mindset - Directing I: A Director's Preparation18
54-221-54-222Directing II: In the Studio - Directing II: In The Room18
54-159-54-159Production Practicum-Production Practicum
(two times)
12
54-517Director's Colloquium
(four times)
16

A minimum of 24 additional Directing units must be approved by the Directing faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Dramaturgy Required Courses (9 courses, 53 units minimum)
54-109Dramaturgy 1: Approaches to Text9
54-184Dramaturgy 2: Introduction to Production Dramaturgy9
54-121Directing I: A Director's Mindset9
54-159-54-159Production Practicum-Production Practicum
(two times)
12
54-200-54-200Dramaturgy Forum-Dramaturgy Forum -Fall (minimum of two; every semester it is offered while enrolled)2
54-xxxDramaturgy 3, 4, 5 or 6 (minimum of two; all four if enrolled as BXA for six semesters or more)18

A minimum of 29 additional Dramaturgy units must be approved by the Dramaturgy faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Production Technology and Management Required Courses (2 courses, 26 units)
54-151-54-152Stagecraft-Stagecraft
(13 units + 13 units)
26

A minimum of 62 additional PTM units must be approved by the PTM faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Music Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Options available in the following areas: 1) Audio Recording & Production, 2) Composition, 2) Music Performance (instrumental, organ, piano, voice), 4) Sound Theory & Practice

Required Course for All Concentration Options (1 course, 9 units)
57-152Harmony I9
or 57-149 Basic Harmony I

Work with Music Advisor to Approve Concentration Option (99 units minimum).

Audio Recording & Production Required Courses (7 courses, 40 units)
57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
or 57-171 Introduction to Music Technology (self-paced)
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
57-337Sound Recording6
57-338Sound Editing and Mastering6
57-438Multitrack Recording9

Choose 59 units from:

57-153Harmony II9
or 57-150 Basic Harmony II
57-182Solfege II3
or 57-186 Advanced Solfege II
15-104Introduction to Computing for Creative Practice10
15-322Introduction to Computer Music9
18-090Twisted Signals: Multimedia Processing for the Arts10
33-114Physics of Musical Sound9
54-166Introduction to Sound Design for Theatre6
54-275History of Sound Design3
54-666Production Audio6
57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-344Experimental Sound Synthesis9
57-358Introduction to Electronic Music
(with instructor permission as space allows)
9
57-421Exploded Ensemble6
57-427Advanced Seminar in Film Musicology9
57-478Survey of Historical Recording6
57-622Independent Study in Sound Recording Production3
60-131Foundations: Sculpture10
60-210Electronic Media Studio: Introduction to Interactivity10

Note: Students completing an IDeATe minor may double-count up to two of the IDeATe minor courses towards the Audio Recording & Production concentration.

Composition Required Courses (12 courses, 76 units)
57-161Eurhythmics I
(recommended co-requisite: 57-181)
3
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
57-49xBXA Studio (4 semesters) 36
57-xxxMajor Ensemble (4 semesters) 24

A minimum of 23 additional Music units must be approved by the Music advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Music Performance Required Courses (12 courses, 76 units)
57-161Eurhythmics I
(recommended co-requisite: 57-181)
3
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
57-49xBXA Studio (4 semesters) 36
57-xxxMajor Ensemble (4 semesters) 24

A minimum of 23 additional Music units must be approved by the Music advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Sound Theory & Practice Required Courses (7 courses, 47 units)
57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
or 57-171 Introduction to Music Technology (self-paced)
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
18-090Twisted Signals: Multimedia Processing for the Arts10
57-911Music Since 19459
57-616Independent Study in Sound Studies9
Choose 52 units from:
57-153Harmony II9
or 57-150 Basic Harmony II
57-182Solfege II3
or 57-186 Advanced Solfege II
15-104Introduction to Computing for Creative Practice10
15-322Introduction to Computer Music
(prerequisite: 15-112)
9
33-114Physics of Musical Sound9
57-337Sound Recording6
57-343Music, Technology, and Culture9
57-344Experimental Sound Synthesis9
57-347Electronic and Computer Music
(prerequisite: 57-101 or 57-171)
6
57-358Introduction to Electronic Music
(with instructor permission as space allows)
9
57-421Exploded Ensemble6
57-438Multitrack Recording9
57-478Survey of Historical Recording6
60-131Foundations: Sculpture10
60-210Electronic Media Studio: Introduction to Interactivity10

Note: Students completing an IDeATe minor may double-count up to two of the IDeATe minor courses towards the Sound Theory & Practice concentration.


Free Electives

(approximately 8-9 courses, 72-78 units)

Take any Carnegie Mellon course. Many BHA students use their electives to broaden or deepen their concentrations. A maximum of 9 units of physical education and/or military science may be counted toward this requirement.

Bachelor of Science and Arts Degree Program

The Bachelor of Science and Arts (BSA) intercollege degree program combines the strengths of the College of Fine Arts (CFA) and the Mellon College of Science (MCS). This degree is designed for students who are gifted in both the fine arts and the natural sciences or mathematics, and who have the interest and the exceptional ability to pursue both disciplines simultaneously. Students choose their arts concentration from the following schools in CFA: Architecture, Art, Design, Drama or Music. Students choose their science concentration from among the departments in MCS: Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Environmental & Sustainability Studies, Mathematical Sciences, Neurobiology or Physics.

The BSA curriculum has three main components: general core requirements, fine arts concentration requirements and natural sciences/mathematics concentration requirements. Each student's course of study is structured so they can complete this rigorous program in four years.

Students receive extensive advising support. The academic advisors in the BXA Intercollege Degree Programs are the primary advisors and liaisons between CFA and MCS. Each student has two additional academic advisors: an advisor in the admitting school of CFA to guide their focus in the arts and an advisor in MCS to guide their focus in the sciences.


BSA Curriculum

Units
I. BSA General Education129
II. MCS Concentration114-144
III. CFA Concentration108-114
IV. Free Electives0-29
Total BSA Degree Requirements380

BSA General Education

(18 courses, 129 units minimum)

  • Mathematics (2 courses, 20 units, 21-120 and 21-122 or 21-124 required)        

  • Science (3 courses, 31 units, 03-121, 09-105, and 33-121 or 33-151 required)

  • First-year Courses (2 courses, 12 units, 76-101 and 99-101 required)

  • ENGAGE (3 courses, 3 units)

  • Cultural/Global Understanding (1 course, 9 units)

  • Humanities and Social Sciences (2 courses, 18 units)

  • BXA Required Courses (5 courses, 36 units, 52-19052-291, 52-392, 52-401, 52-402)

Technical Breadth Requirements (5 courses, 51 units)

As a 21st Century practicing scientist or mathematician, our graduates will work with others from a variety of technical backgrounds. Therefore, all of our students will be broadly trained within the technical fields of science and math. Students will fulfill this training by completing five (5) introductory technical courses in the Mellon College of Science at Carnegie Mellon University.

A student must take the five (5) courses listed below. AP/IB/Cambridge credit may be used to fulfill some of these requirements, but STEM electives must be taken at CMU or at another university for transfer credit to reach the total of five (5) Technical Breadth courses. A list of STEM electives can be found in the MCS general education requirements.

Mathematics (2 courses, 20 units)
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration and Approximation10
or 21-124 Calculus II for Biologists and Chemists
Science (3 courses, 31 units)
03-121Modern Biology9
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
33-121Physics I for Science Students12
or 33-151 Matter and Interactions I
Nontechnical Breadth Requirements (8 courses, 42 units)

MCS aspires for all of our undergraduates to leave our campus with a strong sense of personal integrity, social responsibility, ethics, working with diverse others, global engagement, and personal health and well-being. The following non-technical breadth requirements will require students to develop a personalized plan for their course selection and meta-curricular participation to maximize their CMU experience. Our graduates will be well trained to be life-long and life-wide learners that will lead the scientific community and the world at large.

