Carnegie Mellon University offers several degree programs and courses of study which are coordinated by multiple colleges, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the university. These are detailed below.

Intercollege Majors

  • BXA Intercollege Degree Programs
    • Bachelor of Humanities and Arts Program
    • Bachelor of Science and Arts Program
    • Bachelor of Computer Science and Arts Program
  • B.S. in Computational Finance
  • B.S. in Music and Technology
  • B.S. in Neuroscience
  • B.S. in Psychology and Biological Sciences
  • Science and Humanities Scholars Program (B.A./B.S.)

Intercollege Minors

  • Minor in Computational Finance
  • Minor in Game Design (IDeATe)
  • Minor in Health Care Policy and Management

BXA Intercollege Degree Programs

The BXA Intercollege Degree Programs enable students the freedom to individualize their educational experience by promoting integration, balance and innovation. There are three degree programs from which to choose:

  • Bachelor of Humanities and Arts
  • Bachelor of Science and Arts
  • Bachelor of Computer Science and Arts

For detailed information on the BXA Intercollege Degree Programs, go to BXA Intercollege Degree Programs.

Bachelor of Science in Computational Finance

The Mellon College of Science, the Heinz College of Public Policy and Management and the Tepper School of Business jointly offer a degree uniquely designed to meet the quantitative needs of the finance industry. Modeled after the highly successful Carnegie Mellon Master of Science in Computational Finance, this degree allows students to develop a deep knowledge of mathematics, probability, statistics, and the applications of these disciplines to finance. Students who complete this degree may directly enter the finance industry, enter other industries where an applied mathematics training is appropriate, or pursue advanced degrees in economics, finance or the mathematical sciences. Students entering the work force upon completion of this degree may wish to later complement their undergraduate degree with a Master's degree in Business Administration or other professional degree. Students who might eventually pursue doctoral degrees in economics, finance, statistics or mathematics should seek advising on how to use their electives in order to prepare for graduate work in their chosen disciplines. Students apply for admission to the B.S. program in Computational Finance in the second semester of the sophomore year. Later application is also possible.

The Bachelor of Science in Computational Finance is an Intercollegiate Program. Students who pursue Computational Finance as their primary major may elect to have either the Mellon College of Science (MCS) or the Tepper School of Business (Tepper) as their home college. The coursework required for the major is the same in either case, with one minor exception outlined below. The general education requirements for the degree depend on the student's home college. MCS students must complete the same Humanities, Social Sciences, and Fine Arts requirements as other MCS students. In addition, MCS students are required to take two science courses, one fewer than other MCS majors. Tepper students must complete the Breadth Requirements of the Undergraduate Business Administration Program. Additionally, they must take several courses from the Functional Business Core of that program.

Majors in Computational Finance can tailor their degree program by selecting Depth Electives aligned with their interests and ambitions. MCS students are required to take three depth electives. Tepper students must take two depth electives and 70-391 Finance (MCS students may select 70-391 as one of their three depth electives).

MCS Science Requirements

Students intending to apply to the B.S. program in Computational Finance should  take two semesters of calculus, 21-120 Differential and Integral Calculus and 21-122 Integration and Approximation, and 15-110 Principles of Computing.

In addition, in the freshman year students should complete two of the following three courses:
03-121Modern Biology9
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
33-111Physics I for Science Students12

MCS Humanities, Social Sciences & Fine Arts Requirements

Candidates for the B. S. in Computational Finance must complete 72 units offered by Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Science and/or the College of Fine Arts. Of these 72 units, 36 are specified by the detailed curriculum in below. These are:

76-101Interpretation and Argument9
73-102Principles of Microeconomics9
73-103Principles of Macroeconomics9
73-240Intermediate Macroeconomics9

Two more nine unit courses must be in specific categories: One in Category 1: Cognition, Choice and Behavior, and one in Category 3: Cultural Analysis.  The remaining 18 units may be filled by courses from any of the departments in DC, CFA or Tepper, subject to the list of exclusions and additions maintained by MCS.

Tepper Functional Business Core

The Functional Business Core of the Undergraduate Business Administration Program includes 70-122 Introduction to Accounting, which is required by all Computational Finance majors. It also includes 70-391 , which Tepper students majoring in Computational Finance must select as of one their Depth Electives. In addition, Tepper students pursuing the B.S. in Computational Finance must complete six other courses from the Functional Business Core.

These courses are:
70-100Global Business9
70-311Organizational Behavior9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-371Operations Management9
70-381Marketing I9
70-401Management Game12

Tepper Breadth Requirements

Candidates for the B.S. in Computational Finance must complete the breadth requirements outlined in the section describing the Undergraduate Business Administration Program.

Depth Electives

The detailed curricula below include two or three depth electives.  The courses listed below may be taken as depth electives, but it is not an exhaustive list.  The Director of Undergraduate Computational Finance may approve other finance related courses as depth electives.

21-355Principles of Real Analysis I9
21-365Projects in Applied Mathematics9
21-372Partial Differential Equations and Fourier Analysis9
36-401Modern Regression9
36-402Advanced Methods for Data Analysis9
70-391Finance9
70-398International Finance9
70-492Investment Analysis9
70-495Corporate Finance9
70-497Derivative Securities9
73-372International Money and Finance9

MCS Detailed Curriculum

What follows is the detailed curriculum for the degree Bachelor of Science in Computational Finance in the Mellon College of Science. The courses listed are required. The semesters in which the courses are to be taken are suggested.

Freshman Year
Fall Units
15-110Principles of Computing10
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
xx-xxxScience Requirement 9-12
 41-44
Spring Units
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
21-122Integration and Approximation10
70-122Introduction to Accounting9
xx-xxxScience Requirement (9-12 units)12
xx-xxxElective9
 52
Sophomore Year
Fall Units
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
21-260Differential Equations9
73-102Principles of Microeconomics9
xx-xxxHumanities, Social Science or Fine Arts Elective9
 46
Spring Units
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
21-270Introduction to Mathematical Finance9
21-369Numerical Methods9
73-103Principles of Macroeconomics9
xx-xxxElective9
 46
Junior Year
Fall Units
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
21-325Probability9
21-370Discrete Time Finance9
73-240Intermediate Macroeconomics9
xx-xxxElective9
 46
Spring Units
21-420Continuous-Time Finance9
36-226Introduction to Statistical Inference9
xx-xxxDepth Elective9
xx-xxxHumanities, Social Science or Fine Arts Elective9
xx-xxxElective
 36
Senior Year
Fall Units
36-401Modern Regression9
94-700Organizational Design & Implementation6
94-702Professional Writing6
or 94-701 Business English
xx-xxxDepth Elective9
xx-xxxHumanities, Social Science or Fine Arts9
xx-xxxElective9
 48
Spring Units
90-718Strategic Presentation Skills6
45-925Studies in Financial Engineering6
xx-xxxDepth Elective9
xx-xxxHumanities, Social Science or Fine Arts Elective9
xx-xxxElective9
xx-xxxElective9
 48

Tepper Detailed Curriculum

What follows is the detailed curriculum for the degree Bachelor of Science in Computational Finance in the Tepper School of Business. The courses listed are required. The semesters in which the courses are to be taken are suggested.

Freshman Year
Fall Units
15-110Principles of Computing10
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
or 21-122 Integration and Approximation
70-100Global Business9
73-102Principles of Microeconomics9
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
 50
Spring Units
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
21-122Integration and Approximation10
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
73-103Principles of Macroeconomics9
xx-xxxBreadth Course9
xx-xxxBreadth Course9
 59
Sophomore Year
Fall Units
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
21-260Differential Equations9
21-325Probability9
70-122Introduction to Accounting9
73-240Intermediate Macroeconomics9
 45
Spring Units
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
21-270Introduction to Mathematical Finance9
36-226Introduction to Statistical Inference9
70-311Organizational Behavior9
70-381Marketing I9
 46
Junior Year
Fall Units
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
21-370Discrete Time Finance9
70-391Finance9
xx-xxxBreadth Course9
xx-xxxElective9
 46
Spring Units
21-369Numerical Methods9
21-420Continuous-Time Finance9
70-371Operations Management9
xx-xxxBreadth Course
xx-xxxBreadth Course9
 36
Senior Year
Fall Units
36-401Modern Regression9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-401Management Game12
xx-xxxDepth Elective9
xx-xxxBreadth Course9
 48
Spring Units
45-925Studies in Financial Engineering6
90-718Strategic Presentation Skills6
94-702Professional Writing6
or 94-701 Business English
xx-xxxDepth Elective 9
xx-xxxBreadth Course9
xx-xxxElective9
 45

Minor in Computational Finance

Students do not need to apply for the minor in Computational Finance, however in order to declare the minor in Computational Finance, a student must satisfy one of the following two requirements:

  1. Completion of 21-270 Introduction to Mathematical Finance with a grade of A and an overall QPA of at least 3.20

    OR
  2. Completion of 21-270 Introduction to Mathematical Finance and 21-370 Discrete Time Finance with an average grade of B and an overall QPA of at least 3.00.

When a student has met the necessary requirements, he or she may declare the minor by contacting the Associate Director of the Undergraduate Computational Finance program.

21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations9-10
or 21-242 Matrix Theory
or 21-341 Linear Algebra
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
or 21-256 Multivariate Analysis
21-260Differential Equations9
21-270Introduction to Mathematical Finance9
21-370Discrete Time Finance *9
21-420Continuous-Time Finance **9

To avoid excessive double counting, Computational Finance minors may not count 21-270 Introduction to Mathematical Finance21-370 Discrete Time Finance or 21-420 Continuous-Time Finance toward any other requirement.

*The prerequisites for 21-370 are 21-270 and either 21-256 or 21-259 , and the co-requisite is 70-207 , 21-325 , 36-225 or 36-217.  Note that 70-207 is not accepted as a prerequisite for 21-420.

** The prerequisites for 21-420 are 21-260 , 21-370 and one of the following three calculus based probability courses: 21-325 , 36-225 or 36-217 . Note that 70-207 is not a sufficient preparation in probability. Also note that 21-122 is a prerequisite for 21-260 and that 21-127 is a prerequisite for 21-341 and is recommended for 21-241 .

Students minoring in Computational Finance are strongly encouraged to take one or two economics course, e.g., 73-102, 73-103, 73-230 , or 73-240 .

Game Design Minor – IDeATe

The Game Design minor is offered by the Entertainment Technology Center as part of the Integrative Design, Arts and Technology (IDeATe) network. IDeATe offers students the opportunity to become immersed in a collaborative community of faculty and peers who share expertise, experience, and passions at the intersection of arts and technology. Students will engage in active “learning by doing” in state-of-the-art maker spaces. The program addresses current and emerging real-world challenges that require disciplinary expertise coupled with multidisciplinary perspectives and collaborative integrative approaches.

The IDeATe undergraduate curriculum consists of eight interrelated concentration areas, all of which can also be taken as minors. The themes of these areas integrate knowledge in technology and arts: Game Design, Animation & Special Effects, Media Design, Learning Media, Sound Design, Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Intelligent Environments, and Physical Computing. For more information about the IDeATe network, please visit http://coursecatalog.web.cmu.edu/servicesandoptions/undergraduateoptions/#ideate

In the Game Design minor, students are able to enhance their knowledge of key component areas of games such as dramatic narrative and character development, programming and engine development, game assessment and redesign. They will have the opportunity to create games for varied platforms from mobile devices to home entertainment systems and theme parks.

Curriculum

Required Courses
One Portal Course
15-104Introduction to Computing for Creative Practice *10
62-150IDeATe: Introduction to Media Synthesis and Analysis10

* DC, CFA, and TSB students may take 15-112 Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science as a substitute for 15-104.

Four Collaborative or Supportive Courses
05-418Design Educational Games12
15-466Computer Game Programming12
53-230Programming for Game Designers12
53-371Role Playing Games Writing Workshop12
53-409Game Design12
53-451Research Issues in Game Development10
53-471Game Design, Prototyping and Production12
60-419Advanced ETB: Experimental Game Design10
60-333Character Rigging for Production10
Electives

Students may take a collaborative or supportive course from one of the other IDeATe areas as one of their four collaborative or supportive courses toward the Game Design minor.

