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School of Computer Science

Andrew Moore, Dean
Klaus Sutner, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education
Thomas Cortina, Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Education
Undergraduate Office: GHC 4115
http://www.csd.cs.cmu.edu/education/bscs/

Departments:

Carnegie Mellon founded one of the first Computer Science departments in the world in 1965. Today, the Computer Science Department forms the centerpiece of the School of Computer Science, and is joined by the Human-Computer Interaction Institute, the Institute for Software Research, the Lane Center for Computational Biology, the Language Technologies Institute, the Machine Learning Department, and the Robotics Institute. Together, these units make the School of Computer Science a world leader in research and education.

The B.S. program in Computer Science combines a solid core of Computer Science courses with the ability to gain substantial depth in another area through a required minor in a second subject. In addition, the curriculum provides numerous choices for science, engineering, humanities and fine arts courses. As computing is a discipline with strong links to many fields, this provides students with unparalleled flexibility to pursue allied (or non-allied) interests. The curriculum's mathematics and probability component ensures that students have the formal tools to remain current as technologies and systems change, rather than be limited by a narrow focus on programming alone. At the same time, students gain insight into the practical issues of building and maintaining systems by participating in intensive project-oriented courses. Due to the tremendous number of ongoing research projects within the School, many students obtain part-time or summer jobs, or receive independent study credit, working on research while pursuing their undergraduate degree. Students seeking a research/graduate school career may pursue an intensive course of research, equivalent to four classroom courses, culminating in the preparation of a senior research thesis.

Students apply to, and are directly admitted into, the undergraduate program in Computer Science and, upon successful completion, are awarded a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science. Suitably prepared students from other Carnegie Mellon colleges are eligible to apply for internal transfer to the School of Computer Science and will be considered for transfer if space is available. Computation-oriented programs are also available within the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Information Systems, Philosophy, Psychology, and Design. We also offer a B.S. degree in Computational Biology and joint degrees with the College of Fine Arts in Computer Science and Arts as well as Music and Technology.  SCS offers double majors in Computer Science (for non-CS majors), Human-Computer Interaction, and Robotics, and minors in Computational Biology, Computer Science (for non-CS majors), Language Technologies, Machine Learning, Neural Computation, Robotics, and Software Engineering.

Curriculum - B.S. in Computer Science

Computer Science

Computer Science Core: Units
15-128Freshman Immigration Course1
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation
(students with no prior programming experience take 15-112 before 15-122)
10
15-150Principles of Functional Programming10
15-210Parallel and Sequential Data Structures and Algorithms12
15-213Introduction to Computer Systems12
15-251Great Theoretical Ideas in Computer Science12
15-451Algorithm Design and Analysis12
One Communications course: Units
15-221Technical Communication for Computer Scientists9
One Algorithms/Complexity elective (min. 9 units):
15-354Computational Discrete Mathematics12
15-355Modern Computer Algebra9
15-453Formal Languages, Automata, and Computability9
15-455Undergraduate Complexity Theory9
15-456Computational Geometry9
21-301Combinatorics9
21-484Graph Theory9
others as designated by the CS Undergraduate Program
One Logics/Languages elective (min. 9 units):
15-312Foundations of Programming Languages12
15-317Constructive Logic9
15-414Bug Catching: Automated Program Verification and Testing9
15-424Foundations of Cyber-Physical Systems12
21-300Basic Logic9
80-310Formal Logic9
80-311Undecidability and Incompleteness9
others as designated by the CS Undergraduate Program
One Software Systems elective (min. 12 units):
15-410Operating System Design and Implementation12
15-411Compiler Design12
15-418Parallel Computer Architecture and Programming12
15-440Distributed Systems12
15-441Computer Networks12
others as designated by the CS Undergraduate Program
One Applications elective (min. 9 units):
02-510Computational Genomics12
05-391Designing Human Centered Software12
10-601Introduction to Machine Learning12
11-411Natural Language Processing12
15-313Foundations of Software Engineering12
15-322Introduction to Computer Music9
15-323Computer Music Systems and Information Processing9
15-381Artificial Intelligence: Representation and Problem Solving9
15-415Database Applications12
15-462Computer Graphics12
16-384Robot Kinematics and Dynamics12
16-385Computer Vision9
others as designated by the CS Undergraduate Program
Two Computer Science electives: Units
These electives can be from any SCS department; 200-level or above, at least 9 units each: Computer Science [15-], Lane Center for Computational Biology [02-], Human Computer Interaction Institute [05-], Institute for Software Research [08-,17-], Machine Learning [10-], Language Technologies Institute [11-], and Robotics Institute [16-]. (NOTE: The following courses do NOT count as Computer Science electives: 02-223, 02-250, 02-261, 08-200, 15-351. Consult with a CS undergraduate advisor before registration to determine eligibility for this requirement.) 18

Mathematics

21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration and Approximation10
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
one of the following Matrix Algebra courses:
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
21-242Matrix Theory10
one of the following Probability courses:
15-359Probability and Computing12
21-325Probability9
36-217Probability Theory and Random Processes9
36-225Introduction to Probability Theory9

Engineering and Natural Sciences

Four engineering or science courses are required, of which at least one must have a laboratory component and at least two must be from the same department. At present, courses meeting the lab requirement are:

02-261Quantitative Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory9
03-124Modern Biology Laboratory9
09-101Introduction to Experimental Chemistry
(This 3 unit lab together with 09-105 satisfies the lab requirement.)
3
09-221Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis12
15-321Research Methods for Experimental Computer Science9
27-100Engineering the Materials of the Future12
33-104Experimental Physics9
42-203Biomedical Engineering Laboratory9
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9

The following courses from the Lane Center for Computational Biology can be used to satisfy the Science and Engineering requirement and can be paired with a Biology [03-] course for two courses from one department:

02-223Personalized Medicine: Understanding Your Own Genome9
02-250Introduction to Computational Biology
(or 02-251 + 02-252)
12
02-261Quantitative Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory9

The following MCS and CIT courses cannot be used to satisfy the Engineering and Natural Sciences requirement:

06-262Mathematical Methods of Chemical Engineering12
09-103Atoms, Molecules and Chemical Change9
09-104Fundamental Aspects of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry9
09-231Mathematical Methods for Chemists9
18-090Introduction to Signal Processing for Creative Practice10
18-202Mathematical Foundations of Electrical Engineering12
18-345Introduction to Telecommunication Networks12
18-411Computational Techniques in Engineering12
18-487Introduction to Computer & Network Security & Applied Cryptography12
19-101Introduction to Engineering and Public Policy12
19-211Ethics and Policy Issues in Computing9
19-350SP TP: Research Methods & Statistics for Engineering & Public Policy Analysis9
19-402Telecommunications Technology, Policy & Management12
19-403Policies of Wireless Systems and the Internet12
19-411Global Competitiveness: Firms, Nations and Technological Change9
19-448Science, Technology & Ethics9
33-100Basic Experimental Physics6
33-115Physics for Future Presidents9
33-124Introduction to Astronomy9
33-232Mathematical Methods of Physics10
39-100Special Topics: WHAT IS ENGINEERING?9
39-200Business for Engineers9

In addition, all Electrical and Computer Engineering graduate courses [18-6xx, 18-7xx, 18-8xx, 18-9xx] cannot be used for this requirement. Consult with a CS undergraduate advisor about any course to be used for the Science and Engineering requirement before registration.

Humanities and Arts

All candidates for the bachelor's degree must complete a minimum of 63 units offered by the College of Humanities & Social Sciences and/or the College of Fine Arts as prescribed below:

A. Writing Requirement (9 units)

Complete the following course:
76-101Interpretation and Argument9

B. Breadth Requirement (27 units)
Complete three courses, one each from Category 1, Category 2, and Category 3:

Category 1: Cognition, Choice and Behavior - this requirement explores the process of thinking, decision making, and behavior in the context of the individual.
70-311Organizational Behavior9
80-130Introduction to Ethics9
80-150Nature of Reason9
80-180Nature of Language9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-230Ethical Theory9
80-241Ethical Judgments in Professional Life9
80-270Philosophy of Mind9
80-271Philosophy and Psychology9
80-275Metaphysics9
80-281Language and Thought9
85-102Introduction to Psychology9
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
85-221Principles of Child Development9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-251Personality9
85-261Abnormal Psychology9
88-120Reason, Passion and Cognition9
88-260Organizations9
Category 2: Economic, Political and Social Institutions - this requirement explores the processes by which institutions organize individual preferences and actions into collective outcomes.
19-101Introduction to Engineering and Public Policy12
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
73-100Principles of Economics9
73-230Intermediate Microeconomics9
73-240Intermediate Macroeconomics9
79-300History of American Public Policy9
79-331Body Politics: Women and Health in America9
79-335Drug Use and Drug Policy9
80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-235Political Philosophy9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-341Computers, Society and Ethics9
88-104Decision Processes in American Political Institutions9
88-110Experiments with Economic Principles9
88-205Comparative Politics9
88-210Comparative Political Systems9
88-220Policy Analysis I9
Category 3: Cultural Analysis - this requirement seeks to recognize cultures that have shaped and continue to shape the human experience; courses in this category are usually either broad in place, time, or cultural diversity.
57-173Survey of Western Music History9
60-205Modern Visual Culture 1789-19609
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
76-232African American Literature9
76-239Introduction to Film Studies9
76-241Introduction to Gender Studies9
79-104Global Histories9
79-207Development of European Culture9
79-222Between Revolutions: The Development of Modern Latin America9
79-226Introduction to African History: Earliest Times to 17809
79-230Arab-Israeli Conflict and Peace Process since 19489
79-240The Development of American Culture9
79-241African American History: Africa to the Civil War9
79-242African American History: Reconstruction to the Present9
79-255Irish History9
79-281Introduction to Religion9
79-282Europe and the World since 18006
79-311Introduction to Anthropology9
79-345The Roots of Rock and Roll, 1870-19709
79-350Early Christianity9
79-395The Arts in Pittsburgh9
79-396Music and Society in 19th and 20th Century Europe and the U.S.9
80-100Introduction to Philosophy9
80-250Ancient Philosophy9
80-251Modern Philosophy9
80-253Continental Philosophy9
80-254Analytic Philosophy9
80-255Pragmatism9
80-261Empiricism and Rationalism9
80-276Philosophy of Religion9
82-273Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture9
82-293Introduction to Russian Culture9
82-303French Culture9
82-304The Francophone World9
82-333Introduction to Chinese Language and CultureVar.
82-342Spain: Language and Culture9
82-343Latin America: Language and Culture9
82-344U.S. Latinos: Language and Culture9
82-345Introduction to Hispanic Literary and Cultural Studies9

C. Humanities and Arts Electives (27 units)
Complete 3 non-technical courses of at least 9 units each from any of the departments in the College of Humanities & Social Sciences or the College of Fine Arts. Some of the courses taught in these units are considered technical courses and may not be used to satisfy this requirement. Additionally, a select set of courses from Business Administration and from Environmental and Public Policy can also count for this requirement.   The complete list of additions and deletions can be found at http://www.csd.cs.cmu.edu/education/bscs/humanities-arts.html. Consult with a CS undergraduate advisor for additional information.