All candidates for BSA degree must complete the following non-technical breadth requirements:

First-year Courses (2 courses, 12 units)
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
or 76-102 Advanced First Year Writing: Special Topics
or 76-106
76-107
76-108
Writing about Literature, Art and Culture
and Writing about Data
and Writing about Public Problems
All undergraduate students must complete the First-Year Writing requirement—the Department of English does not accept any Advanced Placement exemptions. This requirement can be completed in two different ways. Enroll in one of two full-semester courses 101 or 102 (by invitation only), 9 units, or enroll in two of three half-semester mini courses (back-to-back within a single semester) 106/107/108, 4.5 + 4.5 units. Course options and topics: www.cmu.edu/hss/english/first_year/index.html
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
ENGAGE (3 courses, 3 units)

The ENGAGE courses are self-directed learning opportunities (using the MyCORE online platform) designed to enhance students’ engagement with wellness and community service. Choose three courses from the list below:

38-110ENGAGE in Service1
38-230ENGAGE in Wellness: Looking Inward1
38-330ENGAGE in Wellness: Looking Outward1
38-430ENGAGE in Wellness: Looking Forward1
Cultural/Global Understanding (1 course, 9 units)

Cultural or global understanding course(s) may be taken at any time. Nine (9) or more units from the following group of courses will fulfill this requirement. Any student who finds an appropriate Carnegie Mellon course not on the list below that might fulfill this requirement should contact their academic advisor to review the course description to determine if it can be substituted. Cultural and global understanding courses that are taken while studying abroad can be used to fulfill this category. In addition, transfer courses will also be considered for this category. However, this course requirement cannot be satisfied with AP/IB/Cambridge exam credit.

57-173Survey of Western Music History9
57-209The Beatles9
57-306World Music9
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
76-221Books You Should Have Read By Now9
76-232Introduction to Black Literature9
76-239Introduction to Film Studies9
76-241Introduction to Gender Studies9
76-386Language & Culture9
79-145Genocide and Weapons of Mass Destruction9
79-189History of Democracy: Thinking Beyond the Self9
79-201Introduction to Anthropology9
79-202Flesh and Spirit: Early Modern Europe, 1400-17509
79-20520th Century Europe9
79-208Witchcraft and Witch-Hunting9
79-211Modern Southeast Asia: Colonialism, Capitalism, and Cultural Exchange9
79-223Mexico: From the Aztec Empire to the Drug War9
79-227Modern Africa: The Slave Trade to the End of Apartheid9
79-229The Origins of the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict, 1880-19489
79-230Arab-Israeli Conflict Since 19489
79-232Arabian Peninsula Environmental History9
79-233The United States and the Middle East since 19459
79-234Technology and Society9
79-240Development of American Culture9
79-241African American History: Africa to the Civil War9
79-242African American History: Reconstruction to the Present9
79-244Women in American History9
79-245Capitalism and Individualism in American Culture9
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China: From the Birth of Mao ... to Now9
79-263Mao and the Chinese Cultural Revolution9
79-265Russian History: Game of Thrones9
79-266Russian History and Revolutionary Socialism9
79-267The Soviet Union in World War II: Military, Political, and Social History9
79-275Introduction to Global Studies9
79-280Coffee and Capitalism9
79-283Hungry World: Food and Famine in Global Perspective9
79-307Religion and Politics in the Middle East9
79-343Education, Democracy, and Civil Rights9
79-345Roots of Rock & Roll9
79-350Early Christianity9
79-377Food, Culture, and Power: A History of Eating9
80-100Introduction to Philosophy9
80-250Ancient Philosophy9
80-251Modern Philosophy9
80-253Continental Philosophy9
80-254Analytic Philosophy9
80-255Pragmatism9
80-276Philosophy of Religion9
82-xxxAny course from Modern Languages
84-380US Grand Strategy9
Humanities and Social Sciences (2 courses, 18 units)

To fulfill this requirement, students must complete a minimum of two (2) nontechnical courses totaling at least 18 units in the Tepper School of Business and/or the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences. Courses counted toward the Cultural/Global Understanding requirement, and 76-101, do not count toward this requirement.

Check our web site for courses from DC, CFA, and Tepper that may NOT be used to satisfy this requirement because they are too technical in nature, plus a list of courses in other colleges (including SCS, CIT, Tepper, and Heinz College) that do satisfy this requirement.

BXA Required Courses (5 courses, 36 units)

BXA-specific courses give students the opportunity to integrate their areas of concentration by focusing on interdisciplinary approaches and arts-based research techniques.

52-190BXA Seminar I: Building the Wunderkammer -Spring, Freshman (mini-4)4.5
52-291BXA Seminar II: Transferring Knowledge -Spring, Sophomore (mini-3)4.5
52-392BXA Seminar III: Deconstructing Disciplines9
52-401BXA Seminar IV: Capstone Project Research9
52-402BXA Seminar V: Capstone Project Production9

Mellon College of Science Concentration

(number of courses vary, 114-144 units)

BSA students declare one of the following concentrations, through consultation with their BXA advisor and the MCS concentration advisors. A completed MCS Concentration Declaration form must be approved by the concentration advisor and submitted to the BXA office, by spring mid-semester break of the student's first year.
Note: The BSA Physics concentration requires additional coursework totaling the degree requirements beyond 380 units.

  • Biological Sciences (114 units)

  • Chemistry (121 units)

  • Environmental & Sustainability Studies (123 units)

  • Mathematical Sciences (125 units)

  • Neurobiology (114 units)

  • Physics (144 units)

BSA students who are admitted as freshmen are undeclared until they have met with a concentration advisor and have submitted their signed Declaration form. BSA students who are admitted through internal transfer must have chosen an MCS concentration at the time of their application (which serves as declaration). All BSA students wishing to change their MCS concentration at any time following the initial declaration must meet with the advisor of their intended concentration area to complete a new Declaration form, which will be reviewed during the internal transfer application period.

Biological Sciences Concentration

(114 units minimum)

Biological Sciences Required Courses (11 courses, 96 units minimum)
03-201Undergraduate Colloquium for Sophomores2
03-220Genetics - Fall, Sophomore year9
03-231Honors Biochemistry - Spring, Sophomore year9
03-320Cell Biology - Fall, Junior year9
03-343Experimental Techniques in Molecular Biology - Fall, Junior year12
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
09-207Techniques in Quantitative Analysis9
09-208Techniques for Organic Synthesis and Analysis9
or 03-344 Experimental Biochemistry
or 03-345 Experimental Cell and Developmental Biology
or 03-346 Experimental Neuroscience
09-217Organic Chemistry I9
09-218Organic Chemistry II9
33-122Physics II for Biological Sciences & Chemistry Students9
Biological Sciences Electives (2 courses, 18 units)

One course must be an advanced elective selected from 03-3xx or higher, excluding 03-445 and 03-545.

Chemistry Concentration

(121 units minimum)

Chemistry Required Courses (14 courses, 103 units)
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
09-219Modern Organic Chemistry10
09-220Modern Organic Chemistry II10
09-331Modern Analytical Instrumentation9
09-348Inorganic Chemistry10
09-221Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis12
09-222Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis12
09-321Laboratory III: Molecular Design and Synthesis12
or 09-323 Bioorganic Chemistry Laboratory
09-204Professional Communication Skills in Chemistry3
09-201-09-202-09-301Undergraduate Seminar I - Undergraduate Seminar II: Safety and Environmental Issues for Chemists - Undergraduate Seminar III3
09-402Undergraduate Seminar VI3
33-122Physics II for Biological Sciences & Chemistry Students9

Note: Students who have a strong chemistry background, should enroll in 09-107 rather than 09-105. Students who complete 09-107 with an "A" grade will be exempted from the requirement to take 09-106 Modern Chemistry II.

Advanced Chemistry Electives (2 courses, 18 units)

May be any upper level chemistry course, 09-3xx or higher, or Biochemistry I, 03-231 or 03-232, with the exception of 09-435 Independent Study, which can be used only by permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. 

Environmental & Sustainability Studies Concentration

(123 units minimum)

Additional Required Courses (2 courses, 18 units minimum)
09-217Organic Chemistry I9
33-122Physics II for Biological Sciences & Chemistry Students9
or 33-142 Physics II for Engineering and Physics Students
Core Courses (4 courses, 30 units)
24/09-291Environmental Systems on a Changing Planet9
24/09-381Environmental Systems on a Changing Planet: Science & Engineering Addendum
(co-req: 24-291/09-291)
3
79-336Introduction to Environmental Ideas9
66-506Senior Capstone
(Interdisciplinary Research: Capstone in ESS)
9
Earth and Environmental Science (1 course, 9 units)

Choose one course from the list below.