Double-Counting Restriction

Students may double-count two of their Game Design minor courses for other requirements.

 

Minor in Health Care Policy and Management

Sponsored by:
Heinz College of Information Systems and Public Policy
Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Mellon College of Science

Faculty Advisors:
Jason D'Antonio, Mellon College of Science
James F. Jordan, H. John Heinz III College

The face of health care is changing. The practice of medicine is being fundamentally altered by the forces of change in public policy, health care organizations and in the industry as a whole. The role of individual professionals in this industry is changing as rapidly as the industry itself. Traditional career paths have disappeared overnight to be replaced by new opportunities that require new skills. New organizations are placing new demands on their professional and medical staffs. The criteria of efficiency and financial stability are entering the domains of diagnosis and treatment.

This minor is designed to provide students considering a career in the health professions with an understanding of how these changes are likely to affect their careers. Students will become familiar with the critical policy and management issues and will begin to learn to operate effectively in the emerging health care environment. The curriculum combines economic, organizational, managerial, historical and psychological perspectives on these issues to provide a foundation for a deepened understanding of the changing structure of health care organizations and policy.

Required Courses for HCPM Minor(42 Unit minimum)

Seven courses (a minimum of 60 units) are required to complete this minor. Entry into the minor requires completion of  88-220 Policy Analysis I or the equivalent by approval.

Required Courses
Students are required to take the following courses.
79-330Medicine and Society9
94-705Health Economics12
90-836Health Systems6
90-861Health Policy6
Elective Courses24 units

Complete a minimum of 24 units.

Heinz College Courses
90-721Healthcare Management6
90-818Health Care Quality & Performance Improvement6
90-831Advanced Financial Management of Health Care6
94-706Healthcare Information Systems12
90-832Health Law6
Humanities and Social Sciences Courses (9 units each)
76-494Healthcare Communications9
79-318Sustainable Social Change: History and Practice9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-247Ethics and Global Economics9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-442Health Psychology9
85-446Psychology of Gender9

Please note that some of these courses have prerequisites that will not count toward the completion of the requirements for this minor.

Bachelor of Science in Music and Technology

The Bachelor of Science in Music and Technology is offered jointly by the School of Music, the School of Computer Science (SCS), and the Carnegie Institute of Technology (CIT).

This program consists of a set of courses that span both music and technology, as well as a capstone composition/design/performance project. Courses in all three areas of study are stipulated in the music and technology undergraduate curriculum and provide for students coming from any of the three areas. In other words, regardless of a student’s entry point — an interest in computer science, electrical engineering, or music — the coursework prescribed will allow the student to gain the requisite knowledge and experience in all three areas. Students will work closely with advisors and will be guided in both course selection and capstone projects.

Curriculum

Minimum units required for B.S. in Music and Technology380
General Requirements85 units

Seminar

57-570Sound and Music Computing Seminar
(8 semesters for a total of 8 units)
1
University
99-10xComputing @ Carnegie Mellon3
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
79-104Global Histories9

Humanities

xx-xxxCognition, Choice and Behavior course9
xx-xxxEnglish, History, Modern Languages, Philosophy, or Psychology course9

Mathematics

21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration and Approximation10

Science

33-114Physics of Musical Sound9
33-106Physics I for Engineering Students12
Electives33 units
Music Core87 units
57-152Harmony I9
57-153Harmony II9
57-408Form and Analysis6
57-151Counterpoint in Theory and Application6
57-25820th-21st Century Techniques6
57-257Orchestration I6
57-xxxMusic Support Course6
57-189Introduction to Repertoire and Listening for Musicians3
57-190Repertoire and Listening for Musicians I3
57-289Repertoire and Listening for Musicians II3
57-290Repertoire and Listening for Musicians III3
57-181Solfege I3
57-182Solfege II3
57-183Solfege III3
57-184Solfege IV3
57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-162Eurhythmics II3
57-173Survey of Western Music History9
Music and Technology Core120 units
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
15-322Introduction to Computer Music9
18-100Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering12
18-202Mathematical Foundations of Electrical Engineering12
18-290Signals and Systems12
57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
57-347Electronic and Computer Music6
57-337Sound Recording6
57-338Sound Editing and Mastering6
57-438Multitrack Recording9
57-571Music and Technology Project12
57-572Music and Technology Project12
Concentration

Students complete either the Music Concentration or the Technical Concentration:

Music Concentration60 units
57-5xxStudio (4 semesters)36
57-4xxMajor Ensemble (4 semesters)24
Technical Concentration57 or 55 units
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
15/18-213Introduction to Computer Systems12

AND EITHER:

18-220Electronic Devices and Analog Circuits12
18-240Structure and Design of Digital Systems12
15-2xx/18-3xx Electives in ECE or CS12
or above

OR:

15-128Freshman Immigration Course1
15-210Parallel and Sequential Data Structures and Algorithms12
15-323Computer Music Systems and Information Processing9
15-2xx/18-3xx Electives in ECE or CS 12
or above

Bachelor of Science in Neuroscience

Aaron P. Mitchell, Department Head, Biological Sciences

Michael Tarr, Department Head, Psychology

www.cmu.edu/neuro

Neuroscience is an interdisciplinary field in which scientists from many backgrounds apply the tools of biology, cognitive science, psychology, chemistry, mathematics, statistics, computer science, and engineering to develop a comprehensive understanding of brain function at the level of molecules, neurons, brain circuits, cognitive brain modules, and behavior. Research in neuroscience across these disciplines has grown substantially in the past two decades, and a solid understanding of the physiological basis of many aspects of brain function both in health and disease has come along with this growth in research. Along with this comes an increasing need for students to begin careers in neuroscience and to be prepared to work on the problems in neuroscience and to bring new answers to the public and to patients. In order to be successful in developing new treatments and answering outstanding questions in the field, neuroscientists need to be conversant in many different levels of inquiry from neurobiology to cognitive neuroscience to computational neuroscience.

The Dietrich College of Humanities & Social Sciences and the Mellon College of Science have joined forces to establish an exciting interdisciplinary program leading to a Bachelor of Science in Neuroscience. The goal of this degree program is to provide an intensive interdisciplinary education to enable outstanding students to become leaders in identifying and solving tomorrow's Neuroscience problems using a variety of methods. The program's interdisciplinary curriculum is designed for students to gain a fundamental understanding of brain function on many different levels and to begin to specialize within the broad field of Neuroscience. Students in Mellon College of Science, Dietrich College, or Science and Humanities Scholars Program may have a primary major in Neuroscience in any of the three concentrations.  Students from other colleges may have a second major in Neuroscience in any of the three concentrations, subject to double-counting restrictions.

A degree in neuroscience provides excellent preparation for medical school or other graduate programs in the health professions. These students are aided by the Carnegie Mellon Health Professions Program (HPP), an advisory and resource service for all Carnegie Mellon students who are considering careers in the health care field. (See the HPP section in this catalog or www.cmu.edu/hpp for more information.)

Students wishing to pursue the Neuroscience major through Dietrich College should contact Dr. Lori Holt (loriholt@cmu.edu).  Students wishing to pursue the Neuroscience major through the Mellon College of Science should contact Dr. Becki Campanaro (bcampana@andrew.cmu.edu).  Students wishing to pursue an additional major in either the Neurobiology or Computational Neuroscience concentrations should contact Dr. Becki Campanaro (bcampana@andrew.cmu.edu).  Students wishing to pursue an additional major in the Cognitive Neuroscience concentration should contact Dr. Lori Holt (loriholt@cmu.edu). 

Students who pursue this major will:

  • Gain a broad understanding of Neuroscience at many different levels of analysis, including: cellular biology of the brain, brain systems, cognitive brain function, and computational brain modeling
  • Gain an understanding of the sciences underlying Neuroscience, including: Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Cognition and Psychology, and other emerging areas
  • Develop a comprehensive understanding of brain function in health and disease
  • Be familiar with neuroanatomy & neurophysiology and their implications for nervous system function
  • Be prepared for advanced study in neurobiology, cognitive neuroscience, and/or neural computation
  • Be able to collaborate with Neuroscientists across a wide range of systems and levels of analysis
  • Prepare for careers in Neuroscience related companies, Neuroscience research, and/or medicine
  • Be prepared for specialization within subfields of Neuroscience given their concentration selection

Requirements for a B.S. in Neuroscience

All students must complete the following:

  1. General Science Requirements (see section A)
  2. Core Neuroscience Courses (see section B)
  3. Requirements for one concentration (see sections C, D, or E)*
  4. 18 additional relevant course units in their home concentration or other neuroscience areas (some examples listed in sections C, D, E, & F). At least 9 of these units must be at the 300-level or above.
  5. Their home college’s General Education requirements
  6. Free elective units to come to a total of 360 total course units
A. General Science Requirements
Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration and Approximation10
or 21-124 Calculus II for Biologists and Chemists
03-121Modern Biology9
or 03-151 Honors Modern Biology
03-201Undergraduate Colloquium for Sophomores1
03-220Genetics9
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
09-207Techniques in Quantitative Analysis 19-12
or 09-221 Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis
or 03-124 Modern Biology Laboratory
09-217Organic Chemistry I 19
or 33-122 Physics II for Biological Sciences & Chemistry Students
33-121Physics I for Science Students12
15-110Principles of Computing 210-12
or 15-112 Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science
or 02-201 Programming for Scientists
36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice 29
or 36-217 Probability Theory and Random Processes
or 36-247 Statistics for Lab Sciences
or 36-225 Introduction to Probability Theory
 108-113
B. Core Neuroscience Courses
Units
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
or 03-161 Molecules to Mind
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-213 Human Information Processing and Artifical Intelligence
03-362Cellular Neuroscience9
03-363Systems Neuroscience9
15-386Neural Computation 39
or 85-419 Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing
or 02-319 Genomics and Epigenetics of the Brain
or 86-375 Computational Perception
 45
C. Neurobiology Concentration
Didactic Core: Students must complete all of the following* Units
03-231/232Biochemistry I9
03-320Cell Biology9
 18
Required laboratory, data analysis, & methodological courses Units
03-343Experimental Techniques in Molecular Biology12
03-346Experimental Neuroscience12
or 03-345 Experimental Cell and Developmental Biology
 24
Electives in Neurobiology (minimum of 18 additional units)** Units
03-133Neurobiology of Disease9
03-250Introduction to Computational Biology12
03-251Introduction to Computational Molecular Biology6
03-252Introduction to Computational Cell Biology6
03-350Developmental Biology9
03-364Developmental Neuroscience9
03-365Neural Correlates of Learning and Memory9
03-366Biochemistry of the Brain9
03-439Introduction to Biophysics9
03-442Molecular Biology9
09-218Organic Chemistry II9
09-208Techniques for Organic Synthesis and Analysis9
or 09-222 Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis
42-202Physiology9
42-203Biomedical Engineering Laboratory
NOTE: VERY Limited Seating Available for 42-203
9
D. Cognitive Neuroscience Concentration
Didactic Core. Students must complete all of the following Units
85-102Introduction to Psychology9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences9
 18
Required laboratory, data analysis, & methodological courses Units
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
85-314Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods9
 18
Electives in Cognitive Neuroscience (minimum of 27 additional hours)** Units
85-221Principles of Child Development9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-261Abnormal Psychology9
85-356Music and Mind: The Cognitive Neuroscience of Sound9
85-370Perception9
85-390Human Memory9
85-406Autism: Psychological and Neuroscience Perspectives9
85-408Visual Cognition9
85-412Cognitive Modeling9
85-414Cognitive Neuropsychology9
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing *9
85-424Hemispheric Specialization: Why, How and What?9
85-426Learning in Humans and Machines9
85-429Cognitive Brain Imaging9
85-442Health Psychology9
85-501Stress, Coping and Well-Being9
E. Computational Neuroscience Concentration    
Didactic Core. Students must complete all of the following* Units
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
or 15-150 Principles of Functional Programming
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
or 21-240 Matrix Algebra with Applications
 30

* Computational Neuroscience concentration students must complete 21-122, 15-112, and 36-217 in their General Science Requirements (section A, above) and 15-386 in their Core Neuroscience Courses (section B, above).  Students must complete a minimum of 60 units in this concentration.  Students should select their required laboratory and elective courses to complete a minimum of 31 units (Four 9 unit courses or a lesser number of 9 and 12 unit courses could be combined to complete this requirement).