Required Minor

A sequence of courses proscribed by the requirements of the particular department. Completion of a second major (or double degree) also satisfies this requirement. If permitted by the minor or second major department, courses taken in satisfaction of the minor or second major may also count toward any category other than Computer Science and Mathematics. Consult with a CS undergraduate advisor and an advisor from the department of the minor (or double major) for specific restrictions on double counting.

Computing @ Carnegie Mellon

The following course is required of all students to familiarize them with the campus computing environment:

99-10xComputing @ Carnegie Mellon3
Free Electives

A free elective is any Carnegie Mellon course. However, a maximum of nine units of Physical Education and/or Military Science (ROTC) and/or Student-Led (StuCo) courses may be used toward fulfilling graduation requirements.

Summary of Degree Requirements:
AreaCoursesUnits
Computer Science14135
Mathematics549
Science/Engineering436
Humanities/Arts763
Minor Requirement/Free electives874
Computing @ Carnegie Mellon13
360

Sample Course Sequence

Freshman Year:
Fall Units
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
15-128Freshman Immigration Course1
15-131Great Practical Ideas for Computer Scientists
(optional, not required for CS major)
2
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
99-10xComputing Skills Workshop3
 45
Spring Units
15-150Principles of Functional Programming10
15-251Great Theoretical Ideas in Computer Science12
21-122Integration and Approximation10
xx-xxxScience/Engineering Course9
xx-xxxHumanities and Arts Elective9
 50
Sophomore Year:
Fall Units
15-213Introduction to Computer Systems12
15-221Technical Communication for Computer Scientists9
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
xx-xxxScience/Engineering Course9
xx-xxxMinor Requirement / Free Elective9
 49
Spring Units
15-210Parallel and Sequential Data Structures and Algorithms12
xx-xxxComputer Science: Applications Elective9
xx-xxxScience/Engineering Course9
xx-xxxHumanities and Arts Electivs9
xx-xxxMinor Requirement / Free Elective9
 48
Junior Year:
Fall Units
15-451Algorithm Design and Analysis12
xx-xxxComputer Science: Logic/Languages Elective9
xx-xxxProbability Course9
xx-xxxHumanities and Arts Elective9
xx-xxxMinor Requirement / Free Elective9
 48
Spring Units
15-xxxComputer Science: Systems Elective12
xx-xxxComputer Science: Algorithms/Complexity Elective9
xx-xxxHumanities and Arts Elective9
xx-xxxMinor Requirement / Free Elective9
xx-xxxScience/Engineering Course9
 48
Senior Year:
Fall Units
xx-xxxSchool of Computer Science Elective9
xx-xxxHumanities and Arts Elective9
xx-xxxMinor Requirement / Free Elective9
xx-xxxMinor Requirement / Free Elective9
 36
Spring Units
xx-xxxSchool of Computer Science Elective9
xx-xxxHumanities and Arts Elective9
xx-xxxMinor Requirement / Free Elective9
xx-xxxMinor Requirement / Free Elective9
 36
360Minimum number of units required for the degree:

The flexibility in the curriculum allows many different schedules, of which the above is only one possibility. Some elective courses are offered only once per year (Fall or Spring). Constrained CS electives (algorithms/complexity, logic/languages, systems and applications) may be taken in any order and in any semester if prerequisites are met and seats are available. Constrained electives are shown in the specific semesters in the schedule above as an example only. Students should consult with their academic advisor to determine the best elective options depending on course availability, their academic interests and their career goals.  Additionally, the School of Computer Science offers a Double Major in Human-Computer Interaction and a Double Major in Robotics, as well as numerous computing-oriented Minors available to majors and non-majors alike. 

Undergraduate Research Thesis

Students considering going on to graduate school in Computer Science should take a wide variety of Computer Science and Mathematics courses, as well as consider getting involved in independent research as early as possible.  This would be no later than the junior year and can begin even earlier.  Students interested in graduate school are strongly encouraged to participate in the Undergraduate Research Thesis program.  Additionally, graduate CS courses can be taken with permission of the instructor and in consultation with an academic advisor.

The goal of the Undergraduate Research Thesis Program is to introduce students to the breadth of tasks involved in independent research, including library work, problem formulation, experimentation, analysis, writing and speaking. In particular, students write a survey paper summarizing prior results in their desired area of research, present a public poster session in December describing their current progress, present their final results in an oral summary in the year-end university-wide Undergraduate Research Symposium (Meeting of the Minds) and submit a written thesis at the end of their senior year. Students work closely with faculty advisors to plan and carry out their research. The Undergraduate Research Thesis (15-599) can start as early as the Spring semester of the junior year, and spans the entire senior year. Students receive a total of 36 units of academic credit for the thesis work. Up to 18 units can be counted toward CS elective requirements (9 per semester). For most students, the thesis program requires at least one semester with 18 units of thesis work, so students in this program are advised to plan their schedules carefully to ensure there is ample time to perform the required research for the thesis. Students interested in research are urged to consult with their CS undergraduate advisor and Assistant Dean no later than the start of their junior year in order to plan their workload effectively.

Computer Science Additional Majors and Minors

The School of Computer Science offers an Additional Major in Computer Science, Human-Computer Interaction, and Robotics.  It also offers Minors in Computer Science, Computational Biology, Human-Computer Interaction, Language Technologies, Neural Computation, Robotics, and Software Engineering.

To see the additional majors and minors other than Computer Science, see Additional Majors and Minors in SCS.

Computer Science Additional Major

Students interested in pursuing an additional major in Computer Science should first consult with an advisor in the CS Undergraduate Office after completion of prerequisites and at least two of the core courses for application requirements and availability of seats.

The following courses are required for the Additional Major in Computer Science:

Prerequisites: Units
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation
(requires 21-127 as a co-requisite)
10
15-150Principles of Functional Programming10
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration and Approximation10
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
Computer Science core: Units
15-210Parallel and Sequential Data Structures and Algorithms12
15-213Introduction to Computer Systems12
15-251Great Theoretical Ideas in Computer Science12
15-451Algorithm Design and Analysis12
One of the following Matrix Algebra courses:
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
21-242Matrix Theory10
One of the following Probability courses:
15-359Probability and Computing12
21-325Probability9
36-217Probability Theory and Random Processes9
36-225Introduction to Probability Theory9
One Communications course: Units
15-221Technical Communication for Computer Scientists9
One Algorithms & Complexity elective:
15-354Computational Discrete Mathematics12
15-355Modern Computer Algebra9
15-453Formal Languages, Automata, and Computability9
15-455Undergraduate Complexity Theory9
15-456Computational Geometry9
21-301Combinatorics9
21-484Graph Theory9
others as designated by the CS Undergraduate Program
One Logics & Languages elective:
15-312Foundations of Programming Languages12
15-317Constructive Logic9
15-414Bug Catching: Automated Program Verification and Testing9
15-424Foundations of Cyber-Physical Systems12
21-300Basic Logic9
80-310Formal Logic9
80-311Undecidability and Incompleteness9
others as designated by the CS Undergraduate Program
One Software Systems elective:
15-410Operating System Design and Implementation12
15-411Compiler Design12
15-418Parallel Computer Architecture and Programming12
15-440Distributed Systems12
15-441Computer Networks12
others as designated by the CS Undergraduate Program
One Applications elective:
02-510Computational Genomics12
05-391Designing Human Centered Software12
10-601Introduction to Machine Learning12
11-411Natural Language Processing12
15-313Foundations of Software Engineering12
15-322Introduction to Computer Music9
15-323Computer Music Systems and Information Processing9
15-381Artificial Intelligence: Representation and Problem Solving9
15-415Database Applications12
15-462Computer Graphics12
16-384Robot Kinematics and Dynamics12
16-385Computer Vision9
others as designated by the CS Undergraduate Program
Two Computer Science electives: Units
These electives can be from any SCS department; 200-level or above, at least 9 units each: Computer Science [15-], Lane Center for Computational Biology [02-], Human Computer Interaction Institute [05-], Institute for Software Research [08-,17-], Machine Learning [10-], Language Technologies Institute [11-], and Robotics Institute [16-]. (NOTE: The following courses do NOT count as Computer Science electives: 02-223, 02-250, 02-261, 08-200, 15-351. Consult with the CS undergraduate office before registration to determine eligibility for this requirement.)18

Computer Science Minor

Students interested in pursuing a minor in Computer Science should first consult with an advisor in the CS Undergraduate Office after completion of the prerequisites and core courses for application requirements.

The following courses are required for the Minor in Computer Science:

Prerequisites: Units
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
Computer Science core courses: Units
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
15-150Principles of Functional Programming10
15-210Parallel and Sequential Data Structures and Algorithms12
One of the following Computer Science core courses:
15-213Introduction to Computer Systems12
15-251Great Theoretical Ideas in Computer Science12
Two Computer Science electives, of at least 9 units each: Units
CS elective courses must be 15-213 or higher, at least 9-units each. 15-221 and 15-351 cannot be used. One course can be from any SCS department, with prior approval. 18

Note: Since ECE students must take 15-213/18-213, they are required to take three CS electives; two can be from any SCS department with prior approval.  This three-elective stricture applies to any student minoring in CS who is required to take 15-213/18-213 or 15-251 for their home major requirements.