03-140Ecology and Environmental Science9
09-225Climate Change: Chemistry, Physics and Planetary Science *9
09-510Chemistry and Sustainability *9
09-524Environmental Chemistry *9
09-529Introduction to Sustainable Energy Science *9
33-226Physics of Energy *9

* Prerequisites from the BSA general education curriculum

Global Course (1 course, 3 units)
99-xxxEach semester, a new course is offered on Global themes, in partnership with University of Pittsburgh’s Global Studies Center.3

Statistics and Data Science (1 course, 9 units)

36-xxxAny Statistics Course9
Political Economy (1 course, 9 units minimum)

Choose one course from the list below.

19-101Introduction to Engineering and Public Policy12
79-300History of American Public Policy9
84-110Foundations of Political Economy9
84-313International Organizations and Law9
84-325Contemporary American Foreign Policy9
88-344Systems Analysis: Environmental Policy9
Electives (5 courses, 45 units minimum)

Choose three MCS Electives and two DC Electives in consultation with the concentration advisor.

MCS Electives:
03-140Ecology and Environmental Science9
09-225Climate Change: Chemistry, Physics and Planetary Science9
09-510Chemistry and Sustainability9
09-524Environmental Chemistry *9
09-529Introduction to Sustainable Energy Science9
12-100Exploring CEE: Infrastructure and Environment in a Changing World12
12-201Geology9
19-101Introduction to Engineering and Public Policy12
19-425Sustainable Energy for the Developing World9
24-292Renewable Energy Engineering9
27-505Exploration of Everyday Materials9
33-226Physics of Energy9
DC Electives:
76-241Introduction to Gender Studies9
76-291Getting Heard/Making a Difference9
76-354Watchdog Journalism9
76-395Science Writing *9
76-450Law, Culture, and the Humanities9
79-201Introduction to Anthropology9
79-275Introduction to Global Studies9
79-278How (Not) to Change the World9
79-288Bananas, Baseball, and Borders: Latin America and the United States9
79-297Technology and Work9
79-331Body Politics: Women and Health in America9
79-372The Rise and Fall of Pittsburgh Steel6
79-377Food, Culture, and Power: A History of Eating9
79-379Extreme Ethnography9
79-383The History of Capitalism9
79-386A Tale of Two Epidemics: Influenza 1918 and Covid 199
80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
84-110Foundations of Political Economy9
84-275Comparative Politics9
84-325Contemporary American Foreign Policy9
85-241Social Psychology9

* Additional prerequisites

Mathematical Sciences Concentration

(125 units minimum)

Mathematical Sciences Required Courses (9 courses, 89 units minimum)

(Reasonable substitutions within the core program will be allowed.)

15-110Principles of Computing10
21-127Concepts of Mathematics12
or 21-128 Mathematical Concepts and Proofs
21-228Discrete Mathematics9
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
or 21-242 Matrix Theory
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
or 21-268 Multidimensional Calculus
21-260Differential Equations9
or 21-261 Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations
or 33-231 Physical Analysis
21-355Principles of Real Analysis I9
21-373Algebraic Structures9
33-142Physics II for Engineering and Physics Students12
or 33-152 Matter and Interactions II
Mathematical Sciences Electives (2 courses, 18 units)

Students with a Music concentration should take 21-469 Computational Introduction to Partial Differential Equations.

Mathematical Sciences, Statistics, or Computer Science Electives (2 courses, 18 units)

May be computer science course above the 100-level, mathematical science courses beyond the calculus sequence, and statistics courses at the level of 36-225 or higher. 

Neurobiology Concentration

(114 units minimum)

Neurobiology Required Courses (12 courses, 96 units)
03-161Molecules to Mind9
or 85-219 Biological Foundations of Behavior
03-201Undergraduate Colloquium for Sophomores2
03-220Genetics - Fall, Sophomore year9
03-231Honors Biochemistry - Spring, Sophomore year9
03-320Cell Biology - Fall, Junior year9
03-342Introduction to Biological Laboratory Practices - Fall, Junior year1
03-343Experimental Techniques in Molecular Biology - Fall, Junior year12
03-362Cellular Neuroscience9
03-363Systems Neuroscience9
09-217Organic Chemistry I9
33-122Physics II for Biological Sciences & Chemistry Students9
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
Neurobiology Electives (2 courses, 18 units)

One course must be an advanced elective selected from 03-3xx or higher.

Physics Concentration (135 units minimum)
Physics Required Courses (16 courses, 126 units)
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
33-104Experimental Physics9
33-142Physics II for Engineering and Physics Students12
or 33-152 Matter and Interactions II
33-201Physics Sophomore Colloquium I -Fall2
33-202Physics Sophomore Colloquium II -Spring2
33-211Physics III: Modern Essentials10
33-228Electronics I10
33-231Physical Analysis10
33-232Mathematical Methods of Physics10
33-234Quantum Physics10
33-301Physics Upperclass Colloquium I -Fall1
33-302Physics Upperclass Colloquium II -Spring1
33-331Physical Mechanics I10
33-338Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism I10
33-340Modern Physics Laboratory10
33-341Thermal Physics I10
Qualifying Physics Electives (2 courses, 18 units)

Two 33-xxx qualifying physics elective courses pre-approved by the Physics Department. 33-114 Physics of Musical Sound is highly recommended for students with a Music concentration.


COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS CONCENTRATION 

(number of courses vary, 108-114 units minimum)

BSA students choose one of the following concentrations:

  • Architecture (108 units)
  • Art (114 units)
  • Design (108 units)
  • Drama (108 units)
  • Music (108 units)
Architecture Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Architecture Required Courses (7 courses, 52 units minimum)
48-100Architecture Design Studio: POIESIS STUDIO 1 -Fall, Freshman or Sophomore year10-15
or 48-095 Spatial Concepts for Non-Architecture Majors
62-122Digital Media I -Fall, Freshman year6
62-125Drawing I -Fall, Freshman year6
62-123Digital Media II -Spring, Freshman year6
62-126Drawing II -Spring, Freshman year6
48-240History of World Architecture, I -Spring, Freshman year9
48-241Modern Architecture -Fall, Sophomore year9
Architecture Electives (56 units minimum)

A minimum of 56 additional Architecture units must be approved by the Architecture advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Art Concentration

(114 units minimum)

First-Year Seminar (1 course, 6 units)
60-104Foundations: Art First-Year Seminar6
Foundation Studios (3 courses, 30 units)

Complete three courses:

60-110Foundations: Time-Based Media10
60-120Foundations: Digital Media10
60-131Foundations: Sculpture10
60-135Foundations: Expanded Media Sculpture10
60-150Foundations: Drawing10
60-170Foundations: Paint/Print10
Intermediate Studios (3 courses, 30 units)

Complete three courses:

60-2xxIntermediate Studio Elective10
60-2xxIntermediate Studio Elective10
60-2xxIntermediate Studio Elective10
Advanced Studios (3 courses, 30 units)

Students may take courses in any media area (ETB, SIS, CP or DP3). They may take all courses in one media area if a focus is desired. With approval from the Art advisor, BXA students can take an additional intermediate studio in lieu of an advanced studio to increase breadth.

Complete three courses:

60-401/402Senior Studio10
60-403Senior Critique Seminar10
Advanced Electronic and Time-Based Work (ETB) (course numbers 60-410 through 60-429) *10
Advanced Sculpture, Installation and Site-Work (SIS) (course numbers 60-430 through 60-447) *10
Advanced Contextual Practice (CP) (course numbers 60-448 through 60-449) *10
Advanced Drawing, Painting, Print Media and Photography (DP3) (course numbers 60-450 through 60-498) *10
60-499Studio Independent Study
(one only)
10

* Courses offered intermittently; speak with a BXA advisor to determine course availability.

Critical Studies (2 courses, 18 units)
60-105Cultural History of the Visual Arts -Spring9
60-3xxCritical Studies Elective9
Review Requirement (2 required reviews, 0 units)

A review is required at the end of the sophomore and senior years. Pass/no pass only.

