Department of Modern Languages Courses

About Course Numbers:

Each Carnegie Mellon course number begins with a two-digit prefix that designates the department offering the course (i.e., 76-xxx courses are offered by the Department of English). Although each department maintains its own course numbering practices, typically, the first digit after the prefix indicates the class level: xx-1xx courses are freshmen-level, xx-2xx courses are sophomore level, etc. Depending on the department, xx-6xx courses may be either undergraduate senior-level or graduate-level, and xx-7xx courses and higher are graduate-level. Consult the Schedule of Classes each semester for course offerings and for any necessary pre-requisites or co-requisites.


82-101 Elementary French I
Fall and Spring: 12 units
This course is for students with no prior experience in French. Using a proficiency-oriented approach, students will develop contextually appropriate interpersonal communication skills in both written and spoken French, develop reading and listening skills through the use of various media, understand fundamental grammar, acquire vocabulary, and gain a basic understanding of French and francophone cultures through class activities. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, presentations, and class participation are mandatory (four in-class hours per week). The elementary level is also designed to help students learn to reflect and draw upon strategies used by good language learners in their second language study. A student with prior experience in French must take the placement exam.
82-102 Elementary French II
Fall and Spring: 12 units
This course is designed for students who have taken first-semester French at Carnegie Mellon or learned its equivalent as determined by placement. Using a proficiency-oriented approach, students will expand contextually appropriate interpersonal communication skills in both written and spoken French, continue to develop reading and listening skills through the use of various media, review previously learned and practice new grammar and vocabulary, and gain a further understanding of French and francophone cultures through class activities. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, presentations, and class participation are mandatory (four in-class hours per week). The elementary level is also designed to help students learn to reflect and draw upon strategies used by good language learners in their second language study. A student with prior experience in French must take the placement exam.
Prerequisites: 82-101 or 82-103
82-103 Elementary French I Online
Fall and Spring: 12 units
This course is designed for students with no prior experience with French and who need a more flexible approach to language learning than that offered in a standard classroom course. Beginning language learners will develop communicative competence in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Basic vocabulary and sentence structures for use in essential daily-life situations, as well as cultural information, are taught through the course materials and assignments. Materials are web-based, with extensive use of Internet technologies for listening, reading, and communication. During regular semesters, this course is offered in a hybrid mode requiring one 80-minute class per week in addition to weekly 20-minute individual meetings with the instructor or a peer speaking assistant. There is a materials fee for taking this course which is paid by credit card on first log-in to the course website. A student with prior experience in French must take the placement exam.
82-104 Elementary French II Online
Fall and Spring: 12 units
This course is designed for students who need a more flexible approach to language learning than that offered in a standard classroom course. Students will learn more useful and complex expressions and sentence structures necessary for use in everyday life. Students will continue building their skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing for everyday communication. Additionally, course materials and assignments are designed to improve students' understanding of French and francophone cultures and societies. Materials are web-based with extensive use of Internet technologies for listening, reading, and communication. During regular semesters, this course is offered in a hybrid mode requiring one 80-minute class per week in addition to weekly 20-minute individual meetings with the instructor or a peer speaking assistant. There is a materials fee for taking this course which is paid by credit card on first log-in to the course website. A student with prior experience in French must take the placement exam.
Prerequisites: 82-103 or 82-101
82-111 Elementary Arabic I
Fall: 12 units
This course introduces learners to Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) in its written and spoken forms to achieve communicative competence at the elementary level in all language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). To this end the course follows a proficiency-oriented approach to language teaching. In addition to MSA, the course introduces students to one of the popular spoken dialects in the Arab world such as Egyptian, Levantine, or Moroccan (depending upon the instructor's background/expertise). Students will also study various cultural aspects of the Arab world through written, audio-visual and online-based materials. Students with prior knowledge of Arabic must take the placement exam.
82-112 Elementary Arabic II
Spring: 12 units
This course builds on Elementary Arabic I to continue introducing students to Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) to achieve communicative competence at the Novice-High/Intermediate-Low level in all language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). To this end, the course follows a proficiency-oriented approach to language teaching. In addition to MSA, the course continues to introduce students to one of the popular spoken dialects in the Arab world such as Egyptian, Levantine, or Moroccan (depending upon the instructor's background/expertise). Students will continue to explore various cultural aspects of the Arab world through written, audio-visual and online materials.
Prerequisite: 82-111
82-114 Arabic for Global Exchange Online
Fall and Spring: 6 units
Arabic for Global Exchange is a course in Arabic language and culture that utilizes cognitive learning technologies and computer-assisted language instruction to enhance educational, governmental, and business exchanges that are increasingly vital to public policy and economic development in the global economy. This is a mini-course for individuals with no proficiency or extremely limited knowledge of Arabic language and culture who are about to begin study or work in an Arabic-speaking context. The course introduces learners to basic concepts and information to facilitate entry and engagement in an Arabic-speaking environment. The Arabic for Global Exchange project aims to meet a need for high quality, communication-oriented instructional materials to introduce basic cultural knowledge and survival language. Arabic for Global Exchange is a six-week, six-lesson, half-semester course (equivalent of six weeks of university-level instruction), or roughly sixty hours of student effort. Each of the six lessons in the course includes texts and activities to promote acquisition of cultural content in English as well as basic introductory exposure to the Arabic language.
82-115 Beginning Arabic for Oral Communication
Intermittent: 6 units
This course is meant for students who have either taken Arabic for Global Exchange or who seek an introductory course to the Arabic Language. It is designed to give learners an overview of Arabic, and introduce them to the letters, sounds, and symbols that make up the Arabic writing system. In addition to the sounds and letters of Arabic, the course also helps students to master basic vocabulary and important expressions for basic interaction with speakers of Arabic. Students will be provided with written, audio, and visual materials to prepare at home and should come to class ready to speak, read, and write using what they have studied outside class.
82-116 Arabic Cultural Issues Past & Present
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course is offered only at Carnegie Mellon's campus in Qatar. This course is intended for students who wish to master speaking in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). This is done through reading articles on customs and traditions of the Arabs and discussing them thoroughly in class using MSA. Since this is an elementary level course, it is to help students switch from their dialect to speaking MSA. Through the reading of complex articles and texts on customs and traditions of Arabs and discussing them thoroughly in class using Modern Standard Arabic (MSA), students will engage in academic conversations with the goals of a developing a deeper understanding of Arab cultures and a facility to use MSA at an academic level. An elementary level course, this course is designed for students who wish to improve their proficiency in speaking and reading MSA as an alternative to their dialect.
82-117 Arabic Conversation & Dialect I
Fall and Spring: 6 units
This course introduces students to a particular dialect of Arabic and to the culture of the region where the dialect is spoken. The dialect of the course will vary based on the instructor's background/expertise (for example, Levantine, Egyptian, Moroccan, etc.). This class adopts a proficiency-based approach and the content of the course will be organized around specific themes such as greetings, introductions, directions, family, food, etc. Students will be required to engage actively in speaking activities and complete a variety of related oral practice assignments outside of class. Because of the significant contribution of technology in facilitating and empowering language learning and language teaching, a substantial part of communication, activities, and assignments will be done via programs such as Aswaat Arabiyya, BYKI, Film clips, Skype, Youtube, etc. Please contact the department for specific information on the upcoming semester's course content.
82-118 Arabic Conversation & Dialect II
Fall and Spring: 6 units
This course continues students' exploration of the same regional dialect and culture taught in Arabic Conversation and Dialect I for that particular semester. The content of the course will be organized around specific themes that build on previously introduced topics (e.g., daily schedule, weddings, traveling, hobbies, etc.). Students will be required to engage actively in speaking activities and complete a variety of related oral practice assignments outside of class. Because of the significant contribution of technology in facilitating and empowering language learning and language teaching, a substantial part of communication, activities, and assignments will be done via programs such as Aswaat Arabiyya, BYKI, Film clips, Skype, Youtube, etc. Please contact the department for specific information on the upcoming semester's course content.
Prerequisite: 82-117 Min. grade C
82-119 Arabic Calligraphy Culture & Skills
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course introduces its participants to historical and cultural contexts and various techniques used to produce Arabic calligraphy works. No previous knowledge of the Arabic script or language is necessary. At the end of the course, participants will demonstrate familiarity and comfort with key movements in the history and art of Arabic calligraphy, and read simple alphabet constructions or words in a variety of styles. Participants will apply proper techniques to producing calligraphy in two of the most commonly used styles, Naskh and Riq'ah, as well as experiment with some modern script styles. The class will use lecture discussions, audio-visual media, projects, guest speakers, and field trips as occasions arise.
82-121 Elementary German I
Fall and Spring: 12 units
This course is for students with no prior experience in German. Using a proficiency-oriented approach, students will develop contextually appropriate interpersonal communication skills in both written and spoken German, develop reading and listening skills through the use of various media, understand fundamental grammar, acquire vocabulary, and gain a basic understanding of German-speaking cultures through class activities. The elementary level is also designed to help students learn to reflect and draw upon strategies used by good language learners in their second language study. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, presentations, and class participation are mandatory (four in-class hours per week). A student with prior experience in German must take the placement exam.
82-122 Elementary German II
Fall and Spring: 12 units
This course is designed for students who have taken first-semester German at Carnegie Mellon or learned its equivalent as determined by placement. Using a proficiency-oriented approach, students will expand contextually appropriate interpersonal communication skills in both written and spoken German, continue to develop reading and listening skills through the use of various media, review previously learned and practice new grammar and vocabulary, and gain a further understanding of German cultures through class activities. The elementary level is also designed to help students learn to reflect and draw upon strategies used by good language learners in their second language study. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, presentations, and class participation are mandatory (four in-class hours per week). A student with prior experience in German must take the placement exam.
Prerequisites: 82-121 or 82-123
82-123 Directed Language Study: Elementary German I or II
Fall and Spring: 12 units
This course is a directed, instructor-supervised version of the courses 82-121 or 82-122. It is recommended for (1) students who are strongly motivated and have the time, self-discipline, and desire to work independently, (2) students whose schedule precludes enrollment in the regular elementary course, and/or (3) students who have had previous German study but are not prepared to take 82-122. This course develops the fundamental language skills as outlined in the descriptions of 82-121 and 82-122, and students complete the same work as for those courses. Written work is turned in for correction and tests covering each unit of material will be taken according to a schedule determined by the instructor. The instructor will be available during office hours or by appointment for individual consultations and testing. Students are permitted to take only one semester of 82-123. Prerequisite: There is no prerequisite for students enrolling for German Elementary I. For students enrolling in German Elementary II, the prerequisite is German Elementary I (82-121) or placement.
82-130 Navigating Chinese Culture: Intro to the Three Kingdoms
Intermittent: 9 units
This course introduces students to the basics of Chinese culture in order to assist them to better understand and appreciate traditional Chinese humanistic ideas, thoughts and value systems, with a focus on the Confucian point of view. Through the study of the classic novel, ?The Three Kingdoms?, the most valued virtues within Chinese culture and society - loyalty, filial piety, benevolence and righteousness ?are presented and discussed. Different aspects of the daily life culture will be introduced as well. Supplementary readings, video clips as well as video games will be used to provide students with a deeper insight, observation and motivation to explore more issues related to Chinese culture, history and philosophy. Assessment will be based on short essays, group projects and individual presentations. Some basic Chinese language instruction will be included to give students a taste of the Chinese language. After taking this course, students will - develop a basic understanding of the essence of Chinese culture - build an awareness of cultural differences between different countries - understand some basic characteristics of Chinese language This course is conducted in English; no prior knowledge of the Chinese culture is required.
82-131 Elementary Chinese I
Fall and Spring: 12 units
This course is for students with no prior experience in Chinese. Using a proficiency-oriented approach, students will develop contextually appropriate interpersonal communication skills in both written and spoken Chinese, develop reading and listening skills through various media, understand fundamental grammar, acquire vocabulary, and gain a basic understanding of Chinese cultures through class and extracurricular activities. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, and participation in class are mandatory (four in-class hours per week). Students will learn the phonetic transcriptions of Chinese (Pinyin) for speaking and listening as well as Chinese characters for reading and writing. The elementary level is also designed to help students learn to reflect and draw upon strategies used by good language learners in their second language study. A student with prior experience in Chinese must take the placement exam.
82-132 Elementary Chinese II
Fall and Spring: 12 units
This course is designed for students who have taken first-semester Chinese at Carnegie Mellon or its equivalent by placement. Students will continue developing contextually appropriate interpersonal communication skills in both written and spoken Chinese, developing reading and listening skills through various media, and working toward a deeper understanding of Chinese culture. Work for this course will include the introduction and use of more complicated sentence structures, grammar, and expressions. Students are also encouraged to communicate in longer sentences and write short paragraphs and essays in Chinese. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, and participation in class are mandatory (four in-class hours per week). Students will continue to learn the phonetic transcriptions of Chinese (Pinyin) for speaking and listening as well as Chinese characters for reading and writing. The elementary level is designed to help students learn to reflect and draw upon strategies used by good language learners in their second language study. A student with prior experience in Chinese must take the placement exam.
Prerequisites: 82-131 or 82-133
82-133 Elementary Chinese Online I
Fall: 12 units
This course is designed for students who need a more flexible approach to language learning than that offered in a standard classroom course. It is designed to help beginners develop communicative competence in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing the Chinese language. Basic vocabulary and sentence structures for use in essential daily-life situations, as well as cultural information, are taught through the course materials and assignments. Materials are web-based with extensive use of Internet technologies for listening, reading, and communication. This course is offered in a hybrid mode requiring one 80-minute class per week in addition to weekly 20-minute individual meetings with the instructor or a peer speaking assistant. There is a materials fee for taking this course which is paid by credit card on first log-in to the course website. Students in this class should be prepared to participate in such studies in the course of their classwork. A student with prior experience in Chinese must take the placement exam.
82-134 Elementary Chinese Online II
Spring: 12 units
This course is the continuation of 82-133, Elementary Chinese I Online. Students will continue learning more useful and complex expressions and sentence structures necessary for use in everyday life. Students will also continue building their skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing for everyday communication, and their understanding of Chinese culture and society. This course is offered in a hybrid mode requiring one 80-minute class per week in addition to weekly 20-minute individual meetings with the instructor or a peer speaking assistant. There is a materials fee for taking this course which is paid by credit card on first log-in to the course website. A student with prior experience in Chinese must take the placement exam. Instructions for the placement exam are available in Baker Hall 160. Prerequisite: 82-131 or 82-133 or placement
Prerequisites: 82-131 or 82-133
82-135 Elementary Chinese for Heritage Students
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course is designed for students who have some basic knowledge of spoken Chinese, but know little of how to read and write Chinese. While an integrated approach will be applied to the development of all the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing simultaneously, the focus will be on the intensive study of Chinese characters through reading and writing practice. Based on their speaking and listening abilities, students will learn how to communicate in writing in everyday situations. The cultivation of cultural awareness will also be a focus of this course. At the end of this course, students will be well-equipped to continue their study of Chinese at the intermediate level. A student with prior experience in Chinese must take the placement exam. Prerequisites: Placement by test and Chinese group advisor
82-137 Chinese Calligraphy: Culture and Skills
Fall and Spring: 9 units
Chinese calligraphy is a crucial part of Chinese culture and world art. It is also a clear manifestation of Chinese philosophy that has influenced Chinese people for several thousand years. This introductory course on Chinese calligraphy provides students with basic knowledge of Chinese calligraphy and how it mirrors Chinese history, culture, and philosophy. It will also introduce the fundamental characteristics of the Chinese writing system, its cultural content, and principles of formation as well as the skills used in Chinese calligraphy. At the end of the course, students will have a good understanding of Chinese characters and their cultural and philosophical background but also be able to appreciate the art and beauty in Chinese calligraphy. Classes include lectures, movies, discussions, hands-on practice, and projects. Field trips and guest speakers may also be arranged if opportunities should arise.
82-141 Elementary Spanish I
Fall and Spring: 12 units
Elementary Spanish I is the first part of a two-semester course sequence for beginning students, emphasizing the development of communicative language and cultural competence. Students will work towards improving their writing, reading, listening and speaking abilities in Spanish, such that they become comfortable working with a variety of topics from Spanish-speaking cultural areas. Students will develop basic interactional and routine public communication patterns, frequently working in groups and pairs, and utilizing technologies that enhance learning opportunities and promote skill development. This course also provides extracurricular opportunities to interact with members of the Spanish-speaking community. Four hours of in-class instruction per week are required. A student with prior experience in Spanish must take the placement exam.