Double-Counting Restriction

In order to avoid excessive double-counting, students pursuing a Double Major or Minor in Computer Science must complete at least 6 courses in their home department, of at least 9 units each, none of which are required by (or are cognates for requirements in) the Computer Science major.

Additional Majors and Minors in SCS

Computational Biology Minor

Director: Dr. Ziv Bar-Joseph
Advisor: Dr. Karen Thickman
Admin Coordinator: Thom Gulish
Website: http://lane.compbio.cmu.edu/education/minor.html

The computational biology minor is open to students in any major of any college at Carnegie Mellon.  The curriculum and course requirements are designed to maximize the participation of students from diverse academic disciplines. The program seeks to produce students with both basic computational skills and knowledge in biological sciences that are central to computational biology.

Why Minor in Computational Biology?

Computational Biology is concerned with solving biological and biomedical problems using mathematical and computational methods. It is recognized as an essential element in modern biological and biomedical research. There have been fundamental changes in biology and medicine over the past two decades due to spectacular advances in high throughput data collection for genomics, proteomics and biomedical imaging. The resulting availability of unprecedented amounts of biological data demands the application of advanced computational tools to build integrated models of biological systems, and to use them to devise methods of prevent or treat disease. Computational Biologists inhabit and expand the interface of computation and biology, making them integral to the future of biology and medicine.

A minor in Computational Biology will position students well for entering the job market and graduate school in this exciting and growing field.

Admission

Students must apply for admission no later than November 30 of their senior years; an admission decision will usually be made within one month. Students are encouraged to apply as early as possible in their undergraduate careers so that the advisor of the computational biology minor can provide advice on their curriculum.

To apply, send email to Dr. Ziv Bar-Joseph <zivbj at andrew.cmu.edu> and Dr. Karen Thickman <krthickman at cmu.edu>. Include in your email:

  • Full name
  • Andrew ID
  • Preferred email address (if different)
  • Your class and College/School at Carnegie Mellon
  • Semester you intend to graduate
  • All (currently) declared majors and minors
  • Statement of purpose (maximum 1 page) — Describes why you want to take this minor and how it fits into your career goals
  • Proposed schedule of courses for the minor (this is your plan, NOT a commitment)

Curriculum

The minor in computational biology requires a total of five courses: 3 core courses, 1 biology elective, and 1 computer science elective, for a total of at least 45 units.

Prerequisites Units
03-121Modern Biology9
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
Core Classes
02-250Introduction to Computational Biology12
02-261Quantitative Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory
(03-116 Phage Genomics Research or 03-343 Experimental Techniques in Molecular Biology may be substituted for 02-261 with permission of the minor advisor)
9
plus one of the following courses:
02-510Computational Genomics12
02-512Computational Methods for Biological Modeling and Simulation9
02-530Cell and Systems Modeling12
Biology Electives (one of the following):
03-231Biochemistry I9
03-240Cell Biology9
03-327Phylogenetics9
03-330Genetics9
03-362Cellular Neuroscience9
03-363Systems Neuroscience9
03-364Developmental Neuroscience9
03-439Introduction to Biophysics9
03-442Molecular Biology9
03-534Biological Imaging and Fluorescence Spectroscopy9
42-202Physiology9
Computer Science Electives (one of the following):
02-422Advanced Algorithms for Computational Structural Biology9
02-450Automation of Biological Research9
02-500Undergraduate Research in Computational BiologyVar.
02-510Computational Genomics12
02-512Computational Methods for Biological Modeling and Simulation9
02-530Cell and Systems Modeling12
02-740Bioimage Informatics12
09-560Computational Chemistry12
10-601Introduction to Machine Learning12
15-381Artificial Intelligence: Representation and Problem Solving9
15-386Neural Computation9
15-415Database Applications12
16-721Learning-based Methods in Vision12
A number of graduate courses in CS and Robotics may be taken in consultation with the minor advisor.

Note: No more than two courses may be double counted with your major's core requirements. Courses in the minor may not be counted towards another SCS minor. Consult the advisor for the minor for more information.

Human-Computer Interaction Additional Major

The undergraduate major in HCI is available only as an additional major. If you have questions, please contact the Academic Program Coordinator at hciibachelors@cs.cmu.edu.

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is devoted to the design, implementation, and evaluation of interactive computer-based technology. Examples of HCI products include intelligent computer tutors, wearable computers, and highly interactive web sites. Constructing an HCI product is a cyclic, iterative process that involves at least three stages.

Human-Computer Interaction Minor

The Minor in Human-Computer Interaction will give students core knowledge about techniques for building successful user interfaces, approaches for conceiving, refining, and evaluating interfaces that are useful and useable, and techniques for identifying opportunities for computational technology to improve the quality of people’s lives. The students will be able to effectively collaborate in the design, implementation, and evaluation of easy-to-use, desirable, and thoughtful interactive systems. They will be prepared to contribute to multi-disciplinary teams that create new interactive products, services, environments, and systems.

The key concepts, skills and methods that students will learn in the HCI Minor include:

  • Fieldwork for understanding people’s needs and the influence of context
  • Generative approaches to imagining many possible solutions such as sketching and “bodystorming”
  • Iterative refinement of designs
  • Basic visual design including typography, grids, color, and the use of images
  • Implementation of interactive prototypes
  • Evaluation techniques including discount and empirical evaluation methods

The HCI minor is targeted at undergraduates who expect to get jobs where they design and/or implement information technology-based systems for end users, and well as students with an interest in learning more about the design of socio-technical systems. It is appropriate for students with majors in Computer Science and Information Systems, as well as students in less software-focused majors, including Design, Architecture, Art, Business Administration, Psychology, Statistics, Decision Science, Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, English and many others in the university.

Curriculum

The only prerequisite for this Minor is an introductory-level college programming course (such as 15-110, 15-112, 15-121, or 51-257) and to be in good standing with the University.

In addition to the programming prerequisite, the Minor has required two courses—05-391 Designing Human Centered Software (DHCS) and 05-4xx Interaction Design Overview (IDO)—and four electives from an approved list. The student will be required to get a grade of “C” or better in each course in order for it to count as part of the Minor. There is no final project or research required for the Minor.

Required Courses
  • 05-391 Designing Human Centered Software (DHCS)1: This course provides an overview of the most important methods taught in the Additional Major in HCI, such as Contextual Inquiry, Prototyping and Iterative Design, Heuristic Evaluation, and Think Aloud User Studies. It covers in a more abbreviated form the content of 05-410 User-Centered Research and Evaluation, 05-430 Programming Usable Interfaces, and 05-433 User Interface Lab.
  • 05-392 (IDO)2: This is a new design course that will combine material from 05-651 and 05-650 for students who do not have any previous experience with design, in a form that will fit appropriately in to a one-semester format. It will be first offered in Spring 2014.
Electives

The HCI minor requires four electives from the pre-approved list of electives made available at the HCII website.

Double Counting

Students may double count up to two (2) of the required courses or electives with their primary major.

relationship between the BHCI Major and Minor

Admission
  • BHCI Major: Application and admissions required, information on the HCII website.
  • BHCI Minor: Admissions form available at the HCII website.
Prerequisites
  • BHCI Major:
    • Freshman-level programming (51-257 or 15-110 or 15-112 or 15-121 .
    • Statistics (introductory)
    • Cognitive Psychology
    • Interaction Design Fundamentals or Communication Design Fundamentals
  • BHCI Minor:
Core Courses
  • BHCI Major:
    • Interaction Design Studio (IDS)
    • User Centered Research & Evaluation (UCRE)
    • HCI Programming (PUI/SSUI) and Lab 
    • BHCI Project
  • BHCI Minor:
    • Interaction Design Overview (IDO)
    • Designing Human Centered Systems (DHCS)
Electives
  • BHCI Major: Four (4) electives (2 from defined list and 2 free electives approved by the director of the BHCI major)
  • BHCI Minor: Four (4) electives (from defined list)
Double Counting
  • BHCI Major: Two (2) courses with primary major.
  • BHCI Minor: Two (2) courses with primary major.

Footnotes

1 Alternatively, a student can take both the BS/MHCI empirical methods course (05-410) and the BS/MHCI core-programming course (either 05-430 Programming Usable Interfaces or05-431 Software Structures for User Interfaces, along with its associated 05-433 User Interface Lab). If students take this course sequence, they would get credit for fulfilling this requirement plus one elective.

2 Alternatively, students can fulfill the design requirement by taking 05-650 and 05-651. If students take this course sequence, they would get credit for fulfilling this requirement plus one elective.

These alternative ways of fulfilling the requirements for the HCI minor are designed for students who are in the HCI 2nd major who want to “downgrade” to the minor. These students can use some the courses completed for the HCI 2nd major as a way of fulfilling the requirements for the minor.

Students who are in the HCI minor right from the start are strongly encouraged to follow the regular requirements outlined above and are strongly discouraged from trying these alternative ways of fulfilling the requirements. It can be extremely difficult to get into any of the alternative courses. This is true especially for 05-650, but for other courses as well. The fact that a student in the minor has already taken 05-651 will not give priority for getting into Studio.

Language Technologies Minor

Chair: Alan W. Black
E-mail: awb@cs.cmu.edu
Website: http://www.lti.cs.cmu.edu/lti_minor

Human language technologies have become an increasingly central component of Computer Science in the last decade. Information retrieval, machine translation and speech technology are used daily by the general public, while text mining, natural language processing, and language-based tutoring are used regularly within more specialized professional or educational environments. The Language Technologies Minor allows students to learn about language technologies and apply them through a directed project.