Required laboratory, data analysis, and methodological courses (18-24 total units) Units
42-631Neural Data Analysis9
or 86-631 Neural Data Analysis
42-632Neural Signal Processing12
15-494Cognitive Robotics: The Future of Robot Toys12
15-883Computational Models of Neural Systems12
Electives in Computational Neuroscience (minimum of 9 units) Units
03-512Computational Methods for Biological Modeling and Simulation9
or 02-512 Computational Methods for Biological Modeling and Simulation
10-601Introduction to Machine Learning (Master's)12
15-381Artificial Intelligence: Representation and Problem Solving9
15-387Computational Perception9
15-451Algorithm Design and Analysis12
15-453Formal Languages, Automata, and Computability9
15-494Cognitive Robotics: The Future of Robot Toys12
15-883Computational Models of Neural Systems12
16-299Introduction to Feedback Control Systems12
16-311Introduction to Robotics12
21-228Discrete Mathematics9
or 15-251 Great Ideas in Theoretical Computer Science
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
21-272Introduction to Partial Differential Equations9
21-341Linear Algebra9
36-208Regression Analysis9
36-226Introduction to Statistical Inference9
36-350Statistical Computing9
36-401Modern Regression9
36-462Special Topics: Data Mining9
42-631Neural Data Analysis9
or 86-631 Neural Data Analysis
42-632Neural Signal Processing12
F. Additional Neuroscience Electives 

Students are required to take a minimum of 18 additional relevant course units in their home concentration or other neuroscience areas.  Some examples are listed in sections C, D, & E above as well as in the list below.  At least 9 of these units must be at the 300-level or above.

NOTE: this list is not restrictive. Concentration advisors can approve additional elective courses that contribute to the student’s neuroscience education, subject to additional approval by the major steering committee.  

Examples of Additional Electives relevant to major*
33-122Physics II for Biological Sciences & Chemistry Students unless used for Science Core (section A)9
76-385Introduction to Discourse Analysis9
80-210Logic and Proofs9
80-211Logic and Mathematical Inquiry9
80-220Philosophy of Science9
80-254Analytic Philosophy9
80-270Philosophy of Mind9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-314Logic and Artificial Intelligence9
88-355Social Brains: Neural Bases of Social Perception and Cognition9
Free Electives (depending on concentration & college)51-61
TOTAL hours to degree360
 

B.S. in Psychology & Biological Sciences

This major is intended to reflect the interdisciplinary nature of current research in the fields of biology and psychology, as well as the national trend in some professions to seek individuals broadly trained in both the social and natural sciences.

Note: Students entering from the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences will earn a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and Biological Sciences. Students in the Mellon College of Science will earn a Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences and Psychology. Students in the joint Science and Humanities Scholars (SHS) program can complete the SHS educational core and choose either departmental order for their diploma.

Depending on a student's home college (DC or MCS), General Education (GenEd) requirements will be different. GenEd requirements for DC and MCS are found on their respective Catalog pages.

Degree Requirements:

Biological Sciences Units
03-121Modern Biology9
or 03-151 Honors Modern Biology
03-220Genetics9
03-231/232Biochemistry I9
03-320Cell Biology9
03-343Experimental Techniques in Molecular Biology12
03-411Topics in Research1
03-412Topics in Research1
03-xxxGeneral Biology Elective 19
03-3xxAdvanced Biology Elective 118
Total Biology units77

1 Please see description and requirements for electives under the B.S. in Biological Sciences section of this Catalog.

Mathematics, Statistics, Physics and Computer Science Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration and Approximation10
or 21-124 Calculus II for Biologists and Chemists
36-247Statistics for Lab Sciences9
or 36-201 Statistical Reasoning and Practice
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences9
33-121Physics I for Science Students 212
15-110Principles of Computing10-12
or 15-112 Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science
or 02-201 Programming for Scientists
99-10xComputing at Carnegie Mellon3
Total Science units63-65

2 MCS students must also complete 33-122 Physics II for Biological Sciences & Chemistry Students.

Chemistry Units
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
09-217Organic Chemistry I9
or 09-219 Modern Organic Chemistry
09-218Organic Chemistry II9
or 09-220 Modern Organic Chemistry II
09-207Techniques in Quantitative Analysis9-12
or 09-221 Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis
09-208Techniques for Organic Synthesis and Analysis9-12
or 09-222 Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis
Total Chemistry units56-62
Psychology Courses Units
85-102Introduction to Psychology9
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-2xxSurvey Psychology Courses *18
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-340 Research Methods in Social Psychology
or 85-320 Research Methods in Developmental Psychology
or 85-314 Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods
or 85-330 Analytic Research Methods
85-3xxAdvanced Psychology Electives18
Total Psychology units63

 * Excluding 85-261 Abnormal Psychology

 
Additional Advanced Elective9 units
(Choose one of the following courses)
85-3xxAdvanced Psychology Elective9
or
03-3xxAdvanced Biology Elective9

 

Additional Laboratory or Research Methods9-12 units

(Choose one of the following courses)
03-344Experimental Biochemistry12
03-345Experimental Cell and Developmental Biology12
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
85-314Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods9
85-320Research Methods in Developmental Psychology9
85-340Research Methods in Social Psychology9
Elective Units Units
Free Electives33-36
MCS Nontechnical Breadth or DC General Education requirements36-48
Total Elective units69-84

Minimum number of units required for degree:360

Science and Humanities Scholars Program

Sponsored by the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences and by the Mellon College of Science
Dr. William Alba, Director and Assistant Dean
Office: Doherty Hall, Room 2201
http://www.cmu.edu/shs

The Science and Humanities Scholars (SHS) Program supports undergraduate students seeking to build their education upon a solid academic foundation in the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and mathematics. Students in the program, whether formally enrolled in the Mellon College of Science (MCS) or the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences (DC), can readily access the resources of both colleges. The SHS General Education curriculum enables students to prepare for any field of study in two colleges while exploring the entire university.

Science and Humanities Scholars in their first year may choose to live in a Stever House residential cluster that promotes the integration of academic and social interests. The program additionally provides students with interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary courses and activities.

Before a student declares a major, the Program Director serves as the student's primary academic advisor, complementing the range of other advising opportunities available around the university. After a student declares a major, the Director continues to provide supplementary advising for the student, especially on matters of General Education.

Entering first-year students who apply to DC or MCS with outstanding credentials may receive an invitation to the SHS Program. Invited students should carefully consider whether this academic program matches their own scholarly interests. Students enrolled in either college may also request to transfer into the Science and Humanities Scholars Program after completing at least one semester at the university.

Science and Humanities Scholars General Education Program

The requirements in the SHS General Education Program are designed to expose students to a variety of subjects and methodologies, in order to enable them to become better citizens of the world and more complete scholars. The curriculum permits flexibility and independence in selecting courses to fulfill these General Education requirements; students in the Program may petition the Director to take alternate courses in addition to the ones listed here.
 

Mathematical Sciences (20 units)
Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration and Approximation10
or 21-124 Calculus II for Biologists and Chemists
Statistical Reasoning (9 units)

Students may select one of the following courses or any other Statistics course at the 200- level or higher.

36-200Reasoning with Data9
36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice9
36-202Methods for Statistics and Data Science9
21-325Probability9
36-217Probability Theory and Random Processes9
36-225Introduction to Probability Theory9
36-247Statistics for Lab Sciences9
Writing/Expression (9 units)

Language is a tool used to communicate, as well as a way to organize thinking. This university-wide requirement, to be completed in the first year, focuses on the social nature of language and the ways in which writing constitutes thinking.

76-101Interpretation and Argument9
or 76-102 Advanced First Year Writing: Special Topics
World Cultures (9 units)

This requirement seeks to enable students to recognize how cultures have shaped and continue to shape the human experience, as well as analyze material that provide clues as to how these cultures operate.

79-104Global Histories9
Freshman Seminar (6-9 units)

Students may select seminars offered by the SHS Program, Dietrich College, and the Mellon College of Science, from a list of courses provided every semester. Past and present SHS seminars include:

99-241Revolutions of Circularity9
99-242Meaning Across the Millennia9
99-243Light from the Enlightenment
99-245Energy: Science, Society and Communication9
Computational Reasoning (9-12 units)

Students may select one of the following courses offered in Computer Science, Mathematical Sciences, Philosophy, or related fields.

21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
21-128Mathematical Concepts and Proofs12
80-210Logic and Proofs9
80-211Logic and Mathematical Inquiry9
80-212Arguments and Logical Analysis9
15-110Principles of Computing10
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
15-104Introduction to Computing for Creative Practice10
15-121Introduction to Data Structures10
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
02-201Programming for Scientists10
Science Core (28 units)

Choose three of the following courses. Science majors with primary majors in the Mellon College of Science must complete at least two that are outside of their major department.

03-121Modern Biology9-10
or 03-151 Honors Modern Biology
03-230Intro to Mammalian Physiology9
or 42-202 Physiology
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
or 09-107 Honors Chemistry: Fundamentals, Concepts and Applications
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
33-121Physics I for Science Students12
or 33-151 Matter and Interactions I
33-142Physics II for Engineering and Physics Students9-12
or 33-151 Matter and Interactions I
or 33-122 Physics II for Biological Sciences & Chemistry Students
Distribution Requirements (36 units)

Choose a minimum of four courses, 9 units per category, totaling at least 36 units. Below are examples of courses satisfying these categories. You are encouraged to identify other courses that could fulfill these requirements; see the SHS Director for prior approval.

Cognition, Choice, and Behavior

Courses in this category use model-based analysis to broaden an understanding of human thinking, choices, and behavior on an individual basis across a variety of settings. The following list includes examples from Philosophy, Psychology, and Social and Decision Sciences.

80-100Introduction to Philosophy9
80-130Introduction to Ethics9
80-150Nature of Reason9
80-180Nature of Language9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-230Ethical Theory9
80-241Ethical Judgments in Professional Life9
80-270Philosophy of Mind9
85-102Introduction to Psychology9
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
85-221Principles of Child Development9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-251Personality9
85-261Abnormal Psychology9
88-120Reason, Passion and Cognition9
Economic, Political, and Social Institutions

Courses in this category examine the ways in which institutions organize individual preferences and actions into collective outcomes using model-based reasoning. The following list includes examples primarily from Economics, History, and Social and Decision Sciences; similar courses in those and other departments may also fulfill this requirement.

36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
73-102Principles of Microeconomics9
73-103Principles of Macroeconomics9
73-230Intermediate Microeconomics9
79-266Russian History: From Communism to Capitalism9
79-318Sustainable Social Change: History and Practice9
79-331Body Politics: Women and Health in America9
79-350Early Christianity9
80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-341Computers, Society and Ethics9
84-104Decision Processes in American Political Institutions9
Creative Production and Reflection

Courses in this category encourage exploration of the artistic and intellectual creation of others while allowing for personal expression and reflection upon the creative process.

xx-xxxCourses from the College of Fine Arts (Architecture 48-xxx, Design 51-xxx, Drama 54-xxx, Music 57-xxx, Art 60-xxx, CFA Interdisciplinary 62-xxx)Var.
76-260Survey of Forms: Fiction9
76-262Survey of Forms: Nonfiction9
76-265Survey of Forms: Poetry9
76-269Survey of Forms: Screenwriting9
79-345Roots of Rock & Roll9
80-220Philosophy of Science9
82-1xxAny Elementary Modern Language course
82-2xxAny Intermediate Modern Language course
99-241Revolutions of Circularity9
99-242Meaning Across the Millennia9
Cultural Analysis

Courses in this category explore definitions of culture and the role culture plays in producing different actions and institutions, as well as the roles of institutions, systems, and human actions in shaping cultural contexts.