82-142 Elementary Spanish II
Fall and Spring: 12 units
Elementary Spanish II is the second part of a two-semester course sequence for beginning students, emphasizing the development of communicative language and cultural competence. Students will work towards improving their writing, reading, listening and speaking abilities in Spanish, such that they become comfortable working with a variety of topics from Spanish-speaking cultural areas. Students will develop basic interactional and routine public communication patterns, frequently working in groups and pairs, and utilizing technologies that enhance learning opportunities and promote skill development. This course also provides extracurricular opportunities to interact with members of the Spanish-speaking community. Four hours of in-class instruction per week are required. A student with prior experience in Spanish must take the placement exam.
Prerequisites: 82-143 or 82-141
82-143 Elementary Spanish I Online
Fall: 12 units
Elementary Spanish Online I is for beginning students, emphasizing the development of communicative language and cultural competence. Students will work towards improving their writing, reading, listening and speaking abilities in Spanish, such that they become comfortable working with a variety of topics from Spanish-speaking cultural areas. Students will develop basic interactional and routine public communication patterns. This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of Spanish and who need a more flexible approach to language learning than that offered in a standard classroom course. All materials are Web-based, with extensive use of Internet technologies for research, writing, and communication. During regular semesters, this course is offered in a hybrid mode requiring one 80-minute class per week in addition to weekly 20-minute individual meetings with the instructor or a peer speaking assistant. There is a materials fee for taking this course which is paid by credit card on first log-in to the course website. Students who have taken Spanish before are required to take the placement exam.
82-144 Elementary Spanish II Online
Spring: 12 units
Elementary Spanish Online II is the second part of a two-course sequence, emphasizing the development of communicative language and cultural competence. Students will work towards improving their writing, reading, listening and speaking abilities in Spanish, such that they become comfortable working with a variety of topics from Spanish-speaking cultural areas. Students will develop basic interactional and routine public communication patterns. This course is designed for students who need a more flexible approach to language learning than that offered in a standard classroom course. All materials are Web-based, with extensive use of Internet technologies for research, writing, and communication. During regular semesters, this course is offered in a hybrid mode requiring one 80-minute class per week in addition to weekly 20-minute individual meetings with the instructor or a peer speaking assistant. There is a materials fee for taking this course which is paid by credit card on first log-in to the course website. A student with prior experience in Spanish must take the placement exam. Instructions for the placement exam are available in Baker Hall 160. Prerequisite: 82-141 or 82-143 or placement
Prerequisites: 82-141 or 82-143
82-161 Elementary Italian I
Fall: 12 units
This course is for students with no prior experience in Italian. Using a proficiency-oriented approach, students will develop contextually appropriate interpersonal communication skills in both written and spoken Italian, develop reading and listening skills through the use of various media, understand fundamental grammar, acquire vocabulary, and gain a basic understanding of Italian culture through class activities. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, presentations, and class participation are mandatory (four in-class hours per week). The elementary level is also designed to help students learn to reflect and draw upon strategies used by good language learners in their second language study. A student with prior experience in Italian must take the placement exam.
82-162 Elementary Italian II
Spring: 12 units
This course is designed for students who have taken first-semester Italian at Carnegie Mellon or learned its equivalent as determined by placement. Using a proficiency-oriented approach, students will expand contextually appropriate interpersonal communication skills in both written and spoken Italian, continue to develop reading and listening skills through the use of various media, review previously learned and practice new grammar and vocabulary, and gain a further understanding of Italian culture through class activities. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, presentations, and class participation are mandatory (four in-class hours per week). The elementary level is also designed to help students learn to reflect and draw upon strategies used by good language learners in their second language study. A student with prior experience in Italian must contact the Department of Modern Languages for placement.
Prerequisites: 82-163 or 82-161
82-163 Directed Language Study: Elementary Italian I or II
Fall and Spring: 12 units
A self-paced version of first or second semester Elementary Italian, this course is for highly motivated students capable of working independently. The coursework includes weekly classes, aural practice using online materials, periodic assessments, and individual meetings with the instructor. Students are permitted to take only one semester of 82-163. A student with prior experience in Italian must take the placement exam.
82-171 Elementary Japanese I
Fall and Spring: 12 units
This course is the first part of a two-semester course sequence (82-171, 82-172) for students with no prior experience in Japanese. It emphasizes the development of communicative language proficiency through oral practice, aural comprehension, reading, writing, and the study of cultural aspects of Japanese society. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, presentations, and class participation are mandatory (four in-class hours per week). The elementary level is also designed to help students learn to reflect and draw upon strategies used by good language learners in their second language study. A student with prior experience in Japanese must take the placement exam.
82-172 Elementary Japanese II
Fall and Spring: 12 units
This course is a sequel to Elementary Japanese I (82-171) and continues to further the development of communicative language proficiency through oral practice, aural comprehension, reading, writing, and the study of cultural aspects of Japanese society. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, presentations, and class participation are mandatory (four in-class hours per week). The elementary level is also designed to help students learn to reflect and draw upon strategies used by good language learners in their second language study. A student with prior experience in Japanese must take the placement exam.
Prerequisites: 82-171 or 82-174
82-173 Introduction to Japanese I
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course is the first part of a two-semester sequence (82-173, 82-174) for students with no background in Japanese. Since it covers the first half of 82-171 in one semester, it is suitable for those students who need sufficient practice time both in and outside of class to begin their study of Japanese. It emphasizes the development of communicative language proficiency through oral practice, aural comprehension, reading, writing, and the study of cultural aspects of Japanese society. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, presentations, and class participation are mandatory (three in-class hours per week plus six hours of required homework). The elementary level is also designed to help students learn to reflect and draw upon strategies used by good language learners in their second language study. Students who intend to minor or major Japanese should consult with their Japanese minor or major advisor before deciding on 82-171 or 82-173.
82-174 Introduction to Japanese II
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course is a sequel to Introduction to Japanese I (82-173) for students with no background in Japanese. Since the course covers the second half of the 82-171 in one semester, it is suitable for those students who need lots of practice time both in and outside class. It continues to further the development of communicative language proficiency through oral practice, aural comprehension, reading, writing, and the study of cultural aspects of Japanese society. The elementary level is also designed to help students learn to reflect upon and draw upon strategies used by good language learners in their second language study. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, presentations, and class participation are mandatory (three in-class hours per week plus six hours of required homework The elementary level is also designed to help students learn to reflect and draw upon strategies used by good language learners in their second language study. Upon completion of this course, students can take 82-172.
Prerequisite: 82-173
82-176 Intensive Japanese Language & Culture: Elementary Level
Intermittent
No course description provided.
82-191 Elementary Russian I
Fall: 12 units
This course is for students who have never studied Russian. It begins the Russian language sequence and is offered in the fall semester only. The course takes a communicative approach to teaching basic skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Language is presented in communicative contexts illustrating cultural aspects of daily Russian life. The elementary level is also designed to help students learn to reflect and draw upon strategies used by good language learners in their second language study. Daily homework and participation in class are mandatory (four in-class hours per week), as is weekly consultation and conversation practice with a course assistant. A student with prior experience in Russian must take the placement exam. **If you would like to take this course, but the current time slot does not work with your schedule please contact the instructor as soon as possible and we may be able to accommodate you**
82-192 Elementary Russian II
Spring: 12 units
Elementary Russian II is the second semester of a yearlong beginning Russian sequence. Students who complete this yearlong sequence will acquire the basics of Russian grammar and develop an active vocabulary of approximately 1,000 words. They will learn how to tell simple stories on familiar topics, ask questions, and express their opinions. They will be able to grasp the main ideas of short newspaper articles and understand the gist of straightforward Russian speech. Throughout the course, students will encounter oral, visual, and written content and engage in the interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational modes of communication. A student with prior experience in Russian must take the placement exam.
Prerequisite: 82-191
82-198 Research Training: Modern Languages
Fall and Spring
These courses are designed to give eligible and interested students some hands-on research experience working on a faculty project or in a lab in ways that might stimulate and nurture the students' interest in doing more research. They are open to students who are Dietrich College, SHS, or BHA majors, double majors, and minors who will be second semester freshmen or sophomores during the semester they take the course. Prerequisites: At least a 3.0 cumulative QPA or approval by petition and permission of instructor A sample course contract can be found here: http://www.cmu.edu/dietrich/docs/undergraduate/RTC-Contract.pdf S18: Section A: Section B:Encoding Hispanic Comics This project involves research of Spanish-language comics. The course will teach Comic Book Markup Language (CBML, a TEI-based XML vocabulary) for encoding and analyzing the structural, textual, visual, and bibliographic complexity of digitized comic books and related documents. Student researchers will assist in: a) editing, marking up, and structuring digitized Spanish-language comics; b) reading and subjecting these texts to interpretation, making inferences, and embarking in theoretical explorations of issues according to given criteria. Long-term results of this project entail possible inclusion of encoded materials in the Latin American Comics Archive, collaboration with national and international students and researchers, and perhaps a published work (for which student participants would be acknowledged as contributors). Interested students: Send an email to Professor Gomez and include information about your interests in this project. Open to one or two students with at least intermediate level reading skills in Spanish. Section C:

Course Website: http://www.cmu.edu/dietrich/docs/undergraduate/RTC-Contract.pdf
82-201 Intermediate French I
Fall and Spring: 9 units
At the intermediate level, students will continue to improve listening, speaking, reading and writing skills with the goal of becoming more proficient in daily and extended communication needs. In addition to an ongoing review of basic grammar, a greater variety of grammar, expressions and complicated sentence structures will be taught so that students can carry on more sophisticated conversations on various topics. In-class activities and homework using authentic texts related to the broad spectrum of French and francophone cultures will be used to integrate language learning with content and culture. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, presentations, essays, and class participation are mandatory. A student with prior experience in French must take the placement exam.
Prerequisites: 82-104 or 82-102
82-202 Intermediate French II
Fall and Spring: 9 units
At the intermediate level, students will continue to improve listening, speaking, reading and writing skills with the goal of becoming more proficient in daily and extended communication needs. In addition to an ongoing review of basic grammar, a greater variety of grammar, expressions and complicated sentence structures will be taught so that students can carry on more sophisticated conversations on various topics. In-class activities and homework using authentic texts related to the broad spectrum of French and francophone cultures will be used to integrate language learning with content and culture. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, presentations, essays, and class participation are mandatory. A student with prior experience in French must take the placement exam.
Prerequisite: 82-201
82-208 Topics in European Studies
Intermittent: 9 units
F17: European Society and Culture Between and After the Two Great Wars of the 20th Century. How did World War I and World War II change European society and culture? Defining the meaning of Europe or European is complicated, since it refers to both a geographical location and a shared history and cultural identity. Based on an interdisciplinary approach to the multiple regions and countries located on a single continent, the course will equip students with the skills, methods, and concepts essential for a better understanding of European culture, society and thought. It will focus particularly on such tragic events as World War I and World War II, and the rise and fall of Nazi and Communist regimes and ideologies. Students will learn how to present material effectively, to analyze texts critically and to construct coherent arguments.
82-211 Intermediate Arabic I
Fall: 12 units
This course builds on Elementary Arabic II to continue building students' communicative competence at the Intermediate Low-Mid level in Modern Standard Arabic in all four language skills (listening, reading, speaking, and writing) following a proficiency-oriented teaching approach. The course also continues to 1) integrate a spoken dialect to enrich students' background in oral communication; and 2) educate students about to various aspects of Arab culture through written and audio-visual materials.
Prerequisite: 82-112
82-212 Intermediate Arabic II
Spring: 12 units
This course follows Intermediate Arabic I. It continues to build students' communicative competence at the Intermediate Mid-High level in Modern Standard Arabic in all four skills (listening, reading, speaking, and writing) following a proficiency-oriented teaching approach. The course also continues to 1) integrate a spoken dialect to enrich students background in oral communication; and 2) educate students about to various aspects of Arab culture through written and audio-visual materials.
Prerequisite: 82-211
82-214 Topics in Modern Arabic Language, Literature, & Culture
Fall and Spring: 9 units
An integrated approach to the study of the Arabic language, literature and culture by means of literary and cultural readings.This course explores definitions of culture and analyzes the dynamic role of language in culture and culture in language, with an aim to foster cross-cultural awareness and self-realization while developing proficiency in Arabic. This course is designed to strengthen listening, speaking, reading and writing, within the context of an evolving Arabic culture.
82-215 Arab Culture Through Film & Literature
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course introduces students to the Arab World through a lens that challenges stereotypes, fosters a better understanding of the social reality of Arab societies, and appreciates the diverse identities. The objective is to increase cross-cultural understanding and equip students with the skills needed to thrive in the 21st century and become global citizens. Students will build cultural literacy and relationships through virtual meetings with Arab students in Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Qatar, and Morocco, in addition to watching a variety of critically-acclaimed films and reading two novels. Topics covered are the diversity of the Arab World, homo/sexuality, gender roles, social values, the effect of modernization on changes, and revolution music and art that emerged since the Arab uprisings of 2011.
82-216 Literature of the Arabic-speaking World
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course is offered only at Carnegie Mellon's campus in Qatar. This repeatable introductory course explores the Arab world through a thematic or conceptual focus. In spring 2016, the theme will be "Cultural Issues in the West and the Arab World". Coursework will include reading short stories and novels to understand the cultural context that gave rise to specific literary works. Students will also continue to develop their abilities to express their ideas both in speaking and in writing, as well as their listening skills in Modern Standard Arabic.
82-217 Multilingualism and Multiculturalism in the Arab World
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course brings linguistic and cultural diversity in the Arab world to the forefront through exposing students to the key social issues in the study of multilingualism. To this end, the course will explore and analyze some of the deeply held language ideologies in Arab and international contexts. Topics to be covered in the course include (but are not limited to) multilingualism within and across languages (e.g., multidialectal practices, code-switching between languages, language variation and change), societal and individual multilingualism (e.g. language and identity), multilingualism in institutional sites (e.g. schools, the work place), language policy and planning, and language rights. The course is taught in a seminar, discussion-based format and students will construct projects to explore course topics in a hands-on manner. The course is taught in English and students who wish to take the course as a Modern Languages major or minor elective will need to complete their final project on a topic relevant to the language they study.
82-221 Intermediate German I
Fall and Spring: 9 units
The goal of Intermediate German I is to further develop students linguistic and cultural knowledge, allowing them to feel more comfortable as a user of German. By the end of the semester, students should be able to: use and understand German in everyday situations; communicate effectively in general areas and in individual areas of interest; understand general cultural perspectives in contemporary Germany; and read and understand authentic materials from German-speaking countries. Activities will help develop the four skills and of cultural knowledge. This course focuses on intercultural concepts and will help students see what things Germans view differently from other nations and what things might be similar. Topics will include issues such as travel, politics, immigration, and music. A student with prior experience in German must take the placement exam.
Prerequisites: 82-122 or 82-123
82-222 Intermediate German II
Fall and Spring: 9 units
In this class, students will expand and develop their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills, as well as their cultural knowledge of German-speaking countries. This course focuses on intercultural concepts and will help students see what things Germans view differently from other nations and what things might be similar. Topics will include issues such as views on German history, prospects for Germany's future, art and artists, and the German film industry. By the end of the course, students should be able to make themselves understood in German and understand German-speakers with experience dealing with foreigners. A student with prior experience in German must take the placement exam. Instructions for the placement exam are available in Baker Hall 160. Prerequisite: 82-221 or placement
Prerequisite: 82-221
82-227 Germany & the European Union
Spring: 9 units
This course offers an overview of contemporary Germany, its problems and its promise, with a particular focus on German politics, the German economy, and Germany's role in the European Union and in the world system. Primary topics include: 1) Germany on the World Stage; 2) Germany and the Past; 3) the German political system; 4) the German economic system; 5) the European Union, its challenges, and Germany's role in it; 6) Germany, the EU, and multiculturalism and ethnic and cultural pluralism, including the role played in Germany and Europe by ethnic, religious, and cultural minorities. Each of these topics will take about 2-3 weeks of the course. Students in the course will be required 1) to complete all required course readings (the equivalent of about three books in English, although in most cases we will be reading chapters from books rather than entire books, plus about five separate articles in English), 2) to take five short fifteen-minute quizzes on the some of the various themes of the course, 3) to do a book review of a book of their choosing dealing with contemporary Germany and/or the European Union and to make a presentation about that book in class, 4) to write three short (four page) papers on the themes of the course, and 5) to participate in two debates about A) Germany's response to the past; and B) Whether or not Germany and the EU should be more open to ethnic, cultural, and religious minorities.