Prerequisites
Prerequisites Units
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
15-150Principles of Functional Programming10
Recommended
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
or 21-341 Linear Algebra
36-217Probability Theory and Random Processes9
Curriculum
Core Course
11-721Grammars and Lexicons12
Electives (choose 3)
11-411Natural Language Processing12
11-441Search Engines and Web Mining12
11-492Speech Processing12
11-711Algorithms for NLP12
11-731Machine Translation12
11-741Information Retrieval12
11-751Speech Recognition and Understanding12
11-752Speech II: Phonetics, Prosody, Perception and Synthesis12
11-761Language and Statistics12
80-180Nature of Language9
or 80-280 Linguistic Analysis
Project
A semester-long directed research project OR paper to provide hands-on experience and an in-depth study of a topic (in same area as a chosen elective)12
Double Counting of Courses

SCS undergraduates may use 11-721 Grammars and Lexicons as an elective for their CS degree and also as a required course for the LT minor. Courses in the minor may not be counted towards another SCS minor.

Machine Learning Minor

Chair: William W. Cohen
E-mail: ml-minor@cs.cmu.edu
Website: http://www.ml.cmu.edu/prospective-students/minor-in-machine-learning.html

Machine learning and statistical methods are increasingly used in many application areas including natural language processing, speech, vision, robotics, and computational biology.  The Minor in Machine Learning allows undergraduates to learn about the core principles of this field.

Prerequisites
Units
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
21-122Integration and Approximation10
36-217Probability Theory and Random Processes9
or 36-225 Introduction to Probability Theory
or 21-325 Probability
36-226Introduction to Statistical Inference9
or 36-326 Mathematical Statistics (Honors)
Core Courses
Units
10-601Introduction to Machine Learning12
or 10-701 Introduction to Machine Learning
36-401Modern Regression9
Electives
Total of 3 courses (36 units) from: Units
10-701Introduction to Machine Learning12
10-7xxcertain ML grad courses as specified on the Minor web page
10-xxxyear-long supervised research
36-315Statistical Graphics and Visualization9
36-402Advanced Methods for Data Analysis9
36-462Special Topics: Data Mining9
36-463Special Topics: Multilevel and Hierarchical Models9
36-464Special Topics: Applied Multivariate Methods9

 Additional electives can be found on the minor electives page.

Double Counting

Any course in the Machine Learning minor, other than the prerequisites, may not be counted towards another SCS minor.

The Minor in Neural Computation

Director: Dr. Tai Sing Lee
Administrative Coordinator: Melissa Stupka
Website: http://www.cnbc.cmu.edu/upnc/nc_minor/

The minor in Neural Computation is an inter college minor jointly sponsored by the School of Computer Science, the Mellon College of Science, and the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and is coordinated by the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC).

The Neural Computation minor is open to students in any major of any college at Carnegie Mellon. It seeks to attract undergraduate students from computer science, psychology, engineering, biology, statistics, physics, and mathematics from SCS, CIT, Dietrich College and MCS. The primary objective of the minor is to encourage students in biology and psychology to take computer science, engineering and mathematics courses, to encourage students in computer science, engineering, statistics and physics to take courses in neuroscience and psychology, and to bring students from different disciplines together to form a community. The curriculum and course requirements are designed to maximize the participation of students from diverse academic disciplines. The program seeks to produce students with both basic computational skills and knowledge in cognitive science and neuroscience that are central to computational neuroscience.

Curriculum

The minor in Neural Computation will require a total of five courses: four courses drawn from the four core areas (A: Neural Computation, B: Neuroscience, C: Cognitive Psychology, D: Intelligent System Analysis), one from each area, and one additional depth elective chosen from one of the core areas that is outside the student's major. The depth elective can be replaced by a one-year research project in computational neuroscience. No more than two courses can be double counted toward the student's major or other minors. However, courses taken for general education requirements of the student's degree are not considered to be double counted. A course taken to satisfy one core area cannot be used to satisfy the course requirement for another core area. The following listing presents a set of current possible courses in each area. Substitution is possible but requires approval by the director of the minor program.

 

A. Neural Computation
Units
15-386Neural Computation9
15-387Computational Perception9
15-883Computational Models of Neural Systems12
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing9
86-375Computational Perception9
Pitt-Mathematics-1800 Introduction to Mathematical Neuroscience9

 

B. Neuroscience
03-362Cellular Neuroscience9
03-363Systems Neuroscience9
03-761Neural Plasticity9
85-765Cognitive NeuroscienceVar.
Pitt-Neuroscience 1000 Introduction to Neuroscience9
Pitt-Neuroscience 1012 Neurophysiology9

 

C. Cognitive Psychology
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
85-213Human Information Processing and Artifical Intelligence9
85-412Cognitive Modeling9
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing9
85-426Learning in Humans and Machines9
85-765Cognitive NeuroscienceVar.

 

D. Intelligent System Analysis
10-601Introduction to Machine Learning12
15-381Artificial Intelligence: Representation and Problem Solving9
15-386Neural Computation9
15-387Computational Perception9
15-486Artificial Neural Networks12
15-494Special Topic: Cognitive Robotics12
16-299Introduction to Feedback Control Systems12
16-311Introduction to Robotics12
16-385Computer Vision9
18-290Signals and Systems12
24-352Dynamic Systems and Controls12
36-225Introduction to Probability Theory9
36-247Statistics for Lab Sciences9
36-401Modern Regression9
36-410Introduction to Probability Modeling9
42-631Neural Data Analysis9
42-632Neural Signal Processing12
86-375Computational Perception9
86-631Neural Data Analysis9

 

Prerequisites

The required courses in the above four core areas require a number of basic prerequisites: basic programming skills at the level of 15-110 Principles of Computing and basic mathematical skills at the level of 21-122 Integration and Approximation or their equivalents. Some courses in Area D require additional prerequisites. Area B Biology courses require, at minimum, 03-121 Modern Biology. Students might skip the prerequisites if they have the permission of the instructor to take the required courses. Prerequisite courses are typically taken to satisfy the students' major or other requirements. In the event that these basic skill courses are not part of the prerequisite or required courses of a student's major, one of them can potentially count toward the five required courses (e.g. the depth elective), conditional on approval by the director of the minor program.

 

Research Requirements (Optional)

The minor itself does not require a research project. The student however may replace the depth elective with a year-long research project. In special circumstances, a research project can also be used to replace one of the five courses, as long as (1) the project is not required by the student's major or other minor, (2) the student has taken a course in each of the four core areas (not necessarily for the purpose of satisfying this minor's requirements), and (3) has taken at least three courses in this curriculum not counted toward the student's major or other minors. Students interested in participating in the research project should contact any faculty engaged in computational neuroscience or neural computation research at Carnegie Mellon or in the University of Pittsburgh. A useful webpage that provides listing of faculty in neural computation is http://www.cnbc.cmu.edu/computational-neuroscience. The director of the minor program will be happy to discuss with students about their research interest and direct them to the appropriate faculty.

 

Fellowship Opportunities

The Program in Neural Computation (PNC) administered by the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition currently provides 3-4 competitive full-year fellowships ($11,000) to Carnegie Mellon undergraduate students to carry out mentored research in neural computation. The fellowship has course requirements similar to the requirements of the minor. Students do not apply to the fellowship program directly. They have to be nominated by the faculty members who are willing to mentor them. Therefore, students interested in the full-year fellowship program should contact and discuss research opportunities with any CNBC faculty at Carnegie Mellon or University of Pittsburgh working in the area of neural computation or computational neuroscience and ask for their nomination by sending email to Dr. Tai Sing Lee, who also administers the undergraduate fellowship program at Carnegie Mellon. See http://www.cnbc.cmu.edu/fellowcompneuro for details.

The Program in Neural Computation also offers a summer training program for undergraduate students from any U.S. undergraduate college. The students will engage in a 10-week intense mentored research and attend a series of lectures in neural computation. See the http://www.cnbc.cmu.edu/summercompneuro for application information.

Robotics Additional Major

Director: Dr. Howie Choset
Administrative Coordinator: Julie Goldstein
Website: http://addlmajor.ri.cmu.edu/#&panel1-1

The Additional Major in Robotics focuses on the theme that robotics is both multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary. This means that it draws from many fields, such as mechanical engineering, computer science and electrical engineering, and it also integrates these fields in a novel manner. The foundation of this program lies in motion and control. Upon this base, sensing, cognition, and action are layered. These foci are brought together by a unique systems perspective special to robotics. Since robotics involves building artifacts that embody these fundamentals, foci, and systems thinking, there is a "hands-on" course requirement. Lastly, students will complete a capstone course that will tie together previously learned skills and knowledge.

Admission

The Additional Major in Robotics is available to all Carnegie Mellon undergraduate students. Students should apply for the Robotics Additional Major in their Freshman year. Students in their Sophomore year may apply, provided they meet the requirements and their schedule would allow. The application is due early February and decisions on admittance to the Additional Major will be emailed to students in time for Fall registration. Application materials include:

  • Full name and email address
  • Home college, year you intend to graduate, and list of all declared Majors and Minors
  • Statement of purpose (maximum 1 page, single spaced, to articulate why the student wants to pursue the Robotics Additional Major)
  • Proposed schedule of required courses 
  • Unofficial Transcript (can be downloaded from SIO)

Curriculum

Prerequisites
Calculus Units
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
Linear Algebra (choose one)
18-202Mathematical Foundations of Electrical Engineering12
21-240Matrix Algebra with Applications10
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
21-260Differential Equations9
24-311Numerical Methods12
Programming in C
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
or knowledge and experience programming in C
Required Courses

Choose 10 courses total (one from each category plus two electives):