60-200Sophomore Review -Spring0
60-400Senior Review -Spring0
Design Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Design Required Courses (16 courses, 98 units)
51-101Studio: Survey of Design -Fall, First-year10
51-121Visualizing -Fall, First-year10
51-175Design Studies: Place -Fall, First-year (mini-1)5
51-177Design Studies: Histories -Fall, First-year (mini-2)5
51-102Design Lab -Spring, First-year10
51-122Collaborative Visualizing -Spring, First-year10
51-176Design Studies: Futures -Spring, First-year (mini-3)5
51-178Design Studies: Experience -Spring, First-year (mini-4)5
51-277Design Studies: Systems -Fall, Sophomore year (mini-1)5
51-279Design Studies: Cultures -Fall, Sophomore year (mini-2)5
51-282Design Studies: Persuasion -Spring, Sophomore year (mini-3)5
51-284Design Studies: Power -Spring, Sophomore year (mini-4)5
Choose Two Studios -Fall, Sophomore year:4.5+4.5
51-225Communications Studio I: Understanding Form & Context4.5
or 51-245 Products Studio I: Understanding Form & Context
or 51-265 Environments Studio I: Understanding Form & Context
Choose Two Corresponding Labs -Fall, Sophomore year:4.5+4.5
51-227Prototyping Lab I: Communications4.5
or 51-247 Prototyping Lab I: Products
or 51-267 Prototyping Lab I: Environments
Design Electives (10 units)

A minimum of 10 additional Design units must be approved by the Design advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Drama Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Options available in the following areas: 1) Design, 2) Directing, 3) Dramaturgy, 4) Production Technology and Management

Required Courses for All Concentration Options (5 courses, 20 units)
54-175-54-176Conservatory Hour-Conservatory Hour
(1 unit each)
2
54-177Foundations of Drama I6
54-281Foundations of Drama II
(prerequisite: 54-177)
6
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism6
54-362Anti-Racist & Equitable Practices in Theater
(optional)
6

Work with Drama Faculty Option Coordinator to Approve Concentration Option (88 units minimum).

Design Required Courses (2 courses, 26 units)
54-151-54-152Stagecraft-Stagecraft
(13 units + 13 units)
26

A minimum of 62 additional Design units must be approved by the Design faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Directing Required Courses (10 courses, 64 units)
54-121-54-122Directing I: A Director's Mindset - Directing I: A Director's Preparation18
54-221-54-222Directing II: In the Studio - Directing II: In The Room18
54-159-54-159Production Practicum-Production Practicum
(two times)
12
54-517Director's Colloquium
(four times)
16

A minimum of 24 additional Directing units must be approved by the Directing faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Dramaturgy Required Courses (9 courses, 53 units minimum)
54-109Dramaturgy 1: Approaches to Text9
54-184Dramaturgy 2: Introduction to Production Dramaturgy9
54-121Directing I: A Director's Mindset9
54-159-54-159Production Practicum-Production Practicum
(two times)
12
54-200-54-200Dramaturgy Forum-Dramaturgy Forum -Fall (minimum of two; every semester it is offered while enrolled)2
54-xxxDramaturgy 3, 4, 5 or 6 (minimum of two; all four if enrolled as BXA for six semesters or more)18

A minimum of 29 additional Dramaturgy units must be approved by the Dramaturgy faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Production Technology and Management Required Courses (2 courses, 26 units)
54-151-54-152Stagecraft-Stagecraft
(13 units + 13 units)
26

A minimum of 62 additional PTM units must be approved by the PTM faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Music Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Options available in the following areas: 1) Audio Recording & Production, 2) Composition, 2) Music Performance (instrumental, organ, piano, voice), 4) Sound Theory & Practice

Required Course for All Concentration Options (1 course, 9 units)
57-152Harmony I9
or 57-149 Basic Harmony I

Work with Music Advisor to Approve Concentration Option (99 units minimum).

Audio Recording & Production Required Courses (7 courses, 40 units)
57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
or 57-171 Introduction to Music Technology (self-paced)
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
57-337Sound Recording6
57-338Sound Editing and Mastering6
57-438Multitrack Recording9

Choose 59 units from:

57-153Harmony II9
or 57-150 Basic Harmony II
57-182Solfege II3
or 57-186 Advanced Solfege II
15-104Introduction to Computing for Creative Practice10
15-322Introduction to Computer Music9
18-090Twisted Signals: Multimedia Processing for the Arts10
33-114Physics of Musical Sound9
54-166Introduction to Sound Design for Theatre6
54-275History of Sound Design3
54-666Production Audio6
57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-344Experimental Sound Synthesis9
57-358Introduction to Electronic Music
(with instructor permission as space allows)
9
57-421Exploded Ensemble6
57-427Advanced Seminar in Film Musicology9
57-478Survey of Historical Recording6
57-622Independent Study in Sound Recording Production3
60-131Foundations: Sculpture10
60-210Electronic Media Studio: Introduction to Interactivity10

Note: Students completing an IDeATe minor may double-count up to two of the IDeATe minor courses towards the Audio Recording & Production concentration.

Composition Required Courses (12 courses, 76 units)
57-161Eurhythmics I
(recommended co-requisite: 57-181)
3
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
57-49xBXA Studio (4 semesters) 36
57-xxxMajor Ensemble (4 semesters) 24

A minimum of 23 additional Music units must be approved by the Music advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Music Performance Required Courses (12 courses, 76 units)
57-161Eurhythmics I
(recommended co-requisite: 57-181)
3
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
57-49xBXA Studio (4 semesters) 36
57-xxxMajor Ensemble (4 semesters) 24

A minimum of 23 additional Music units must be approved by the Music advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Sound Theory & Practice Required Courses (7 courses, 47 units)
57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
or 57-171 Introduction to Music Technology (self-paced)
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
18-090Twisted Signals: Multimedia Processing for the Arts10
57-911Music Since 19459
57-616Independent Study in Sound Studies9
Choose 52 units from:
57-153Harmony II9
or 57-150 Basic Harmony II
57-182Solfege II3
or 57-186 Advanced Solfege II
15-104Introduction to Computing for Creative Practice10
15-322Introduction to Computer Music
(pre-requisite: 15-112)
9
33-114Physics of Musical Sound
(prerequisite: 15-112)
9
57-337Sound Recording6
57-343Music, Technology, and Culture9
57-344Experimental Sound Synthesis9
57-347Electronic and Computer Music
(prerequisite: 57-101 or 57-171)
6
57-358Introduction to Electronic Music
(with instructor permission as space allows)
9
57-421Exploded Ensemble6
57-438Multitrack Recording9
57-478Survey of Historical Recording6
60-131Foundations: Sculpture10
60-210Electronic Media Studio: Introduction to Interactivity10

Note: Students completing an IDeATe minor may double-count up to two of the IDeATe minor courses towards the Sound Theory & Practice concentration.


Free Electives

(approximately 0-3 courses, 0-29 units)

Take any Carnegie Mellon course. A maximum of 9 units of physical education and/or military science may be counted toward this requirement. Physical education and military science courses will not be calculated in a student's QPA.

Engineering and Arts Additional Major

The Engineering and Arts (EA) additional major combines the strengths of the College of Fine Arts (CFA) and the College of Engineering (ENG). This additional major provides students with formal practice and training in the creative arts that is more robust than a minor, as well as the foundation of interdisciplinary research to accomplish the integration of their interests. Students who currently have a primary major in engineering, choose their arts concentration from the following schools in CFA: Architecture, Art, Drama or Music.

The EA curriculum has two main components: BXA requirements and fine arts concentration requirements. Each student's course of study is structured so it can be completed alongside their primary engineering major.

Students receive extensive advising support. The academic advisors in the BXA Intercollege Degree Programs are the advisors and liaisons between CFA and Engineering. Each student has two additional academic advisors: an advisor in the admitting school of CFA to guide their focus in the arts and their primary advisor in Engineering to guide their full major in engineering.


EA Curriculum

Units
I. BXA Requirements36
II. CFA Concentration108-114
Total EA Additional Major Requirements144-150

BXA Requirements

BXA Required Courses (5 courses, 36 units)

BXA-specific courses give students the opportunity to integrate their areas of concentration by focusing on interdisciplinary approaches and arts-based research techniques.