82-230 Topics in Cultural Comparison
Intermittent: 9 units
Courses offered under this repeatable title will transcend the focus on one area or nation or language by engaging in cultural comparison. This course makes full use of the variety of faculty specializations in the department and Dietrich College to broaden students' perspectives and help them gain an understanding of the divergences and convergences of world cultures. This course and all source materials will be in English. Past titles have included The Great Divergence Debate in Chinese Economic History. SPRING 2017:
82-231 Intermediate Chinese I
Fall and Spring: 12 units
This course is the continuation of Elementary Chinese II (82-132). At the intermediate level, students will continue to improve the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing with the goal of becoming more proficient in daily communication needs. In addition to an ongoing review of basic grammar, a greater variety of expressions and complicated sentence structures will be taught so that students can carry on more sophisticated daily conversations on various topics related to every day life. While equal emphasis will still be on both Pinyin and characters, students will be encouraged to use more and more Chinese characters with the help of Pinyin for communication. In-class and extracurricular activities related to the broad spectrum of Chinese culture will be organized to facilitate language learning using knowledge of the cultural background of the language. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, presentations, essays, and class participation are mandatory (four in-class hours per week). A student with prior experience in Chinese must take the placement exam.
Prerequisites: 82-134 or 82-132 or 82-135
82-232 Intermediate Chinese II
Fall and Spring: 12 units
This is the second semester of Intermediate Chinese. Its primary goals are to expand students' vocabulary and knowledge of grammar of the Chinese language by learning more new words, expressions, and sentence patterns needed for everyday communication and by consolidating their knowledge through oral and written practice in and out of class. In this course, students will participate in classroom discussions in Mandarin Chinese on various topics concerning everyday life and write short paragraphs on those topics using Chinese characters. Different aspects of Chinese culture will also be introduced during the whole semester through multimedia, lectures, and discussions. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, presentations, and class participation are mandatory (four in-class hours per week). A student with prior experience in Chinese must take the placement exam.
Prerequisite: 82-231
82-234 Topics in Chinese History
Intermittent: 9 units
In fewer than three decades, the People's Republic of China has transformed itself from an underdeveloped and reclusive state to become the world's next probable superpower. Divided roughly into three sections, this course examines: 1) the miraculous economic development that made China's rise possible; 2) the political system that allowed the Chinese Communist Party to rule over that rise; 3) China's rising global stature and its implications for the rest of the world. In combination these sections allow us to understand how China's rise happened and what it means for the future of the entire globe. Issues addressed include: economic development, inequality, cyber-security and internet censorship, Intellectual Property Protection, China's influence in Africa, China's military capability, and the Beijing Consensus. The goal of this course is to prepare students for a world where China is increasingly important, but also to ask how China got to where it is today, and where it is going as chances are highly likely that students in most any area of study will be influenced by China's future. This course and all source materials will be in English. No knowledge of Chinese is required.
82-235 Fables, Legends and Stories from Ancient Chinese Civilization
Spring: 9 units
This course is designed for intermediate level students who would like to focus on improving their reading and writing skills in Mandarin Chinese. One major course goal is to teach students to read in Chinese with fluency and proficiency within a format of rich cultural content by expanding their vocabulary and building up their knowledge of socio-cultural influences on Chinese language use. Readings will include traditional fables, mini-stories, and articles on the lifestyle and social changes in ancient and modern China. Discussion will be one major class activity, however students will also be expected to develop long-term retention and control of the knowledge acquired through reading and writing assignments.
Prerequisites: 82-231 or 82-135
82-236 Intensive Chinese Language & Culture: Intermediate Level
Spring
No course description provided.
82-238 Topics in Chinese Culture
Intermittent: 9 units
Courses offered under this repeatable title will focus on aspects of modern and contemporary Chinese culture, including, for example, literature, the arts, theater and music, and gender studies. Through the critical analysis of original sources in translation, film, as well as outstanding works of scholarship, students will gain a deeper understanding of important developments in modern and contemporary China and will learn how to locate and evaluate sources of knowledge about China for future study. This course and all source materials will be in English. No knowledge of Chinese is required. Past titles have included Gender & Sexuality in China: Tradition and Transformation. F18: Gender & Sexuality in China: Tradition and Transformation Over the past 100 years, Chinese women and men have seen tremendous changes in their social and private lives as China underwent wars, revolutions, market reform and opening up. The study of gender and sexuality provides a unique opportunity to explore how Chinese social/ private life has been transformed through economic development and social revolution in China. The course begins with a background discussion of Chinese traditions in the field of gender and sexuality, and covers the period from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. It aims to help student explore the answers to questions on the cultural expectations behind the idea of "man", "woman" and "sex" and the role the government p has played in regulating intimacy/sex/gender in different historical periods of China. Discussions will also be conducted on the changes in Chinese people's gender/sexuality experiences in contemporary to help students develop a deeper understanding of the sexual revolution in China, and changing conceptions of gender/sexuality identity under Confucianism, Western Imperialism, socialism and globalization. Course materials include articles, books, as well as films.
82-241 Intermediate Spanish I
Fall and Spring: 9 units
Intermediate Spanish I is the first part of a two-semester course sequence (82-241, 82-242) designed to familiarize students with the cultures and perspectives of the Spanish-speaking world. Students will develop self-expression across a range of culturally significant topics, improving their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills while working with longer passages of language in context through reading, writing and listening/viewing (e.g. tv series, movies, short novels, plays) and frequently working in groups and pairs, and utilizing technologies that enhance learning opportunities and promote skill development. The course provides extracurricular opportunities to interact with members of the Spanish-speaking community.
Prerequisites: 82-142 or 82-144
82-242 Intermediate Spanish II
Fall and Spring: 9 units
Intermediate Spanish II is the second part of a two-semester course sequence (82-241, 82-242) designed to familiarize students with the cultures and perspectives of the Spanish-speaking world. Students will develop self-expression across a range of culturally significant topics, improving their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills while working with longer passages of language in context through reading, writing and listening/viewing (e.g. tv series, movies, short novels, plays) and frequently working in groups and pairs, and utilizing technologies that enhance learning opportunities and promote skill development. The course provides extracurricular opportunities to interact with members of the Spanish-speaking community.
Prerequisites: 82-243 or 82-241
82-245 New Directions in Hispanic Studies
Intermittent: 9 units
FALL 2019: Death, Dope, Drag and Doctors in 20th and 21st Century Spanish Film "Even today, I've no idea what the truth is, or what I did with it." ¿ Luis Buñuel, My Last Sigh Spanish film is known for its quirkiness, irreverence and, as referenced by the inimitable Luis Buñuel, contemplation of truth. This course will enter into that discourse by analyzing films from 20th and 21st century Spain. While no prior knowledge of Spanish language, culture nor history are required, interest in cultural exploration and critical thinking are necessary. Film analysis will form part of the crux of the course, as we will examine cinematography, sound, script, and music. Some questions that might arise may include - How does the film portray emotion? How does the film reflect cultural nuance? The class will be student-centered, and thus highly interactive. It is also a goal of this course to stimulate analytical thinking, and to promote the close readings of texts directed by argumentation and well-structured insights. "
82-247 The Hispanic World: History, Culture and Globalization
Intermittent: 9 units
This course examines the histories, cultures, and current socio-political and economic concerns of the Hispanic world including Spain, Latin America, and transnational Hispanic communities around the world. The course provides a historical foundation in order to understand the impact of various historical events on the Hispanic world today such as the Arab conquest, the colonization of Latin America, independence movements, revolutions, dictatorships, democratization, and globalization. We will examine current concerns of the Hispanic world such as democratization processes, trade, economic crisis, and migration that have shaped its languages, cultures, politics, and economies. These topics will be explored through readings, films, music, classroom visits, field trips, and exploration of the Spanish language. The course is intended to lead to a greater knowledge and an increased appreciation of the cultural and historical roots, past and current life-styles, and languages of the peoples of the Hispanic world. (The language of instruction is English.)
82-248 Topics in Social Change
Fall and Spring: 9 units
FALL 2019: Arts, Media and Social Change: The Arts in Revolution ¿ Cuba and Nicaragua. This course will examine the Cuban and Nicaraguan Revolutions and their relationships to artistic production in a larger socio-political context, considering the complex dynamic of both fomenting creative expression, while also (on occasion) stifling its content. 2019 marks 60 years since the Cuban Revolution, touted as the victory of a tiny island over US imperialism, and 40 years since the triumph of the Sandinistas in Nicaragua - both cases garnering broad international attention due to their importance in Cold War political agendas and the subsequent interplay of US-Soviet relationships in the US' "backyard". While quite different, the Cuban and Nicaraguan Revolutions shared an inherent understanding of the value of capturing the public imaginary and support through the use of the arts to promote their messages and as such, invested significant resources in the promotion of creative production. This course will interrogate the relationships between political and artistic movements, examining for example the formation of ICAIC (Instituto Cubano del Arte e Industria Cinematográficos) in Cuba and the mural movement in Nicaragua. Once these political movements had triumphed, how did artists negotiate the institutionalization of revolution? How did the role of prominent cultural workers like Tomas Gutierrez Alea (Cuba) and Ernesto Cardenal (Nicaragua) evolve as these revolutions aged? We will also question the dynamic between artists whose works express discontent and the State - what was/is the space for dissent? How do artists of newer generations create space for different types of expression that diverge from what early revolutionary moments considered to be transformative? Decades later with deeply entrenched governments, what now is the relationship between the arts and socio-political change?
82-249 Hispanic Language & Cultures for the Professions
Fall and Spring: 9 units
FALL 2019: This course focuses on building proficiency in Spanish-language communicative skills and cultural awareness for business contexts in the very diverse Spanish-speaking world, one with over 437 million speakers worldwide. Students will be introduced to a variety of contexts in the Spanish-speaking world of global business and finance through multimodal materials, e.g., newspapers, film, advertisements, and other relevant texts. By examining different scenarios such as job interviews, international trade, and workplace environments, students will build knowledge of vocabulary and develop a real-world understanding of appropriate linguistic, cultural, and discipline-specific practices.
Prerequisite: 82-241
82-253 Korean Culture Through Film
Intermittent: 9 units
South Korean cinema became one of the most vibrant local film industries at the end of the last century, attracting great attention from both the public and scholars, not only at home but abroad as well. Intriguingly, its renaissance involves a strong tendency to revisit and reassess a variety of historical traumas from the last century, which makes it an important venue for discussing the evolution of modern Korean society and culture. This course thus explores works of acclaimed filmmakers such as Im Kown-taek, Park Kwang-su, Jang Sun-woo, Hong Sang-soo, Lee Chang-dong, Park Chan-wook, Bong Joon-ho, Kim Ji-woon, etc. to enrich our understanding of social and cultural formations in South Korea over the last century. In examining the voices from the Korean peninsula whose history had remained obscured until recently, this course also aspires to contribute fresh perspectives to broader geopolitical settings such as East Asian and Pacific Rim discourses. Prerequisite: None
82-254 World of Korea, Then and Now
Intermittent: 9 units
Over the past two decades or so, South Korea has grown to become a major player, not only in East Asia, but also in world politics, economy, and culture. While Korean society thus certainly deserves enough attention as a venue for discussing the changes occurring across the world, its history and culture still remains less known than it should be to the outside world including the U.S. This course thus aims to offer an opportunity to explore the evolution of Korean society and culture over the course of its modern history. By enriching the knowledge of Korean history, it also hopes to help the student gain fresh perspectives on broader contexts such as East Asia and the Pacific Rim. This course covers a broad range of time periods: the colonial era to the present. Yet designed to inspire critical approach rather than just offer sketchy overviews, it is structured around key sociocultural issues such as colonial legacies, the cold war paranoia, dictatorship, democratization, national culture, gender politics, diaspora, globalization, hallyu (k-pop/k-drama), etc. To better serve its objectives, this course also utilizes diverse forms of texts: historical studies, critical essays, literary works, films, TV dramas, and music videos. Prerequisite: None
82-261 Intermediate Italian I
Fall: 9 units
This course begins a two-semester course sequence (82-261, 82-262) for intermediate-level students. At the intermediate level, students will continue to improve listening, speaking, reading and writing skills with the goal of becoming more proficient in daily and extended communication needs. In addition to an ongoing review of basic grammar, a greater variety of grammar, expressions and complicated sentence structures will be taught so that students can carry on more sophisticated conversations on various topics. In-class activities and homework using authentic texts related to the broad spectrum of Italian culture will be used to integrate language learning with content and culture. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, presentations, essays, and class participation are mandatory. A student with prior experience in Italian must take the placement exam.
Prerequisites: 82-162 or 82-163
82-262 Intermediate Italian II
Spring: 9 units
At the intermediate level, students will continue to improve listening, speaking, reading and writing skills with the goal of becoming more proficient in daily and extended communication needs. In addition to an ongoing review of basic grammar, a greater variety of grammar, expressions and complicated sentence structures will be taught so that students can carry on more sophisticated conversations on various topics. In-class activities and homework using authentic texts related to the broad spectrum of Italian culture will be used to integrate language learning with content and culture. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, presentations, essays, and class participation are mandatory. A student with prior experience in Italian must take the placement exam. Instructions for the placement exam are available in Baker Hall 160. Prerequisite: 82-261 or placement
Prerequisite: 82-261
82-263 Intensive Italian Language & Culture: Intermediate Level
Intermittent: 9 units
No course description provided.
82-267 Topics in Italian Language & Culture
Intermittent: 9 units
FALL 2019 Beyond the Mafia and Michelangelo: Italy Unmasked Eclipsed by the consumer obsessions of tourists and the most well-known figures of Italian history, the uniqueness of Italy, offering distinct cultures in the north, central, and south, is rarely understood by outsiders. In this course, students will discover an Italy rich with cultural variants, radically diverse histories, customs, cults, and superstitions, in addition to physical expressions of culture in cooking and clothing, art and architecture. Students will identify and critically analyze diversity within the peninsula and its islands, and expand their awareness and understanding of the role of culture in behavior. Film, documentaries, and readings from epistolary and literary sources will help reveal a more profound Italy, for example, the science of Dulbecco (the Human Genome), the architecture of Trulli conical houses, the religious importance of Pitigliano ('Little Jerusalem'), and the immigration problems of San Marino. Coursework will include class participation, readings, film viewings, and writing. Final projects will be based on interviews and oral histories with the Italo-American community in Bloomfield (Pittsburgh), leading to critical comparisons of that population with Italians in Italy. This course is offered in English.
82-271 Intermediate Japanese I
Fall and Spring: 12 units
This course is the first part of a two-semester course sequence (82-271, 82-272). At the intermediate level, students will continue to improve the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills with the goal of becoming more proficient in daily communication needs, and takes an integrated approach to the study of Japanese language and culture, consisting of grammar review, reading, and intensive practice in written and spoken Japanese. Course materials include authentic audiovisual and written texts in addition to the assigned textbooks. Also integrated are cultural explorations through direct interactions with native speakers. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, presentations, essays, and class participation are mandatory (four in-class hours per week). A student with prior experience in Japanese must take the placement exam.
Prerequisite: 82-172
82-272 Intermediate Japanese II
Spring: 12 units
This course is a sequel to Intermediate Japanese I (82-27182-171). At the intermediate level, students will continue to improve the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills with the goal of becoming more proficient in daily communication needs, and takes an integrated approach to the study of Japanese language and culture, consisting of grammar review, reading, and intensive practice in written and spoken Japanese. Course materials include authentic audiovisual and written texts in addition to the assigned textbooks. Also integrated are cultural explorations through direct interactions with native speakers. Regular homework, quizzes, tests, presentations, essays, and class participation are mandatory (four in-class hours per week). A student with prior experience in Japanese must take the placement exam. Prerequisite: 82-271 or placement
Prerequisite: 82-271
82-273 Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course is an introduction to modern Japanese. Given the close link between the Japanese language and culture, the examination of the distinctive characteristics of the Japanese language and its sociocultural context provides important insights into contemporary Japan. This course is taught in English and is intended both for individuals who want to gain a better understanding of modern Japanese society, as well as for students of the Japanese language.
82-276 Intensive Japanese Language & Culture: Intermediate Level
Intermittent
No course description provided.
82-278 Japanese Film and Literature: The Art of Storytelling
Intermittent: 9 units
This course explores how the art of storytelling is in tandem with the vicissitudes of the human condition as illustrated in Japan's variety of fictions, non-fictions, and films in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Analyses of each storytelling not only reveal the cultural dynamics behind Japanese modernity, but also invite students to find new insights into Japanese culture and their ways of perceiving our globalized world. What kind of cultural exchanges took place between modern Japan and the West? How are Japan's traditional values transformed in the face of modern technicalization and industrialization, compared to the modernization of other countries? And, in turn, what kind of impact has modern Japanese culture had on today's world? Tackling these questions among others, the course also extends to such issues as the legacy of traditional Japanese culture, the modern Emperor system, World War II experiences, emerging voices of minorities, and popular culture (e.g., anime and subculture). This course is taught in English.
82-279 Anime - Visual Interplay between Japan and the World
All Semesters: 9 units
In contemporary Japanese culture, anime plays a vital role, unfolding a wide range of stories with its distinct modes of visual representation and complementing to other forms of culture (e.g., literature, film, and art). This course explores Japanese anime¿s appeal to the international viewers today, centering around cultural analyses of anime such as the Studio Ghibli production and Cyberpunk. Equally important are to locate the origin of Japanese animation, which is also investigated through the prewar and postwar works of animation in conjunction with related forms such as manga, or comic strips (e.g., Osamu Tezuka¿s works that was initially inspired by Disney) and to discuss the potential of anime as an art form.