57-173Survey of Western Music History9
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
76-227Comedy9
76-232Introduction to African American Literature9
76-241Introduction to Gender Studies9
79-201Introduction to Anthropology9
79-240Development of American Culture9
79-207Development of European Culture9
79-241African American History: Africa to the Civil War9
79-242African American History: Reconstruction to the Present9
79-224Mayan America9
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-318Sustainable Social Change: History and Practice9
79-330Medicine and Society9
79-345Roots of Rock & Roll9
80-100Introduction to Philosophy9
80-250Ancient Philosophy9
80-251Modern Philosophy9
80-253Continental Philosophy9
80-254Analytic Philosophy9
80-255Pragmatism9
80-261Empiricism and Rationalism9
82-273Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture9
82-294Topics in Russian Language and Culture9
82-303Introduction to French Culture9
82-304The Francophone World9
82-333Introduction to Chinese Language and CultureVar.
82-342Spain: Language and Culture9
82-343Latin America: Language and Culture9
82-344U.S. Latinos: Language and Culture9
82-345Introduction to Hispanic Literary and Cultural Studies9
82-396The Faust Legend at Home and AbroadVar.
82-415Topics in French and Francophone Studies9
82-426Topics in German Literature and Culture9
82-451Studies in Latin American Literature and Culture9
Note on Course Numbers

Each Carnegie Mellon course number begins with a two-digit prefix which designates the department offering the course (76-xxx courses are offered by the Department of English, etc.). Although each department maintains its own course numbering practices, typically the first digit after the prefix indicates the class level: xx-1xx courses are freshmen-level, xx-2xx courses are sophomore level, etc. xx-6xx courses may be either undergraduate senior-level or graduate-level, depending on the department. xx-7xx courses and higher are graduate-level. Please consult the Schedule of Classes each semester for course offerings and for any necessary pre-requisites or co-requisites.

Intercollege Courses

Carnegie Mellon University-wide Studies Courses

99-101 Computing @ Carnegie Mellon
Fall and Spring: 3 units
Computing@Carnegie Mellon (C@CM) is a 3-unit, pass/fail mini course that will help you develop foundational computing and information literacy skills, focusing on the tools and technologies that are specific to Carnegie Mellon so you can be successful in your other academic courses. All undergraduate students are required to take the course. C@CM is offered in a hybrid format through the Open Learning Initiative's (OLI) online course environment; meaning that you'll complete your coursework online and attend a face-to-face recitation session for review and supplemental instruction.

Course Website: http://www.cmu.edu/c-cm/
99-102 Computing @ Carnegie Mellon
Fall and Spring: 3 units
Computing@Carnegie Mellon (C@CM) is a 3-unit, pass/fail mini course that will help you develop foundational computing and information literacy skills, focusing on the tools and technologies that are specific to Carnegie Mellon so you can be successful in your other academic courses. All undergraduate students are required to take the course. C@CM is offered in a hybrid format through the Open Learning Initiative's (OLI) online course environment; meaning that you'll complete your coursework online and attend a face-to-face recitation session for review and supplemental instruction.

Course Website: http://www.cmu.edu/c-cm/
99-104 Carnegie Skills Workshop
All Semesters: 3 units
Carnegie Skills Workshop (CSW) is a 3-unit course that helps students to define, locate, evaluate, organize and present information. CSW focuses on essential tools and technologies necessary for the successful completion of research and writing projects assigned in other courses. The same skills are indispensable at any stage in a person's professional career and personal life. All undergraduate students at CMU-Qatar are required to take the CSW course. Incoming students are expected to take CSW during the fall semester.
99-238 Materials, Energy and Environment
Fall: 9 units
The survival of humans and the advancement of civilization and culture are a result of mankinds' continued development of materials. From early times, civilizations with the most advanced materials have dominated the history of warfare and have been responsible for the infrastructural developments that have cradled out societies. As a result, materials have been influential in the trade and commerce between societies and are still to this day, strongly involved in the political, economic and social conflicts worldwide. Materials do not stand alone in development however, they are a result of, or are influenced by, technological needs and developments. The more advanced the material, the more energy and effort is required for its' production. In the US, the production of materials accounts for about 90% of the country's energy usage. This fact clearly indicates a strong tie between materials and energy, and without energy, technological developments based on material advancement will not occur. In our world today, the need to provide improved performance, economics and design in consumer goods comes as a direct result of the market conditions established by consumers. Material selection and design therefore is driven by application and consumer needs which implies that the consumer has a large influence on material consumption. Material selection and material usage in turn have major ecological implications in energy, material resources and direct environmental impact. Awareness of the complicated interaction is paramount for continued development of civilization. With the scale of industrialization that exists on our planet, consideration of resource management, ethical material selection choices, energy management, and final disposal are all necessary to ensure a sustainable future.
99-241 Revolutions of Circularity
Fall: 9 units
In this course we will investigate how the apparently simple concept of circularity (both in stillness and in motion) has accreted meaning. Starting with the circle as presented in early geometry, we will encompass circularity in ancient and Renaissance astronomy as well as classical physics. We will also discuss appearances of the circle in literature, philosophy, and art since our study will reveal connections such as how Aristotle's views on nature influenced Ptolemy and an understanding of our place in relation to the world, including central imagery in the poetry of Donne. As we demonstrate proofs and analyze texts, circularity will emerge not only as a device through which intellectual revolutions have occurred, but also as an object that has itself been transformed over the centuries.
99-242 Meaning Across the Millennia
Spring: 9 units
Is it possible to convey messages that remain comprehensible after immense time, in the face of inevitable cultural shifts and physical decay? In this course, students will come to terms with the technical and philosophical aspects to this problem while working on group projects to propose solutions to the preservation of memory. Along the way, we will identify the challenges in extracting meaning from artifacts, both ancient and contemporary, such as documents and monuments, whether intentional or unintentional. We will also confront ethical and esthetic issues in identifying what is worth preserving, the challenge of societal pressures on past projects, the possibility of future indifference, and the question of what purpose this endeavor may serve for present-day humanity. Case studies will include time capsules such as those created by the Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company for the 1939 and 1964 New York World's Fairs; the proposed warning marker system for the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; the Voyager Golden Records launched aboard two interplanetary probes; and attempts at communication with extraterrestrial intelligence.
99-245 Energy: Science, Society and Communication
Spring: 9 units
Energy pervades our lives, influencing our transportation, industry, agriculture, building use, and more. Climate change, national security, resource depletion, air and water quality, biodiversity loss, and other challenges demand new technological and social approaches related to energy, including broader public understanding and engagement. In response, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and National Academy of Engineering (NAE) recently chose Pittsburgh as the pilot city for its Science and Engineering Ambassadors program, which selects, prepares, and supports local experts to providing the perspective of science and engineering as community members make energy choices in their personal and professional lives. This course links NAS/NAE Ambassadors and staff, CMU and Pitt students and faculty, and citizens for a series of events on energy topics. Students will review background literature on the energy landscape, read scholarship on energy issues of local concern, and collaborate with partners on public events to communicate energy issues. Through their work, students will increase their own understanding of and ability to engage publicly with energy issues, as well as contribute to the mission of the National Academies and the welfare of our local community. Discussions of technical issues enable students without advanced backgrounds in the engineering and the natural sciences to participate fully. Students from all disciplines, especially the social sciences and humanities, are welcome to join this interdisciplinary course. NOTE: The course is scheduled on Tuesday and Thursday evenings for 2-1/2 hours. We will meet approximately half of those times. This allows us to respect the academic calendars of both universities, and provides flexibility in scheduling collaborative and independent student work.
99-250 Seminar for Peer Tutors
Fall and Spring: 4.5 units
SPECIAL PERMISSION REQUIRED: YES The purpose of this training course is to provide undergraduates with the knowledge, skills, and experience necessary to become effective Peer Tutors. Throughout the course, students will be exposed to the mission and goals of Academic Development and the Peer Tutoring Program. The class lasts approximately nine weeks and is generally offered in the spring term from February through April. The course explores the roles and responsibilities of the tutor while offering insights into effective tutoring strategies through interactive discussion and role plays. In addition, trainees work hands-on with experienced tutors to troubleshoot potential problems and situations. Students will gain experience in group dynamics, communication skills, study strategies, referral resources, leadership, and creating a supportive learning environment. Teaching practice is an integral part of the training program. Students must complete an application in person or electronically at (http://www.cmu.edu/acadev/studentjobs/index.html) and then be interviewed by the instructor(s) to determine if the student possesses the basic qualifications.

Course Website: http://www.cmu.edu/acadev/studentjobs/
99-251 Seminar for Supplemental Instruction
Fall and Spring: 4.5 units
SPECIAL PERMISSION REQUIRED: YES The purpose of this training course is to provide undergraduates with the knowledge, skills and experience necessary to become effective Supplemental Instruction (SI) Leaders. Throughout the course, students will be exposed to the mission and goals of Academic Development and the Supplemental Instruction Program. The class lasts approximately nine weeks and is generally offered in the spring term from February through April. Course participants will actively explore collaborative learning instructional practices, learning theory, group dynamics, study strategies, and communication and leadership skills in order to create a supportive learning environment. Teaching practice is an integral part of the training program. Students must complete an application in person or electronically at (http://www.cmu.edu/acadev/studentjobs/index.html) and then be interviewed by the instructor(s) to determine if the student possesses the basic qualifications.

Course Website: http://www.cmu.edu/acadev/studentjobs/
99-252 Seminar for Academic Counseling
Fall and Spring: 4.5 units
SPECIAL PERMISSION REQUIRED: YES The purpose of this training course is to provide undergraduates with the knowledge, skills and experience necessary to become effective Academic Counselors (AC's). Throughout the course, students will be exposed to the mission and goals of Academic Development and the Academic Counseling Program. The class lasts approximately nine weeks and is generally offered in the spring term from February through April. Students will gain experience in effective and efficient study strategies, learning theory, communication skills, group dynamics, referral resources and how to create a supportive learning environment. Teaching practice is an integral part of the training program. Students must complete an application in person or electronically at (http://www.cmu.edu/acadev/studentjobs/index.html) and then be interviewed by the instructor(s) to determine if the student possesses the basic qualifications.