52-190BXA Seminar I: Building the Wunderkammer -Spring, Freshman (mini-4)4.5
52-291BXA Seminar II: Transferring Knowledge -Spring, Sophomore (mini-3)4.5
52-392BXA Seminar III: Deconstructing Disciplines9
52-401BXA Seminar IV: Capstone Project Research9
52-402BXA Seminar V: Capstone Project Production9

COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS CONCENTRATION 

(number of courses vary, 108-114 units minimum)

EA students choose one of the following concentrations:

  • Architecture (108 units)
  • Art (114 units)
  • Drama (108 units)
  • Music (108 units)
Architecture Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Architecture Required Courses (7 courses, 52 units minimum)
48-100Architecture Design Studio: POIESIS STUDIO 1 -Fall, Freshman or Sophomore year10-15
or 48-095 Spatial Concepts for Non-Architecture Majors
62-122Digital Media I -Fall, Freshman year6
62-125Drawing I -Fall, Freshman year6
62-123Digital Media II -Spring, Freshman year6
62-126Drawing II -Spring, Freshman year6
48-240History of World Architecture, I -Spring, Freshman year9
48-241Modern Architecture -Fall, Sophomore year9
Architecture Electives (56 units minimum)

A minimum of 56 additional Architecture units must be approved by the Architecture advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Art Concentration

(114 units minimum)

First-Year Seminar (1 course, 6 units)
60-104Foundations: Art First-Year Seminar6
Foundation Studios (3 courses, 30 units)

Complete three courses:

60-110Foundations: Time-Based Media10
60-120Foundations: Digital Media10
60-131Foundations: Sculpture10
60-135Foundations: Expanded Media Sculpture10
60-150Foundations: Drawing10
60-170Foundations: Paint/Print10
Intermediate Studios (3 courses, 30 units)

Complete three courses:

60-2xxIntermediate Studio Elective10
60-2xxIntermediate Studio Elective10
60-2xxIntermediate Studio Elective10
Advanced Studios (3 courses, 30 units)

Students may take courses in any media area (ETB, SIS, CP or DP3). They may take all courses in one media area if a focus is desired. With approval from the Art advisor, BXA students can take an additional intermediate studio in lieu of an advanced studio to increase breadth.

Complete three courses:

60-401/402Senior Studio10
60-403Senior Critique Seminar10
Advanced Electronic and Time-Based Work (ETB) (course numbers 60-410 through 60-429) *10
Advanced Sculpture, Installation and Site-Work (SIS) (course numbers 60-430 through 60-447) *10
Advanced Contextual Practice (CP) (course numbers 60-448 through 60-449) *10
Advanced Drawing, Painting, Print Media and Photography (DP3) (course numbers 60-450 through 60-498) *10
60-499Studio Independent Study
(one only)
10

* Courses offered intermittently; speak with a BXA advisor to determine course availability.

Critical Studies (2 courses, 18 units)
60-105Cultural History of the Visual Arts -Spring9
60-3xxCritical Studies Elective9
Review Requirement (2 required reviews, 0 units)

A review is required at the end of the sophomore and senior years. Pass/no pass only.

60-200Sophomore Review -Spring0
60-400Senior Review -Spring0
Drama Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Options available in the following areas: 1) Design, 2) Directing, 3) Dramaturgy, 4) Production Technology and Management

Required Courses for All Concentration Options (5 courses, 20 units)
54-175-54-176Conservatory Hour-Conservatory Hour
(1 unit each)
2
54-177Foundations of Drama I6
54-281Foundations of Drama II
(prerequisite: 54-177)
6
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism6
54-362Anti-Racist & Equitable Practices in Theater
(optional)
6

Work with Drama Faculty Option Coordinator to Approve Concentration Option (88 units minimum).

Design Required Courses (2 courses, 26 units)
54-151-54-152Stagecraft-Stagecraft
(13 units + 13 units)
26

A minimum of 62 additional Design units must be approved by the Design faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Directing Required Courses (10 courses, 64 units)
54-121-54-122Directing I: A Director's Mindset - Directing I: A Director's Preparation18
54-221-54-222Directing II: In the Studio - Directing II: In The Room18
54-159-54-159Production Practicum-Production Practicum
(two times)
12
54-517Director's Colloquium
(four times)
16

A minimum of 24 additional Directing units must be approved by the Directing faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Dramaturgy Required Courses (9 courses, 53 units minimum)
54-109Dramaturgy 1: Approaches to Text9
54-184Dramaturgy 2: Introduction to Production Dramaturgy9
54-121Directing I: A Director's Mindset9
54-159-54-159Production Practicum-Production Practicum
(two times)
12
54-200-54-200Dramaturgy Forum-Dramaturgy Forum -Fall (minimum of two; every semester it is offered while enrolled)2
54-xxxDramaturgy 3, 4, 5 or 6 (minimum of two; all four if enrolled as BXA for six semesters or more)18

A minimum of 29 additional Dramaturgy units must be approved by the Dramaturgy faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Production Technology and Management Required Courses (2 courses, 26 units)
54-151-54-152Stagecraft-Stagecraft
(13 units + 13 units)
26

A minimum of 62 additional PTM units must be approved by the PTM faculty option coordinator. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Music Concentration

(108 units minimum)

Options available in the following areas: 1) Audio Recording & Production, 2) Composition, 2) Music Performance (instrumental, organ, piano, voice), 4) Sound Theory & Practice

Required Course for All Concentration Options (1 course, 9 units)
57-152Harmony I9
or 57-149 Basic Harmony I

Work with Music Advisor to Approve Concentration Option (99 units minimum).

Audio Recording & Production Required Courses (7 courses, 40 units)
57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
or 57-171 Introduction to Music Technology (self-paced)
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
57-337Sound Recording6
57-338Sound Editing and Mastering6
57-438Multitrack Recording9

Choose 59 units from:

57-153Harmony II9
or 57-150 Basic Harmony II
57-182Solfege II3
or 57-186 Advanced Solfege II
15-104Introduction to Computing for Creative Practice10
15-322Introduction to Computer Music9
18-090Twisted Signals: Multimedia Processing for the Arts10
33-114Physics of Musical Sound9
54-166Introduction to Sound Design for Theatre6
54-275History of Sound Design3
54-666Production Audio6
57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-344Experimental Sound Synthesis9
57-358Introduction to Electronic Music
(with instructor permission as space allows)
9
57-421Exploded Ensemble6
57-427Advanced Seminar in Film Musicology9
57-478Survey of Historical Recording6
57-622Independent Study in Sound Recording Production3
60-131Foundations: Sculpture10
60-210Electronic Media Studio: Introduction to Interactivity10

Note: Students completing an IDeATe minor may double-count up to two of the IDeATe minor courses towards the Audio Recording & Production concentration.

Composition Required Courses (12 courses, 76 units)
57-161Eurhythmics I
(recommended co-requisite: 57-181)
3
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
57-49xBXA Studio (4 semesters) 36
57-xxxMajor Ensemble (4 semesters) 24

A minimum of 23 additional Music units must be approved by the Music advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Music Performance Required Courses (12 courses, 76 units)
57-161Eurhythmics I
(recommended co-requisite: 57-181)
3
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
57-49xBXA Studio (4 semesters) 36
57-xxxMajor Ensemble (4 semesters) 24

A minimum of 23 additional Music units must be approved by the Music advisor. A list of these selected courses must be filed in the BXA office.

Sound Theory & Practice Required Courses (7 courses, 47 units)
57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
or 57-171 Introduction to Music Technology (self-paced)
57-181Solfege I3
or 57-180 Basic Solfege I
or 57-185 Advanced Solfege I
57-173Survey of Western Music History
(co-requisite: 57-188)
9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians1
18-090Twisted Signals: Multimedia Processing for the Arts10
57-911Music Since 19459
57-616Independent Study in Sound Studies9
Choose 52 units from:
57-153Harmony II9
or 57-150 Basic Harmony II
57-182Solfege II3
or 57-186 Advanced Solfege II
15-104Introduction to Computing for Creative Practice10
15-322Introduction to Computer Music
(pre-requisite: 15-112)
9
33-114Physics of Musical Sound
(prerequisite: 15-112)
9
57-337Sound Recording6
57-343Music, Technology, and Culture9
57-344Experimental Sound Synthesis9
57-347Electronic and Computer Music
(prerequisite: 57-101 or 57-171)
6
57-358Introduction to Electronic Music
(with instructor permission as space allows)
9
57-421Exploded Ensemble6
57-438Multitrack Recording9
57-478Survey of Historical Recording6
60-131Foundations: Sculpture10
60-210Electronic Media Studio: Introduction to Interactivity10

Note: Students completing an IDeATe minor may double-count up to two of the IDeATe minor courses towards the Sound Theory & Practice concentration.