82-280 Learning About Language Learning
Fall: 9 units
This seminar focuses on the role of diverse affective, cognitive and social factors in second language learning. All participating students are required to be studying an additional language while taking this seminar. Each class is devoted to discussion of assigned readings as well as to completion of various measures, inventories or questionnaires that assess diverse predictors of second language learning. These data are collected throughout the term, and then analyzed and related to predictions based upon previous research that have been discussed in class. Each student also identifies a "good" or a "poor" second language learner to interview and then report back to the class on the learners' characteristics. Prerequisite: None Corequisite: Study of a foreign language
82-281 Tutoring for Community Outreach
Intermittent
6-9 units This course enables students to participate in a community outreach program in the Pittsburgh Public Schools with either elementary school, middle school, or high school students, and, depending on the site, foster their studies of Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Spanish or ESL. The elementary school experience will involve regular visits, mentoring, and tutoring at school sites in the East End of Pittsburgh. The middle school experience provides opportunity for tutoring in Japanese, French, or Spanish at Barack Obama Academy of International Studies. The high school or middle school experience invites advanced students, majors, or minors in Chinese, French, German, Japanese, or Spanish to work with language students and teachers at local schools. During the early weeks of the semester, students will meet to arrange their community outreach activities and prepare for their experience. Depending on the number of units to be earned, students will spend a certain number of hours per week engaged in some of the following activities: attending and participating in the individual and group meetings, working in the schools four to six hours per week, reading and preparing for their volunteer activities, keeping a journal of their experiences and responses to course readings, writing a paper or completing a project at the end of the term that reflects experiences. The weekly on-campus class meeting will run 50 minutes. The remaining 30 minutes will be devoted to individual consultations related to school-site activities. The final course grade will be based on the student's participation at the school site and fulfillment of the plan set at the beginning of the semester, participation in weekly on-campus discussions, weekly journal submissions, and final synthesis project.
82-282 Community Service Learning
Intermittent
In this course students of Modern Languages will work in the Pittsburgh community to promote learning of cultures and languages. This work may be done to complement course work in modern languages on campus and involve an experience in one of a variety of community settings, such as a heritage language school, hospital translation center, or neighborhood center. Grade will be based on the student's participation at the outreach site and fulfillment of the plan set at the beginning of the semester. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
82-283 Language Diversity & Cultural Identity
Fall and Spring: 9 units
Culture, language, and identity are intimately tied together. Individuals, families, communities, and nations identify themselves in relation to the language or languages they speak. Local, national, and international governmental organizations make choices about the language or languages they recognize and use for political and economic affairs. The United Nations even recognizes language as integral to maintaining the cultural heritage of communities and peoples around the world, and the freedom to choose ones language of expression as a universal human right. In this course, we will explore a variety of questions, advantages, and challenges related to language diversity and cultural identity across the globe. Our main focus will be on contexts of multilingualism that is, contexts in which two or more languages may be used. Adopting a comparative case study approach, we will explore the following themes: (i) The historical underpinnings of language diversity and its consequences for cultural identity today (e.g., migration, colonization, conquest); (ii) How language diversity and cultural identity shapes, and is shaped by, local, regional, national, and international politics; (iii) The relationship between language diversity and language use and visibility in public spaces (i.e., the linguistic landscape); (iv) Relations between linguistic communities (e.g., majority and minority language users) and the sense of belonging to a culture. The course is taught in English. Students who wish to take the course as a Modern Languages major or minor elective will need to complete their final project on a topic relevant to the language they study.
82-284 Multicultural Pittsburgh: A Creative Media Exploration of Cmmnty, Lang & Identit
Fall and Spring: 9 units
Pittsburgh is known for its multicultural landscape and communities. Through this course, students will explore the cultures, identities, languages, and groups that have historically shaped, and are still shaping Pittsburgh. Students will develop digital documentation of the city¿s communities, for example using video, photography, audio podcast augmented AR and immersive VR. Through active learning, students will employ approaches such as testimony, psycho-geography, use map-making and topographical tools, and explore data visualization and 3D imaging. Students will craft their work in a new multimedia space for engagement with global languages and cultures housed in the newly opened Tepper Quad, and at the end of the semester, their work will be on exhibit for the campus community and the wider public. This course will develop your research and fieldwork skills, media creation skills and multicultural literacy. The only pre-requisites are an adventurous spirit and an open approach to creativity. Limited to 12 students.
82-285 Podcasting: Language and Culture Through Storytelling
Fall: 9 units
Do you love stories? Stories told on the radio have always had significant power. For example, the 1938 War of the Worlds broadcast by Orson Welles was so effective that it panicked the entire United States. Today, podcasts such as Serial, This American Life, and The Moth have the same power to tell stories and provide audiences with rich, intimate and immersive audio experiences while often supporting diversity and giving voice to minorities and those under-represented in mainstream media. Owing its rising popularity to the ease and accessibility of production and distribution, there has never been a better time to create and tell stories in audio. In this course students will take on the role of podcast producers, learning while creating a series of podcasts that explore linguistic and cultural landscapes with the goals of educating and entertaining. Possible audio resources include field interviews with native speakers in their own language, allowing student producers to document informants' personal histories and aspects of their life related to culture, multilingualism, or political, social or environmental issues. Students will blend studio recordings with interviews and/or suitable "found" recordings, music, and sound. Coursework will include skill development on audio recording and podcasting, production management, creative thinking, materials sourcing, and giving and receiving constructive feedback from classmates and varied audiences on team and individual projects. The course will be offered in English.
82-286 Understanding Cultural Complexities
Fall and Spring: 9 units
Section A: Haiti: Challenge & Hope: CANCELLED Section B: Service Learning or Poverty Tourism? Exploring Pedagogy & Privilege in Int'l Contexts: We will examine the phenomenon of short-term trips to the developing world, as thousands of people each year travel from the United States to Asia, Africa and Latin America with the goal of "helping" people. Recently, this has been one of the fastest-growing populations of students who go abroad. From church groups, to medical organizations, to student groups, these initiatives propose to build houses, provide medical care, plant trees, and teach children. There is no shortage of projects. What do these short-term engagements do, and who is served? We will explore the ethical questions that arise around the themes of "service" and "engagement", with particular focus on initiatives in Latin America. We will consider to what extent these projects respond appropriately to the cultural contexts. What is the responsibility of participants to ensure the best experience for the communities they visit? Can these initiatives have the impact they propose? Students who have participated or will participate in short-term service trips are encouraged to enroll. Opportunity will be given to study the organizations and locations related to their trips.
82-288 Introduction to Haitian Studies
Intermittent: 9 units
TBA
82-291 Intermediate Russian I
Fall: 12 units
This course is designed for students who have taken two semesters of Russian at Carnegie Mellon or the equivalent. It is offered in the fall only. This course furthers communicative proficiency through intensive practice in written and spoken Russian. Complex grammatical structures and stylistic variations are mastered and extensive vocabulary is acquired. Through reading materials, fictional and non-fictional, acquaintance is made with the basic components of Russian cultural literacy as well as the distinctive cultural aspects of daily Russian life. Attention is directed toward the dynamic interaction of language and culture in order to foster cross-cultural awareness. Attendance is required at three-hourly class meetings per week, as is weekly consultation and conversation practice with a peer language assistant. **"If you would like to take this course, but the current time slot does not work with your schedule please contact the instructor as soon as possible and we may be able to accommodate you**
Prerequisite: 82-192
82-292 Intermediate Russian II
Spring: 12 units
In this second semester of the yearlong intermediate Russian course students will review the basics of Russian grammar, develop listening comprehension, and expand their vocabularies. They will learn to relate simple narratives on familiar topics, express their opinions, ask questions, and speak about hypothetical situations. Students will be able to grasp the main ideas and certain nuances of texts presented in print and visual media as well as conduct straightforward conversations with native speakers. Students will also begin to build their skills in interpreting Russian poetry, literary prose, and film. A student with prior experience in Russian must take the placement exam.
Prerequisite: 82-291
82-293 Russian Cinema: From the Bolshevik Revolution to Putin's Russia
Intermittent: 9 units
"Last night I was in the kingdom of shadows," said the writer Maxim Gorky in 1896 after seeing a film for the first time. "How terrifying to be there!" Early film inspired fear and fascination in its Russian audiences, and before long became a medium of bold aesthetic and philosophical experimentation. This seminar-style course surveys the development of Russian and Soviet film, paying equal attention to the formal evolution of the medium and the circumstances¿historical, cultural, institutional¿that shaped it. We will examine Sergei Eisenstein's and Dziga Vertov's experiments with montage in light of the events of the Bolshevik Revolution and the directors' engagement with Marxism; Georgi Alexandrov's and the Vasiliev brothers' Socialist Realist production against the backdrop of Stalinist censorship; Andrei Tarkovsky's and Kira Muratova's Thaw-era films within the broader context of New Wave Cinema; and the works of contemporary directors, including Aleksei Balabanov, Alexander Sokurov, and Andrey Zvyagintsev, in connection with the shifting social and political landscape of post-Soviet Russia. Besides introducing students to the Russian and Soviet cinematic tradition, this course will hone their skills in close visual analysis. No prior knowledge of Russian language or culture is required. The course is conducted in English, but students will have the option to do work in Russian for three extra course units.
82-294 Topics in Russian Language and Culture
Intermittent: 9 units
SPRING 2019: Topics in Russian Language and Culture: 20th Century Russian Masterpieces. The October Revolution of 1917 had profound effects not only for Russian society, but also for literature and culture. Even before the Revolution, Vladimir Lenin stressed the importance of literature on the hearts and minds of people. After the Revolution, the new Soviet state demanded writers to become, in Stalin's words, engineers of human souls, and proclaimed socialist realism as the only permissible method of creative work in literature. This course focuses on masterpieces of Russian prose and poetry of the 20th century. Readings will include the proletarian writings of Maxim Gorky, the symbolism of Alexander Blok, the futurism and modernism of Vladimir Mayakovsky, as well as works by many other authors. We will discuss such important issues for Russian cultural history as the role of the intelligentsia in the Russian Revolution; the content and method of Russian decadence; symbolism and modernism; and the experience of imprisonment, liberation, and exile that became so important for many writers and poets.
82-296 A Century of Russian Film
Intermittent: 9 units
FALL 2014 This course presents a selection of the dominant works, directors and genres that have defined Russian film-making from its birth to the present. About twenty sub-titled films are viewed and discussed within the context of artistic trends and political events shaping the Russian film industry. Films are screened in class on Mondays. While the primary aim is to acquaint you with Russian film in its cultural context, a secondary purpose is to focus your attention on the aesthetics of film form. This will increase your pleasure in viewing any film, Russian or otherwise. Discussion will be organized around topics such as these: intellectual climate and key issues in national life at the time of a film?s making; a film?s major and minor themes; historical/national/political/social/artistic issues a film raises; how a film affects its viewers? thinking about these themes and issues. The instructor's own experience as a film director will provide further insight into various aspects of film-making and getting a deeper pleasure from viewing film. No knowledge of Russian is required.
82-299 Alternative Break Project (General)
Intermittent
This course provides ML language students and non-ML students enrolled in an Alternative Break student trip project the opportunity to earn credit by engaging in "connected" modes of knowing, by identifying and analyzing a problem, and developing plans for short-term and sustainable solutions, reflecting, and creating and disseminating an informational and interpretive website and print materials about their experience. Students will also bring to bear or gain experience in non-academic skills/talents/interests in areas like photography, image editing, video production, writing, design, website development, sound recording, and art, etc., by doing community service under the auspices of Carnegie Mellon University's Alternative Break program. Students will earn three (3) units for full participation and fulfillment of course requirements. With the approval of the faculty facilitator, an additional three (3) units may be earned by completing an additional assignment. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
82-300 Language & Society in the Arab World
Fall and Spring: 9 units
Course content varies. Last offered topic: Negotiating Arab Identities & Gender Roles in Film & Literature. This course focuses on the processes of self-definition by Arab men and women in conflict zones in the Middle East and North Africa with relation to national and religious identities, social stratification, sexuality/homosexuality, and gender roles. Students will learn about the social, economic, and political contexts of the films and literary works representing the Maghreb, Egypt, Palestine, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, the Gulf countries, and Yemen. This course fosters a better understanding of Arab societies and the hybrid identities that negotiate their presence and space within. Students will have the opportunity to engage in a video-conference dialogue with students in the American University in Cairo, Egypt, attend an Arab film during CMU's International Film Festival, and interview native speakers of different Arab countries to further their learning of Arab culture.
82-303 Introduction to French Culture
Fall and Spring: 9 units
Through deep cultural analysis of France and the French, students attempt to discover the French "mentality" or what it means to be French. By studying French history, institutions, regions, literature, and current events, students understand how a cultural identity is developed throughout a country's history. Comparisons between current events and France's cultural and social development from the Renaissance forward explain in part the French mentality and how and why France and the French react to the world as they do. The coursework will develop students skills in writing, reading, speaking, and listening, and improve their control of grammar through class discussions, presentations, and essays. Prerequisite: 82-202 or placement
Prerequisites: 82-204 or 82-202
82-304 The Francophone World
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course introduces the students of French to several of the francophone regional cultures outside of France, including North and sub-Saharan Africa, Belgium, Switzerland, Quebec, Louisiana, and the French Antilles. The culture commonly associated with the French language is the primarily Christian and Cartesian European tradition. Through this course, students will learn about the socio-political and cultural realities of the Francophone sphere. The course will also explore the multiple synthetic cultural realities which have arisen through the colonial and post-colonial processes of contact between European and non-European cultures, and which are now expressed through the medium of the French language. Students will expand their interpersonal and presentational communication skills in both written and spoken French, improve reading and listening skills through various media so as to analyze content objectively, use appropriate vocabulary and grammar to express critical judgments, synthesize ideas from different source materials, and continue perfecting cultural analysis skills. Assignments will include using accepted academic conventions for research documentation and exposition. Social debates and current events will add a valuable perspective to our study.
Prerequisite: 82-303
82-305 French in its Social Contexts
Fall and Spring: 9 units
S18: This course is designed to introduce students to how the French is used by its speakers to create meaning in a wide variety of contexts, which in terms are influenced by various variables (e.g., the political and historical circumstances within which French has developed and continues to change, social and geographic variables). To explore these issues, we will create interactive multimedia experiences aimed at being deployed on an interactive video wall and/or in augmented reality settings. This course includes a trip to France over Spring Break. If you have experience in French as well as design, film and photography, or computer-science, this is a course for you! Prerequisites: 82-303 and 82-304 or permission of the instructor,
Prerequisites: 82-303 and 82-304
82-311 Advanced Arabic I
Fall: 9 units
This course promotes multiple literacies in an integrated approach to Arabic language and culture studies and builds students' ability to function at the Intermediate High/Advanced Low level in a variety of topics. It also embraces the diglossic nature of Arabic by explicitly integrating the teaching of Arabic regional spoken varieties alongside Modern Standard Arabic. Moreover, the course incorporates Computer and other Technology Assisted Language Learning pedagogies to support student learning inside and outside the classroom. The course is aligned with ACTFL's updated Arabic guidelines that perceive the Arabic language as a continuum in which both the regional spoken varieties and Modern Standard Arabic constitute a whole in terms of usage.
Prerequisite: 82-212
82-312 Advanced Arabic II
Spring: 9 units
The course is the continuation of Advanced Arabic I. It continues promoting multiple literacies in an integrated approach to Arabic language and culture studies and builds students' ability to function at the advanced level in a variety of topics. It also embraces the diglossic nature of Arabic by explicitly integrating the teaching of Arabic regional spoken varieties alongside Modern Standard Arabic. Moreover, the course incorporates technology-assisted language learning pedagogies to enhance student learning inside and outside the classroom. The course also implements ACTFL's Arabic guidelines that recognize Arabic as a continuum in which both the regional spoken varieties and Modern Standard Arabic constitute a whole in terms of language use.
Prerequisite: 82-311
82-313 Topics in Modern Arabic Language, Literature and Culture
Fall: 9 units
This course explores definitions of culture and analyzes the dynamic role of language in culture, and culture in language, with an aim to foster cross-cultural awareness and self-realization while developing proficiency in Arabic. Using an integrated approach to the study of the Arabic language, literature, and culture through close readings of current media sources (press, news, magazines, as appropriate), and literary and cultural readings. Additionally, this course is designed to strengthen listening, speaking, reading and writing, within the context of an evolving Arabic culture.