Overview/Introductory Units
16-311Introduction to Robotics12
Controls
16-299Introduction to Feedback Control Systems12
18-370Fundamentals of Control12
24-451Feedback Control Systems12
16-xxxUpper-level RI course with instructor and Program Director's permission
Kinematics
16-384Robot Kinematics and Dynamics12
24-355Kinematics and Dynamics of Mechanisms
(not offered regularly)
9
16-xxxUpper-level RI course with instructor and Program Director's permission
Machine Perception
15-463Computational Photography12
16-385Computer Vision9
16-421Vision Sensors12
85-370Perception
Upper-level RI course with Instructor and Program Director's permission
9
Cognition and Reasoning
10-601Introduction to Machine Learning12
11-344Machine Learning in Practice12
15-381Artificial Intelligence: Representation and Problem Solving9
15-494Special Topic: Cognitive Robotics12
16-xxxUpper-level RI planning course with instructor and Program Director's permission
"Hands-on Course"
15-491Special Topic: CMRoboBits: Creating Intelligent Robots12
16-362Mobile Robot Programming Laboratory12
18-578Mechatronic Design12
16-xxxUpper-level RI project course e.g., 16-861 or 16-865 or independent study with instructor and Program Director's permission
Systems Engineering
16-450Robotics Systems Engineering12
Capstone Course
16-474Robotics Capstone12
Required Electives (choose two)
10-601Introduction to Machine Learning12
11-344Machine Learning in Practice12
15-381Artificial Intelligence: Representation and Problem Solving9
15-462Computer Graphics12
15-491Special Topic: CMRoboBits: Creating Intelligent Robots12
15-494Special Topic: Cognitive Robotics12
16-264Humanoids12
16-362Mobile Robot Programming Laboratory12
16-385Computer Vision9
16-421Vision Sensors12
18-342Fundamentals of Embedded Systems12
18-348Embedded Systems Engineering12
18-349Embedded Real-Time Systems12
18-549Embedded Systems Design12
18-578Mechatronic Design12
24-491Department Research HonorsVar.
24-675Micro/Nano Robotics12
39-500Honors Research ProjectVar.
85-370Perception9
85-382Consciousness and Cognition9
85-395Applications of Cognitive Science9
85-412Cognitive Modeling9
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing9

Any of these can be independent study but only one independent study is allowed. A student can also take additional courses from the core; e.g., a student who takes 16-385 as a core can take 16-421 as an elective.

Graduate level Robotics courses may be used to meet elective requirement with permission from the Program Director. Graduate level Mechanical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering courses that are relevant to robotics may be used to meet the elective requirement with permission from the Program Director.

A 3.0 QPA in the Additional Major curriculum is required for graduation.

Robotics Minor

Director: Dr. Howie Choset
Administrative Coordinator: Julie Goldstein
Website: http://www.ri.cmu.edu/education/ugrad_minor.html

The Minor in Robotics provides an opportunity for undergraduate students at Carnegie Mellon to learn the principles and practices of robotics through theoretical studies and hands-on experience with robots. The Minor is open to students in any major of any college at Carnegie Mellon. Students initially learn the basics of robotics in an introductory robotics overview course. Additional required courses teach control systems and robotic manipulation. Students also choose from a wide selection of electives in robotics, perception, computer vision, cognition and cognitive science, or computer graphics. Students have a unique opportunity to undertake independent research projects, working under the guidance of Robotics Institute faculty members, this provides an excellent introduction to robotics research for those considering graduate studies.

All Robotics Minors are required to take Introduction to Robotics (16-311). This course is designed to help students understand the big picture of what is going on in robotics through topics such as kinematics, mechanisms, motion planning, sensor based planning, mobile robotics, sensors, and vision.  The minor also requires students to take a controls class and a manipulation, dynamics, or mechanism class.  These courses provide students with the necessary intuition and technical background to move on to more advanced robotics courses.

In addition to the required courses, students must take 2 electives. Students may satisfy the elective requirement by taking an approved course or upper-level Robotics course. The student must have course selection approved by the Director of the Minor during the application submission process.  In order to be awarded the Minor in Robotics, a student must earn a cumulative QPA of 2.5 in these courses. Courses that are taken Pass/Fail or audited cannot be counted for the Minor.

Admission

Admission to the Undergraduate Minor in Robotics is limited to current Carnegie Mellon students. Students interested in signing up for the minor should fill out the application form.

Prerequisite

Successful candidates for the Robotics Minor will have prerequisite knowledge of C language, basic programming skills, and familiarity with basic algorithms. Students can gain this knowledge by taking 15-122 Principles of Imperative Computation.

Required Courses
Overview: Units
16-311Introduction to Robotics12
Controls (choose one of the following):
24-451Feedback Control Systems12
18-370Fundamentals of Control12
16-299Introduction to Feedback Control Systems
(Computer Science)
12
Manipulation (choose one of the following):
16-384Robot Kinematics and Dynamics12
24-355Kinematics and Dynamics of Mechanisms9
Electives
Two Electives (chosen from the following): Units
10-601Introduction to Machine Learning12
11-344Machine Learning in Practice12
15-381Artificial Intelligence: Representation and Problem Solving9
15-424Foundations of Cyber-Physical Systems12
15-462Computer Graphics12
15-463Computational Photography12
15-491Special Topic: CMRoboBits: Creating Intelligent Robots12
15-494Special Topic: Cognitive Robotics12
16-264Humanoids12
16-362Mobile Robot Programming Laboratory12
16-385Computer Vision9
16-421Vision Sensors12
18-342Fundamentals of Embedded Systems12
18-348Embedded Systems Engineering12
18-349Embedded Real-Time Systems12
18-549Embedded Systems Design12
18-578Mechatronic Design12
24-491Department Research HonorsVar.
24-675Micro/Nano Robotics12
39-500Honors Research ProjectVar.
85-370Perception9
85-382Consciousness and Cognition9
85-395Applications of Cognitive Science9
85-412Cognitive Modeling9
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing9

Graduate level Robotics courses may be used to meet elective requirement with permission from the Program Director. Graduate level Mechanical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering courses that are relevant to robotics may be used to meet the elective requirement with permission from the Program Director.

Double-Counting Restriction

Courses in the Robotics Minor may not be counted towards another SCS minor. Computer Science (CS) Majors are permitted to double count a maximum of two courses (excluding General Education requirements) towards the Minor in Robotics.

Software Engineering Minor

Co-Director: Jonathan Aldrich
Co-Director: Claire Le Goues
Website: http://isri.cmu.edu/education/undergrad/

The Software Engineering minor is designed to teach the fundamental tools, techniques, and processes of software engineering.Through internships and a mentored project experience, students gain an understanding of the issues of scale and complexity that motivate software engineering tools and techniques.The core curriculum includes material both on engineering the software product and on the process, teamwork, and management skills that are essential to successful engineering.Graduates of the program should have the technical, process, and teamwork skills to be immediately productive in a mature engineering organization.

Prerequisite
Units
15-214Principles of Software Construction: Objects, Design, and Concurrency12
 Core Course Requirements
15-313Foundations of Software Engineering12
15-413Software Engineering Practicum12
Electives

The minor requires three elective courses, one selected from each of the following categories:

1. One domain-independent course focused on technical software engineering material:
15-414Bug Catching: Automated Program Verification and Testing9
17-651Models of Software Systems12
17-652Methods: Deciding What to Design12
17-653Managing Software Development12
17-654Analysis of Software Artifacts12
17-655Architectures for Software Systems12
17-690Seminar in Software ProcessVar.
17-xxxOther Software Engineering graduate classes may be taken; get preapproval from the program director.
2. One engineering-focused course with a significant software component:
15-410Operating System Design and Implementation12
15-412Operating System PracticumVar.
15-437Web Application Development12
15-440Distributed Systems12
15-441Computer Networks12
15-610Engineering Distributed Systems12
18-549Embedded Systems Design12
18-649Distributed Embedded Systems12
Other courses may be acceptable, with prior approval from the director of the minor.
3. One course that explores computer science problems related to existing and emerging technologies and their associated social, political, legal, business, and organizational contexts:
08-200Ethics and Policy Issues in Computing9
08-300Constructing Appropriate Technology12
08-532Law of Computer Technology9
08-533Privacy, Policy, Law and Technology9
08-781Mobile and Pervasive Computing Services9
08-801Dynamic Network Analysis12
08-810Computational Modeling of Complex Socio-Technical Systems12
70-459Web Business Engineering9
15-390Entrepreneurship for Computer Science9
15-421Information Security and Privacy12
19-402Telecommunications Technology, Policy & Management12
19-403Policies of Wireless Systems and the Internet12
70-311Organizational Behavior9
70-414Entrepreneurship for Engineers9
70-421Entrepreneurship for Computer Scientists9
70-471Supply Chain Management9
88-260Organizations9
88-341Organizational Communication9
88-343Economics of Technological Change9
88-391Technology and Economic Growth9
Other courses may be acceptable, with prior approval from the director of the minor.
Required Internship and Reflection Course

A software engineering internship of a minimum of 8 full-time weeks in an industrial setting is required.  The student must be integrated into a team and exposed to industry pressures.  The intern may work in development, management, quality assurance, or other relevant positions.  The director of the SE minor program has sole discretion in approving an internship experience based on these criteria.  Students should confirm that an internship position is appropriate before accepting it, but internships that fulfill the criteria will also be accepted after the fact.

17-413Software Engineering Reflection
Each student will write an issue-focused reflection and analysis of some personal software engineering experience, typically (but not always) based on the engineering internship above. This report must be passed by one SCS faculty member and one SE Ph.D. student, for both technical content and effective written communication. Initial course meetings will cover the reflective, writing, and speaking process. In later meetings, each student will present his or her experience through a 30-45 minute talk, which will be evaluated for communication skills and critical reflective content. This course is limited to enrollment of 16, and students who are admitted to the minor program are given first priority.
6
Double Counting Rule

At most 2 of the courses used to fulfill the minor requirements may be counted towards any other major or minor program.

SCS Policies & Procedures

School of Computer Science (SCS) Academic Standards and Actions

Grading Practices

Grades given to record academic performance in SCS are detailed under Grading Practices at http://coursecatalog.web.cmu.edu/servicesandoptions/undergraduateacademicregulations/

Dean's List

SCS recognizes each semester those undergraduates who have earned outstanding academic records by naming them to the Dean's List. The criterion for such recognition is a quality point average of at least 3.75 while completing a minimum of 36 factorable units and earning no incomplete grades.

Academic Actions

In the first year, quality point averages below 1.75 in either semester invoke an academic action. For all subsequent semesters an academic action will be taken if the semester quality point average or the cumulative quality point average (excluding the first year) is below 2.00.

Probation: The action of probation will be taken in the following cases:

  1. One semester of the first year is below 1.75 QPA;
  2. The semester QPA of a student in good standing beyond the first year falls below 2.00.