Course Website: http://www.cmu.edu/acadev/studentjobs/
99-270 Summer Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship
Summer
This course consists of student participation in projects focused on undergraduate research or creative inquiry under the direction of a Carnegie Mellon faculty member. Tenure track, teaching track, research track, librarian track, and special faculty may serve as SURA mentors. The subject of the inquiry, the number of units, and the criteria for grading are to be determined by the student and the faculty mentor. This agreement should be formalized in a one-page apprenticeship verification form that includes documented approval from the faculty mentor with a copy to be submitted to the Undergraduate Research Office (URO). In addition to the research experience, course requirements include an individual meeting with the student's career counselor at the Career and Professional Development Center (CPDC) to update the student's resume, an individual meeting with a tutor at the Global Communication Center (GCC) to begin to develop a professional biography, and presentation at Meeting of the Minds undergraduate research symposium during the subsequent spring semester. Students may register for a maximum of nine units with work to be completed over an eight-week period during the summer all term.
99-275 Summer ReCharge
Summer: 3 units
The goal of this course is to provide students with the tools they will need to become better equipped to handle the challenges they have or will face in their academic experiences. It is designed to promote student awareness of the necessary components of a successful educational experience. Each week, students will engage in self-awareness activities and group discussion of topics in key areas shown to be predictive of student success. Through discussion with peers, exposure to academic findings, and self-reflection essays, this course will provide students with the opportunity for self-growth and allow them to become better connected with the campus community.
99-352 IDeATe: Soft Fabrication Skills
Intermittent: 1 unit
PLEASE NOTE: The specific meeting dates for the A1 section of this micro course are September 23rd, September 30th, and October 7th. The specific meeting dates for the A2 section of this micro course are November 12th, November 19th, and December 3rd. Textiles are a ubiquitous part of our everyday tactile experience. This workshop series aims to introduce textile techniques to participants with diverse backgrounds across the CMU campus. The fabrication skills and concepts that will be covered in this course will be taught from an interdisciplinary approach to merge practices in arts and technology. Students will learn methods of working with fabric such as hand and machine sewing, felting and knitting, along with merging aspects of digital fabrication and physical computing using flexible materials. Through discussions and demos, participants will have the opportunity to explore new methods of fabrication to integrate into their own practice.
99-353 IDeATe: SolidWorks and Laser Cutting
Fall and Spring: 1 unit
PLEASE NOTE: The specific meeting dates for the A1 section of this micro course are September 2nd, September 9th, and September 16th. The specific meeting dates for the A2 section of this micro course are October 22nd, October 29th, and November 5th. This micro course is an introduction to Computer Aided Design (CAD) and the use of laser cutters for fabrication. Students will learn the basics of SolidWorks, a popular CAD package. They will also receive hands-on training in the use of laser cutters to turn their designs into physical objects. Students who complete this course PLUS the separate fire safety training will be able to use the IDeATe facility (Hunt Library) laser cutters on their own for future course work or personal projects.
99-354 IDeATe: Machine Shop, Lathe, Mill, Metrology
Fall and Spring: 2 units
Open to undergraduates, graduates, faculty, and staff! This course is an introduction to machining using the manual lathe and mill. Students will learn the culture of shop safety, the basics of metrology, and how to lathe and mill simple parts. Through two hands-on projects, the students will engage in the interactive process of ideating, making and reflecting. IMPORTANT: Students must wear closed-toe shoes and comfortable clothing. Students will be working around oil-based machines so please wear clothing that you are okay with getting stained. Also, NO JEWELRY and NO SHORTS while working in the Machine Shop. Emphasis on exercise-safe practices in the shop at all times.
99-355 IDeATe: Introduction to Arduino
Fall and Spring: 1 unit
PLEASE NOTE: The specific meeting dates for the A1 section of this micro course are September 23rd, September 30th, and October 7th. The specific meeting dates for the A2 section of this micro course are November 12th, November 19th, and December 3rd. This workshop aims to demystify the Arduino microcontroller through hands-on work in the lab creating simple machines with embodied behaviors. The Arduino is a versatile resource for physical projects for students in all disciplines. This course brings students over the beginner's threshold to a basic understanding of the use, terminology, and potential of the Arduino. The skills and concepts taught in this course are presented from an interdisciplinary approach which merges practices in arts and technology. The first portion will teach the essential skills for creating a simple sensor-driven physical computing system, and the second portion will reinforce those skills by making a simple interactive project. The course has no technical prerequisites, although uses a little bit of algebra-level math. Undergraduate students, graduate students, faculty and staff interested in learning new skills in an interdisciplinary environment are welcome!

Course Website: http://courses.ideate.cmu.edu/99-355
99-356 IDeATe: Digital Media Literacies: Great World Challenge
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course introduces students to new media for ethically finding, evaluating, producing and sharing artistic and scholarly innovations. It allows students the opportunity to gain practice with and exposure to tools, technologies and processes which support data analysis, visualization, communication, presentation and sharing through a variety of emerging and established dissemination channels. Students who excel in the course may be further supported in identifying and pursuing appropriate publication outlets for their research. The course will be of particular interest to students planning to engage in further undergraduate research opportunities.
99-357 IDeATe: Pragmatic Phototgraphy
Fall and Spring: 1 unit
PLEASE NOTE: The specific meeting dates for the A1 section of this micro course are September 2nd, September 9th, and September 16th. The specific meeting dates for the A2 section of this micro course are October 22nd, October 29th, and November 5th. Pragmatic Photography is a digital imaging course for the non-photographer. A tech-first approach provides a strong grounding in the core concepts and techniques of image-based media. This course will enable students to create photographs for project documentation. This class will not require special cameras or software; students will use commonly-available photo-editing software to create images using DSLRs, point and click cameras, or their cell phones. The course focuses on general principles that apply across different equipment and software.
99-415 Internship in Educational Outreach
All Semesters
Missing Course Description - please contact the teaching department.
99-451 Building Fluency for Presentations: A class for nonnative English speakers
Fall and Spring: 4.5 units
Building Fluency for Presentations: A class for nonnative English speakers (NNES) is a 4.5 unit pass/fail mini designed to prepare undergraduate NNES to deliver effective oral presentations. The course will help students become familiar with the expectations of the US style of presenting and will offer opportunities to practice giving presentations on academic topics. Students will focus on developing a broad range of skills, including the ability to: 1) communicate clearly with an audience in academic English; 2) employ linguistic features such as stress, intonation, and nonverbal cues to clarify and emphasize information; 3) consider various organizational strategies; 4) assess speaking strengths and weaknesses; and 5) feel comfortable in the role of presenter. Prerequisite: Permission from the Intercultural Communication Center (ICC). Please call the ICC at 412-268-4979.

Course Website: http://www.cmu.edu/icc

StuCo (Student-Led) Courses

98-012 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Fun with Robots
Fall and Spring: 3 units
This course students will be given a hands-on look at robotics and electronics in general. Students will receive a robot to program and explore throughout the course. Successfully passing the course will mean the robot is yours to keep.

Course Website: http://www.cmu.edu/stuco/
98-036 Student Taught Courses (StuCo):Intro to Cars and Motorsports
Intermittent: 3 units
Join in as we take a look at some of the most remarkable innovation in automotive history from a layman's perspective. Ranging from every day civilian vehicles to hypercars and motorsport spec vehicles, we will watch lots of informative shows and videos (like Top Gear, 5th Gear, Vehicle Virgins, etc.) and respectfully voice our opinions.
98-068 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Introduction to Lucid Dreaming
Intermittent: 3 units
This course will teach students how to lucid dream and how to improve their dream control. Students will be required to keep a confidential dream journal over the length of the course. As students' abilities grow, students will be given optional challenges to complete for the next class. All students, whether experienced or new dreamers, are welcome to enroll. Note: This course is not recommended for students with dissociative disorders.
98-075 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Buddhism and Chinese Culture
Intermittent: 3 units
What do you know about Chinese culture? Have you wondered what does "Zen" mean in Buddhism and how it becomes part of the English vocabulary? Are you confused about the differences between Tibetan Buddhism and "Chinese" Buddhism? Do you want to know the historic origins of the conflicts between Dalai Lama and Chinese government? Are you surprised by the diversity and exuberance of Buddhist art? Do you know some Chinese festivals and rituals were influenced by Buddhism? Do you want to be able to introduce some history, characteristics and origins of some Chinese cultural phenomena when you go to China? If you are interested in any questions above or just want to know about Buddhism or Chinese culture in general, then this is the course for you. Buddhism hugely impacted the Chinese culture. This course will examine a variety of Chinese cultural elements. We will cover topics such as famous tourist mountains, Buddhist art, Zen and its meanings, Tibetan Buddhism, Shaolin martial art, and tea culture. We will link of some the recent trends and events so that we can make connections to the modern world we are living with. This is not a religion course, the focus is the cultural part, although some Buddhist teachings will be covered to have better understanding of the history. Chinese is not a requirement for this course, but this course will strengthen your grasp of Chinese.
98-128 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Fundamentals of Improv Comedy
Intermittent: 3 units
Through improv games and structured activities, students will learn the basic tenants of improvisational theatre with a focus on comedic short-form style. These tenants will include character creation, miming, scene work, storytelling, movement, and general wit.
98-166 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Intro to Video Game Analysis
Intermittent: 3 units
Video game analysis is the critique, interpretation and deconstruction of video games as a multi-media, literary medium. In this course, we will discuss how to create a valuable analysis, look at existing critiques, and write our own analyses. We will examine the influence that visual cues, non-diegetic sounds, and control schemes play in the total experience of the game. By the end of the semester, students should ask the questions: "How does the narrative motivate player action?", "Do all of the mechanics convey the same message?", "How does the art style frame the rest of the experience?" This course is open anyone interested in video games or art in general.
98-169 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Origami
Fall: 3 units
Origami is the ancient Japanese art of paper folding. In this StuCo, we will be exploring different folding techniques and algorithms for designing your own origami models. Students will learn the basics of foldability, as well as how to create novel tessellations, animals, curved folds, and thick origami. This course is heavily project based, and students will be expected to work on their origami models outside of class.
98-171 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): How to Get a Job
Intermittent: 3 units
By the end of this course, you will have 8 complete job applications to 8 real jobs you want or are interested in learning more about. Every other week you will turn in one complete application for review, and will receive back that application with edits. This class is for students, of any major, at any stage in their search who want an active, supportive approach to their job, internship, or fellowship search. This StuCo will cover how to find a job, write a resume and cover letter, interview, network, contact references, and negotiate for salary and benefits. With the support of professional career consultants, we will discuss how to plan a lifetime of fulfilling employment and support each other in our journeys to careers where we define our own visions of success.
98-181 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Practical Magic
Intermittent: 3 units
An exploratory, hands on introduction to herbal medicine, mindfulness, tarot, and other common ritual processes, with a primary focus on using these tools for self-care, stress management, and everyday mental health care. Students will learn the basic building blocks of herbal medicine, including how to prepare common herbal remedies such as infusions, oils, salves, and tinctures. Additionally, the class will include units on traditional and practical uses of tarot, as well as learning to integrate mindfulness and ritual into a busy CMU student schedule.
98-182 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Billiard Games: From Noob to Pro
Intermittent: 3 units
Learn how to play billiard games such as 8-ball pool in this new StuCo! Don't know how to play? Don't worry, we start from the very basics. You will learn many different games that can be played on a pool table as well as how to properly hit the balls and add spin!
98-186 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Roller Coasters: Background and Design
Intermittent: 3 units
This course will be an extensive study of roller coasters. It will include the history of roller coasters (from Russian Mountains to modern day), a solid background on roller coasters such as different types and manufacturers, and issues concerning their design. As part of the course, the class will take a field trip to Kennywood, the local amusement park, for a behind the scenes tour of the park and its roller coasters (the trip is free to all enrolled students). The course is open to all interested students, and while physics related to roller coasters will be discussed, no previous knowledge of physics is assumed. Please send any questions about the course to hlawrenc@andrew.cmu.edu.
98-194 Student Taught Courses (StuCo):Introduction to Puzzle Hunts
Fall: 3 units
Puzzle hunts, which have soared in popularity over the past several years, are events consisting of several logic, wordplay, crossword, or trivia puzzles which culminate in a metapuzzle at the very end. In this class, students will learn the fundamentals of solving these types of puzzles, including puzzle types, logical techniques, answer extraction methods, and more! Open to anyone regardless of prior experience or skill level.
98-205 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Introduction to Minecraft
Spring: 3 units
Minecraft is a widely popular computer game. It places you in a randomly generated world of blocks and sets you free to survive and be creative. This course will provide an in-depth introduction of how to play Minecraft, including basic survival skills, as well as exploring new areas the game has expanded into. Along with playing survival Minecraft together on a class server with custom plugins and fun features to explore, (such as dungeons and treasure hunts built by us,) we will play Minecraft minigames in class and explore possibilities such as playing on public servers and setting up modded Minecraft. This class is designed for both players completely new to the game as well as those with plenty of experience looking to play Minecraft with some new friends. The course will be mainly taught on a private class server, so students should purchase a copy of Minecraft before the first class. The game costs $27 and is required for the course.
98-217 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Bhangra 101
Fall and Spring: 3 units
BHANGRA 101 will provide an introduction to the dance, the music, and the cultural roots of Bhangra. We aim to teach not only how to dance, but about all the different moves and styles and Bhangra's prevalence today. The goal of this StuCo is to make Bhangra more accessible to those that have never danced and have built up interest in Bhangra after seeing the school's Bhangra team perform on campus. NO DANCE EXPERIENCE EXPECTED OR REQUIRED! Class will be held in the Morewood Gardens Multipurpose Room.
98-222 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Introduction to IOS Development
Intermittent: 3 units
This course is a hands-on introduction to iOS development and creating basic applications for iPhone (and by extension, iPad). Even though this is a StuCo, we still go fairly in-depth to the many facets of basic iOS design. Therefore, expect this course to be more time-intensive than a traditional StuCo. You should expect weekly homework assignments in the first half of the semester and a midterm and final project in the second half of the semester. It is also highly recommended that you have some experience with object-oriented programming. 15-122 and 15-150 are recommended prerequisites, but 15-112 is okay too. You will either need a Mac running the latest version of Mac OS X or access to one of the Mac clusters on campus. View the course website at 98-222/index.html">http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/course/98-222/index.html.
98-230 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Avatar and Korra
Fall: 3 units
This course will explore topics presented in the television show Avatar: The Last Airbender and Legend of Korra. It will include discussion of characters and exploration of major themes such as spirituality, cultural references, and fighting styles.
98-238 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Classic Japanese Film
Intermittent: 3 units
Welcome to Classic Japanese Cinema. In this class we explore the techniques, themes, styles and directors of both the Golden Era of Japanese Cinema as well as the Japanese New Wave.
98-239 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): League of Legends
Intermittent: 3 units
With millions of players and an active competitive scene, League of Legends has become one of the most popular games in the world. This class is for players who are pretty familiar with the basics of the game and are looking to improve. We will cover topics such as team compositions, item builds, the specifics of each role, and many others in a discussion-based lecture format. We will also split students into teams and pit these teams against each other during some of the weeks. Players will be able to hone their own skills while also learning how to grow and play with their teammates over the course of the semester.
98-244 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Sign Language Through Pop Music
Fall and Spring: 3 units
In this class, you will learn sign language to the rhythm of well-known music! Each class will cover a different topic, starting at fingerspelling and basic conversation and moving to signs for school and family topics. The history of sign language and deaf culture will be explored as well. Each week the assignment will be to learn the signs for the chorus of a song that uses words learned in class. The final project is to create a sign language music video or present a live choreography.
98-247 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Harry Potter Literary Analysis
Fall and Spring: 3 units
Each week, we'll focus a discussion on a different aspect of the Harry Potter universe and the new expansions from JK Rowling. From the morality of horcruxes to why Hufflepuff isn't all that bad, it's a weekly dose of the series that we all grew up with. Covers the Harry Potter books, their film adaptations, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, and the Cursed Child play.
98-251 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Racecar Engineering
Fall and Spring: 3 units
This course aims to teach students about the systems contained on a racing vehicle, along with the practical design and manufacturing theory behind it. Topics include system overviews, modern manufacturing processes, design intuition, computer simulation tools and modelling. A heavy focus will be placed on hands-on activity and learning relevant knowledge to the engineering discipline. No previous knowledge is necessary, and all majors are welcome.
98-252 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Wordplay: Fundamentals of Scrabble Strategy
Intermittent: 3 units
Contrary to popular belief, knowledge of obscure words is not the foremost determiner of Scrabble success. This course will cover the strategies and paradigms that advanced players employ to consistently outplay even those with wider vocabularies, including: anagramming; bingos; rack management; S, blank, and Q strategy; defense; bluffing and challenging; exchanging; and endgame finesse. Beginning with the rules of Scrabble, the course does not presume any prior experience and is absolutely accessible to beginners. Classes will follow a structure of alternating lessons and workshops where students will have the opportunity to practice skills with each other in real Scrabble games.