82-314 Literature of the Arabic-speaking World
Intermittent: 9 units
This repeatable introductory course explores the Arab world through a thematic or conceptual focus. In spring 2018, the theme will be 'Diversity in The Arab Culture'. Coursework will include reading short stories and novels to understand the cultural context that gave rise to specific literary works. Students will also continue to develop their abilities to express their ideas both in speaking and in writing, as well as their listening skills in Modern Standard Arabic. There is no prerequisite for this course but it is expected that your language proficiency in the Arabic language is good. **This is a content course in the Arabic language and not an Arabic language course.**
82-320 Contemporary Society in Germany, Austria and Switzerland
Fall: 9 units
This course offers an introduction to contemporary German culture since 1989. Switzerland and Austria will be frequently included in class discussions but the main focus will be on Germany. In the wake of reunification, constructions of German cultural identity have undergone radical changes. Through encounters with articles, literary texts, popular music, and film students will explore these transformations and examine German culture and (both individual and collective) "identities" after reunification. The class sessions will be organized around several thematic segments, including East/West relations during and after reunification, German media, multiculturalism and minorities, and, finally, a segment on how to navigate the business world in German-speaking countries. The course will be conducted entirely in German and is designed to deepen students' understanding and awareness of issues in contemporary German culture.
Prerequisite: 82-222
82-323 Germany, Austria and Switzerland in the 20th Century
Spring: 9 units
This course advances proficiency in communicative and grammatical skills in the German language and knowledge of German-speaking cultures through the study of important events, trends, and people of the twentieth century in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Examples will be drawn from literature, newspapers, television, film and other sources. Students will be expected to complete assignments that demonstrate the ability to express critical judgments in both written and oral form, documented through readings and personal research. The course includes a review of the most troublesome points of German grammar.
Prerequisite: 82-222
82-327 The Emergence of the German Speaking World
Intermittent: 9 units
The Italian literary theorist Franco Moretti has written that "Germany is a sort of Magic Stage, where the symbolic antagonisms of European culture achieve a metaphysical intractability, and clash irreconcilably. It is the center and catalyst of the integrated historical system we call Europe." This course is a general introduction to German culture, German history, and German society, with a focus on Germany's role as center and catalyst of the European system. The course is conducted entirely in German. Its goal is to provide students with a basic level of cultural literacy about the German-speaking world. In the course, we will study major trends from the earliest days of German civilization through the middle ages but with primary emphasis on the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries and with a special focus on problems of national, political and cultural identity. Students coming out of the course should have a broad understanding of the various tensions and problems that have characterized German culture and society for the last two centuries. In addition to broadening students' cultural knowledge about the German-speaking world, this course will continue to emphasize the improvement of students' ability to speak, read, write, and listen to German.
Prerequisites: 82-323 or 82-320 or 82-324
82-331 Advanced Chinese I
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course is designed for students who have reached the intermediate level of proficiency in the use of Chinese language to develop their language competency in all four skills to a more advanced level. Students will expand explicit knowledge of socio-cultural influences on Chinese language use, and be able to apply the knowledge to conduct culturally appropriate spoken and written communication across various social domains and genres. Topics to be covered in this class will be closely related to some current social issues in China, such as population, youth, love & marriage, and popular culture. Students will also develop a repertoire of strategies and resources to assist their learning so that they will be gradually become autonomous learners who are able to conduct independent learning of the Chinese language, culture, history, and society. Classroom discussions and essay writing will be the major forms of work throughout the semester. Research projects on Chinese culture and society are also a requirement so that students will be able to gain a deeper understanding of the cultural background of the language. With Pinyin for support, students will learn both the traditional and simplified forms of Chinese characters.
Prerequisites: 82-232 or 82-235
82-332 Advanced Chinese II
Fall and Spring: 9 units
A continuation of Advanced Chinese I, this course is designed to improve students' proficiency to function with Chinese in situations beyond their everyday life. Students will continue to learn more complex language phenomena in order to use exposition, explanation, description, and argumentation in Chinese. More sophisticated language phenomena will be introduced to students together with their social and cultural background through texts and multimedia related to various social issues in China today, for example, traffic, education, employment, healthy living, and other human relations as well as economic situations. Classroom discussion and research project presentations will be the major forms of oral practice, and writing practice will mainly focus on essays and group research project papers.
Prerequisite: 82-331
82-333 Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture
Fall and Spring
This course will introduce students to important developments in China's culture and language since the end of the nineteenth century focusing on the interactions between Chinese and Western cultural traditions and the historical, social, and political contexts in which these interactions evolved. The following questions will motivate discussion: What is Chinese culture in the modern world? What is "modern" and what "traditional" Chinese culture? How does high culture interact with folk culture and popular culture? How have education and language policies shaped Chinese cultural identities over the last century? What does it mean to be Chinese in a diaspora context? Secondary readings, primary documents, and video material chosen for analysis will provide students with important insights into the diverse factors that have been shaping contemporary Chinese culture. This course is conducted in English with no requirement of prior knowledge of Chinese language for students who take it for 9 units. Students who take this course towards fulfillment of requirements for the Chinese major or minor must register for 12 units requiring completion of three (3) units of study in Chinese Studies. Prerequisites: To register for 12 units, there is a prerequisite of either 82-232 or 82-235 or placement. There is no prerequisite for students taking the course for 9 units.
82-334 Structure of Chinese
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This is an upper-level Chinese course for students who have completed the requirements for intermediate Chinese with the goal of enabling students to build up a more comprehensive and systematic understanding of the structure of Chinese so as to lay a solid foundation for the further development of their advanced level language proficiency. This course will cover major complicated structural phenomena in Modern Chinese through the study of specially selected sample texts. Special emphasis will be given to high frequent errors and weaknesses on particularly problematic elements and sentence structures that are common among non-native Chinese speakers. After this course, students can expect to have the ability to use Chinese more accurately and naturally in both speaking and writing on sophisticated topics in life. Prerequisite: 82-232 or 82-235 or placement
Prerequisites: 82-235 or 82-232
82-335 Chinese Culture Through Legends and Folktales
Intermittent: 9 units
This is an upper-level Chinese Reading course for students who have reached intermediate level proficiency in Chinese. It is designed to train students to read extensively in Chinese with fluency and proficiency within a context of rich cultural content. Materials used in this class are selected from traditional fables, mini-stories, and articles from newspapers and magazines on the lifestyle and social changes in modern China. While discussion will be one of the major class activities, students are strongly encouraged to profit from opportunities to build their vocabulary and improve their sense of the Chinese language through reading and writing assignments throughout the semester. Prerequisite: 82-232 or 82-235 or placement
Prerequisite: 82-232
82-337 Mandarin Chinese for Oral Communication I
Fall: 9 units
This course is designed for students who have reached intermediate level in reading and writing Chinese, but have little knowledge of Mandarin Chinese pronunciation, as well as those who aim to further improve their speaking in Chinese. Students will be introduced to Pinyin, the phonetic system of Mandarin Chinese, and work to refine and perfect their speaking skills through special attention to different styles, colloquialisms, and dialectal variations of contemporary spoken Mandarin. Course materials will include authentic Chinese TV programs, documentaries, films, recorded materials, and contemporary literary and non-literary texts. Students will be required to participate in intensive speaking activities, such as interviewing native speakers of Chinese, oral presentations, discussions, debates, and special projects. At the end of the course, students are expected to carry on oral communication with native Mandarin speakers in a clearly participatory fashion on topics related to various social issues in Modern China.
Prerequisite: 82-232
82-338 Mandarin Chinese for Oral Communication II
Spring: 9 units
This is an upper-level course focused on the improvement of students' oral communicative competence and self-expression in Chinese. This course is designed for students who have reached intermediate level in reading and writing Chinese, and who would like to promote their oral communicative competence and knowledge of Chinese culture. It is a seminar-type class that relies on active participation from the students. Students will practice various conversational tasks, such as giving presentations, participating in discussions and debates, interviewing, describing, and interpreting. Topics will include current events and cultural trends in the U.S. and China, analysis of Chinese culture and comparisons with other cultures, contemporary Chinese television shows and movies, and other modern issues.
Prerequisites: 82-232 or 82-235
82-339 Business Language & Culture in China I
Fall: 9 units
Designed for students who have had at least two years of Chinese language training, this course enables students to enhance their language proficiency for professional environments and develop an in-depth understanding of the current business culture in China. Substantial authentic materials from newspapers, magazines, TV shows and online sources will be introduced in class to help students interact smoothly with the Chinese business world. Students will also be encouraged to foster creative and independent thinking, which is crucial for survival in today's business world, through a variety of classroom activities such as group discussion/debate, professional interviews, business projects and presentations, and oral/written business reports. Professional language skills (both speaking and writing) as well as social and business etiquette will be introduced and reinforced throughout the course. Sample topics include: China's reform and "opening up", China's market, "Made in China", marketing in China, Chinese business cards and connections, Chinese etiquette at business banquets, consumer psychology in China.
Prerequisites: 82-232 or 82-235
82-340 Business Language & Culture in China II
Spring: 9 units
The goal of this course is to help students improve their language proficiency in professional environments and develop an in-depth understanding of the current business culture in China. Authentic materials from newspapers, magazines, TV shows, and online sources will be introduced in class to help students interact smoothly with the Chinese business world. Students will be encouraged to foster creative and independent thinking skills, which are crucial for survival in today's business world, through a variety of classroom activities such as group discussion/debate, professional interviews, business projects and presentations, and oral/written business reports. Professional language skills (both speaking and writing) as well as social and business etiquette will be introduced and reinforced throughout the course. Sample topics include: appreciation of the Chinese currency RMB, the Chinese perspective of privacy, euphemism in Chinese culture, China's gift-giving culture, how to properly promote yourself in China, the Chinese perspective of wealth management, the Chinese management style. Prerequisite: 82-232 or 82-235 or placement
Prerequisites: 82-331 or 82-339
82-342 Spain: Language and Culture
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course is part of the post-intermediate, 300-level program that forms the introduction to the major or minor in Hispanic Studies. Students may begin with any one of the three courses at this level or they may be taken concurrently. Spain: Language and Culture focuses on the cultures of Spain, the autonomous regions and the creation of a national identity as a reaction to the multiple ethnicities that have inhabited the peninsula since ancient times. The course advances proficiency in grammatical accuracy, the ability to communicate one's ideas in Spanish, and cultural proficiency. The focus of in-class activities is on written and non-written sources such as history, literature, film, art, and elements of popular culture; the building of reading and writing skills will be complemented by continued oral practice in the form of small and large group discussions and class presentations. Treatment of reading selections is designed to increase students general familiarity with a variety of genres, devices, and discourse types and to build a foundation for the department's more advanced courses in literature, history and culture. The course will be taught in Spanish.
Prerequisites: 82-244 or 82-242
82-343 Latin America Language and Culture
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course is part of the post-intermediate, 300-level program that forms the introduction to the major or minor in Hispanic Studies. Students may begin with any one of the three courses at this level or they may be taken concurrently. This course will explore Latin American culture and language, focusing on issues of cultural identity. Tracing the historical thread of the construction of Latin American cultural identity we will distinguish 6 periods organized around crisis when the topic of Who we are? becomes a central debate (Larrain 1996). These periods include: the conquest and colonization, the independence and constitution of nation-states, the inter war period and the depression, the 1970s and the military dictatorships and the present globalization stage. These phases in the development of a Latin American cultural identity represent the existence of certain dominant discourses and controversies that are important in understanding Latin American culture (Larrain 1996). The idea is to explore how Latin America imagines itself and constructs a narrative about its origins and development. There are three main questions we will be exploring throughout the course: Where does the discussion about Latin America emerge from?; How does Latin America think of itself?; What does Latin America want to be?. These questions will be explored historically through readings of philosophical and political texts that deal with Latin American identity as well as with literary texts, films and music that represent practices that enact this/ese identity/ies. The course will be taught in Spanish.
Prerequisites: 82-242 or 82-244
82-344 U.S. Latinos: Language and Culture
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course is part of the post-intermediate, 300-level program that forms the introduction to the major or minor in Hispanic Studies. Students may begin with any one of the three courses at this level or they may be taken concurrently. This course provides an introduction to and analysis of the cultures and histories of U.S. Latinos. The course will trace the historical trajectories of these groups, both those dating back centuries, such as Mexican-Americans and certain Caribbean populations, and those with more recent, quickly growing populations, such as Salvadoran and Honduran immigrants, in an effort to understand how their identities are forged and transformed over time, considering both internal and external perspectives. Our exploration of U.S. Latino history and cultures will compare and contrast the experiences of people from the above-described categories and analyze the dynamic tension amongst them, with other minority groups, and with the mainstream US society. We will examine a wide variety of materials, including texts, film, art, music etc. in order to gain a better understanding of Latino populations in the United States. Ultimately, we seek to question and to understand the complexities of Latinidad in the 21st century U.S. The course will be taught in Spanish.
Prerequisites: 82-242 or 82-244
82-345 Introduction to Hispanic Literary & Cultural Studies
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This advanced-level course is required for the Hispanic Studies major or minor, and should be taken prior to the 400-level courses. The course is transatlantic, incorporating the study of the cultures of Latinos in the US, Latin American and Spain. Topics vary from semester to semester, aiming to provide a thorough understanding of Latin American, Spanish and U.S. cultures in connection to issues such as race, gender, socio-economic class. Students will improve their language use (reading, speaking, writing, and listening). SPRING 2019: The Case of the Hispanic Detective: The development of a specific and idiosyncratic detective genre in Spain and Latin America is considered one of the most important cultural phenomena in the Hispanic World since the second half of the 20th century. This course is a thematic introduction to the cultural production of the transatlantic, Hispanic world (Spain and the Americas) through the lens of the Hispanic detective genre as presented in texts, film, music, and other arts. We will be using detective fiction as a tool to increase linguistic and cultural proficiency, while also addressing a selection of theoretical readings in order to gain knowledge about the development of the genre, often comparing it to the Anglo- and Francophone models. More importantly, we will use these texts as a means to inquire about the crucial roles played by language and discourse, politics, religion, and economic factors in the constant shaping and reshaping of the histories and cultures of the Hispanic world; likewise, these texts will be used to explore relevant and current issues such as socioeconomic, racial, and gender inequalities, immigration and exile, etc. Materials will include classic literary texts by Borges, Ocampo, Taibo II, Piglia, and Vázquez Montalbán, among others, alongside notable and more recent examples of the genre in various formats.
Prerequisites: 82-342 and 82-343
82-355 Tpcs in Hispanic Std: Beyond the Film Screen: The Hispanic World Through Film
Intermittent: 9 units
This course is offered only at Carnegie Mellon's campus in Qatar. The purpose of this course is to explore Hispanic culture and history through contemporary films in Spanish. Undoubtedly, films are a rich source of meaningful cultural information that can provide the audience with an understanding of a countrys culture (history, politics, social problems, etc.) through their discussion and analysis. Movies not only represent reality, but they do it from a particular position. The images produced in films are charged with political interests that reproduce or challenge established beliefs and views. Films offer different representations of reality as well as different ways of relating to it (Achugar, 2008). We will view and analyze a selected group of films portraying four main issues in Hispanic history and society: memory and oblivion, immigration and exile, marginalized identities throughout history, and the Hispanic world in globalization. An understanding of the socio-political context that these films aim to portray through in-depth reading, analysis, discussion, and investigation will provide a thorough understanding of the complexities of various historic events, and opportunities and challenges faced by the Hispanic world. Throughout the semester, we will practice the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) as we continue to build on vocabulary and review grammar points based on the films viewed, the texts read, and the topics discussed. The course is conducted in Spanish and has a prerequisite of 82-242 or equivalent.
Prerequisite: 82-242
82-361 Italian Language and Culture I
Fall: 9 units
This is a course in Italian culture and language with a streamlined review of grammar. The course deals with the social, political, economic, demographic, and cultural issues of contemporary Italy. At the same time links are drawn between past and present, evidencing the importance of tradition and history in Italian society.
Prerequisite: 82-262
82-362 Italian Language and Culture II
Spring: 9 units
This is a course in Italian culture and language with a streamlined review of grammar. The course deals with the social, political, economic, demographic, and cultural issues of contemporary Italy. At the same time links are drawn between past and present, evidencing the importance of tradition and history in Italian society. A student with prior experience in Italian must take the Italian placement exam. SPRING 2018: This course traces the development of Italian film from the 1900's silent films to the 21st Century. We will follow a trajectory beginning with the epic tradition of Pastrones Cabiria (1914) and Carmine Gallone's Scipio Africans of the Fascist Regime, and continue with study of the Telefoni Bianchi (Art Deco) films of the 30s, neorealism of post-war Italy, the commedia all italiana (Italian style comedy (1950-1970), the humor of Paolo Virzì, the intellectual and artistic concerns of Nanni Moretti, and conclude with Sorrentino's, Il Divo. Students will continue to build their skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing Italian while developing their appreciation of the impact of Italian Film as a cultural and artistic force. The assignments and learning activities which accompany each film provide opportunities for discussion, research, reflection and conversation. The course places emphasis on the historical and cultural situations presented in the films, to help students broaden their background on the history, customs, and geographical representations of Italy. The class will be conducted in Italian.
