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Intercollege Programs

Carnegie Mellon University offers several degree programs and courses of study which are coordinated by multiple colleges, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the university. These are detailed below.

 

BXA Intercollege Degree Programs

The BXA Intercollege Degree Programs enable students the freedom to individualize their educational experience by promoting integration, balance and innovation. There are three degree programs from which to choose:

  • Bachelor of Humanities and Arts
  • Bachelor of Science and Arts
  • Bachelor of Computer Science and Arts

For detailed information on the BXA Intercollege Degree Programs, go to BXA Intercollege Degree Programs.

Bachelor of Science in Computational Biology

Computational Biology is concerned with solving biological and biomedical problems using mathematical and computational methods. It is recognized as an essential element in modern biological and biomedical research. There have been fundamental changes in biology and medicine over the past decade due to spectacular advances in biomedical imaging, genomics, and proteomics. The nature of these changes demands the application of novel theories and advanced computational tools to decipher the implications of these data, and to devise methods of controlling or modifying biological function. Consequently, Computational Biologists must be well trained and grounded in biology, mathematics, and computer science.

The School of Computer Science and Mellon College of Science have joined forces to establish an exciting interdisciplinary program leading to a B.S. in Computational Biology. The goal of this degree program is to provide an intensive interdisciplinary education to enable outstanding students to become leaders in identifying and solving tomorrow's biological problems using computational methods. The program's curriculum is truly interdisciplinary and is designed for students interested in the intersection of Biology and Computer Science.

Applications to the program are invited from current sophomores. Applicants must have completed, or be currently enrolled in: and . Applicants must submit an informal transcript (whiteprint, obtainable from their academic advisor) and an essay describing their interest in the program. Completed applications should be submitted to Dr. Maggie Braun at mabraun@andrew.cmu.edu in Doherty Hall 1320, Dr. Karen Thickman at krthickman@cmu.edu in Gates-Hillman Center 7403, or Dr. Tom Cortina at tcortina@cs.cmu.edu in Gates-Hillman Center 4117 no later than one week after midsemester grades are released in a given semester.

Degree Requirements
47 unitsMath/Stats Core
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation10
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
21-xxxMath Elective (21-241, 21-260, 21-341)9
36-xxxStatistics Elective (36-217, 36-225, 36-247, 36-625)9
 
41 unitsGeneral Science Core
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
09-217Organic Chemistry I9
33-111Physics I for Science Students12

 

51 unitsBiological Sciences Core
03-121Modern Biology9
03-231Biochemistry I9
or 03-232 Biochemistry I
03-240Cell Biology9
03-330Genetics9
03-342Introduction to Biological Laboratory Practices *1
03-343Experimental Techniques in Molecular Biology *12
03-201Undergraduate Colloquium for Sophomores1
or 15-128 Freshman Immigration Course
03-411Topics in Research1

* these two courses are co-requisites and must be taken together.

 

56 units  Computer Science Core
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
15-150Principles of Functional Programming10
15-210Parallel and Sequential Data Structures and Algorithms12
15-251Great Theoretical Ideas in Computer Science12
15-451Algorithm Design and Analysis12

 

45-54 unitsMajor Electives
03-511Computational Molecular Biology and Genomics9
03-xxx, 05-xxx, or 02-xxx Computational Biology Electives18-24
03-3xxAdvanced Biology Elective9
15-xxxAdvanced Computer Science Elective (15-211 or higher)9
 
75 unitsGeneral Education
99-10xComputing @ Carnegie Mellon3
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
Elective Cognition, Choice and Behavior9
Elective Economics, Political and Social Institutions9
Elective Cultural Analysis9
Non-technical Elective9
Non-technical Elective9
Non-technical Elective9
Non-technical Elective9


40-49 unitsFree Electives
 

360Minimum number of units required for degree:

Bachelor of Science in Computational Finance

The Mellon College of Science, the Heinz College of Public Policy and Management and the Tepper School of Business jointly offer a degree uniquely designed to meet the quantitative needs of the finance industry. Modeled after the highly successful Carnegie Mellon Master of Science in Computational Finance, this degree allows students to develop a deep knowledge of mathematics, probability, statistics, and the applications of these disciplines to finance. Students who complete this degree may directly enter the finance industry, enter other industries where an applied mathematics training is appropriate, or pursue advanced degrees in economics, finance or the mathematical sciences. Students entering the work force upon completion of this degree may wish to later complement their undergraduate degree with a Master's degree in Business Administration or other professional degree. Students who might eventually pursue doctoral degrees in economics, finance, statistics or mathematics should seek advising on how to use their electives in order to prepare for graduate work in their chosen disciplines. Students apply for admission to the B.S. program in Computational Finance in the second semester of the sophomore year. Later application is also possible.