Course Website: http://www.contrib.andrew.cmu.edu/~jemminc/98-252/
98-253 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Beginner Throwing: An Introduction to Yo-yo
Fall and Spring: 3 units
Modern yo-yo is an exciting hobby and an interesting combination of art and sport requiring both creativity and dexterity. This course will be an introduction to 1A style yo-yo (single yo-yo, string tricks) that will start with basic techniques and lead into a variety of types of tricks. Responsive play will be introduced at first, followed by unresponsive play in order to perform more advanced tricks. Class will consist of practicing tricks presented through videos and demonstrations. As a final, students will create a unique trick to be presented to the class along with a short tutorial video explaining and teaching the trick.
98-254 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Ukulele For Non-Majors
Fall and Spring: 3 units
The ukulele is one of the most accessible instruments created; unlike the guitar or piano, the ukulele only has four strings and is much smaller, which is easier to transport. This makes it an ideal instrument for making music anywhere. This course will develop the musical abilities of students through a combined crash course of basic harmony, eurhythmics, and solfege, while simultaneously applying that knowledge to the ukulele. Students will acquire knowledge in music theory to order to read and build chords, a skill important to learning songs. Students will also acquire a rhythmic ability such that they can strum comfortably and effortlessly. Lastly, students will acquire some form of vocal and ear knowledge to assist in their education. The course may be intensive for students with absolutely no musical ability. Students will learn a variety of techniques in weekly classes and the broad scope of musical development may prove a little difficult. However, this can be amended with adequate practice, which is emphasized at the end of each class. Students are required to purchase their own ukulele instruments. Prices range from $30-$45.
98-255 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Cosplay 101
Fall and Spring: 3 units
This course will provide a foundation for obtaining the skills and mindset required for creating a cosplay out?t. Students will learn essential techniques such as using a sewing machine, determining materials, working with ?found objects? to create props and costumes, and other basic cosplay knowledge. By the end of the course students will be able to employ the knowledge learned in class to create a cosplay of their choosing!
98-256 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Introduction to Humor Theory, for Non-Majors
Fall and Spring: 3 units
This course focuses on the underlying principles of humor. We will ask questions such as, "Why is this joke funny??", "Under what circumstances is this joke funny?", and "What would make this joke funnier?" By asking these questions in context of various genres, styles, and settings, we hope to illuminate some of the underlying principles that make a joke ?work.? Some recurring themes will be: the intended effect of humor on the audience, the structural elements of jokes,and the relationship between a joke and its medium. The course will be discussion-based, since humor is both subjective and an inherently social subject. Topics include: puns, anti-humor,stand-up comedy, one-liners, meta humor, and literary humor. There is no course fee.
98-257 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Women in Film
Fall and Spring: 3 units
This course will explore the role of women in film and how the medium treats female characters and their stories. We will look at films with prominent female characters as well as films that have been written or directed by women.
98-258 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Pokemon 101
Fall and Spring: 3 units
Course In 1996 Pokémon Red and Green/Blue where released and would soon gain rapid popularity and become not only the best selling RPG on the original Game Boy but become one the best selling RPG of all time. This lead to future sequels and becoming the multi-billion dollar franchise known today. Amongst many of the groundbreaking features the series started and evolved over time the biggest is often referred to its battle system. It spawn a competitive environment based on the system's heavy need of predication and preparation analysis for high level play and has continued to evolve with each passing sequel. In this course we will introduce the depth of the battle mechanics and move into developing and analyzing strategies. The course will consist of lectures and discussions on the mechanics, strategy, meta, and team composition along with a few progress reports and a tournament amongst the class for the final.
98-259 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): From Food to Chinese Culture
Fall and Spring: 3 units
Maybe you are familiar with General Tso's chicken, Kung Pao chicken Ma Po Tofu, dumplings and spring rolls, and maybe you like them pretty much. But who is general Tso? What is Kung Pao? Where is Ma Po from? Who invented dumpling? Why do we eat spring rolls? If you are curious about the answers, this course is right for you. The lecture series covers ten most well-known Chinese festivals with their food and one additional special topic. Each lecture has a culture session and a language session. The culture session introduces Chinese festivals with their associated legend stories and food while the language session introduces students to some sophisticated yet practical Chinese phrases (or even verses from a poem). Through this interesting detour, this course provides an explanation of obscure aspects of Chinese language and culture. By the end of the course, students should walk away with basic ideas about Chinese culture and also advance in Chinese language.
98-260 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction
Fall and Spring: 3 units
Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) was originally developed at UMass Medical Center. MBSR brings together mindfulness and conscious breathing with yoga and meditation in order to increase attention span and reduce stress naturally. With the exception of the introduction in the 1st week, the midterm in the 8th week, and the final in the 16th week, every class will consist of 25 minutes of ?class time? - in-class worksheets, activities, group discussion, etc.; the remaining 25 minutes will be used for meditation and yoga purposes. Remember to wear comfortable clothing to class, as 25 minutes every week will consist of a guided meditation! Feel free to bring a yoga mat to lie on if you so choose, though it is not required.
98-261 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): The Captivity Debate: Killer Whales
Intermittent: 3 units
The death of experienced SeaWorld trainer Dawn Brancheau in February of 2010 raised questions about humans? relationship with killer whales and the suitability of keeping them in captivity for human entertainment. This course will explore the history of killer whales in captivity, delve into the behavior of killer whales in the wild, compare it to that of killer whales in captivity, and question humans? role in the lives of highly intelligent, emotionally complex creatures.
98-262 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Intro to Boardgames and Miniature Wargames
Fall and Spring: 3 units
This course will introduce students to the hobby of boardgames, nonstandard cardgames and miniature wargames. We will be playing a wide variety of game genres and investigating their mechanics, with the ultimate goal of expanding your knowledge of the wide varieties of games and understanding their mechanics enough to extend similar principles of play to games that use similar mechanics. What Kinds of Games will we be playing*: ?Eurogames?: Settlers of Catan, Carcassonne, Ticket to Ride, Stone Age, Puerto Rico, etc. Nonstandard Card Games: Fluxx, Pit, Race for the Galaxy, The Resistance, etc. Miniature Wargames (The games we will play are similar to): Warhammer (Fantasy/40K), Flames of War, Bolt-Action, Dystopian Wars, etc. Board wargames: Diplomacy, Axis and Allies, Battle Cry, etc. What Kinds of Games we will NOT be playing (Including but not limited to the following examples): Common household boardgames: Risk, Monopoly, Dominoes, Sorry, Apples to Apples, Scrabble, Clue, Life, Trivial Pursuit, etc. Standard 52 Card Deck Card Games: Blackjack, Poker, Rummy, etc. Traditional Games: Chess, Checkers, Go, Nine Man's Morris, etc.
98-264 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Brick Walls and First Bases: A History of Comedy
Fall and Spring: 3 units
So, why am I here, exactly? E.B. White once said, ?Analyzing a joke is like dissecting a frog. Few people are interested and the frog dies.?* Brick Walls and First Bases is a course dedicated to hitting that balance between knowing why jokes are funny and knowing so much about jokes that they just aren?t funny anymore.** We will be covering general historical trends in comedy as well as discussing comedic theory and social aspects vital to what makes something funny. The goal of this course is to know how comedy developed into what it is today. There will also be a notable focus on the contemporary comedy scene in America. Ok, I get it, comedy?s great. How will I learn about how great it is? This class will meet once a week from 6:30p.m. to 7:30p.m. During this time there will either be lecture or discussion. There will also be short, weekly homework assignments posted by me on blackboard. It is your responsibility to come to class having listened to or watched the necessary reading or video, so you can participate in class. There will also be a midterm exam and a final (students can choose either a paper or presentation) to show what you learned throughout the class. (Just think of how cool you?ll seem to your friends when you told them you were once ostensibly forced by someone who is barely your superior to write a paper on Mort Sahl! How exciting.)
98-265 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Hello Theater: The Logic of Illogical Methods
Fall and Spring: 3 units
This course explores how to a) Understand Various Theatrical techniques (both modern and traditional) b) Increasing Appreciation for Non-traditional theater and examining its strengths and merits c) Practical techniques for improving your own theatrical work. The course also explores closely related areas like leadership, learning theory, psychology and post- modernist culture.
98-267 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Jamaican Entertainment
Intermittent: 3 units
This course is meant to examine the entertainment industry in Jamaica. The first-half of the semester will first examine the cultural aspects of the industry, such as the origins and types of: dance, food, music, and dialect. Given this background, the second-half of the semester will dive into event planning and management in the context of this culture; such as marketing, budgeting and finances.
98-268 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): The Scary Story: Gothic Lit and the Uncanny
Intermittent: 3 units
This course on Gothic literature and the scary story is for anyone who is intrigued by things that chill the blood and tingle the spine. All are welcome, from literary enthusiasts to those who haven?t taken an English course in years; all you need is an interest in storytelling and curiosity about human darkness. The course will explore Gothic themes, the nature of the uncanny, and the evolution of the scary story across region and time. How is the scary story colored by history and folklore? What psychological horrors lurk at the core of all truly scary stories? How does the history of the scary story relate to contemporary horror media? We will explore these questions and many more through authors such as Edgar Allan Poe, H. P. Lovecraft, Joyce Carol Oates, and a host of others. Class will be primarily lecture- and discussion-based. The midterm and final will allow you to create your own scary stories or creations to be shared in a spooky campfire- esque setting. Enroll if you dare!
98-269 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Intro to Sabermetrics & Exploring Baseball Data
Spring: 3 units
Born in the 1970s and popularized by ?Moneyball? as a radical challenge to traditional  baseball statistics, sabermetrics has developed into a new way of understanding America?s  pastime. Its practitioners have created new statistical tools and revised our old ways of  thinking about the game, transforming the way fans and front offices view and assess players.    This introduction to the basics of sabermetrics will explain concepts including normalization,  peak versus career performance, linear weights and runs created, as well as popular  calculations like OPS (On­Base plus Slugging), WHIP (Walks and Hits per Inning Pitched), PF  (Park Factor) and others increasingly used by members of the sabermetrics community.
98-270 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Quadrotors: Robots in da Skies
Intermittent: 3 units
"Drones". "UAV's". We are starting to hear these words in the media, often in a negative context. But there is a world of hobbyists that play with the same machines with an entirely different intent. "Quadrotors" (robots that are like helicopters, but with four motors and blades) are being used to get beautiful footage from unique perspectives, to lift beer, for research, and even for music; and they are a blast to build, tinker with, and fly. We hope to use these robots as an introduction to the world of hobbyists for any student who would find making "something that they can fly" fun. It is not hard to learn to build a quadrotor, it is just a matter of being taught. We would love for students in fields such as "fine arts" or "business" to take this course, and we have designed it to be understood by a nontechnical audience, but to be enjoyed by everyone. Take our StuCo and harass your roommate by flying at them with your very own quadrotor that YOU built.
98-271 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Speedrunning 101%
Spring: 3 units
This course focuses on teaching students the principles of Speedrunning, including  choosing games, learning games, designing splits, recording/streaming their runs, and racing.  We will cover everything from the basics and lingo, to the software used for recording, and how  to integrate into the speedrunning community.
98-272 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Financial Freedom
Spring: 3 units
Financial freedom is the moment when you no longer work for money, but rather, when you let your money work for you. When you choose to work because you love your job over the necessity of working for a salary, you become financially independent. This is a course about personal finance and investing. We will cover topics from credit to getting started with your own 5-minute-a-month investment portfolio. We will also hold several workshops and one-on-ones on topics like applying for a credit card, paying off student loans, and filing taxes. Empower yourself to make important decisions in your life by learning about the steps to achieve your financial freedom.