Prerequisite: 82-262
82-363 Intensive Italian Language & Culture: Advanced Level
Intermittent
No course description provided.
82-371 Advanced Japanese I
Fall: 9 units
This course emphasizes the acquisition of advanced level of communicative language proficiency by immersing students in authentic cultural explorations. The curriculum includes authentic reading texts, multimedia, interviews with native speakers, and viewing and summarizing Japanese films that depict current Japanese society and cultural trends. The course also provides an individualized learning environment throughout the term in improving students' language skills and cultural proficiency. Students may pick a topic of personal interest for their term project thesis. A student with prior experience in Japanese must take the placement exam.
Prerequisite: 82-272
82-372 Advanced Japanese II
Spring: 9 units
This course continues to further improve the acquisition of advanced level communicative language proficiency by immersing students in authentic cultural explorations. The curriculum includes authentic reading texts, multimedia, interviews with native speakers, and viewing and summarizing Japanese films that depict current Japanese society and cultural trends. The course also provides an individualized learning environment throughout the term in improving students' language skills and cultural proficiency. Students may pick a topic of personal interest for their term project thesis. A student with prior experience in Japanese must take the placement exam.
Prerequisite: 82-371
82-373 Structure of the Japanese Language
Fall: 9 units
This course examines the basic Japanese grammar covered in elementary and intermediate Japanese courses by comparison with English and aids students in systematizing their knowledge of Japanese and in deepening their understanding of Japanese culture (i.e., cultural ways of thinking underlying Japanese verbal behaviors). After a brief discussion of the overall typological differences between the two languages and an initial training to analyze them cross-linguistically, it deals with specific areas of grammar that exhibit pervasive structural and semantic differences and serve as exercises for cross-linguistic analysis. On the basis of the discussions and exercises in class, students gather and analyze relevant Japanese data for their project, which facilitates their understanding of the grammar points and cultural ways of thinking in question, and develops their analytical skills. This course is taught in Japanese. A student with prior experience in Japanese must take the placement exam.
Prerequisite: 82-272
82-374 Technical Japanese
Spring: 9 units
This course seeks to (1) introduce students to technical Japanese or Japanese language used in the field of science and technology, (2) acquaint them with current issues in Japan involving science and technology, and (3) deepen their understanding of the science and technology culture of Japan. It draws on various sources of information such as books, newspapers, video clips, and TV news to familiarize students with current issues in Japan related to science and technology. Through understanding those issues, the course enables them to acquire necessary knowledge of technical Japanese and Japanese cultural perspectives on science and technology. It also requires them to work on an individual project to form and express their own thoughts and opinions on a science and technology issue of personal interest. This course is taught in Japanese. A student with prior experience in Japanese must take the placement exam.
Prerequisite: 82-272
82-376 Intensive Japanese Language & Culture: Advanced Level
Intermittent
tba
82-380 Independent Study in Second Language Acquisition
Spring
An opportunity for students who wish to pursue independent supervised study in second language acquisition (SLA). In conjunction with a faculty member, students will arrange a program of study to explore aspects of SLA. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor.
82-383 Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research
Fall: 9 units
This course provides an introduction to research and theories in Second Language Acquisition (SLA). Processes that underlie the learning and use of second languages are examined from four perspectives: 1) as linguistic knowledge, 2) as a cognitive skill, 3) as a personality-meditated process, and 4) a socio-culturally mediated process. Factors examined include: age-related differences, the influence of the first language, the role played by innate (universal) principles, the role of memory processes, attitudes, motivation, personality and cognitive styles, and formal versus naturalistic learning contexts. Issues that arise from the course readings are investigated through practical experience in applying theoretical knowledge to small-scale empirical research projects. Students are also provided with opportunities to consider the relevance of these issues to their own language learning experiences.
Prerequisite: 82-280
82-385 Language Across the University
Fall and Spring
Language credit may be attached to any course, independent study, or project unit for which a student receives content-area academic credit. The program is available at the discretion of the responsible content-area faculty, who should be sufficiently skilled in the chosen language to be able to evaluate the technical content of a student's work. The student, content-area faculty and language faculty negotiate a plan for the semester's work, designed to consume approximately three hours per week for three units of academic credit. The course may be repeated on multiple occasions. Prerequisites: Intermediate level language proficiency or above and permission of a content-area faculty member and the Department of Modern Languages
82-388 Understanding Second Language Fluency
Fall: 9 units
This course examines differences and similarities in the way literacy is learned and used in diverse languages and cultures. In the first step of examining the cognitive and social consequences of literacy, students will analyze the major characteristics of spoken and written communications. Following that analysis, students will compare literacy practices in a variety of cultural contexts and explore how literacy utilization alters its collective impacts on the users. Finally, through systematic comparisons of literacy education, students will identify the social, cognitive, linguistic factors directly affecting literacy development in different cultural contexts.
82-391 Advanced Russian I - Modern Russia
Intermittent: 9 units
This course seeks to enhance listening-comprehension skills while perfecting the linguistic and stylistic practices of advanced students. Intensive study is made of varied literary, journalistic and colloquial texts in audio-visual and print media. Focus is on rapid vocabulary expansion as well as correction of high frequency syntax errors that persist beyond the intermediate level. Practice with online resources, additional to three class hours per week, is mandatory for the evolution of aural/oral fluency. Written compositions and translations, assigned for homework, are required for the development of grammatical accuracy and stylistic appropriateness. All class discussions are conducted in Russian. Prerequisite or approved equivalent
Prerequisites: 82-292 or 82-399
82-392 Advanced Russian II: Great Short Works
Intermittent: 9 units
A mad copy clerk declares himself the King of Spain. A nightmarish visit to a local museum somehow spirits a Russian refugee back to the Soviet Union. A bespectacled Jewish reporter brutally kills a goose to earn the respect of his Cossack platoon. Although Russian literature is famous for its long 19th-century novels, the absurdities of Russian society were explored no less profoundly in short stories by Gogol, Chekhov, Nabokov, Babel, and many others. This seminar examines the Russian short story as a form particularly suited to revealing the barbarism, hilarity, and ecstasy of human experience. The course aims to advance Russian language learning by expanding students' vocabulary, reinforcing grammatical knowledge, and developing their capacity to speak and write on abstract topics. The readings will be available in English, though students will be encouraged to read the works in Russian. In addition to discussing the texts in Russian, students will complete short weekly homework assignments.
Prerequisite: 82-391
82-394 Russian for Heritage Speakers: Babushkas, Russia & Beyond
All Semesters: 9 units
This course is designed to address the linguistic and cultural learning needs of heritage speakers of Russian, those who grew up hearing and speaking Russian at home but who have had little or no formal study of Russian language, culture, or history. Although heritage speakers of Russian often achieve advanced or near-native listening comprehension skills, they require further training in reading, writing, and speaking. Heritage speakers may also be unfamiliar with important aspects of Russian culturekey events in Russian and Soviet history, well-known cultural phenomena, literary works, films, and so onand have gaps in their knowledge of social norms. Russian for Heritage Speakers aims to fill these gaps through a combination of grammar instruction and student-led close analysis of texts and audiovisual material. The course is organized around five thematic units that allow students to learn about Russian culture while engaging in interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational modes of communication: "Foundations: Truth & Legends," "Revolutions: Political, Cultural, Social," "Student Life: ' ,'" "Russia in the World," and "Individual and Community." Pre-requisite: Permission of the Instructor.
82-396 The Faust Legend at Home and Abroad
Intermittent
This course introduces students to the basic outlines of the Faust story, and examines its nineteenth- through twenty first-century manifestations in a variety of European, Russian and American novels, plays, films and operas. On the assumption that cultures reveal something distinctive about themselves by the particular way in which they adapt the legend, this course aims to discover how and why these Faustian works of art respond and contribute to the social, political and historical context in which they are produced. On what is the persistent appeal of the Faust legend based? To what needs does it speak? How does the history of its own, continual reemergence affect the meanings it communicates? Prerequisites: None for 9 units; an additional 3 units, requiring permission of the instructor, can be earned for work done in Russian.
82-397 Radical, Heretics, Hackers: Russian Outlaws in History, Literature, and Film
Intermittent
The Russian hacker looms large in the global imagination. He's the cyber outlaw who we imagine can take down the powerful with the click of a finger, sometimes serving as an agent of the Russian government, at other times threatening the state itself. This course will examine the mythology and reality of the Russian hacker by tracing its prehistory, from anarchists in Imperial Russia, to Bolshevik revolutionaries, to dissident artists of the Soviet Union, and finally to contemporary heretics such as Pussy Riot and Edward Snowden. The course will culminate in a student-led symposium on the sociocultural role of the Russian hacker. This course follows a seminar format. Students will be required to critically analyze literature, film, and historical documents. They will work on written exercises that prepare them to write a research paper to be presented at the symposium. This is a 9-unit course. For those proficient in Russian, however, a total of 12 units can be earned by conducting some portion of the work in Russian and meeting outside of class for some additional hours. Details are to be worked out in advance, in consultation with the instructor.
82-399 Special Topics: Russian in Context
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course is designed for students who have completed four semesters of Russian at Carnegie Mellon or for those who have equivalent Russian skills as demonstrated via placement exam. The course focuses on further development of the linguistic and stylistic practices of advanced students based on cultural analysis of Russian literature. Focus is on rapid vocabulary expansion as well as correction of high frequency syntax errors that persist beyond the intermediate level. Written compositions and translations, assigned for homework, are required for the development of grammatical accuracy and stylistic appropriateness. All class discussions are conducted in Russian. A student with prior experience in Russian must take the placement exam.
82-400 Russian Studies Topics
Fall and Summer: 6 units
(A1)Literary Culture of the 19th Century Russia (6 Units) The purpose of the course is to give students an introduction to the cultural environment of the Imperial Russia through the works of major 19th century Russian writers. We will read and analyze some masterpieces of Russian fiction, including works of Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov. Emphasis will be made on how these brilliant classics reflected turbulent history of the 19th century Russia. (A2) Literary Culture of the 20th Century Russia (6 Units) This mini-course focuses on Russian prose and poetry of the early 20th century. Readings will include the "proletarian" writings of Maxim Gorky, "symbolism" of Alexander Blok, "futurism" and "modernism" of Vladimir Mayakovsky as well as works of some other authors. We will discuss such important issues for 20th century Russian Cultural History as the role of intelligentsia in the Russian Revolution, the content and method of Russian decadence, symbolism, and modernism, as well as imprisonment, liberation, and exile that became so important for many writers and poets.
82-411 Topics in Arabic Media
Fall and Spring
Given the development and spread of new and multi-literacies around us today, the course focuses on reading and analyzing Arabic media sources to engage in discussions about current topics in our modern world. Topics of interest include (but are not limited to): Culture, politics, economy, environment, education, and linguistic diversity. While reading and writing will be mainly in Modern Standard Arabic, class discussions will be of a multidialectal and multilingual nature to encourage questioning, analyzing, and conceptualizing topics in various contexts.
82-412 Topics in Arabic Studies
Spring: 9 units
This course is designed for students who have completed Advanced Arabic. Students will study written, audio, and video material taken from well-known Arabic-language media outlets such as Al-Jazeera, BBC Arabic, al-Arabiyya, etc. Linguistically, this course focuses on Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) because the media is one of the main domains in which MSA is significantly utilized in our modern age. Students will utilize reading, writing, and speaking skills to engage actively in class activities such as group discussions, debates, interviews, short presentations, etc. Students will prepare and present a final project in Arabic to share with the class. **The course can be repeated but after consent of instructor.**
82-413 Readings in Islamic History
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course focuses on Islamic history and enables students to read authentic historical texts in Arabic written three to five centuries ago and to understand the cultural context that gave rise to these texts. Students also will continue to develop their ability to express their ideas both in speaking and in writing and to develop their listening skills in Modern Standard Arabic.
82-415 Topics in French and Francophone Studies
Fall: 9 units
This repeatable course explores target cultures through a thematic or conceptual focus. Students critically analyze authentic documents through, for example, historical, biographical, filmic, artistic, literary, musical, and theoretical perspectives, while improving and expanding their language skills. FALL 2019: La France au Moyen Orient
Prerequisites: 82-303 Min. grade C and 82-304 Min. grade C and 82-305 Min. grade C
82-416 Topics in French and Francophone Studies
Spring: 9 units
This repeatable course explores target cultures through a thematic or conceptual focus. Students critically analyze authentic documents through, for example, historical, biographical, filmic, artistic, literary, musical, and theoretical perspectives, while improving and expanding their language skills. Spring 2019: Growing up Black or Asian in Contemporary France: Frenchness redefined through the Arts This course will examine the impact of the Post-World War II migrations on 21st-century France's definitions of national identity. Our study will particularly focus on the cultural productions of a new generation of French painters, filmmakers, writers and influencers with roots in sub-Saharan Africa, the Caribbean and Asia. We will investigate the ways in which these works, rooted in hybridity and the celebration of non-French ethnic heritage, interrogate the French republican tradition of a "singular and indivisible" identity. Readings will include Grace Ly's Une Enfance Modèle, Aya Cissoko's N'ba and Julie Hamaïde's Koï. The course will also examine the filmic representations of hybrid identity in works such as Ça reste entre nous (Irène Nam/Grace Ly), YA'R (Brams Koudié) and Mariannes Noires (Niang/Nielsen). Throughout the semester, students will have the opportunity to meet some of the artists and writers whose works we will analyze in class. A the end of the semester, Afro-French visual artist Alexis Peskine will accompany the students in the creation of their final project for the course. Good reading skills in French and a good ability to express oneself both orally and in writing are essential."
Prerequisites: 82-303 and 82-304
82-420 The Crucible of Modernity:Vienna 1900
Intermittent: 9 units
Vienna 1900 was many things: the political center of the Austro-Hungarian Empire; the center of German-language music and theater; the birthplace of Zionism and of psychoanalysis; the home of cafe culture and the waltz; the city of baroque urban palaces and squalid backyard tenements; and the showcase for historicism. And while the story of Vienna's cultural and political turmoil is interesting, it probably would not command our attention today were it not for its role as the birthplace of Modernism. The class explores Vienna before the collapse of the Austro- Hungarian Empire in 1918. We will be looking at a huge and at times confusing canvas, which by necessity includes almost every aspect of culture. From history and politics we will move on through art, architecture, psychoanalysis, literature, music, and philosophy. We will be looking at art nouveau buildings and furniture, reading literature, viewing films, and listening to recordings. Using an enhanced historical map of the city as a digital interface and an interactive learning tool, we will add a crucial visual component to the course and research the connections between urban and architectural space and the intellectual activity that took place in it. You will work in teams with students from other disciplines. You will research networks of intellectual and artistic activities and create 3D models of the spaces, from public squares to cafe interiors, in which these intellectual activities took place. You will create and expand a growing collection of records, photos, archival materials, as well as artwork, music and other media in an effort to reconstruct the dialogue among the arts and the cultural debate of this key moment in the passage to Modernism. No previous knowledge of 3D modeling software is required, software instruction and tutoring will be provided. The language of instruction is English with a German credit option
82-425 Topics in German Literature and Culture
Fall: 9 units
This repeatable course explores the culture of the German-speaking nations through a thematic or conceptual focus. Students critically analyze authentic documents, for example, historical, biographical, and literary texts, as well as film and works of the visual arts while improving and expanding their language skills. FALL 2019: 82-425 Thirty Years Later: The Collapse of East Germany and the Fall of the Berlin Wall This course, conducted entirely in German, observes the thirtieth anniversary of the collapse of the German Democratic Republic (GDR) in the autumn of 1989 and the fall of the Berlin Wall on November 9, 1989. These events in 1989 were followed by German reunification in October of 1990. The revolution in East Germany, the collapse of the GDR, the fall of the Berlin Wall, and German reunification fundamentally transformed Germany, Europe, and the world. The course will take a close look at the events of 1989 and 1990. Course materials will include documentary and fiction films, plays, essays, novels, and articles. A central part of the course will be interviews conducted by the class as a whole and by individual students with eyewitnesses to the events of 1989-1990. These interviews will be recorded and archived, and students will be required to complete a final project that summarizes what they have learned about these momentous events and their significance. Required work includes active participation in class, preparation of all readings, watching all assigned films, taking two tests, completing an eyewitness interview, completing a final project, and leading one class session, together with a partner, in the final weeks of the semester.