The Bachelor of Science in Computational Finance is an Intercollegiate Program. Students who pursue Computational Finance as their primary major may elect to have either the Mellon College of Science (MCS) or the Tepper School of Business (Tepper) as their home college. The coursework required for the major is the same in either case, with one minor exception outlined below. The general education requirements for the degree depend on the student's home college. MCS students must complete the same Humanities, Social Sciences, and Fine Arts requirements as other MCS students. In addition, MCS students are required to take two science courses, one fewer than other MCS majors. Tepper students must complete the Breadth Requirements of the Undergraduate Business Administration Program. Additionally, they must take several courses from the Functional Business Core of that program.

Majors in Computational Finance can tailor their degree program by selecting Depth Electives aligned with their interests and ambitions. MCS students are required to take three depth electives. Tepper students must take two depth electives and 70-391 Finance (MCS students may select 70-391 as one of their four depth electives).

 

MCS Science Requirements

Students intending to apply to the B.S. program in Computational Finance should  take two semesters of calculus, 21-120 Differential and Integral Calculus and 21-122 Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation, and 15-110 Principles of Computing.

 

In addition, in the freshman year students should complete two of the following three courses:
03-121Modern Biology9
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
33-111Physics I for Science Students12

 

MCS Humanities, Social Sciences & Fine Arts Requirements

Candidates for the B. S. in Computational Finance must complete 72 units offered by the College of Humanities and Social Science and/or the College of Fine Arts. Of these 72 units, 36 are specified by the detailed curriculum in below. These are:

76-101Interpretation and Argument9
73-100Principles of Economics9
73-230Intermediate Microeconomics9
73-240Intermediate Macroeconomics9

Two of the remaining four courses must be in specific categories as listed in the section on general requirements for a Bachelor's degree in the Mellon College of Science. One in Category 1: Cognition, Choice and Behavior, and one in Category 3: Cultural Analysis.

 

Tepper Functional Business Core

The Functional Business Core of the Undergraduate Business Administration Program includes 70-122 Introduction to Accounting, which is required by all Computational Finance majors. It also includes 70-391 , which Tepper students majoring in Computational Finance must take in place of one Depth Elective. In addition, Tepper students pursuing the B.S. in Computational Finance must complete six other courses from the Functional Business Core.

These courses are:
70-100Global Business9
70-311Organizational Behavior9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-371Operations Management9
70-381Marketing I9
70-401Management Game12

 

Tepper Breadth Requirements

Candidates for the B.S. in Computational Finance must complete the breadth requirements outlined in the section describing the Undergraduate Business Administration Program.

 

Depth Electives

The detailed curricula below include three or four depth electives. These may be chosen from among the following:
21-355Principles of Real Analysis I9
21-365Projects in Applied Mathematics9
21-372Partial Differential Equations and Fourier Analysis9
36-401Modern Regression9
36-402Advanced Data Analysis9
36-461Special Topics9
70-391Finance9
70-398International Finance9
70-492Investment Analysis9
70-495Corporate Finance9
70-497Derivative Securities9
73-252Advanced Microeconomic Theory6
73-253Advanced Macroeconomic Theory6
73-372International Money and Finance9
73-392Financial Economics9

MCS Detailed Curriculum

What follows is the detailed curriculum for the degree Bachelor of Science in Computational Finance in the Mellon College of Science. The courses listed are required. The semesters in which the courses are to be taken are suggested.

Freshman Year
Fall Units
15-110Principles of Computing10
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
xx-xxxScience Requirement 9-12
 41-44


Spring Units
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
21-122Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation10
70-122Introduction to Accounting9
xx-xxxScience Requirement (9-12 units)12
xx-xxxElective9
 52
Sophomore Year
Fall Units
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
21-260Differential Equations9
73-100Principles of Economics9
xx-xxxHumanities, Social Science or Fine Arts Elective9
 46


Spring Units
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
21-270Introduction to Mathematical Finance9
21-369Numerical Methods9
73-230Intermediate Microeconomics9
xx-xxxElective9
 46
Junior Year
Fall Units
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
21-325Probability9
21-370Discrete Time Finance9
73-240Intermediate Macroeconomics9
xx-xxxElective9
 46


Spring Units
21-420Continuous-Time Finance9
36-226Introduction to Statistical Inference9
36-410Introduction to Probability Modeling9
xx-xxxHumanities, Social Science or Fine Arts Elective9
xx-xxxDepth Elective9
 45
Senior Year
Fall Units
45-886MSCF Studies in Financial Engineering6
90-718Strategic Presentation Skills6
94-700Organizational Design & Implementation6
xx-xxxDepth Elective9
xx-xxxHumanities, Social Science or Fine Arts9
xx-xxxElective9
 45


Spring Units
94-701Business English6
or 94-702 Professional Writing
xx-xxxDepth Elective9
xx-xxxHumanities, Social Science or Fine Arts Elective9
xx-xxxElective9
xx-xxxElective9
xx-xxxElective 0-6
 42-48

Tepper Detailed Curriculum

What follows is the detailed curriculum for the degree Bachelor of Science in Computational Finance in the Tepper School of Business. The courses listed are required. The semesters in which the courses are to be taken are suggested.