The term of probation is one semester as a full-time student. First year students are no longer on probation at the end of the second semester if the second semester's QPA is 1.75 or above. Students in the third or subsequent semester of study are no longer on probation at the end of one semester if the semester QPA and cumulative QPA (excluding the first year) are 2.00 or above.

Probation Continued: A student who has had one semester on probation and is not yet meeting minimum requirements but whose record indicates that the standards are likely to be met at the end of the next semester of study is occasionally continued on probation. This action is normally taken only when a student's semester QPA is above 2.0 but their cumulative QPA is not yet above 2.0.

Suspension: A student who does not meet minimum standards at the end of one semester of probation will be suspended:

  • A first year student will be suspended if the QPA from each semester is below 1.75.
  • A student on probation in the third or subsequent semester of study will be suspended if the semester QPA is below 2.00.

The minimum period of suspension is one academic year (two semesters). At the end of that period a student may return to school (on probation) by:

  1. receiving permission in writing from the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Education, or the student's academic advisor,
  2. completing a Return from Leave form from the HUB

Students who have been suspended or have withdrawn are required to absent themselves from the campus (including residence halls and Greek houses) within a maximum of two days after the action and to remain off the campus for the duration of the time specified. This action includes debarment from part-time or summer courses at the university for the duration of the period of the action. Although suspended students may not hold student jobs, students on academic suspension may, under certain circumstances, have a non-student job with the university. Students on disciplinary or administrative suspension may not.

Drop: This is a permanent severance. Students who have been suspended and who fail to meet minimum standards in the semester that they return to school will be dropped.

Students who have been dropped are required to absent themselves from the campus (including residence halls and Greek houses) within a maximum of two days after the action.

The relation indicated above between probation, suspension and drop is nominal. In unusual circumstances, College Council may suspend or drop a student without prior probation.

Return from Leave of Absence

SCS undergraduate students returning from a leave of absence are required to submit a Return from Leave of Absence form to the CS Undergraduate Office for approval by the student's academic advisor and assistant dean. In addition, the student must also supply a letter that explains the reason for the leave, the actions that were performed during the leave to prepare the student for a successful return, and a description of the on-campus resources, if required, that would be used by the student in order to increase the likelihood of success. Students returning from a leave are also encouraged to provide two letters of support from people close to the student (e.g. family, friends, clergy, teachers, coaches, others as appropriate). Requests to return are reviewed by the student's academic advisor, assistant dean and student affairs liaison to determine eligibility and any resources that need to be put into place to assist the student upon return. Contact the CS Undergraduate Office for more information.

Transfer into SCS

Undergraduate students admitted to colleges at CMU other than SCS and wishing to transfer into SCS should consult with the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Education during their first year. In general, no undergraduate student will be considered for transfer until after having completed 15-122, 15-150 and at least one 200-level core Computer Science course (15-210, 15-213, or 15-251) with an exceptional grade point average. Additionally, students are expected to have performed well in 21-127. The decision to allow transfer will be made based on availability of space in the student's class and the student's academic performance (in the specified courses and in their courses overall) at the discretion of the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Education. Students should consult the CS Undergraduate Program office for minimum requirements, transfer request instructions and deadlines.

Procedure for transfer of students from another university into SCS: A student should first apply through the Office of Admission. If the Office of Admission believes the applicant is acceptable, the student's record is sent to SCS for evaluation by the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Education. Admission is based on seat availability, overall academic performance from the student's current institution, and the application material. It is important to note that extremely few external transfers are admitted to the SCS program at Carnegie Mellon University.

Graduation Requirements

  1. A requirement for graduation is the completion of the program specified for a degree with a cumulative quality point average of 2.00 or higher for all courses taken after the first year.
  2. Students must be recommended for a degree by the faculty of SCS.
  3. A candidate for the bachelor's degree must complete at the University a minimum of four semesters of full-time study, or the equivalent of part-time study, comprising at least 180 units of course work.
  4. Students will be required to have met all financial obligations to the university before being awarded a degree.

Modification of Graduation Requirements: A student may seek permission to modify graduation requirements by petition to the SCS College Council.