Prerequisites: 82-320 or 82-323 or 82-426 or 82-327
82-426 Topics in German Literature and Culture
Spring: 9 units
This repeatable course explores the culture of the German-speaking nations through a thematic or conceptual focus. Students critically analyze authentic documents, for example, historical, biographical, and literary texts, as well as film and works of the visual arts while improving and expanding their language skills. SPRING 2019: "It was the best of times; it was the worst of times." What Charles Dickens said about the French Revolution also applies to Germany between the wars. Germany had taken the first tentative steps toward democracy in its thousand year history, beginning a journey that was soon to end in one of the most repressive political regimes the world has ever seen. But amid the confusion and uncertainty of the Weimar Republic, German literature, film, art, science, philosophy, music, and architecture flourished like never before since the Age of Goethe—only to see many of the nation's intellectuals emigrate to democratic countries after the rise of Nazism. Come and explore Albert Einstein, Sigmund Freud, Max Planck, Bertolt Brecht, Rainer Maria Rilke, Hermann Hesse, Walter Gropius, Albert Speer, Joseph Goebbels, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Max Beckmann, Käthe Kollwitz, Otto Dix, George Grosz, Edith Stein, Kurt Weill, Lotte Lenya, Marlene Dietrich, Emil Jannings, and others.
Prerequisites: 82-324 or 82-325 or 82-323
82-427 Nazi and Resistance Culture
Spring: 9 units
SPRING 2019: "It was the best of times; it was the worst of times." What Charles Dickens said about the French Revolution also applies to Germany between the wars. Germany had taken the first tentative steps toward democracy in its thousand year history, beginning a journey that was soon to end in one of the most repressive political regimes the world has ever seen. But amid the confusion and uncertainty of the Weimar Republic, German literature, film, art, science, philosophy, music, and architecture flourished like never before since the Age of Goethe—only to see many of the nation's intellectuals emigrate to democratic countries after the rise of Nazism. Come and explore Albert Einstein, Sigmund Freud, Max Planck, Bertolt Brecht, Rainer Maria Rilke, Hermann Hesse, Walter Gropius, Albert Speer, Joseph Goebbels, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Max Beckmann, Käthe Kollwitz, Otto Dix, George Grosz, Edith Stein, Kurt Weill, Lotte Lenya, Marlene Dietrich, Emil Jannings, and others.
Prerequisite: 82-327
82-428 History of German Film
Intermittent: 9 units
This course is a chronological introduction to one of the world's greatest cinema traditions: German cinema. It moves from the silent cinema of the 1910s to the Weimar Republic, when German cinema represented Hollywood's greatest challenger in the international cinema world. It then addresses the cinema of Hitler's so-called "Third Reich," when German cinema dominated European movie theaters, and moves on to the cinema of divided Germany from 1949-1989, when cinema in the socialist east and cinema in the capitalist west developed in very different ways. In the final week of the semester, the course will address German cinema in the post-unification period, which has experienced a revival in popularity and interest. The two historical foci of the semester will be the Weimar Republic, the classic era of German cinema, and the era of the so-called "New German Cinema" of the 1970s and 1980s, when major German directors developed radical new approaches to cinema and critiques of Hollywood. Among the great directors focused on in the course of the semester will be Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau, Fritz Lang, Leni Riefenstahl, Wolfgang Staudte, Werner Herzog, Wim Wenders, and Rainer Werner Fassbinder. No knowledge of the German language is required for this course. Most of the films will be in German with English subtitles. The course will be cross-listed in the departments of Modern Languages, English, and History. Students will be required to attend class, including all film screenings, to actively participate in discussion, to write a term paper on a topic related to German cinema history, and to take two midterm examinations.
82-429 German Reading and Translation Workshop: German in Today's World
Intermittent: 9 units
This course will address issues of translation, mostly from German into English, but to a lesser extent also from English into German. It will focus primarily on texts coming from the spheres of current events, politics, economics, and the cultural sphere, but students will also be encouraged to explore and locate texts based on their own interests and concerns. In order to facilitate well-honed translation, it will be necessary to address points of advanced grammar where the structures of the German and English languages feature not only similarities but also differences. The course will thus also constitute a review of issues in German grammar that English speakers may sometimes find particularly challenging. The language of instruction will be primarily German, and students should be comfortable speaking and listening to German. Students will be required to complete a several translation projects, to locate a number of texts from the contemporary German-speaking world that interest them, and to take a midterm and final examination that will focus on translation, issues of advanced grammar, and cultural content.
Prerequisite: 82-324
82-431 China and the West
Intermittent: 9 units
FALL 2012 This course takes a look at the multifaceted relationship between China and the Western world from Marco Polo's time to the present. The focus will be on how people in China and the West imagined each other in different times of history and in what ways some historical events and figures, as well as concepts and cultural practices are interpreted differently from Chinese and Western perspectives. Students are expected to reach a deeper understanding of the complexities of cultural interactions and their implications for the diverse world in which we now live. The students will read a rich collection of scholarly writings, and the class will be conducted primarily in discussion format. The class is conducted in English and Chinese. Students will complete readings in both English and Chinese. Assessment will be based on participation in the discussion, student presentations, and written assignments (including research papers, book reviews, and translations). Prerequisits: 82-332, or instructor's approval.
82-432 Popular Culture in China
Intermittent: 9 units
This class is a general introduction to various aspects of popular culture in twentieth century and contemporary China. Students will gain a critical understanding of common people's perspectives and experiences with China's revolutionary past and its contemporary global economy through fiction, film, music, newspaper and magazine articles, internet discussion forums, and other forms of visual and written materials. The class is conducted in Chinese, supplemented by occasional scholarly writings in English. Prerequisite: 82-332 or placement
Prerequisite: 82-332
82-433 Topics in Contemporary Culture of China
Fall: 9 units
This repeatable course explores target cultures through a thematic or conceptual focus. Students critically analyze authentic documents through, for example, historical, biographical, filmic, artistic, literary, musical, and theoretical perspectives, while improving and expanding their language skills. Prerequisite: 82-332
Prerequisite: 82-332
82-434 Studies in Chinese Traditions
Intermittent: 9 units
Traditional Chinese Thought and Literature through Comic Books Starting from the 1980's, Tsai Chih Chung (a master cartoonist in Taiwan) created a series of comic books illustrating canonical works in traditional Chinese philosophy and literature. The series soon became a great hit both in Taiwan and China, and has since been translated into different languages around the world. While its popularity continues to grow among its readers, its wide circulation also raises questions among scholars and critics of traditional Chinese literature and culture. In this course, students will be asked to read Tsai Chih Chung's comic books and their animated adaptations, the English translations of the Chinese canonical texts of philosophy and literature, and the secondary sources that provide historical and analytical introductions to the texts. While enjoying Tsai's innovative and delightful comic interpretation, students will work in Chinese to consider serious philosophical questions along with the early Chinese thinkers, to learn to savor the aesthetic beauty of traditional Chinese literature, and to prepare to share their ideas and discovery with the rest of the class.
Prerequisite: 82-332
82-436 Introduction to Classical Chinese
Intermittent: 9 units
This course is designed for students who have reached the advanced level of Modern Chinese and would like to promote their knowledge and skills in reading Classical Chinese, a language shaped in the latter half of the first millennium B. C. which still persists as a living medium of expression today. The course aims to introduce students to the basic syntactic patterns of Classical Chinese and the most frequently used Classical Chinese vocabulary. In the course, readings will be representative selections from ancient Chinese texts, chosen for their historical value, beauty, and influence on later writers. With this knowledge and training, students will be sufficiently equipped to read the Chinese Classics and will gain a deeper understanding of the history of Chinese civilization, culture and language. Moreover, knowledge of Classical Chinese will help students read and understand sophisticated modern Chinese texts, which make frequent use of Classical allusions and constructs. Prerequisite: 82-332 or 82-337 or 82-338
Prerequisites: 82-332 or 82-337 or 82-338
82-439 Modern China Through Literature
Intermittent
This repeatable course explores target cultures through a thematic or conceptual focus. Students critically analyze authentic documents through, for example, historical, biographical, filmic, artistic, literary, musical, and theoretical perspectives, while improving and expanding their language skills.
82-440 Studies in Chinese Literature & Culture
Fall: 9 units
This repeatable course explores target cultures through a thematic or conceptual focus. Students critically analyze authentic documents through, for example, historical, biographical, filmic, artistic, literary, musical, and theoretical perspectives, while improving and expanding their language skills. SPRING 2019:This is an introductory course on Chinese folk performance traditions. It aims to help students obtain a general understanding of the various Chinese folk performance forms including puppetry, opera, oral storytelling traditions, and temple festival performances. It will also explore the culture of folk performance, dramatic literature and performing arts, their relationship with Chinese local culture and societies, and their national and global impact. Class activities will include lectures, guest speakers, and discussion, as well as presentation of multimedia examples of folk performances. At the end of the course, students are expected to have a better understanding of the nature and scope of the Chinese folk performance traditions and gain some fundamental training that will enable them to carry on related field work and research.
Prerequisite: 82-332
82-441 Studies in Peninsular Literature and Culture
Intermittent: 9 units
This repeatable course explores the cultures of Spain through a thematic or conceptual focus. Students critically analyze authentic documents through, for example, historical, biographical, filmic, artistic, literary, musical, and theoretical perspectives, while improving and expanding their language skills. SPRING 2017 This course explores contemporary peninsular texts of corporeal representation - medicalized, personalized, objectified and empowered. In this course, we will explore the Spanish body through the lens of medical humanities and disability studies. The former includes texts created in medical environments and from medical experiences, written by doctors, patients and members of the community. Spain has a rich history of doctor/authors that can provide some level of insight into the narrative of the Spanish medical community. Disability studies, on the other hand, views the body in a non-medical context. Instead of proposing the abnormal body as a medical phenomenon to be studied in a petri dish, these expression of (corpo)reality trace ideas of normalcy as societal constructs. The theme of disability in Spain comes in to play with the wealth of organizations dedicated to disability rights (while also mired in controversy). The texts will come in the form of advocacy pamphlets, novels written by doctors, fictional (and non) depictions of the medical field, illness, etc., painting and sculpture, and films. This course will prompt us to pay attention to the objectification and abjectification of these bodies and consider that through this awareness must also come understanding the body as a text - not an object - but a text that warrants intricate observation. We will analyze these texts in an effort to understanding the constructions of normalcy. In the end, our analysis will be used to create our own texts.
Prerequisite: 82-345
82-443 Spanish Reading and Translation Workshop
Intermittent: 9 units
This course is of interest to advanced Spanish majors and minors as well as other native or heritage speaker non-specialists seeking to develop translation skills from English-Spanish and Spanish-English. It provides students with an introduction to basic concepts, theories, and techniques of translation, and helps them develop a systematic approach to resolving language transference problems. Students will deepen their understanding of Spanish and English as they consider how best to translate structures, words, text, and discourse styles unique to each respective language while simultaneously acquiring a valuable and highly marketable skill. This course is conducted in Spanish. *Prerequisites: 82-345 or permission of instructor.
Prerequisites: 82-342 or 82-343 or 82-344 or 82-345
82-444 The Structure of Spanish
Intermittent: 9 units
This course will provide students with a theoretical framework and analytic tools to investigate how Spanish speakers represent, construct, and transform their social worlds. In particular, the focus is on language as a social practice through which power relations are maintained or challenged. Using a variety of spoken and written texts, the course seeks to analyze to explore the discourse-semantic and lexico-grammatical features that Spanish users deploy to make meanings and negotiate understandings. This analysis will later be interpreted from an interdisciplinary perspective drawing on social theory and history. FALL 2017: This course is an advanced introduction-in Spanish-to contemporary "print," digital and visual media from North, Central & South America, and the Caribbean, and how "information" and "opinion" produce, disseminate, and communicate specific messages. We will review and analyze the rhetorical and visual toolse.g., style, tone, perspective, purpose, exaggeration, distortion, symbolism, labels, irony, and allusionsthese texts deploy to determine their role in meaning making for readers and viewers. A primary goal for this course is for students to develop and sharpen the skills necessary to determine reliability in information sources, and hone their ability to write and talk about this.
Prerequisite: 82-345
82-445 U.S. Latino Literature
Intermittent: 9 units
This course proposes to problematize socio-political and historico-cultural issues concerning U.S. Latinos and Hispanic immigrants in the United States. This will involve the analysis and application of assimilation, transculturation and bilingualism theory, and rhetorical/translational problematics of the material under examination. Also of interest will be an ongoing class discussion of Latinos/Hispanics in history, the media, entertainment, politics, and education. Students will consider the question of the "borders," geographical, political and societal, that may or do exist between U.S. mainstream society, Latinos and Hispanic immigrants, and strategies employed by hyphenated-Americans for overcoming, subverting or undermining this situation. Materials for the course will include literature, film, essays, and music by and about Latinos and Hispanics in the United States. FALL 2016: Mapping Dreams and Nightmares: Transfronteriza Aesthetics on the US-Mexico Border This course will focus on the US-Mexico border, with particular emphasis on visual representations of the border from both the US and Mexico, and on the unique, vibrant fronteriza cultures that result in the space betwixt and between. The course will emphasize key moments and events in the history of the border, including for example the Mexican Revolution, the creation of the border patrol in the 1920s, the Bracero program, Operation Wetback, the Chicano movement, Operation Gatekeeper, and will consider how visual and textual representations have responded to and been conditioned by the political and economic relationship between the US and Mexico, particularly in the wake of neoliberal policies. We will draw on a wide variety of materials, including film, video, visual arts, performance, border theory, and literary and journalistic texts.
Prerequisite: 82-345
82-448 Topics in Arabic Language, Literature, & Culture
Intermittent: 9 units
This repeatable course explores the Arab world through a thematic or conceptual focus. Students critically analyze authentic documents through, for example, historical, biographical, filmic, artistic, literary, musical, and theoretical perspectives, while improving and expanding their language skills. Prerequisite: 82-312
Prerequisite: 82-312
82-450 Advanced Research in Hispanic Language & Culture
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course permits in-depth, 400-level study in the following courses: 82-342 Spain: Language and Culture, 82-343 Latin America: Language and Culture, and 82-344 U.S. Latinos: Language and Culture. Students will meet with the regularly scheduled 300-level class, read additional texts, and produce research assignments as agreed upon by the instructor and student. The focus is on a deeper understanding and individualized research of the course topics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
82-451 Studies in Latin American Literature and Culture
Intermittent: 9 units
This repeatable course explores the cultures of Latin America through a thematic or conceptual focus. Students critically analyze authentic documents through, for example, historical, biographical, filmic, artistic, literary, musical, and theoretical perspectives, while improving and expanding their language skills. FALL 2019: Venezuela y Colombia: War, Peace, Migration and Exile Venezuela and Colombia converge around many elements, from a common colonial past to shared geographical regions and cultural customs. However, their societies, politics, and cultural production often have followed divergent paths, leading to a current juncture characterized by both fraternity and adversity. Many of these differences stem from societal and cultural transformations developed during the twentieth century. Over the past few decades, for instance, Colombians have gone from emigrating to Venezuela in search of a peaceful and prosperous future, to hosting thousands of Venezuelan refugees fleeing current economic and political conditions. This course will compare the varied ways in which literary and non-literary sources have represented the transformations, challenges, and hopes stemming from situations of violence, war, peace, migration or exile in these two neighboring countries from the 1800 to the present.Students will use these sources to identify significant historical and cultural trends and agents of change, and ultimately to develop an informed perspective on the current cultural and political landscape of the two countries. Student performance in the course will be assessed using various types of written assignments (online posts, online discussion boards, final paper), in-class discussion, and an oral presentation. The course will be taught in Spanish.
Prerequisite: 82-345
82-455 Topics in Hispanic Studies
Fall: 9 units
This repeatable course explores Spanish-speaking cultures through a thematic or conceptual focus. Students critically analyze authentic documents through, for example, historical, biographical, filmic, artistic, literary, musical, and theoretical perspectives, while improving and expanding their language skills. FALL 2018:(Post)Apocalyptic visions are metaphors for the human condition and may often be an expression of political turmoil or social and cultural fears. Their evolution and meaning can be explored and traced to a current complex lexicon pointing to science, technology, globalism, and humankind as catalysts for the end of the world. How are discussions about the end of the world framed in Latin America? What is the relationship between the monstrous & popular fear? What parts of humanity remain when death is rampant and social structures have broken down? How can these visions address social and environmental changes, and the possible future human outcomes of these changes? In pursuit of answers to these questions, the course will be an exploration of written and visual narratives used to contain and explain threats pertaining to Latin America and/or created from within its diffuse borders, with an emphasis on texts produced after the second half of the 20th century. We will examine how different kinds of Spanish-language Latin American mediafrom literature to film, from the Internet to news coverage, from art to comic bookshave looked to the past, seen into the present, and envisioned the future in framing discussions and representations of (post)apocalyptic events and of threats in the post-human world. Contemporary reviews and short historical, critical, and theoretical readings will serve to supplement and provide context for primary texts. The class will be taught entirely in Spanish. *Prerequisites: 82-345 or permission of instructor.