Freshman Year
Fall Units
15-110Principles of Computing10
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
or 21-122 Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation
70-100Global Business9
73-100Principles of Economics9
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
 50


Spring Units
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
21-122Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation10
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
73-230Intermediate Microeconomics9
xx-xxxBreadth Course9
xx-xxxBreadth Course9
 59
Sophomore Year
Fall Units
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
21-260Differential Equations9
21-325Probability9
70-122Introduction to Accounting9
73-240Intermediate Macroeconomics9
 45


Spring Units
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
21-270Introduction to Mathematical Finance9
36-226Introduction to Statistical Inference9
70-311Organizational Behavior9
70-381Marketing I9
 46
Junior Year
Fall Units
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
21-370Discrete Time Finance9
70-391Finance9
xx-xxxBreadth Course9
xx-xxxElective9
 46


Spring Units
21-369Numerical Methods9
21-420Continuous-Time Finance9
36-410Introduction to Probability Modeling9
70-371Operations Management9
xx-xxxBreadth Course9
 45
Senior Year
Fall Units
45-886MSCF Studies in Financial Engineering6
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-401Management Game12
xx-xxxBreadth Course9
xx-xxxDepth Elective9
 45


Spring Units
90-718Strategic Presentation Skills6
94-701Business English6
or 94-702 Professional Writing
xx-xxxDepth Elective 9
xx-xxxBreadth Course9
xx-xxxBreadth Course9
xx-xxxElective9
 48

 

Minor in Computational Finance

Students do not need to apply for the minor in Computational Finance, however in order to declare the minor in Computational Finance, a student must satisfy one of the following two requirements:

  1. Completion of 21-270 Introduction to Mathematical Finance with a grade of A and an overall QPA of at least 3.2.

                or

     2.  Completion of 21-270 Introduction to Mathematical Finance and
         21-370 Discrete Time Finance with an average grade of B and an
         overall QPA of at least 3.0.

When a student has met the necessary requirements, he or she may declare the minor by contacting the Associate Director of the Undergraduate Computational Finance program.

21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations9-10
or 21-242 Matrix Theory
or 21-341 Linear Algebra
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
or 21-256 Multivariate Analysis
21-260Differential Equations9
21-270Introduction to Mathematical Finance9
21-370Discrete Time Finance *9
21-420Continuous-Time Finance **9

To avoid excessive double counting, Mathematical Sciences majors may not count 21-270 Introduction to Mathematical Finance21-370 Discrete Time Finance or 21-420 Continuous-Time Finance toward any other requirement.

*The prerequisites for 21-370 are 21-270 and either 21-256 or 21-259 , and the co-requisite is 70-207 , 21-325 , 36-225 or 36-217.  Note that 70-207 is not accepted as a prerequisite for 21-420.

** The prerequisites for 21-420 are 21-260 , 21-370 and one of the following three calculus based probability courses: 21-325 , 36-225 or 36-217 . Note that 70-207 is not a sufficient preparation in probability. Also note that 21-122 is a prerequisite for 21-260 and that 21-127 is a prerequisite for 21-341 and is recommended for 21-241 .

Students minoring in Computational Finance are strongly encouraged to take one or two economics course, e.g., 73-100, 73-230 , or 73-240 .


Minor in Health Care Policy and Management

Sponsored by:
H. John Heinz III College
Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Mellon College of Science

Faculty Advisors:
Jason D'Antonio, Mellon College of Science
Patti Lee, H. John Heinz III College

The face of health care is changing. The practice of medicine is being fundamentally altered by the forces of change in public policy, health care organizations and in the industry as a whole. The role of individual professionals in this industry is changing as rapidly as the industry itself. Traditional career paths have disappeared overnight to be replaced by new opportunities that require new skills. New organizations are placing new demands on their professional and medical staffs. The criteria of efficiency and financial stability are entering the domains of diagnosis and treatment.

This minor is designed to provide students considering a career in the health professions with an understanding of how these changes are likely to affect their careers. Students will become familiar with the critical policy and management issues and will begin to learn to operate effectively in the emerging health care environment. The curriculum combines economic, organizational, managerial, historical and psychological perspectives on these issues to provide a foundation for a deepened understanding of the changing structure of health care organizations and policy.