Faculty

UMUT ACAR, Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.ANIL ADA, Assistant Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., McGill University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.VICTOR ADAMCHIK, Associate Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Byelorussian State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.YUVRAJ AGARWAL, Assistant Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.JONATHAN ALDRICH, Associate Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., University Of Washington; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.VINCENT ALEVEN, Associate Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University Of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.OMEAD AMIDI, Senior Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1994–.DAVID ANDERSEN, Associate Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.JOHN ANDERSON, R.K. Mellon University Professor – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.DIMITRIOS APOSTOLOPOULOS, Senior Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.CHRISTOPHER ATKESON, Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.JAMES BAGNELL, Associate Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.MARIA FLORINA BALCAN, Associate Professor, Machine Learning Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.JOHN BARES, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.ZIV BAR-JOSEPH, Associate Professor, Lane Center for Computational Biology – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.MATTHEW BASS, Assistant Teaching Professor, Institute for Software Research – M.S., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.MARCEL BERGERMAN, Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.KAREN BERNTSEN, Associate Teaching Professor, Human Computer Interaction Institute – M.S., Duquesne University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.JEFFREY BIGHAM, Associate Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University of Washington; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.ALAN BLACK, Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., University Of Edinburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.GUY BLELLOCH, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.AVRIM BLUM, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.LENORE BLUM, Distinguished Career Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.MANUEL BLUM, University Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.DAVID BOURNE, Principal Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – M.S., University Of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 1980–.DANIEL BOYARSKI, Professor – M.F.A., Indiana University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.TRAVIS BREAUX, Assistant Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., North Carolina State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.STEPHEN BROOKES, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University College; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.RALF BROWN, Senior Systems Scientist, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.BRETT BROWNING, Senior Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Queensland; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.EMMA BRUNSKILL, Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.RANDAL BRYANT, University Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.JAMES CALLAN, Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., University Of Massachusetts; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.JAIME CARBONELL, University Professor and Director, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.KATHLEEN CARLEY, Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.JACOBO CARRASQUEL, Associate Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – M.S., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1980–.JUSTINE CASSELL, Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.HOWARD CHOSET, Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., California Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.MICHAEL CHRISTEL, Teaching Professor, Entertainment Technology Center – Ph.D., Georgia Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.EDMUND CLARKE, University Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.WILLIAM COHEN, Professor, Machine Learning Department – Ph.D., Rutgers University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.ALBERT CORBETT, Associate Research Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University Of Oregon; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.THOMAS CORTINA, Associate Teaching Professor and Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Education, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Polytechnic University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.LORRIE CRANOR, Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Washington University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.KARL CRARY, Associate Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.LAURA DABBISH, Associate Professor, Human Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.WANDA DANN, Senior Systems Scientist, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Syracuse University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.ROGER DANNENBERG, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.JENNA DATE, Associate Teaching Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – MHCI, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.FERNANDO DE LA TORRE FRADE, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., La Salle School of Engineering; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.ANIND DEY, Director, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Georgia Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.M BERNARDINE DIAS, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.JOHN DOLAN, Principal Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.STEVEN DOW, Assistant Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.ARTUR DUBRAWSKI, Senior Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Institute of Fundamental Technological Research; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.CHRISTOPHER DYER, Assistant Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.DAVID ECKHARDT, Associate Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.WILLIAM EDDY, Professor – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1976–.JEFFREY EPPINGER, Professor Of The Practice, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.MICHAEL ERDMANN, Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.MAXINE ESKENAZI, Principal Systems Scientist, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., University Of Paris; Carnegie Mellon, 1994–.SCOTT FAHLMAN, Research Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.CHRISTOS FALOUTSOS, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University Of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.KAYVON FATAHALIAN, Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.STEPHEN FIENBERG, Maurice Falk University Professor – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1980–.JODI FORLIZZI, Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.ROBERT FREDERKING, Principal Systems Scientist, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.DAVID GARLAN, Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.CHARLES GARROD, Assistant Teaching Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.ANATOLE GERSHMAN, Distinguished Service Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.HARTMUT GEYER, Assistant Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Friedrich-Schiller University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.GARTH GIBSON, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University Of California; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.CLARK GLYMOUR, Alumni University Professor – Ph.D., Indiana University; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.SETH GOLDSTEIN, Associate Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University Of California; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.GEOFFREY GORDON, Associate Professor, Machine Learning Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.ABHINAV GUPTA, Assistant Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.ANUPAM GUPTA, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University Of California At Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.VENKATESAN GURUSWAMI, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.BERNARD HAEUPLER, Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.JESSICA HAMMER, Assistant Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.MOR HARCHOL-BALTER, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University Of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.ROBERT HARPER, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.CHRISTOPHER HARRISON, Assistant Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.ALEXANDER HAUPTMANN, Principal Systems Scientist, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1994–.MARTIAL HEBERT, Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Paris-Xl; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.JAMES HERBSLEB, Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., University Of Nebraska; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.JESSICA HODGINS, Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.RALPH HOLLIS, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University Of Colorado; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.JASON HONG, Associate Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University Of California At Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.EDUARD HOVY, Associate Research Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.DANIEL HUBER, Senior Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.SCOTT HUDSON, Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University Of Colorado; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.BRANISLAV JARAMAZ, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.ANGEL JORDAN, University Professor Emeritus, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.MICHAEL KAESS, Assistant Research Professor – Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.TAKEO KANADE, University Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Kyoto University; Carnegie Mellon, 1980–.GEORGE KANTOR, Senior Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.CHRISTIAN KASTNER, Assistant Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., University of Magdeburg; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.DILSUN KAYNUR, Assistant Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University of Edinburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.THOMAS KEATING, Assistant Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – M.S., Duquesne University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.ALONZO KELLY, Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.GREGORY KESDEN, Associate Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – M.S., Clemson University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.SARA KIESLER, Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.SEUNGJUN KIM, Systems Scientist, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.SEYOUNG KIM, Assistant Professor, Lane Center for Computational Biology – Ph.D., University of California At Irvine; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.CARL KINGSFORD, Associate Professor, Lane Center for Computational Biology – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.ANIKET KITTUR, Assistant Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University of California At Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.KENNETH KOEDINGER, Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.J. ZICO KOLTER, Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.DAVID KOSBIE, Assistant Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – ABD, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.IOANNIS KOUTIS, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.ROBERT KRAUT, Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.CHRISTOPHER LANGMEAD, Associate Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Dartmouth University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.ANTHONY LATTANZE, Teaching Professor, Institute for Software Research – M.S., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.ALON LAVIE, Research Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.CLAIRE LE GOUES, Assistant Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., University of Virginia; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.CHRISTIAN LEBIERE, Research Psychologist, Psychology – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.TAI-SING LEE, Associate Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.EUN SUN LEE, Assistant Teaching Professor, Institute for Software Research – M.S., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.LORRAINE LEVIN, Research Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.MAXIM LIKACHEV, Assistant Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.SIMON LUCEY, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Southern Queensland; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.JENNIFER MANKOFF, Associate Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Georgia Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.MATTHEW MASON, Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.NOBORU MATSUDA, Systems Scientist, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.ROY MAXION, Research Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University Of Colorado; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.BRUCE MCLAREN, Senior Systems Scientist, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University Of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.FLORIAN METZE, Assistant Research Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Universität Karlsruhe; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.NATHAN MICHAEL, Assistant Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.GARY MILLER, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University Of California; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.EDUARDO MIRANDA, Associate Teaching Professor, Institute for Software Research – M.S./M.Eng., University of Linköping/University of Ottawa; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.TERUKO MITAMURA, Research Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., University Of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.TOM MITCHELL, University Professor, Director and Head, Machine Learning Department – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.ALAN MONTGOMERY, Associate Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., University Of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.ANDREW MOORE, Dean and Professor, School of Computer Science – Ph.D., University of Cambridge; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.JAMES MORRIS, Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.JACK MOSTOW, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.TODD MOWRY, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.ROBERT MURPHY, Professor, Director and Head, Lane Center for Computational Biology – Ph.D., California Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.BRAD MYERS, Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University Of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.PRIYA NARASIMHAN, Associate Professor – Ph.D., University Of California; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.SRINIVASA NARASIMHAN, Associate Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.CHRISTINE NEUWIRTH, Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.ILLAH NOURBAKHSH, Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.ERIC NYBERG, Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.RYAN O'DONNELL, Associate Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.AMY OGAN, Assistant Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.DAVID O'HALLARON, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University of Virginia; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.IRVING OPPENHEIM, Professor – Ph.D., Cambridge University; Carnegie Mellon, 1973–.YOUNG-LAE PARK, Assistant Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.ANDREW PAVLO, Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Brown University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.JUERGEN PFEFFER, Assistant Research Professor – Ph.D., Vienna University of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.FRANK PFENNING, Professor and Head, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.ANDRE PLATZER, Associate Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University of Oldenburg; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.BARNABAS POCZOS, Assistant Professor, Machine Learning Department – Ph.D., Eötvös Loránd University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.NANCY POLLARD, Associate Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.ARIEL PROCACCIA, Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.BHIKSHA RAJ RAMAKRISHNAN, Associate Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.RAJ REDDY, University Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.MARGARET REID-MILLER, Assistant Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.CAMERON RIVIERE, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.ALFRED RIZZI, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.DAVID ROOT, Associate Teaching Professor, Institute for Software Research – M.P.M., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.CAROLYN ROSE, Associate Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.RONALD ROSENFELD, Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.MANUEL ROSSO-LLOPART, Associate Teaching Professor, Institute for Software Research – M.S., Software Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.ZACK RUBINSTEIN, Senior Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Massachusetts; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.STEVEN RUDICH, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University of California; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.ALEXANDER RUDNICKY, Research Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1980–.PAUL RYBSKI, Senior Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.NORMAN SADEH-KONIECPOL, Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.MAJD SAKR, Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.TUOMAS SANDHOLM, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University of Massachusetts; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.MAHADEV SATYANARAYANAN, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.PAUL SCERRI, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Linkoping University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.RICHARD SCHEINES, Professor and Department Head, Philosophy – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.SEBASTIAN SCHERER, Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.WILLIAM SCHERLIS, Professor and Director, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.BRADLEY SCHMERL, Senior Systems Scientist, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Flinders University of South Australia; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.JEFF SCHNEIDER, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Rochester; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.DANA SCOTT, University Professor Emeritus, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.TEDDY SEIDENFELD, Herbert A. Simon Professor – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.SRINIVASAN SESHAN, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University of California; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.MICHAEL SHAMOS, Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1975–.MARY SHAW, University Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1965–.YASER SHEIKH, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.MEL SIEGEL, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Colorado; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.DANIEL SIEWIOREK, University Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1972–.REID SIMMONS, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.ROBERT SIMMONS, Assistant Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.AARTI SINGH, Assistant Professor, Machine Learning Department – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin At Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.RITA SINGH, Systems Scientist, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Tata Institute of Fundamental Research; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.SANJIV SINGH, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1994–.DONALD SLATER, Systems Scientist, Computer Science Department – B.S., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.DANIEL SLEATOR, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.NOAH SMITH, Associate Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.STEPHEN SMITH, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.ALEX SMOLA, Professor, Machine Learning Department – Ph.D., University of Techonology, Berlin; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.PETER SPIRTES, Professor and Associate Head, Philosophy – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.SIDDHARTHA SRINIVASA, Associate Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.JOHN STAMPER, Systems Scientist, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University of North Carolina At Charlotte; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.PETER STEENKISTE, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.MARK STEHLIK, Teaching Professor and Associate Dean for Education, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – B.S., Pace University; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.AARON STEINFELD, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.ANTHONY STENTZ, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.GEORGE STETTEN, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of North Carolina; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.SCOTT STEVENS, Teaching Professor, Entertainment Technology Center – Ph.D., University of Nebraska; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.KLAUS SUTNER, Teaching Professor and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education, Computer Science – Ph.D., University of Munich; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.KATIA SYCARA, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.SUJATA TELANG, Associate Teaching Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.KAREN THICKMAN, Assistant Teaching Professor, Lane Center for Computational Biology – Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.ANTHONY TOMASIC, Instructor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.DAVID TOURETZKY, Research Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.ADRIEN TREUILLE, Assistant Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University Of Washington; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.CHRISTOPHER URMSON, Adjunct Faculty, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.MANUELA VELOSO, University Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.LUIS VON AHN, Associate Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.JOHN VU, Distinguished Career Professor, Lane Center for Computational Biology – M.S., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.HOWARD WACTLAR, Research Professor, Computer Science Department – M.S., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.ALEXANDER WAIBEL, Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.LARRY WASSERMAN, Professor – Ph.D., University of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.LEE WEISS, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.KURT WESCOE, eBusiness Research Fellow, Institute for Software Research – M.S., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.DAVID WETTERGREEN, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.WILLIAM RED WHITTAKER, Fredkin University Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1973–.JEANNETTE WING, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.WEI WU, Associate Research Professor, Lane Center for Computational Biology – Ph.D., Rutgers University; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.POE ERIC XING, Professor, Machine Learning Department – Ph.D., University Of California At Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.YIMING YANG, Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Kyoto University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.HUI ZHANG, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University of California; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.JOHN ZIMMERMAN, Associate Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – M.Des., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.