98-273 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Mermaidology
Intermittent: 3 units
This course will focus on mermaids: what they are, where the stories and myths arose from, and how they affect us today. Topics including the origin of mermaids, mermaids in mythology, gender and sexuality in mermaids, mermaids in the media, and the existence of mermaids will be covered in this StuCo. We will use stories such as Hans Christian Andersen's "The Little Mermaid", movies such as Disney's The Little Mermaid and Peter Pan, and even cultural icons like Aquaman to get a better understanding of the mermaid phenomenon and how it affects us.
98-274 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): How to Start an Anonymous Website
Spring: 3 units
Whatever you do on the Internet, everything starts with your IP address. On the conventional Internet, routing protocols ensure that nothing you do can be... (finishing this later...some statement will be made here about the motivation/concerns for online anonymity and privacy, and its personal and political implications...) The Tor project originated a few years ago as a result of the combination of the development and implementation of new encryption technologies and increasing concerns for privacy.
98-275 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Marvel Film and Media Studies
Intermittent: 3 units
This course is an exploration of one of the last decade?s most successful media franchises: the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), which began with 2008?s "Iron Man," continuing with titles such as "The Avengers" and "Guardians of the Galaxy." Each class session will focus on a specific film (or films or shows) in the MCU. We will study each film from both a filmmaking standpoint and a thematic standpoint; we will begin by following the production of each film before delving into the story and content. We will also examine the cultural influence and impact of the MCU entries; topics will range from Wikileaks to Tumblr fandom. This course is for students who desire to learn more about the behind-?the-?scenes process behind some of their favorite films, or to just talk about how much they love Groot.
98-276 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Learning the Ropes
Intermittent: 3 units
Jump rope has risen from a playground activity to an internationally competitive sport. This StuCo will expose students to the basics of jump rope as a little-known sport and have them develop creativity and skills throughout the semester. Students will perform a choreographed routine at Dancers Symposium as a final project and will also have created a simple "freestyle" using the skills that they have learned. There is a course fee of $6 for a jump rope. The course fee is due to the instructor in person on the first day of class. Class will be held in the Morewood Gardens Multipurpose Room.
98-277 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Vim Editor: Philosophy, Principles and Practice
Intermittent: 3 units
Vim is a very powerful text editor that is often misused. This is because Vim has a editing model that is fundamentally different from almost all other editors out there, and it takes quite a bit of understanding to truly edit text at the speed of thought. The main purpose of this course is to answer the question: Why Vim? We will trace the roots of the Vim editor, and explain in detail how to think in Vim, how to utilize the most out of its commands, and how people use it in practice. We will also be talking a bit about some of the traps that beginners fall into, and will intentionally avoid topics that are too misleading. This course is mostly geared towards CS/ECE majors who spend most of their time coding in a C-style language.
98-278 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Animal Minds: Introduction to Animal Psychology
Intermittent: 3 units
Elephants mourn for their dead, captive dolphins can fall into insanity, and chimpanzees have nearly photographic memory but poor spoken word comprehension. This course is designed to give students an introduction to modern discoveries in animal psychology. Topics covered include animal consciousness, communication/learning, relationships, and emotions. We will also go in-depth with specific animals and explore the emotions and cognitive abilities of these species in order to gain a better understanding of how to interpret animal behavior as thoughts.
98-279 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Lights, Camera, Architecture
Intermittent: 3 units
Telling a story through film requires creating a world that captures the imagination and fancy of moviegoers. Whether a movie is in its preliminary or final stages of development, the setting of the film is essential to the overall storyline. Historical, fantastical or grounded in reality, each style and sense of place has its own impact on the storyline. We will look at the history of architecture in films, the role architecture plays in fantasy, futuristic, dystopian, and hybrid world building. We will also examine famous architecture, its destruction, and films that reach outside of what we understand as place and time. A captivating film is rooted in a strong storyline. A gripping storyline is nothing without the context in which it's placed. The context, the built environment, and the architecture will be the focus of our exploration of film from the 20th century to the present day.
98-280 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Backgammon: Everything You Need to Know
Intermittent: 3 units
This course is designed to take you through a journey to learn the art of Backgammon. We learn the history of the game, how to play the game, advanced techniques, and strategies, among many other things. The purpose of the course ultimately is to teach you to play backgammon well.
98-281 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Global Wine Studies
Intermittent: 3 units
You MUST be 21 or older to register for this course. If you are NOT confirmed on the roster, you are NOT permitted to attend this course. <br> <br> This course is designed to help you learn about wine industry from a consumer standpoint. By the end of the semester you will be able to: choose and serve wine, taste in a professional manner, read and interpret vocabulary, understand wine making, storing/aging, food pairing, and industry etiquette. There will be a course fee of approximately $150.
98-282 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): How to Draw Manga
Intermittent: 3 units
This class will teach students how to draw Japanese sequential comics, called manga, by helping them develop necessary skills including script writing, making names, character design, paneling, etc. Over the course of the semester, students will aim to complete two short comics.
98-283 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Beginner Hula Hooping and Intro to Hoop Dance
Intermittent: 3 units
Hoop Dance is a course which is meant to teach beginner hula hoopers various hula hooping skills that can be incorporated into a dance. Hoop dance is a very free form type of dance done with a hula hoop that has many different styles. Hoop Dance will introduce students to these styles and help each student develop their hooping style and technique.
98-284 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Intro to 3D Game Development in Unity
Intermittent: 3 units
Do you love video games? Have you ever wondered how some of your favorite video games are made? Introduction to Game Development in Unity 3D is a comprehensive course that takes you from a beginner to developing a full 3D game in Unity. This StuCo provides a foundation in the tools, techniques, and methods for creating and successfully using Unity 3D in a production environment. Topics include: Idea Creation, Interface Navigation, Scene Set-Up, Game Objects, Scripting, Animation, Physics, AI, and Overall Design. Design encompasses topics such as: Lighting, UI, Textures, and Audio.
98-285 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Intro to Naval Aviation
Intermittent: 3 units
Aviation is a central part of US Naval history and continues to play a large role in modern warfare today. The purpose of this class is to learn the history of naval aviation, identify the different aircraft and their individual missions, and to better understand the role of naval aviation in the bigger picture of the military and its operations.
98-286 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): The Navajo Language
Intermittent: 3 units
The Navajo language (Diné bizaad) is a Native American language of the Athabaskan language family spoken in the Southwestern United States by over 170,000 people (over 7,500 of whom are monolingual). It is well known to most Americans as the language used in World War II by the United States as a means to transmit military messages with the help of Navajo soldiers, but its history and depth go far beyond that. This course aims to provide students with a way to learn the language to a basic degree, and provide foundations for learning it even more after the course has ended. In addition, this course strives to provide students with a linguistics background a unique opportunity to survey a Native American language. By the end of the course, students should walk away with the ability to describe the world and hold simple conversations in Navajo, as well as a greater understanding of Native American culture and society.
98-287 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Intro to Modern Hebrew
Intermittent: 3 units
While Hebrew itself has been around since the 10th century B.C., modern Hebrew has only been around since the 19th century. Now it is spoken by 9 million people worldwide. This course will teach you the basics of conversational Hebrew through lessons, games, fun, and music. By the end of the course, you will know the alphabet, basic sentence structure and vocabulary, how to ask about the weather and such, and some knew games and songs!
98-288 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Star Wars: The Course Awakens
Intermittent: 3 units
This course will focus primarily on the six Star Wars films and their impact on pop culture. In each class, we will discuss a particular topic relevant to the films. Such topics include: 1. Fan and critical perception of the seven films and each movie's role within the Star Wars universe, 2. Use of special effects to enhance storytelling, 3. Themes of Star Wars and how they continue to resonate with people, 4. Use of music in Star Wars and its recognizability, 5. Debates between Star Wars fans in regard to the prequel trilogy and original trilogy ­ the division between different generations of fans, 6. An analysis of all seven films, 7. The future of Star Wars films. By the end of the course, students should have a good understanding of the Star Wars franchise and why it continues to impact people today.
98-289 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): An Exploration of Synesthesia
Intermittent: 3 units
"Tuesdays are hot pink." Hearing colors, tasting sounds, and feeling flavors are all different types of synesthesia, a neurological condition in which activation of one sense or cognitive pathway triggers another. For certain synesthetes, a particular smell might elicit texture and color; for another, a letter might have a bright color and distinct personality. Synesthesia is rare, and those who have it often believe everyone perceives the world similarly to the way they do. As a result, the condition rarely comes up in conversation or in classes. This course will be an exploration of cross-sensory perception, the different manifestations of synesthesia, and the theories behind its basis. We will compare and contrast the ways in which synesthetes and non-synesthetes experience the world, as well as delve into some of the deeper, emotional effects of living with synesthesia.
98-290 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Intro to Vocal Percussion
Intermittent: 3 units
Beatboxing is a discipline that emerged during the 1980s, when there was a need for electronic equipment to produce accompanying beats for rappers. As people generally could not afford these beat boxes, people discovered the ability to emulate the beats themselves, and these people were known as beatboxers. This course will explore some popular beatbox icons from that time. The popularity of beatbox dwindled once the electronic equipment for producing beats became more affordable, but their has been a resurgence of interest in beatboxing that leads to a split in old school vs. new school beatbox. The course will attempt to provide knowledge of both, with a higher emphasis on the more technical new school styles, which continue to expand today.
98-291 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Android Development
Intermittent: 3 units
In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of native Android app development through several small projects covering many aspects of the Android SDK. By the end of this course, students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of building an Android app from scratch using the most current libraries, techniques, and architectures through a final project of their choosing. Although the Android framework is in Java, no Java experience is required. We recommend having taken 15112 or having equivalent programming experience.
98-292 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): 3D Game Design with Python & Panda3D
Intermittent: 3 units
This course will teach students how to craft 3D video games in python, starting from basic concepts of game engines to full project constructions. We will base our course practice on panda3D, a game engine developed by Carnegie Electrical Entertainment Center. Students are expected to have sufficient experience in python before joining (currently or once in 15-112). This will be a project-focusing class that helps students create their own games.
98-293 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Introduction to Western Esotericism & Occultism
Intermittent: 3 units
The subject of Western esotericism is one that fascinates many but is very difficult to begin to understand. Is the complexity and intricacy of Western esotericism a beautiful thing to behold, or is it an ugly mess that misleads and distracts seekers of the absolute? This course presents a brief introduction to several key themes within the subject of Western esotericism, including Qabbalah, ritual magic, divination, alchemy, enchantment, and evocation. The writings of famous Western esotericists, including Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa, Eliphas Levi, Aleister Crowley, Eugen Grosche, and Austin Osman Spare, will also be studied and discussed.