60 units minimumCurriculum

Seven courses (a minimum of 60 units) are required to complete this minor. Entry into the minor requires completion of 73-100 Principles of Economics or 88-220 Policy Analysis I or the equivalent by approval.

39 unitsRequired Courses 
Students are required to take the following courses.
79-330Medicine and Society9
90-836Health Systems6
90-861Health Policy6
94-705Health Economics12

27 units

Elective Courses

Complete a minimum of 27 units.

Heinz College Courses
90-708Healthcare Ethics6
90-721Healthcare Management6
90-818Health Care Quality & Performance Improvement6
90-830Introduction to Financial Management of Health Care6
90-831Advanced Financial Management of Health Care6
90-832Health Law12
90-863Health Policy II6
94-706Healthcare Information Systems12


Humanities and Social Sciences Courses (9 units each)
76-494Healthcare Communications9
79-335Drug Use and Drug Policy9
79-383Epidemic Disease and Public Health9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-247Ethics and Global Economics9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-442Health Psychology9
85-446Psychology of Gender9

Please note that some of these courses have prerequisites that will not count toward the completion of the requirements for this minor.


Additional Major in Human-Computer Interaction

Robert Kraut, Undergraduate Advisor
Office: Newell Simon Hall (NSH) 3515
For up to date information, see: http://www.hcii.cmu.edu/applying-undergraduate-major

Overview

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is a fast growing field devoted to the design, implementation, and evaluation of interactive computer-based technology. Examples of HCI products include intelligent computer tutors, wearable computers, social networking sites, and internet connected personal digital assistants (PDAs). Constructing an HCI product is a cyclic, iterative process that has at least three stages: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation.

The Design stage involves principles of design and human behavior, the Implementation stage principles of computer science, and the Evaluation stage empirical research methods common to several disciplines. There are thus four topical areas to cover in this major: Human Behavior, Design, Implementation, and Evaluation. In slightly more detail, the major involves the following sorts of knowledge and skill:

Design
  • Eliciting from the client, formulating, and articulating functional specifications
  • Knowing how human factors and cognitive models should inform design
  • Knowing the principles of, and having experience with, communication design
  • Understanding how implementation constraints should inform design
  • Incorporating evaluation results into iterated designs
Implementation Programming Skills
  • Standard programming languages - e.g., C++, Java
  • Rapid prototyping skill (e.g., Visual Basic, Flash)
  • Computational literacy, i.e., knowledge sufficient for effective communication and decision making about:
  • interface construction tools and languages
  • multimedia authoring tools
  • data structures and algorithms
  • Operating systems, platforms, etc.
Evaluation
  • Experimental design
  • Focus Groups
  • Surveys
  • Usability Testing (Cognitive walkthroughs, user models, heuristic evaluation, GOMS)
  • Statistical Analysis

There are over 45 courses relevant to these areas that are now offered by eight different departments in four different colleges at Carnegie Mellon (the School of Computer Science, the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and the College of Fine Arts, and the Tepper School of Business).

Curriculum

Required Courses
Cognitive Psychology: Units
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-213 Human Information Processing and Artifical Intelligence

Communication Design Fundamentals:
51-261Communication Design Fundamentals b9

Statistics (one of the following):
36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice9
36-207Probability and Statistics for Business Applications9
36-220Engineering Statistics and Quality Control9
36-225-36-226Introduction to Probability Theory - Introduction to Statistical Inference18
36-247Statistics for Lab Sciences9
70-207Probability and Statistics for Business Applications9

Introduction to Programming:
15-110Principles of Computing10
or 15-112 Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science
or 15-121 Introduction to Data Structures

Basic Interaction Design:
51-421Basic Interaction Design c9
or 51-422 Interaction Design Studio
 
Evaluation (one of the following):
36-202Statistical Methods a9
36-208Regression Analysis9
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences9
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
85-340Research Methods in Social Psychology9
88-251Empirical Research Methods9
70-208Regression Analysis9
70-481Marketing Research9

Human-Computer Interaction Methods
05-410User-Centered Research and Evaluation12

Interface Programming:
05-430Programming Usable Interfaces6
or 05-431 Software Structures for User Interfaces
05-433User Interface Lab9

Project Course:
05-571Undergraduate Project in HCI12

Notes

a The evaluation and statistics courses are required so that majors will be able to understand and conduct empirical research in HCI. Therefore a mathematically-oriented probability course, such as 36-217 Probability Theory and Random Processes does not fulfill either requirement.

b Design majors do not need to take 51-261 Communication Design Fundamentals as a prerequiste, since they learn similar material in other courses for their major. HCI undergraduates taking Communication Design Fundamentals must go to the School of Design office, MM 110, to register for the course on their assigned day. ID will be required.

c HCI double majors are guaranteed a place in 51-422 Interaction Design Studio, offered every spring by the School of Design for HCI double majors. Students intending to take 51-422 must visit the School of Design office in MM 110 during registration week to fill out an instructor-permission request form. The content of this course is comparable to 51-421 (Fall). 