Academic Policies

Professional and Community Standards

As a condition of enrollment BXA, and as a student in the College of Fine Arts, we expect you to positively contribute to the community in order to fully engage in the intellectual life at CFA. Classrooms, studios, rehearsal and performance spaces, exhibition venues and off-campus curricular destinations are safe spaces for expression and self-identification. Students are expected to treat everyone with respect, regardless of race, country of origin, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, age, religion, political affiliation or marital status. Lack of respect and harassment includes offensive comments related to any protected personal characteristic, deliberate intimidation, sustained disruption of speech, inappropriate physical contact and unwelcome sexual attention. Violations of this agreement are subject to a response to be determined by the BXA Director and CFA Associate Deans.


Academic Standards and Actions

The College of Fine Arts reviews every CFA student’s academic performance and progress towards graduation at the end of each semester. If a student’s academic record falls below the standards outlined in their student handbook, they receive an academic action. These actions are designed to notify the student of specific academic and graduation requirements, outline goals for completion, and identify avenues of support to help them succeed.

A student who is not making satisfactory progress toward meeting course standards, or toward completing graduation requirements in their declared degree path, will receive an academic action. Each academic action will be reviewed by the relevant school’s appointed reviewers and then confirmed by the CFA Academic Advisory Committee, which makes the final decision. The CFA Dean’s office will disseminate the academic action letters directly to the students and their advisors via their CMU email.

Actions are assigned based on the most recent semester under review but include a cumulative review of a student’s performance to date. The actions listed below may be given out of sequence, if a student meets the listed criteria. 

Incomplete grades will be conditionally actioned by the default grades until the student completes the missing coursework. If the student does not complete their missing coursework by the faculty deadline agreed upon, their default grade and action will become permanent. 

In order to support academic success, a student placed on an escalated academic action (probation and final probation) is not permitted to overload, undertake independent studies, or study abroad until they return to good standing. (See school/program handbook for specifics.)

Warning

A Warning notifies the student of unsatisfactory performance and suggests that the student take steps to determine and correct the cause of the difficulty. Warnings are issued when one or more of the listed criteria are met within the semester under review:

  • Receiving an R, D, or N in one elective or general education course;
  • Failure to complete the semester’s coursework as required by the student’s major curriculum (one course);
  • Failure to earn the minimum 2.00 quality point average.

If the student meets new actionable criteria in the following semesters, they may be assigned an escalated academic action.

Probation

Probation notifies the student of severe and/or continuous performance issues and suggests that the student take immediate steps to correct the cause of the difficulty. A previous action is not required. A student will be placed on Probation for failure to meet the academic and professional standards of their program including:

  • Receiving one or more R, D, N, or W grade(s) in a required major course(s);
  • Receiving two or more R, D, N, or W grades in elective or general education courses (either during one semester or over two semesters);
  • Failure to complete the semester’s coursework as required by the student’s major curriculum (either two or more courses during one semester or over multiple semesters);
  • Failure to earn the minimum 2.00 quality point average.

In order to return to good standing, a student must:

  • Receive a C or better in all courses in the next semester;   
  • Complete required courses within the defined school timeline;
  • Have a minimum of 2.00 QPA.

If the student does not meet these standards, they may continue on Probation or be assigned a successive academic action.

Students who are on academic Probation have restrictions from participating in some school, college, and university activities, including eligibility for study abroad or school awards. Refer to school/program handbooks for specific information.

Final Probation

A student will be placed on Final Probation for continued poor performance, or for continued failure to meet the requirements of their declared degree path, as outlined under the previous section on Probation. At least one previous action (warning and/or probation) must have been assigned prior to assigning final probation.

  • Receiving multiple R, D, N, or W grades in a required major course(s) for two or more semesters;
  • Receiving three or more R, D, N, or W grades in elective or general education courses over multiple semesters;
  • Failure to complete the semester’s coursework as required by the student’s major curriculum (three or more semesters);
  • Continued failure to earn the minimum 2.00 quality point average (two or more semesters).

In order to return to good standing, a student must:

  • Receive a C or better in all courses in the next semester;   
  • Complete required courses within the defined school timeline;
  • Have a minimum of 2.00 QPA.

If the student does not meet these standards, they may continue on Final Probation or be assigned a successive academic action.

Students who are on academic Final Probation have restrictions from participating in some school, college, and university activities, including eligibility for study abroad or school awards. Refer to school/program handbooks for specific information.

Academic Suspension

All University Suspensions are a required, temporary leave from the university. This document covers Academic Suspension from the University. (For more information on Disciplinary Suspension or Administrative Suspension visit the student life sections on the university website: https://www.cmu.edu/policies/student-and-student-life/suspension-required-withdrawal-policy.html).

An Academic Suspension is intended to allow the student time to address or rectify any issues impeding or affecting their performance and progress towards meeting the academic standards of their declared degree path. The student is required to temporarily withdraw from the university for a specific period as defined in their suspension letter. Return from suspension is also subject to the conditions specified in the suspension letter and approval of the CFA Dean’s office. At least two previous actions must have been assigned prior to assigning Academic Suspension.

A student will be placed on Academic Suspension for:

  • Continued history of poor academic performance (three or more semesters);
  • Continued lack of progress towards their declared degree (three or more semesters);
  • Continued failure to meet the requirements of their declared degree path for continuing in the program; (three or more semesters)
  • Failure to earn the minimum 2.00 quality point average. (three or more semesters)

A student returning from an Academic Suspension will be placed on Probation for the semester. In order to return to good standing, a student must:

  • Receive a C or better in all courses in the next semester;   
  • Complete required courses within the defined school timeline;
  • Have a minimum of 2.00 QPA.

If the student does not meet these standards, they may be considered for an Academic Drop.

A student who has been suspended from the university is required to leave the campus, including residence halls and fraternity/sorority houses, within a maximum of two days after the action and to remain off the campus for the duration of the time specified in the suspension letter. In addition, the student may not:

  • register for courses at Carnegie Mellon
  • attend classes
  • live in residence halls or fraternity/sorority housing
  • use campus facilities, including athletic facilities, library and computer clusters
  • participate in student activities
  • be members of student organizations
  • have student jobs

(Note: students on academic suspension may still be eligible for a summer campus job if they accepted the job before they were suspended.) Go to the university policy webpage on student life for more information on a University Suspension: https://www.cmu.edu/policies/student-and-student-life/suspension-required-withdrawal-policy.html

Academic Drop

Students receive an Academic Drop from their School only when the student’s academic progress is insufficient to warrant continuing in the current professional field of study. This action terminates the student’s enrollment in their current School/Program but is not intended to prejudice admission to another academic program within Carnegie Mellon University, or to another institution. Once a student receives an Academic Drop they may choose to:

  1. Transfer to another CMU Department or School. Noting that the student must successfully transfer prior to resuming study at Carnegie Mellon.
  2. Withdraw from Carnegie Mellon University. A link to the application for Withdrawal/Leave of Absence form is embedded with the letter notifying the student of this academic action, and is also available at https://www.cmu.edu/hub.
Appeal of Academic Action

Students have the right to appeal academic actions. If a student believes an academic action is inconsistent with BXA policies or merits additional review, a student should submit a formal written appeal, as specified in the initial academic action letter, to the assistant/associate deans listed below, with a copy to the deans of both CFA and their academic college. Appeals should include all relevant materials to substantiate their case and support their concerns.

A student may appeal to the relevant assistant/associate deans within seven days from the date of their academic action letter. All appeals should be in written form, under three pages in length (not including appendices) and authored by the student.