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Faculty

UMUT ACAR, Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.ANIL ADA, Assistant Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., McGill University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.VICTOR ADAMCHIK, Associate Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Byelorussian State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.YUVRAJ AGARWAL, Assistant Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.JONATHAN ALDRICH, Associate Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., University Of Washington; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.VINCENT ALEVEN, Associate Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University Of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.OMEAD AMIDI, Senior Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1994–.DAVID ANDERSEN, Associate Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.JOHN ANDERSON, R.K. Mellon University Professor – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.DIMITRIOS APOSTOLOPOULOS, Senior Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.CHRISTOPHER ATKESON, Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.JAMES BAGNELL, Associate Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.MARIA FLORINA BALCAN, Associate Professor, Machine Learning Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.JOHN BARES, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.ZIV BAR-JOSEPH, Associate Professor, Lane Center for Computational Biology – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.MATTHEW BASS, Assistant Teaching Professor, Institute for Software Research – M.S., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.MARCEL BERGERMAN, Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.KAREN BERNTSEN, Associate Teaching Professor, Human Computer Interaction Institute – M.S., Duquesne University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.JEFFREY BIGHAM, Associate Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University of Washington; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.ALAN BLACK, Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., University Of Edinburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.GUY BLELLOCH, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.AVRIM BLUM, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.LENORE BLUM, Distinguished Career Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.MANUEL BLUM, University Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.DAVID BOURNE, Principal Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – M.S., University Of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 1980–.DANIEL BOYARSKI, Professor – M.F.A., Indiana University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.TRAVIS BREAUX, Assistant Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., North Carolina State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.STEPHEN BROOKES, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University College; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.RALF BROWN, Senior Systems Scientist, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.BRETT BROWNING, Senior Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Queensland; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.EMMA BRUNSKILL, Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.RANDAL BRYANT, University Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.JAMES CALLAN, Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., University Of Massachusetts; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.JAIME CARBONELL, University Professor and Director, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.KATHLEEN CARLEY, Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.JACOBO CARRASQUEL, Associate Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – M.S., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1980–.JUSTINE CASSELL, Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.HOWARD CHOSET, Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., California Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.MICHAEL CHRISTEL, Teaching Professor, Entertainment Technology Center – Ph.D., Georgia Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.EDMUND CLARKE, University Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.WILLIAM COHEN, Professor, Machine Learning Department – Ph.D., Rutgers University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.ALBERT CORBETT, Associate Research Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University Of Oregon; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.THOMAS CORTINA, Associate Teaching Professor and Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Education, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Polytechnic University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.LORRIE CRANOR, Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Washington University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.KARL CRARY, Associate Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.LAURA DABBISH, Associate Professor, Human Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.WANDA DANN, Senior Systems Scientist, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Syracuse University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.ROGER DANNENBERG, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.JENNA DATE, Associate Teaching Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – MHCI, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.FERNANDO DE LA TORRE FRADE, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., La Salle School of Engineering; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.ANIND DEY, Director, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Georgia Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.M BERNARDINE DIAS, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.JOHN DOLAN, Principal Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.STEVEN DOW, Assistant Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.ARTUR DUBRAWSKI, Senior Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Institute of Fundamental Technological Research; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.CHRISTOPHER DYER, Assistant Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.DAVID ECKHARDT, Associate Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.WILLIAM EDDY, Professor – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1976–.JEFFREY EPPINGER, Professor Of The Practice, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.MICHAEL ERDMANN, Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.MAXINE ESKENAZI, Principal Systems Scientist, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., University Of Paris; Carnegie Mellon, 1994–.SCOTT FAHLMAN, Research Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.CHRISTOS FALOUTSOS, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University Of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.KAYVON FATAHALIAN, Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.STEPHEN FIENBERG, Maurice Falk University Professor – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1980–.JODI FORLIZZI, Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.ROBERT FREDERKING, Principal Systems Scientist, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.DAVID GARLAN, Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.CHARLES GARROD, Assistant Teaching Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.ANATOLE GERSHMAN, Distinguished Service Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.HARTMUT GEYER, Assistant Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Friedrich-Schiller University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.GARTH GIBSON, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University Of California; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.CLARK GLYMOUR, Alumni University Professor – Ph.D., Indiana University; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.SETH GOLDSTEIN, Associate Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University Of California; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.GEOFFREY GORDON, Associate Professor, Machine Learning Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.ABHINAV GUPTA, Assistant Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.ANUPAM GUPTA, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University Of California At Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.VENKATESAN GURUSWAMI, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.BERNARD HAEUPLER, Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.JESSICA HAMMER, Assistant Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.MOR HARCHOL-BALTER, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University Of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.ROBERT HARPER, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.CHRISTOPHER HARRISON, Assistant Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.ALEXANDER HAUPTMANN, Principal Systems Scientist, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1994–.MARTIAL HEBERT, Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Paris-Xl; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.JAMES HERBSLEB, Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., University Of Nebraska; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.JESSICA HODGINS, Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.RALPH HOLLIS, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University Of Colorado; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.JASON HONG, Associate Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University Of California At Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.EDUARD HOVY, Associate Research Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.DANIEL HUBER, Senior Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.SCOTT HUDSON, Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University Of Colorado; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.BRANISLAV JARAMAZ, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.ANGEL JORDAN, University Professor Emeritus, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.MICHAEL KAESS, Assistant Research Professor – Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.TAKEO KANADE, University Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Kyoto University; Carnegie Mellon, 1980–.GEORGE KANTOR, Senior Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.CHRISTIAN KASTNER, Assistant Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., University of Magdeburg; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.DILSUN KAYNUR, Assistant Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University of Edinburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.THOMAS KEATING, Assistant Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – M.S., Duquesne University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.ALONZO KELLY, Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.GREGORY KESDEN, Associate Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – M.S., Clemson University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.SARA KIESLER, Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.SEUNGJUN KIM, Systems Scientist, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.SEYOUNG KIM, Assistant Professor, Lane Center for Computational Biology – Ph.D., University of California At Irvine; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.CARL KINGSFORD, Associate Professor, Lane Center for Computational Biology – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.ANIKET KITTUR, Assistant Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University of California At Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.KENNETH KOEDINGER, Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.J. ZICO KOLTER, Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.DAVID KOSBIE, Assistant Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – ABD, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.IOANNIS KOUTIS, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.ROBERT KRAUT, Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.CHRISTOPHER LANGMEAD, Associate Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Dartmouth University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.ANTHONY LATTANZE, Teaching Professor, Institute for Software Research – M.S., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.ALON LAVIE, Research Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.CLAIRE LE GOUES, Assistant Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., University of Virginia; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.CHRISTIAN LEBIERE, Research Psychologist, Psychology – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.TAI-SING LEE, Associate Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.EUN SUN LEE, Assistant Teaching Professor, Institute for Software Research – M.S., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.LORRAINE LEVIN, Research Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.MAXIM LIKACHEV, Assistant Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.SIMON LUCEY, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Southern Queensland; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.JENNIFER MANKOFF, Associate Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Georgia Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.MATTHEW MASON, Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.NOBORU MATSUDA, Systems Scientist, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.ROY MAXION, Research Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University Of Colorado; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.BRUCE MCLAREN, Senior Systems Scientist, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University Of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.FLORIAN METZE, Assistant Research Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Universität Karlsruhe; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.NATHAN MICHAEL, Assistant Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.GARY MILLER, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University Of California; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.EDUARDO MIRANDA, Associate Teaching Professor, Institute for Software Research – M.S./M.Eng., University of Linköping/University of Ottawa; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.TERUKO MITAMURA, Research Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., University Of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.TOM MITCHELL, University Professor, Director and Head, Machine Learning Department – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.ALAN MONTGOMERY, Associate Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., University Of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.ANDREW MOORE, Dean and Professor, School of Computer Science – Ph.D., University of Cambridge; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.JAMES MORRIS, Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.JACK MOSTOW, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.TODD MOWRY, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.ROBERT MURPHY, Professor, Director and Head, Lane Center for Computational Biology – Ph.D., California Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.BRAD MYERS, Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University Of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.PRIYA NARASIMHAN, Associate Professor – Ph.D., University Of California; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.SRINIVASA NARASIMHAN, Associate Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.CHRISTINE NEUWIRTH, Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.ILLAH NOURBAKHSH, Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.ERIC NYBERG, Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.RYAN O'DONNELL, Associate Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.AMY OGAN, Assistant Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.DAVID O'HALLARON, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University of Virginia; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.IRVING OPPENHEIM, Professor – Ph.D., Cambridge University; Carnegie Mellon, 1973–.YOUNG-LAE PARK, Assistant Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.ANDREW PAVLO, Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Brown University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.JUERGEN PFEFFER, Assistant Research Professor – Ph.D., Vienna University of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.FRANK PFENNING, Professor and Head, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.ANDRE PLATZER, Associate Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University of Oldenburg; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.BARNABAS POCZOS, Assistant Professor, Machine Learning Department – Ph.D., Eötvös Loránd University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.NANCY POLLARD, Associate Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute Of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.ARIEL PROCACCIA, Assistant Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.BHIKSHA RAJ RAMAKRISHNAN, Associate Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.RAJ REDDY, University Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.MARGARET REID-MILLER, Assistant Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.CAMERON RIVIERE, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.ALFRED RIZZI, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.DAVID ROOT, Associate Teaching Professor, Institute for Software Research – M.P.M., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.CAROLYN ROSE, Associate Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.RONALD ROSENFELD, Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.MANUEL ROSSO-LLOPART, Associate Teaching Professor, Institute for Software Research – M.S., Software Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.ZACK RUBINSTEIN, Senior Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Massachusetts; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.STEVEN RUDICH, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University of California; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.ALEXANDER RUDNICKY, Research Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1980–.PAUL RYBSKI, Senior Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.NORMAN SADEH-KONIECPOL, Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.MAJD SAKR, Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.TUOMAS SANDHOLM, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University of Massachusetts; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.MAHADEV SATYANARAYANAN, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.PAUL SCERRI, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Linkoping University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.RICHARD SCHEINES, Professor and Department Head, Philosophy – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.SEBASTIAN SCHERER, Systems Scientist, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.WILLIAM SCHERLIS, Professor and Director, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.BRADLEY SCHMERL, Senior Systems Scientist, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Flinders University of South Australia; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.JEFF SCHNEIDER, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Rochester; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.DANA SCOTT, University Professor Emeritus, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.TEDDY SEIDENFELD, Herbert A. Simon Professor – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.SRINIVASAN SESHAN, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University of California; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.MICHAEL SHAMOS, Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1975–.MARY SHAW, University Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1965–.YASER SHEIKH, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.MEL SIEGEL, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Colorado; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.DANIEL SIEWIOREK, University Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1972–.REID SIMMONS, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.ROBERT SIMMONS, Assistant Teaching Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.AARTI SINGH, Assistant Professor, Machine Learning Department – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin At Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.RITA SINGH, Systems Scientist, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Tata Institute of Fundamental Research; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.SANJIV SINGH, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1994–.DONALD SLATER, Systems Scientist, Computer Science Department – B.S., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.DANIEL SLEATOR, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.NOAH SMITH, Associate Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.STEPHEN SMITH, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.ALEX SMOLA, Professor, Machine Learning Department – Ph.D., University of Techonology, Berlin; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.PETER SPIRTES, Professor and Associate Head, Philosophy – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.SIDDHARTHA SRINIVASA, Associate Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.JOHN STAMPER, Systems Scientist, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., University of North Carolina At Charlotte; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.PETER STEENKISTE, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.MARK STEHLIK, Teaching Professor and Associate Dean for Education, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – B.S., Pace University; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.AARON STEINFELD, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.ANTHONY STENTZ, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.GEORGE STETTEN, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of North Carolina; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.SCOTT STEVENS, Teaching Professor, Entertainment Technology Center – Ph.D., University of Nebraska; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.KLAUS SUTNER, Teaching Professor and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education, Computer Science – Ph.D., University of Munich; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.KATIA SYCARA, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.SUJATA TELANG, Associate Teaching Professor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.KAREN THICKMAN, Assistant Teaching Professor, Lane Center for Computational Biology – Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.ANTHONY TOMASIC, Instructor, Institute for Software Research – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.DAVID TOURETZKY, Research Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.ADRIEN TREUILLE, Assistant Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University Of Washington; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.CHRISTOPHER URMSON, Adjunct Faculty, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.MANUELA VELOSO, University Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.LUIS VON AHN, Associate Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.JOHN VU, Distinguished Career Professor, Lane Center for Computational Biology – M.S., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.HOWARD WACTLAR, Research Professor, Computer Science Department – M.S., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.ALEXANDER WAIBEL, Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.LARRY WASSERMAN, Professor – Ph.D., University of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.LEE WEISS, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.KURT WESCOE, eBusiness Research Fellow, Institute for Software Research – M.S., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.DAVID WETTERGREEN, Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.WILLIAM RED WHITTAKER, Fredkin University Research Professor, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1973–.JEANNETTE WING, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.WEI WU, Associate Research Professor, Lane Center for Computational Biology – Ph.D., Rutgers University; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.POE ERIC XING, Professor, Machine Learning Department – Ph.D., University Of California At Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.YIMING YANG, Professor, Language Technologies Institute – Ph.D., Kyoto University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.HUI ZHANG, Professor, Computer Science Department – Ph.D., University of California; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.JOHN ZIMMERMAN, Associate Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute – M.Des., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.