 

Electives (18 Units)

Electives are intended to provide HCI double majors advanced concepts and skills relevant to HCI or breadth of experience not available from their primary major. Given these goals, most electives will be 300-level courses or higher. Courses at the 100-level and 200-level in one's primary major will not count as electives, although the same course taken by a non-major may count (approval is still required).

Students can take electives in the HCII or courses relevant to HCI from many other departments on campus. All electives are approved on a case-by-case basis. Undergraduate majors request approval of an elective using The HCI Institute’s EASy requrements’ management system. The director of the undergraduate program will approve the request, ask for more information or reject it. The EASy system then deeps a record of the electives approved for a particular student.

The following courses have been approved as electives in the past, organized by the offering department:

Human-Computer Interaction Units
05-320Social Web12
05-395Applications of Cognitive Science9
05-413Human Factors9
05-431Software Structures for User Interfaces6
05-540Rapid Prototyping of Computer Systems12
05-589Independent Study in HCI-UGVar.

Machine Learning
10-601Machine Learning12

Computer Science
15-390Entrepreneurship for Computer Science9
15-421Information Security and Privacy12
15-437Web Application Development12
15-462Computer Graphics12
15-466Computer Game Programming12

Statistics
36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences9

Architecture
48-739Making Things Interactive (Graduate)9

Design
51-241How People Work9
51-274Design and Social Change9
51-324Basic Prototyping4.5
51-383Topics: Conceptual Models9
51-385Design for Service9
51-424Web Portfolio4.5

Art
60-418ETB Studio: The Interactive Image10

Business Administration
70-414Technology Based Entrepreneurship for CIT9
70-637Interactive Media Design Management9
70-643Publishing on the World Wide Web9

 

Double Counting

All prerequisites can be double counted with any requirements in your primary major. At most three non-prerequisite courses can be double counted with the primary major and the HCI second major. For example, if you are majoring in Cognitive Psychology, then you might want to take 85-211 (Intro to Cognitive Psychology) as one of your three double counts. If more than three of the requirements are already in your primary major, then you must add electives until you have eight HCI courses not required as part of your primary major.

Accelerated Master's Programs

The HCI Institute currently offers a three semester (12-month), 15 course Masters in HCI. Undergraduates who have taken the core courses, and an elective on the 400 level or above will be considered eligible for the Accelerated Masters program. These students, which include all undergraduate HCI majors, can apply for the Accelerated Masters program by November 1st
of their Senior year, and can begin the Masters program in the Spring of their Senior year. They can finish the Masters degree after the Summer and Fall.

Admission to the Major

The HCI undergraduate major is currently available only as a second major. Because space is limited in the major's required courses, enrollment in the HCI undergraduate major is currently limited to 25 students in each graduating class. 6 with a primary major in Design, 6 in H&SS, 6 in SCS, and 7 anywhere. Applications are processed once a year, during Spring Break. For more detail, see the website: www.hcii.cs.cmu.edu/Academics/Undergrad/undergrad.html

 

B.S. in Mathematical and Statistical Sciences

This degree program is administered under the joint Science & Humanities Scholars Program between the Mellon College of Science and the College of Humanities & Social Sciences. To qualify, a student must be acceptable for admission to both colleges.

85 UnitsMathematical Sciences:
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation10
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
21-201Undergraduate Colloquium1
21-292Operations Research I9
21-355Principles of Real Analysis I9

                or

21-369Numerical Methods9
21-xxxMathematical Science Elective
21-xxxMathematical Science Elective
36 UnitsProbability and Statistics:
21-325Probability9
or 36-225 Introduction to Probability Theory
Note: 21-325 Probability is preferred.

 

36-226Introduction to Statistical Inference9
36-410Introduction to Probability Modeling9
36-461Special Topics9
27 UnitsData Analysis:
36-247Statistics for Lab Sciences9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences9

                   or

36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
36-401Modern Regression9
18 UnitsStatistics and Data Analysis Electives:
Complete two courses from the following:
21-393Operations Research II9
36-402Advanced Data Analysis9
36-462Topics in Statistics: Data Mining9

In consultation with his/her advisor, the student may also arrange to take Statistics graduate courses (36-7xx) to satisfy part of this requirement.