BCSA Appeals should be addressed to:
Kristen Letts Kovak, Senior Associate Dean for Academics, College of Fine Arts
Guy Blelloch, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education, Computer Science Department

BESA Appeals should be addressed to:
Kristen Letts Kovak, Senior Associate Dean for Academics, College of Fine Arts
Conrad Zapanta, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies, College of Engineering

BHA Appeals should be addressed to:
Kristen Letts Kovak, Senior Associate Dean for Academics, College of Fine Arts
Kelli Maxwell, Associate Dean of Student Success, Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences

BSA Appeals should be addressed to:
Kristen Letts Kovak, Senior Associate Dean for Academics, College of Fine Arts
Maggie Braun, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Affairs, Mellon College of Science

If, after carrying out the steps of the process described above, the student believes that the matter has not been adequately resolved, or if no decision has been rendered by the appropriate date, the student may appeal at the university level. To appeal at the university level, the student must present copies of all previously submitted documents and a formal letter of appeal to the provost. The provost or another designated university officer will respond in writing with a final resolution, including the basis for it, within thirty (30) days when possible.


Disabilities

Students with a learning disability or a physical disability are encouraged to email access@andrew.cmu.edu. The circumstances will remain confidential to the extent desired. The university has a formal procedure for documenting disabilities, notifying advisors and faculty, and making arrangements to utilize university resources in support of expressed needs, but will take no action until contacted by the student. The BXA academic advisors will work with the student to coordinate assistance. Please note that requests for accommodations are not retroactive; you must ask that accommodation requests be put in place before you anticipate needing them.


Grading Policies

University grading policies may vary depending on the particular school/department. Please consult the Undergraduate Academic Regulations.


Intercollege Deans’ List 

Students who earn 36 graded units (no “pass/no pass” grades) with a grade point average of 3.5 or higher, no “incompletes” and “no grades” qualify for BCSA, BESA, BHA or BSA Deans’ List. The BXA Intercollege Deans’ List Honors are posted online each semester.


Intercollege Honors

BXA students who successfully complete a BXA Capstone Project under the guidance of a faculty member will graduate with BCSA, BESA, BHA, BSA or EA Intercollege Honors if all of the following conditions are met:

  • grade of “A” achieved in 62-401 and 62-402;
  • overall QPA of 3.25 or higher;
  • research results presented at Meeting of the Minds Undergraduate Research Symposium.

As a citizen of two colleges, a BXA student also has the opportunity to graduate with CFA College Honors, DC College Honors, ENG College Honors, MCS College Honors and SCS College Honors. These particular honors are defined by each college. BXA students will receive honors color cords during Commencement Weekend.


University Honors

Students who graduate with an overall QPA of 3.5 or higher will graduate with University Honors. Students will receive an honors medallion during Commencement Weekend.


Internal Transfer/Additional Major Process

For current Carnegie Mellon students who wish to apply to a BXA program, an internal transfer and additional major (EA) application process takes place in both the fall and spring semester. Applications are available online and are reviewed by a committee of BCSA, BESA, BHA, BSA and EA advisors in October and in March. However, certain concentrations consider applications only once a year; please consult with a BXA advisor for guidance on scheduling your application.

All students applying for internal transfer should meet with their current advisor, a BXA advisor and an advisor in their target area, as well as take preliminary coursework in their target area and complete their first semester before applying. For all concentrations, there are required courses that must be taken before an application will be considered; please consult with a BXA advisor for guidance on scheduling these courses.

Current BXA students who wish to change their BXA program (e.g. BHA to BCSA) or change their CFA concentration (e.g BHA architecture to BHA art) or delineated options within CFA concentrations (e.g. music performance to music composition) must apply for that change through the internal transfer process. Current BESA, BHA and BSA students who wish to change their academic college concentration after declaring (e.g. BHA creative writing to BHA psychology, BSA physics to BSA mathematical sciences) or delineated options within their academic college concentration (e.g. BESA chemical engineering to BESA mechanical engineering) after declaring must submit a new BESA ENG/BHA DC/BSA MCS Concentration Declaration form for approval of that change, which will be reviewed at the internal transfer committee meeting each semester. Current BXA students seeking internal transfer out of BXA into another college program must apply and meet entry requirements to that program. Students who do not remain in BCSA can only return to their original major.


Study Abroad

Studying abroad is encouraged to broaden BXA students’ interdisciplinary experiences through traditional and non-traditional study abroad, from coursework and artistic studios to for-credit internships, volunteer service and research opportunities. 

Courses taken while studying abroad may count toward your BXA concentration requirements, your general education requirements or your free electives. Studying abroad should not delay your graduation, as long as you work with your study abroad advisor and your BXA advisor to plan the most appropriate courses.

The timing and length of program are important considerations while planning. Due to required BXA coursework, students should avoid studying abroad in their last three semesters (junior spring, senior fall/spring). Spending an entire year abroad is not typically possible for BXA students without intending to take an additional semester at Carnegie Mellon. Many students study abroad during the spring of their sophomore year or the fall semester of their junior year, as well during the summer, and over winter and spring breaks. Talk to your BXA academic advisor early in your academic career to identify the best time for study abroad. 

When studying abroad, students are still enrolled at Carnegie Mellon. A student never takes a leave of absence to study abroad. Prior to studying abroad, all students must attend a required pre-departure orientation offered by the Office of International Education (OIE).

Students must also complete a Study Abroad Transfer Credit (SATC) form prior to departure for study abroad, which must be signed after completion by the BXA advisor. The SATC will guarantee transfer credit for courses taken abroad, and is filled out by the corresponding departments to the coursework being transferred. Unlike regular transfer credit, there is no limit to the number of courses transferable from study abroad, but there may exist stricter limits on the use of coursework to fulfill concentration or general education requirements.

Students will receive credit for courses for which they receive a grade of “C” or better. However, grades received abroad do not count toward a student’s Carnegie Mellon University QPA.


Transfer Credit

Once a BXA student enrolls at Carnegie Mellon University as a degree candidate, they may transfer a maximum of five courses from another institution (excepting official study abroad programs through the CMU Office of International Education) for credit towards their BXA degree. This applies to courses taken at other institutions in the United States, as well as courses taken internationally in the student’s home country.  

Individual departments may impose stricter limits regarding the number or type of courses students propose to take elsewhere to fulfill requirements. Some departments may not accept transfer credit from online courses. 

Students must have prior approval to transfer courses from their BXA advisor, as well as concentration advisors, to use coursework towards requirements. To receive permission, students must provide course information (syllabi) to the corresponding department for evaluation of appropriate credit. When the course is finished, official transcripts must be sent to Carnegie Mellon University before credit will be recorded. 

Transfer courses must be taken for a letter grade and students must earn a C (2.00) or above (B or above at a community college). Transfer credit is not factored into a student's CMU QPA.

The following courses must be taken at CMU and cannot be transferred in:

  • First-Year Writing Requirement Course (76-101, 76-102, 76-106/7/8)
  • Reflecting: Societies and Cultures (79-104, 79-145, 79-189)
  • 36-200: Statistical Reasoning (AP credit only)
  • 99-101: Computing @ Carnegie Mellon

Students currently on university suspension are permitted to take no more than three courses per semester at another institution and no more than a total of five courses.


Withdrawal or Leave of Absence

A student who decides to leave the university must meet with their BXA advisor and complete a Withdrawal or Leave of Absence form. Withdrawal means leaving the university with no intention of returning. Leave of Absence means temporarily leaving the university with a stated intention to return. A withdrawal or leave of absence from the university at any time up to and including the last day of classes (excluding the final examination period), means that grades of W will be recorded for all classes for the semester. Financial responsibility for the semester is dependent upon the date of and the reasons for filing the form. Questions about financial responsibility should be directed to the HUB.

A leave of absence may be voluntary or involuntary. If the leave is voluntary, the student may return any time within four years following the beginning of the leave by filing an Application for Return from Leave of Absence form. If the leave is involuntary, that is, required for academic or disciplinary reasons, the conditions for return will be stated.