Prerequisite: 82-345
82-456 Topics in Hispanic Studies
Spring: 9 units
This repeatable course explores Spanish-speaking cultures through a thematic or conceptual focus. Students critically analyze authentic documents through, for example, historical, biographical, filmic, artistic, literary, musical, and theoretical perspectives, while improving and expanding their language skills. SPRING 2017: Southern Cone Dictatorships in the Movies (1984-2016) This course explores the Southern Cone dictatorships during the period of the Cold War through their representation in films. The military-civilian dictatorships of the 1970s in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay were a period of State terrorism. This violent period resulted in thousands of disappeared people, political prisoners and exiles. These experiences have had a lasting impact in the new democracies. There is still a debate over how to address violations of human rights and how to make sense of the past, so that these events don't happen again. There has been a rich production of movies focusing on this historical period that serves as a document of how the struggles over how to come to terms with a traumatic past have been dealt with by different countries. These films also provide a glimpse of how popular culture serves as a vehicle to construct a social memory of recent history. Through films new generations that did not experience these traumatic events learns about what happened and what it means for particular social actors. We will analyze films from Argentina, Chile and Uruguay in order to better understand how these countries have dealt with a contested past. The course will provide students with historical background, theoretical frameworks and analytic tools to approach these cultural productions as documents and discourses about the recent dictatorships.
Prerequisite: 82-345
82-473 Topics in Japanese Studies
Fall: 9 units
This repeatable course explores target cultures through a thematic or conceptual focus. Students critically analyze authentic documents through, for example, cultural, social, historical, biographical, filmic, artistic, literary, musical, linguistic, and theoretical perspectives, while improving and expanding their language skills. FALL 2018: Youth Culture Japanese society is currently confronted with a massive array of social and cultural anomalies among its youth. In the culture, which values and emphasizes conformity, the phenomenon is utterly unprecedented. Accordingly, in this course, we will first explore the defining features of these anomalies by examining how Japanese youth are portrayed in modern day fictions and films. We will then scrutinize the extent to which these portrayals actually reflect real lives of young Japanese by analyzing newspaper articles and essays commenting on the social issues surrounding them. Finally, we will take a close look at the dramatic social changes, over the past three decades, to trace their long-term impacts as a significant factor contributing to the emergence of the new culture, particularly with respect to the changing youth behaviors. F17:The Evolution of Japan's Urban Culture This course analyzes various aspects of Japan's urban culture, the evolution of which has centered around Tokyo, focusing on such topics as the Taisho modernism during 1912-1926, the post-WWII Americanization of Japanese culture and society, the culture surrounding the Bubble Economy during 1980-1995, and the popular culture that has continued to thrive on a global scale, through fictions, non-fictions, films, and multimedia. Taught in Japanese.
Prerequisite: 82-372
82-474 Topics in Japanese Studies
Spring: 9 units
This repeatable course explores target cultures through a thematic or conceptual focus. Students critically analyze authentic documents through, for example, cultural, social, historical, biographical, filmic, artistic, literary, musical, linguistic, and theoretical perspectives, while improving and expanding their language skills. SPRING 2019: Japanese Language and Culture from a Pragmatics Perspective This course deals with topics such as enryo-sasshi, indirectness and politeness in Japanese culture and communication from a pragmatics perspective and provides cultural and linguistic analysis training by using pragmatic concepts. Pragmatics is a sub-field of linguistics that deals with language use in social communication. This course introduces students to basic concepts of pragmatics, including context and co-text, speech acts, conversational implicature, indirectness, and politeness theory, with the aim of understanding them in Japanese language. A variety of Japanese texts and media sources are brought to the class for students to analyze how pragmatics is in place in everyday social interaction and to help them consider cultural background and norms behind the social acts. The course invites active and critical participation in the exploration of Japanese language and culture through pragmatics, as well as other closely related issues including intercultural communication, sociolinguistic variation, and linguistic ideology.
Prerequisites: 82-372 or 82-373
82-480 Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism
Intermittent: 9 units
This course introduces students to the nature and extent of bilingualism in individuals and diverse communities in the US and abroad, with an emphasis on the social, historical and political forces that shape the language varieties and abilities of bilinguals. There is also a brief exploration of the psycholinguistic features that characterize bilingual individuals. It also addresses the challenges and opportunities that bilingualism posses for multilingual societies and individuals. Students will develop their knowledge and critical analysis skills of bilingualism through readings, group discussions, field projects and a research paper. Prerequisite: 82-180 or 82-280 or 82-382 or 82-384 or permission of instructor
Prerequisites: 82-180 or 82-280 or 82-382 or 82-384
82-483 Topics in Modern Languages
Intermittent
This course introduces students to research methodology as it applies to language learning and language teaching through an examination of different approaches currently used in Second Language Acquisition (SLA) research ranging from experimental studies to case studies. The goal is to develop an ability to critically evaluate, design and implement sound SLA research. Prerequisite: None
82-489 Service Learning in the Community
Intermittent
This is a community-based research (CBR) course for advanced students who wish to bridge service and action research. The course provides an experiential component that allows students to use their second language and culture skills while acquiring or honing their research skills. CBR helps bridge the gap between university and community life to facilitate the development of life-long learning habits and humanistic citizenship. ML students and faculty will jointly design and execute ways in which to 'give back' to the community being studied, which will be chosen based upon the language, culture and/or history of a specific community. Students in this course may participate in historical, ethnographic and cultural research; ethnographic fieldwork; problem solving activities around a particular issue the community is facing; discover how to best identify a particular linguistic/cultural community and document, interpret, preserve and disseminate its history and culture. Class activities may include group, pair and independent reading and research; group and pair travel; group, pair and one-on-one interaction with community members; public presentations; photography, filming, scanning; webpage and document design; and different kinds of writing. Prerequisite: Completion of all 300-level coursework, or an approved equivalent, or permission of instructor
82-492 The Historical Imagination in Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature
Intermittent
Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, Turgenev, Dostoevsky and Tolstoy all ruminated upon their nation's historical destiny. This course aims to describe the role played by imagination in these authors' efforts to wreak from Russia's past a vision of her future. Emphasis is placed upon the figurative operations of language that allow narrative to function as a guidepost to a collective mission and a map of the individual's location within the projected historical scheme. Lecture and discussion formats are combined at each class meeting. Written papers, oral presentations, and participation in discussions are required. Prerequisites: None for 9 units; an additional 3 units, requiring permission of the instructor, can be earned for work done in Russian.
82-495 Topics in Applied Second Language Acquisition
Intermittent: 9 units
SPRING 2016: Section A:Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language This course aims to expose students to current professional practices and common situations related to teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language (CFL). It will provide an overview of CFL research, teaching and learning with demonstrations of CFL pedagogical issues, applications and solutions. It is intended to help students become familiar with specific CFL issues concerning the special characteristics of the Chinese language, including tones, a character-based writing system, and special Chinese grammatical structures. Students will be able to apply course material to their CFL teaching and research, and feel more comfortable and adaptable in their CFL professional careers. Section B: Issues in TESOL In this course, students will receive a broad overview of current topics that will introduce them to the pedagogic and sociocultural issues that Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) instructors encounter in classrooms today, in a variety of contexts. Students will be required to familiarize themselves with and be prepared to address issues in TESOL classrooms. These issues include but are not limited to methodology, teacher education, the role of culture and intercultural communication, and specific challenges in diverse settings, such as modifying course content to focus on academic language. The course will be conducted as a seminar with students completing readings outside class time and discussing the topics and perspectives during class time. Students will engage in reflection through class discussions and electronic discussion forums. The main assignments for the course will be case histories of diverse populations of students who are found in TESOL classrooms, and a final research paper. Students will gain in-depth knowledge of the state of the art in TESOL today.
82-499 Alternative Break Projec (Language Specific)
Intermittent
This course provides advanced ML language students and non-ML students enrolled in an Alternative Break student trip project the opportunity to earn credit by engaging in "connected" modes of knowing, by identifying and analyzing a problem, and developing plans for short-term and sustainable solutions, reflecting, and creating and disseminating an informational and interpretive website and print materials about their experience. Students will also bring to bear or gain experience in non-academic skills/talents/interests in areas like photography, image editing, video production, writing, design, website development, sound recording, and art, etc., by doing community service under the auspices of Carnegie Mellon University's Alternative Break program. Students will earn three (3) units for full participation and fulfillment of course requirements. With the approval of the faculty facilitator, an additional three (3) units may be earned by completing an additional assignment.
82-501 Special Topics in French & Francophone Studies
Fall
Restricted to language majors who wish to go beyond the regular course offerings in French and Francophone Studies involving group or individual study in a subject area approved by the instructor.
82-502 Special Topics in French & Francophone Studies
Spring
Restricted to language majors who wish to go beyond the regular course offerings in French and Francophone Studies involving group or individual study in a subject area approved by the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and a 400-level course
82-505 Undergraduate Internship
Intermittent
Approved upper-class language majors may receive credit in connection with work experience related to language learning and language use outside of the classroom setting. As a rule, this experience takes the form of work involving language use or research related to language study at off-campus sites or in the Department. Work or research must be done using the language of study. For off-campus internships, there must be an on-site supervisor appointed to collaborate with the faculty advisor in the final evaluation of the student's work and progress. The student will be responsible for three written reports evaluating the non-classroom experience with the language of study and several other criteria. Students must obtain prior approval for proposed work. Prerequisites: Permission of target faculty member and the Modern Languages internship advisor
82-506 Hispanic Studies Internship
Fall and Spring
Pre-approved, advanced Hispanic Studies majors may receive credit in connection with volunteer or paid work experience (usually in Pittsburgh) in which they primarily or significantly use their target language outside the traditional classroom setting. As a rule, this experience takes the form of work involving language use or research at off-campus sites or in the Department. Work or research must be done using the language of study. For off-campus internships, there must be an on-site supervisor available to collaborate with the faculty advisor in the ongoing and final evaluation of the student's work and progress. Students will be required to write and submit reflexive projects, as determined by the faculty advisor, that evaluate the non-classroom experience in the context of the language- and cultural-learning experience and several other criteria that show how the internship connects back to the student's academic or professional education. Prerequisite: Students must be advanced Hispanic Studies majors and obtain prior permission for the proposed work from a Hispanic Studies advisor and/or the Modern Languages internship advisor.
82-511 Special Topics in Arabic Studies
Fall: 9 units
This repeatable course explores the Arabic language and culture through a thematic or conceptual focus. Students critically analyze authentic documents through, for example, historical, biographical, filmic, artistic, literary, musical, and theoretical perspectives, while improving and expanding their language skills.
82-512 Special Topics: Arabic Language & Culture
Spring
This repeatable course explores the Arabic language and culture through a thematic or conceptual focus. Students critically analyze authentic documents through, for example, historical, biographical, filmic, artistic, literary, musical, and theoretical perspectives, while improving and expanding their language skills. Prerequisite: 82-411 or placement.
82-521 Special Topics: German Studies
Fall
Restricted to language majors who wish to go beyond the regular course offerings in German Studies involving group or individual study in a subject area approved by the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and a 400-level course
82-522 Special Topics: German Studies
Spring
Restricted to language majors who wish to go beyond the regular course offerings in German Studies involving group or individual study in a subject area approved by the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and a 400-level course
Prerequisites: 82-427 or 82-428 or 82-438 or 82-437 or 82-436 or 82-435 or 82-431 or 82-429 or 82-430
82-531 Special Topics in Chinese Studies
Fall
Restricted to language majors who wish to go beyond the regular course offerings in Chinese Studies involving group or individual study in a subject area approved by the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and a 400-level course
Prerequisites: 82-436 Min. grade C or 82-434 Min. grade C or 82-433 Min. grade C or 82-440 Min. grade C
82-532 Special Topics in Chinese Studies
Spring
Restricted to language majors who wish to go beyond the regular course offerings in Chinese Studies involving group or individual study in a subject area approved by the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and a 400-level course
82-533 Cultural Topics in Chinese Studies
Fall: 9 units
F18: Visions of China: Modern Chinese Society and Culture through Documentary Films and New Media People who study China often cherish a secret desire to discover the "real China," which they believe could have been revealed through close examination its different forms of representations, such as history, arts, literature, news reports, or films. While the existence of this so-called "reality" and its ultimate discovery are still very much in question, there are indeed some forms, in which China is presented or represented in a much less embellished, dramatized, stereotyped, albeit no less complex and intriguing way. By way of watching, analyzing and discussing a variety of documentary films and TV shows made with a documentary touch, this course encourages students to develop in-depth knowledge of modern Chinese society and culture in the closest proximity to its bare "reality." The course will use a thematic approach to cover different social and cultural issues that China is facing nowadays, including the harmony/conflicts between human and nature, the social/economic gap between city and countryside, the rise of the second generation of the nouveau riche, a humanitarian tale from the AIDS village, the life of foreigners in Chinese society, and so on. Secondary readings in English and Chinese about these social and cultural issues will be provided. All classroom discussions and course projects will be given or conducted in Chinese and/or English. Students are expected to have excellent Chinese listening and speaking skills and very good writing and reading skills, in order to fully grasp the content of this course.To promote intercultural communications, the course welcomes and invites participation of native Chinese speakers and cross-cultural peer learning.
Prerequisites: 82-433 Min. grade C and 82-434 Min. grade C
82-541 Special Topics: Hispanic Studies
Fall
Restricted to language majors who wish to go beyond the regular course offerings in Hispanic Studies involving group or individual study in a subject area approved by the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and a 400-level course
82-542 Special Topics in Hispanic Studies
Spring
Restricted to language majors who wish to go beyond the regular course offerings in Hispanic Studies involving group or individual study in a subject area approved by the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and a 400-level course
82-561 Special Topics: Italian Studies
Fall
Restricted to language majors who wish to go beyond the regular course offerings in Italian Studies involving group or individual study in a subject area approved by the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and a 400-level course
82-562 Special Topics: Italian Studies
Spring
Restricted to language majors who wish to go beyond the regular course offerings in Italian Studies involving group or individual study in a subject area approved by the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and a 400-level course
82-571 Special Topics in Japanese Studies
Fall
Restricted to language majors who wish to go beyond the regular course offerings in Japanese Studies involving group or individual study in a subject area approved by the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and a 400-level course
82-572 Special Topics in Japanese Studies
Spring
Restricted to language majors who wish to go beyond the regular course offerings in Japanese Studies involving group or individual study in a subject area approved by the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and a 400-level course
82-580 Senior Seminar in Modern Languages
Spring: 3 units
This mini-seminar for majors in Modern Languages focuses on general issues in second language learning. It provides an integrative and culminating experience for students as they complete their studies. The course includes consideration of language learning and language maintenance, the role of second languages in American life, issues of linguistic and cultural diversity in the United States today and discussions of multiculturalism throughout the world. The goal of the seminar is for students to reflect upon their language learning experience and to discuss the role that a second language plays in their own lives and in American society today. Corequisite: Open only to Modern Languages majors
82-585 Topics in Second Language Acquisition
Intermittent: 9 units
This repeatable course promotes inquiry into issues related to second language acquisition, for example, use of technology in language learning, language variation, code-switching, pragmatics, sociocultural theory. Students will engage in research and project work and employ qualitative and/or quantitative research methodology and analytical and/or empirical methods to illuminate and understand the acquisition, use, and maintenance of second languages. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor SPRING 2016 Section B: East Asian Psycholinguistics Our understanding of cognitive processes and mechanisms underlying language has primarily come from studies of European languages. However, languages such as Chinese, Japanese and Korean offer profound implications for the acquisition, representation, and processing of language, due to their differences from most European languages. Topics include first and second language acquisition, spoken word recognition, reading, language disorders, and the relationships between language, culture, and cognition. This course serves to prepare students for more advanced studies of East Asian languages, experimental linguistics, and linguistic theory.
82-591 Modern Languages Honors Thesis
Fall: 9 units
Modern Languages majors with outstanding academic records and intellectual promise will be given the opportunity to undertake original research under the direction of an individual faculty member. Students and faculty select the research topics. Prerequisites: Senior standing; a 3.5 QPA in one's language major; a 3.25 QPA overall; permission of the Department Head and approved entry into the College's Honors Program
82-592 Modern Languages Honors Thesis
Spring: 9 units
Modern Languages majors with outstanding academic records and intellectual promise will be given the opportunity to undertake original research under the direction of an individual faculty member. Students and faculty select the research topics. Prerequisites: Senior standing; a 3.5 QPA in one's language major; a 3.25 QPA overall; permission of the Department Head and approved entry into the College's Honors Program
82-599 Russian Studies Thesis
Intermittent
The Russian Studies thesis, as described for the Russian Studies major, is required of all Russian Studies majors and consists of researching and writing a thesis employing both Russian-language and English-language sources, and generally completed during the senior year. Work is done individually under the guidance of a Russian Studies advisor.
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