Joint MCS/H&SS Core other than Mathematical Science
103-107 Unitsor Statistics courses:

Free Electives:
Enough to reach 360 Units

 

Sample Course Sequence: Math & Statistical Sciences

Freshman Year
Fall
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
33-111Physics I for Science Students12
99-10xComputing @ Carnegie Mellon


Spring
21-122Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation10
36-247Statistics for Lab Sciences9
79-104Global Histories9
xx-xxxScience
xx-xxxFreshman Seminar
Sophomore Year
Fall
21-201Undergraduate Colloquium1
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences9
xx-xxxEconomic, Political and Social Institutions
xx-xxxScience
xx-xxxElective


Spring
21-201Undergraduate Colloquium1
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
21-292Operations Research I9
xx-xxxCultural Analysis
xx-xxxElectives
Junior Year
Fall
21-355Principles of Real Analysis I9
21-325Probability9
xx-xxxCognition, Choice and Behavior
xx-xxxElectives


Spring
21-xxxMathematical Science Elective
36-226Introduction to Statistical Inference9
36-410Introduction to Probability Modeling9
xx-xxxCreative Production & Reflection
xx-xxxElectives
Senior Year
Fall
21-393Operations Research II9
36-401Modern Regression9
36-461Special Topics9
xx-xxxElectives


Spring
21-xxxMathematical Science Elective
36-402Advanced Data Analysis9
36-xxxSenior Research Elective
xx-xxxElectives

 

Bachelor of Science in Music and Technology

The Bachelor of Science in Music and Technology is offered jointly by the School of Music, the School of Computer Science (SCS), and the Carnegie Institute of Technology (CIT).

This program consists of a set of courses that span both music and technology, as well as a capstone composition/design/performance project. Courses in all three areas of study are stipulated in the music and technology undergraduate curriculum and provide for students coming from any of the three areas. In other words, regardless of a student’s entry point — an interest in computer science, electrical engineering, or music — the coursework prescribed will allow the student to gain the requisite knowledge and experience in all three areas. Students will work closely with advisors and will be guided in both course selection and capstone projects.

85 unitsGeneral Requirements

Seminar

57-570Music and Technology Seminar
(8 semesters for a total of 8 units)
8

 

University

 

99-10xComputing @ Carnegie Mellon3
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
79-104Global Histories9

Humanities

xx-xxxCognition, Choice and Behavior course9
xx-xxxEnglish, History, Modern Languages, Philosophy, or Psychology course9

Mathematics

21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation10

Science

33-114Physics of Musical Sound9
33-106Physics I for Engineering Students12
25 unitsElectives
95 unitsMusic Core
57-100Convocation
(8 semesters for a total of 8 units)
8
57-152Harmony I9
57-153Harmony II9
57-408Form and Analysis6
57-151Counterpoint in Theory and Application6
57-25820th-21st Century Techniques6
57-257Orchestration I6
57-271Orchestration II6
57-189Introduction to Repertoire and Listening for Musicians3
57-190Repertoire and Listening for Musicians I3
57-289Repertoire and Listening for Musicians II3
57-290Repertoire and Listening for Musicians III3
57-181Solfege I3
57-182Solfege II3
57-183Solfege III3
57-184Solfege IV3
57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-162Eurhythmics II3
57-173Survey of Western Music History9
120 unitsMusic and Technology Core
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
15-322Introduction to Computer Music9
18-100Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering12
18-202Mathematical Foundations of Electrical Engineering12
18-290Signals and Systems12
57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
57-347Electronic and Computer Music6
57-337Sound Recording6
57-338Sound Editing and Mastering6
57-438Multitrack Recording9
57-57xMusic and Technology Project12
57-57xMusic and Technology Project12

Students complete either the Music Concentration or the Technical Concentration:

60 unitsMusic Concentration
57-5xxStudio (4 semesters)36
57-4xxMajor Ensemble (4 semesters)24
57 or 55 unitsTechnical Concentration
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
15/18-213Introduction to Computer Systems12

AND EITHER:

18-220Electronic Devices and Analog Circuits12
18-240Structure and Design of Digital Systems12
15-2xx/18-3xx Electives in ECE or CS12
or above

OR:

15-128Freshman Immigration Course1
15-210Parallel and Sequential Data Structures and Algorithms12
15-323Computer Music Systems and Information Processing9
15-2xx/18-3xx Electives in ECE or CS 12
or above

  

Total number of units required for major380

 

Major in Psychology & Biological Sciences

This major is intended to reflect the interdisciplinary nature of current research in the fields of biology and psychology, as well as the national trend in some professions to seek individuals broadly trained in both the social and natural sciences.

Note: Students entering from the College of Humanities and Social Sciences will earn a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and Biological Sciences. Students in the Mellon College of Science will earn a Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences and Psychology. Students in the joint Science and Humanities Scholars (SHS) program can complete the SHS educational core and choose either departmental order for their diploma.