About Course Numbers:

Each Carnegie Mellon course number begins with a two-digit prefix that designates the department offering the course (i.e., 76-xxx courses are offered by the Department of English). Although each department maintains its own course numbering practices, typically, the first digit after the prefix indicates the class level: xx-1xx courses are freshmen-level, xx-2xx courses are sophomore level, etc. Depending on the department, xx-6xx courses may be either undergraduate senior-level or graduate-level, and xx-7xx courses and higher are graduate-level. Consult the Schedule of Classes each semester for course offerings and for any necessary pre-requisites or co-requisites.


BXA Intercollege Degree Programs Courses

52-190 BXA Seminar I: Building the Wunderkammer
Fall: 9 units
BXA Seminar I introduces first-year to the field of interdisciplinary work through the concept of the Wunderkammer, the cabinet of wonders. How do we identify and categorize objects? How do we define their position in the world and in a collection? What kind of knowledge is conveyed through context, representation, and juxtaposition? This class considers how interdisciplinary work can be produced, analyzed, justified and--most importantly--contextualized. Students engage with theoretical and practical readings from across disciplines, with particular emphasis on interpretive theory. Weekly readings in aesthetic and critical theory introduce students to a particular vocabulary of analysis, practiced in class discussion and written responses. Students will conceive, research, produce and present a creative final project at the end of the semester.
52-290 Literacy Across Disciplines
Intermittent: 9 units
This course is intended for CFA students who want to improve their writing and communication skills, with a focus on targeting non-specialist audiences. Assignments and readings will cover formats including artists? statements, grant and other funding applications, and other project proposals. Students will also acquire the critical vocabulary to contextualize their creative work in contemporary conversations about the arts. This course will give you the opportunity to develop skills in identifying and targeting audiences in a variety of rhetorical modes and genres. This course is especially well-suited to sophomores and juniors, but is open to all years.
52-291 BXA Seminar II: Transferring Knowledge
Spring: 9 units
BXA Seminar II is intended for students transferring into a BXA program during their sophomore year or beyond. We'll consider how knowledge is represented across different modes of media--what language, what symbols, what logic guides knowledge acquisition and expression in your varied disciplines? Students engage with theoretical and practical readings from across disciplines, with particular emphasis on interpretive theory. Weekly readings in aesthetic and critical theory introduce students to a particular vocabulary of analysis, practiced in class discussions and written responses. Students will produce written assignments as well as creative responses to the course material.
52-292 BXA Student Advisory Council
Intermittent: 3 units
This course will provide opportunities for students to promote and refine the mission of the BXA programs. Students will develop and practice leadership skills, including collaboration, communication, and project management. Students will be responsible for planning and running BXA student events, including info sessions, social hours, skills workshops, and alumni events. Students are encouraged to think about how to engage other interdisciplinary scholars and artists as well as how to present their own work and programs to the larger university community.
52-390 BXA Undergraduate Research Project
All Semesters
The BXA Undergraduate Research Project is for BXA students who want to work on a self-designed project with the one-to-one guidance of a faculty advisor. The project should be interdisciplinary in nature, and can be a scholarly and/or creative endeavor. The project may take the form of a written thesis, a compilation of creative works, an outreach project, etc. The project topic must be pre-approved by the faculty member who agrees to supervise the project and assign a letter grade for the course. Projects are to be completed in one semester, may be worth 3, 6, 9, or 12 units of academic credit, and cannot be taken concurrently with the BXA Capstone Project during the senior year. To register, students must submit an "Undergraduate Research Project Proposal Form" signed by both the student and the faculty advisor, along with a proposal, to their BXA academic advisor.
52-391 BXA Junior Portfolio
Spring
To better assess the goals and needs of BXA students as they enter their final year and prepare for senior-level projects (e.g. BXA Capstone Project), all students will review their own work and assemble a portfolio during the spring semester of their junior year. Students should work with their BXA advisors and their concentration faculty advisors to assemble a portfolio that represents their academic and creative milestones over the course of their college career. This portfolio also includes reflective written components to allow students to present a narrative of their history with BXA, and identify their goals, visions, ideas and concerns for their future work--both for senior year and beyond. Students should provide an assessment of the areas of intersection between their academic and artistic interests, offer their own specific goals for their academic career, and give a self-evaluation of their performance and opportunities to-date, in light of the programs' broader pedagogical goals.
52-392 BXA Seminar III: Deconstructing Disciplines
Spring: 9 units
The BXA Seminar III will engage BXA juniors in examination of critical theory, the structure of disciplinary knowledge, interdisciplinary approaches and methods, and the purpose, categories, and components of research. The course will meet weekly at the beginning of the semester and biweekly or bimonthly at the second half with time given to completing individual projects. The requirements include short readings, participation in online and seminar discussions, individual self-assessment exercises, the production of small creative works and/or research projects, and presentation of work during both BXA Kaleidoscope and a separate class research showcase held during the final exam period. BXA Seminar III is in preparation for the BXA Capstone Project and/or other senior research projects (Dietrich/MCS/SCS thesis, or CFA senior studio work).
52-401 BXA Seminar IV: Capstone Project Research
Fall and Spring
The BXA Capstone gives BXA students the opportunity to demonstrate the extent of their interdisciplinary work over the course of their academic career. The Capstone should include elements that span the student's CFA and SCS concentrations (for BCSA students), CFA and DC concentrations (for BHA students), CFA and MCS concentrations (for BSA students), or CFA concentration and engineering major (for EA additional major students). The project can be either a scholarly or creative endeavor, and may take one of many possible forms (e.g., a written thesis, a compilation of creative work or works, an experiment and report, a computer program or animation, etc.). The BXA Capstone sequence covers both semesters of a student's senior year. In the fall, students are enrolled in 52-401 BXA Seminar IV: Capstone Project Research (9 units), which meets weekly to discuss strategies for managing research, planning the project, and larger theoretical issues related to interdisciplinary work. At the end of the fall course, students will have produced a Capstone Project proposal, an annotated bibliography, and multiple versions of their project pitch. In the spring, students enroll in 52-402 BXA Seminar: Capstone Project Production (9 units), which has no required classroom time. Instead, students spend the semester doing the research and foundational work necessary for the project, as well as meeting with their faculty and BXA advisors as they create their Capstone Project and prepare to present it at the annual Meeting of the Minds Undergraduate Research Symposium held each May. Students will only be enrolled for 18 units when they are unable to complete a two-semester sequence and need to gain special permission by the BXA Director/Academic Advisor. The BXA Capstone sequence is for students in their last two semesters before graduation.
52-402 BXA Seminar V: Capstone Project Production
Fall and Spring: 9 units
The BXA Capstone gives BXA students the opportunity to demonstrate the extent of their interdisciplinary work over the course of their academic career. The Capstone should include elements that span the student's CFA and SCS concentrations (for BCSA students), CFA and DC concentrations (for BHA students), CFA and MCS concentrations (for BSA students), or CFA concentration and engineering major (for EA additional major students). The project can be either a scholarly or creative endeavor, and may take one of many possible forms (e.g., a written thesis, a compilation of creative work or works, an experiment and report, a computer program or animation, etc.). The BXA Capstone sequence covers both semesters of a student's senior year. In the fall, students are enrolled in 52-401 BXA Seminar IV: Capstone Project Research (9 units), which meets weekly to discuss strategies for managing research, planning the project, and larger theoretical issues related to interdisciplinary work. At the end of the fall course, students will have produced a Capstone Project proposal, an annotated bibliography, and multiple versions of their project pitch. In the spring, students enroll in 52-402 BXA Seminar: Capstone Project Production (9 units), which has no required classroom time. Instead, students spend the semester doing the research and foundational work necessary for the project, as well as meeting with their faculty and BXA advisors as they create their Capstone Project and prepare to present it at the annual Meeting of the Minds Undergraduate Research Symposium held each May. The BXA Capstone sequence is for students in their last two semesters before graduation.
52-590 BXA Internship
All Semesters
An internship is a supervised professional work experience with clear links to a student's academic goals. BXA students may choose to complete a BXA Internship for elective credit with appropriate individuals or organizations within or outside of Carnegie Mellon University. Junior and senior BXA students in good academic standing are eligible to receive academic credit for one internship. Grading is pass/no pass only. Prior to enrolling in an internship, the student must have a "BXA Internship Agreement Form" signed by their site supervisor and approved by their BXA academic advisor.
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