Depending on a student's home college (H&SS or MCS), General Education (GenEd) requirements will be different. GenEd requirements for H&SS and MCS are found on their respective Catalog pages.

Degree Requirements:
Biological Sciences Units
03-121Modern Biology9
03-231Biochemistry I9
03-240Cell Biology9
03-330Genetics9
03-343Experimental Techniques in Molecular Biology12
03-411Topics in Research1
03-412Topics in Research1
03-xxxGeneral Biology Elective9
03-3xxAdvanced Biology Elective9
03-3xxAdvanced Biology Elective9
Total Biology units77

 

Mathematics, Statistics, Physics and Computer Science Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation10
or 21-124 Calculus II for Biologists and Chemists
36-247Statistics for Lab Sciences9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences9
33-111Physics I for Science Students12
15-110Principles of Computing *10
99-10xComputing at Carnegie Mellon3
Total Science units63

 

Chemistry Units
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
09-217Organic Chemistry I9
or 09-219 Modern Organic Chemistry
09-218Organic Chemistry II9
or 09-220 Modern Organic Chemistry II
09-221Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis12
09-222Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis12
Total Chemistry units62

 

Psychology Courses Units
85-102Introduction to Psychology9
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-2xxSurvey Psychology Courses **18
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-340 Research Methods in Social Psychology
or 85-320 Research Methods in Developmental Psychology
85-3xxAdvanced Psychology Electives18
Total Psychology units63

 ** Excluding 85-261 Abnormal Psychology

 

Additional Advanced Elective

9 units(Choose one of the following courses)

85-3xxAdvanced Psychology Elective9
or
03-3xxAdvanced Biology Elective9

  

Additional Laboratory or Research Methods

9-12 units(Choose one of the following courses)

03-344Experimental Biochemistry12
03-345Experimental Cell and Developmental Biology12
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
85-320Research Methods in Developmental Psychology9
85-340Research Methods in Social Psychology9

 

Elective Units Units
Free Electives33-36
Dietrich College/CFA Electives36
Total Elective units69-72

360

Minimum number of units required for degree:


 

Science and Humanities Scholars Program

Sponsored by the College of Humanities and Social Sciences and the Mellon College of Science
Dr. William Alba, Director
Office: Doherty Hall, Room 2201
www.cmu.edu/shs

The Science and Humanities Scholars (SHS) program is for students who wish to build upon a solid academic foundation in the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and mathematics. Students in this program enroll in either the Mellon College of Science (MCS) or the College of Humanities and Social Sciences (H&SS). While every student at the university may elect to pursue multi- and interdisciplinary studies, the SHS General Education curriculum assures that students in the program can develop the background for any field of study or combination of studies across both MCS and H&SS.

SHS students in their first year may elect to live in a Stever House residential cluster that promotes the integration of academic and social interests. As upper-class students, they are eligible to live in upper-class housing reserved for interdisciplinary students and may continue to participate in occasions that foster their intellectual community. The program additionally supports students through the creation of interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary courses.

Before a student declares a major, the program director serves as the student's primary academic advisor, complementing the range of other advising available around the university. After a student declares a major, the director continues to provide supplementary advising for the student, especially on matters of General Education.

Entering first-year students with outstanding credentials who applied ot H&SS or MCS may receive an invitation to the SHS Program. Those invited should carefully consider whether this academic program matches their own scholarly interests. Students enrolled in either college may also request to transfer into the Science and Humanities Scholars Program after completing at least one semester at the university.
 

Science and Humanities Scholars General Education Program

There are 14 requirements in the SHS General Education Program. The curriculum is designed to expose students to a variety of subjects and methodologies, in order to enable them to become better citizens of the world and more complete scholars with a comprehensive range of possible major choices. The SHS curriculum allows for flexibility and independence in selecting courses to fulfill these General Education requirements, and in many cases students in the Program can petition the Director to take alternate courses in addition to the ones listed here.


Mathematical Sciences (20 units)
Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation10

 

Writing/Expression (9 units)

Language is a tool used to communicate, as well as a way to organize thinking. This university-wide requirement, to be completed in the first year, focuses on the social nature of language and the ways in which writing constitutes thinking.

76-101Interpretation and Argument9

 

World Cultures (9 units)

This requirement seeks to enable students to recognize how cultures have shaped and continue to shape the human experience, as well as analyze material that provide clues as to how these cultures operate.

79-104Global Histories9

 

Freshman Seminar (6-9 units)

Students may select an SHS seminar, a full-semester seminar from H&SS, or two half-semester freshman seminars from MCS and/or H&SS from a list of courses provided every semester.

Computational Reasoning (9-10 units) Choose from the following courses:
15-110Principles of Computing10
15-121Introduction to Data Structures10
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
80-210Logic and Proofs9
80-211Logic and Mathematical Inquiry9
80-212Arguments and Logical Analysis9

 

Science Core (28 units)

Choose three of the following courses. Science majors with primary majors in the Mellon College of Science must complete at least two that are outside of their major department.

03-121Modern Biology9
03-230Intro to Mammalian Physiology9
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10

                or

09-106Modern Chemistry II10
09-107Honors Chemistry: Fundamentals Concepts and Applications10
33-111Physics I for Science Students12

               or

33-112Physics II for Science Students12
33-131Matter and Interaction I12

              or

33-132Matter and Interactions II12

 

Distribution Requirements (36 units)

Choose a minimum of four courses, at 9 units per category, totaling at least 36 units. Below are examples of courses satisfying these categories. You are encouraged to identify other courses that could fulfill these requirements; see the SHS Director for prior approval.

 

Cognition, Choice, and Behavior

Courses in this category use model-based analysis to broaden an understanding of human thinking, choices, and behavior on an individual basis across a variety of settings.

Units
80-130Introduction to Ethics9
80-150Nature of Reason9
80-180Nature of Language9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-230Ethical Theory9
80-241Ethical Judgments in Professional Life9
80-270Philosophy of Mind9
85-102Introduction to Psychology9
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
85-221Principles of Child Development9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-251Personality9
85-261Abnormal Psychology9
88-120Reason, Passion and Cognition9

 

Economic, Political, and Social Institutions

Courses in this category examine the ways in which institutions organize individual preferences and actions into collective outcomes using model-based reasoning.

36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
73-100Principles of Economics9
73-230Intermediate Microeconomics9
79-266Russian History: From Communism to Capitalism9
79-331Body Politics: Women and Health in America9
79-335Drug Use and Drug Policy9
79-340Juvenile Delinquency and Film: From "Blackboard Jungle" to "The Wire"9
79-345The Roots of Rock and Roll, 1870-19709
79-350Early Christianity9
80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-235Political Philosophy9
80-341Computers, Society and Ethics9
88-104Decision Processes in American Political Institutions9
88-184Topics of Law: The Bill of Rights9
88-205Comparative Politics9

 

Creative Production and Reflection

Courses in this category encourage exploration of the artistic and intellectual creation of others while allowing for personal expression and reflection upon the creative process.

xx-xxxCourses from the College of Fine Arts (Architecture 48-xxx, Design 51-xxx, Drama 54-xxx, Music 57-xxx, Art 60-xxx, CFA Interdisciplinary 62-xxx)Var.
76-260Survey of Forms: Fiction9
76-262Survey of Forms: Nonfiction9
76-265Survey of Forms: Poetry9
76-269Survey of Forms: Screenwriting9
80-220Philosophy of Science9
82-1xxAny Elementary Modern Language course
82-2xxAny Intermediate Modern Language course
99-241Revolutions of Circularity9

 

Cultural Analysis

Courses in this category explore definitions of culture and the role culture plays in producing different actions and institutions, as well as the roles of institutions, systems, and human actions in shaping cultural contexts.

57-173Survey of Western Music History9
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
76-227Comedy9
76-232African American Literature9
76-241Introduction to Gender Studies9
79-311Introduction to Anthropology9
79-240The Development of American Culture9
79-207Development of European Culture9
79-345The Roots of Rock and Roll, 1870-19709
79-241African American History: Africa to the Civil War9
79-242African American History: Reconstruction to the Present9
79-224Mayan America9
79-261Chinese Culture and Society9
79-368Poverty, Charity, and Welfare9
79-330Medicine and Society9
80-100Introduction to Philosophy9
80-250Ancient Philosophy9
80-251Modern Philosophy9
80-253Continental Philosophy9
80-254Analytic Philosophy9
80-255Pragmatism9
80-261Empiricism and Rationalism9
82-273Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture9
82-294Topics in Russian Language and CultureVar.
82-303French Culture9
82-304The Francophone World9
82-333Introduction to Chinese Language and CultureVar.
82-342Spain: Language and Culture9
82-343Latin America: Language and Culture9
82-344U.S. Latinos: Language and Culture9
82-345Introduction to Hispanic Literary and Cultural Studies9
82-396The Faust Legend at Home and AbroadVar.
82-415Topics in French and Francophone Studies9
82-426Topics in German Literature and Culture9
82-451Studies in Latin American Literature and Culture9
82-491Literature, Politics and Film in Russia & East Europe TodayVar.

 

Major Programs

A number of majors that reflect the interdisciplinary nature of research and teaching between the physical and natural sciences, humanities, mathematics, and social/behavioral sciences have been introduced, or are under development, inspired in part by the SHS program. Two are presented here (in Biological Sciences and Psychology, and in Mathematical and Statistical Sciences) and are now available to students.

 

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