98-294 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Server-Side Programming with Node.js
Intermittent: 3 units
While we enjoy the many innovations of internet communication through our smart phones and web browsers, a lot of the heavy work are performed in the back stage by servers. They are the backbone of any web-based application, and they are built to do most of the heavy computing tasks that allows these applications stay dynamic and responsive. With the advent of Node.js, server-side development has become more advanced and approachable thanks to the scalability and modular design of the language. In this course we will learn how to use this advanced language to create a variety of creative server applications, such as a live chat system, GPS tracking, serving web content, and more.
98-295 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Lock Picking and Physical Security
Intermittent: 3 units
The purpose of this class is to both study the wide array of techniques used in modern-day security and to gain real skills in lock picking and bypass techniques. We will study the design of pin tumbler padlocks and deadbolts, which comprise the majority of locks one will encounter. Students will learn how to use single-pin-picking techniques to pick such locks. We will also look at bypass techniques such as unshielded padlock entry, bump keys, and padlock shimming. With this knowledge, students will be able to access the security of their belongings and, of course, will never get locked out of their homes again. There is a fee of $20 per student to cover the cost of basic tools and practice locks.
98-296 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): The Doctor WhoCo
Intermittent: 3 units
The BBC TV show Doctor Who originally aired from 1963 to 1989 before being resurrected in 2005 to become the popular franchise we know and love. The show has endured through many changes in format, leadership, and cast. This course is a place for anyone who wants to learn about the rich history of the show and discuss its eras, monsters, heroes, technology, and fandom. No prior knowledge of Doctor Who is required - all are welcome!
98-297 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Leadership Theory and Practice
Intermittent: 3 units
This course examines the theoretical nature of leadership and focuses on the applications of the leadership theory in economical, global, social, and political contexts. Students will be introduced to the history of leadership and leadership theory, from the "Great Man" theory of born natural leaders to the Contingency Theory of adapting one's leadership styles based on certain situations. By learning these theories and concepts, students will also examine their own leadership styles and develop strategies to become more influential and successful leaders in their organizations or professional workplaces. Emphasis will be placed on specific leadership topics such as team leadership, strategic leadership, developing others, change management, and systems thinking.
98-298 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Introduction to Competitive Table Tennis
Intermittent: 3 units
The ping-pong stu-co is designed to teach the basics of the game of ping-pong and improve the performance of current players. Students will start by learning the fundamentals of the sport, including but not limited to: competition level game rules, player style, and racquet personalization. The majority of the course will then be used to teach spin technique, placement strategy, and consistency. Both single-player and double-player modes will be taught. Instruction includes one on one with experienced teachers and a CMU hosted ping pong tournament! Prior experience can range from none to intermediate skill level. Due to the space restrictions of this course and the material taught, noticeably advanced players are subject for removal. This course will require a $20 materials fee to cover the expenses of personal paddles, balls, and other necessary materials.
98-300 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Elementary Cantonese
Intermittent: 3 units
Cantonese is the language spoken by people in Guangzhou, Hong Kong, Macau, and virtually all overseas Chinatowns. There are more than 100 million people speaking Cantonese worldwide, and more than one million are living in the US and Canada. Being able to communicate in Cantonese will allow students to fully immerse in southern Chinese culture when they visit Hong Kong or Guangzhou, and to further appreciate classical Chinese. </br> </br> In this class, students would be able to learn Cantonese vocabulary and expressions through music, movies and class activities. There will be rich opportunities for student to practice Cantonese conversations. Students will learn to talk about day-to-day situations in basic Cantonese and gain more understanding about Cantonese culture. No knowledge of Cantonese is required but understanding Chinese characters is preferred and will be greatly helpful.
98-301 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Beyonce: Pop Royalty and Beyond
Intermittent: 3 units
This course will be an extensive analysis of one of the biggest celebrities, Beyoncé, and what she means to today's society. We will discuss what role her music plays in the current landscape of pop culture and also what her power means. We will explore and critique what we appreciate about her and why she resonates with us to get a deeper perspective of her celebrity and influence.
98-302 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Fundamentals of Manhood
Intermittent: 3 units
This course will provide an overview of manhood. It will provide the fundamentals that are necessary to thrive as a rugged man in todays world. It will introduce modules of manhood such as basic auto maintenance, key cooking and BEVERAGE skills, outdoorsy concepts, and much much more! (Note: This course is open to men and women however some modules such as shaving techniques are geared specifically toward men. Women are still encouraged to join though!)
98-303 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Introduction to Freestyle Rap
Intermittent: 3 units
Are you a fan of hip-hop who wants to learn how to create your own rhymes? Are you a quick-minded individual who enjoys a mental challenge? Have you ever heard a track and thought damn, I just wanna drop some hot sh*t all over that beat? Then this is the class for you. Freestyle rap is a difficult but rewarding mental exercise that, when mastered, is guaranteed to sound dope as hell. This class will start from the basics and work up to more and more complicated techniques. We promise that anyone who completes this class will be able to spit Sway-in-the-Morning-level bars, anytime, anywhere. All skill levels are welcome!
98-304 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Game Theory Across Disciplines
Intermittent: 3 units
Game Theory is the mathematical study of strategic decision-making, and it has been found to be a toolbox for studying topics across a wide variety of disciplines. This course is intended to introduce models and applications of Game Theory within a diverse set of fields, including (but not limited to) Psychology, Operations Research, Physics, Machine Learning, and International Relations. This course will analyze results in Game Theory that broke ground in the 20th century and will study new frontiers of Game Theory within the 21st century. Topics discussed in the course will include (but are not limited to) K-Level Learning, Matching Problems, The Principal-Agent Model, Evolutionary Game Theory, Quantum Games, Multi-Agent Reinforcement Learning, and Global Games. No previous experience with Game Theory is required, as we will introduce rational Game Theory within the first few weeks of the course. While no previous background in mathematics is required, some familiarity with calculus is preferred.
98-305 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Latin
Intermittent: 3 units
Some (or many) might call it a dead language, but make no mistake: Latin is one of the most important languages in human history. Used by the Romans, the Byzantines, and all Mediterranean cultures, Latin is the essence of all Romance languages and western civilization. In this class, we will be examining the fundamentals of Latin, including the declensions of nouns, the conjugations and tenses of verbs, the types of participles, and the use of conjunctions. Furthermore, we will cover Roman mythology and history and delve into some of Latin's greatest writers, including Catullus, Pliny, and Virgil. This class is meant for students of all types, whether you're new to the language and curious about learning it or studied it in highschool and would like to further your education.
98-306 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Crafting a Community Impact
Intermittent: 3 units
This course aims to provide hands-on exploration, analysis, and exposure to self-initiated community contributions, as well as to provide structural support for those interested in contributing back to the Carnegie Mellon community (and beyond). The course emphasizes on exploration and analysis diverse methods of community contributions, comprehension about how huge ideas can be tackled by dividing into solvable chunks, as well as exposure to planning and implementing a community impact. By the end of the course, you will have analyzed, planned, organized, and implemented your contribution. Are you very much excited to contribute back to the Carnegie Mellon community with your super-awesome innovative ideas, but dont know where and how to start? If so, this is the perfect course for you to get you up and running.
98-307 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Time For Ponies! Intro to My Little Pony
Intermittent: 3 units
The show that has taken the world by storm! Find out why so many adults and even adult men watch "Friendship is Magic". This course will focus primarily on the TV show itself and will let students draw their own conclusions on whether or not its popularity is warranted. However, a few meetings will be devoted to the huge fandom My Little Pony has spawned, as well as how Hasbro interacts with its fans. We will watch, discuss, and analyze episodes, as well as bring in outside articles, YouTube videos, and interviews in an effort to understand My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic. No prior knowledge of My Little Pony is required or assumed.
98-308 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Vehicles of Armored Warfare
Intermittent: 3 units
Just as how battleships were seen as a countrys pride and show of apical military and manufacturing capabilities, tanks were in a sense, too. The course name is a bit of a misnomer because the term vehicle implies a multitude of self-propelled machines. To keep interests focused and manageable, this course deals with tanks. Yes. You heard me. TANKS! My objective is to teach as much as I know about tanks to an interested audience. As we progress, we will learn about the history, particular battles, and specific design details that made these steel monstrosities both loved and feared since the beginning of modern warfare.
98-309 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Startups in the Cultural & Global Context
Intermittent: 3 units
The goal of this course is to expose students to startup opportunities around the world, and give them the starting tools to be able to assess the different startup business models and concepts, as well as letting students gain an understanding of the nations culture. The course will aim to foster an understanding in students as to how to evaluate and develop startup opportunities in different nations around the world, specifically in, India, China, Germany and the United States. These four nations were chosen particularly because their startups ecosystems are diverse. Each country has their own set of issues to resolve, and they are also focusing on different aspects of entrepreneurship for different reasons and economic incentives. By looking at these different nations students will not only be challenged but will also grow their understanding of how startups function in a global context.
98-310 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Advanced Cantonese
Intermittent: 3 units
Cantonese is the language spoken by people in Guangzhou, Hong Kong, Macau, and virtually all overseas Chinatowns. There are more than 100 million people speaking Cantonese worldwide, and more than one million are living in the US and Canada. Being able to communicate in Cantonese will allow students to fully immerse in southern Chinese culture when they visit Hong Kong or Guangzhou, and to further appreciate classical Chinese.
98-311 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Female Empowerment
Intermittent: 3 units
This course will engage with both historical and contemporary readings, as well as draw from anecdotal experiences and observations to understand how female empowerment has been viewed and obtained throughout history and today. We will consider the ways in which female empowerment has interacted with feminist theories of gender, and other demographics. In this course we will focus around how society defines female empowerment, and reshaping and transforming the ideas of female empowerment locally, nationally, and globally.
98-312 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Futurology
Intermittent: 3 units
What will the world look like 100 years from now? Technological breakthroughs happen every day, but where are they taking us as a society? Is that a place we want to go? Well attempt to answer these questions by looking at the past, present, and future of fields such as virtual reality, transportation, biotechnology, renewable energy, space exploration, politics, artificial intelligence, and more. Science fiction and futurology go hand in hand, so well also be looking at media such as Star Trek, Black Mirror, and 1984 to discuss what utopian and dystopian predictions could really come true (or already have).
98-313 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Dungeons & Dragons 101
Intermittent: 3 units
Dungeons & Dragons, or D&D for short, is a fantasy tabletop role playing game traditionally set in a medieval world where a group of players each playing as a hero must conquer some sort of objective or quest which is overseen by a player called the Dungeon Master. Dungeons & Dragons 101 is a course designed to teach students both how to play as characters in D&D and how to run their own games as Dungeon Masters. The course will be taught in the fourth edition of D&D, and students will learn skills that will help them start and continue interesting campaigns with their friends. Students will make their own characters, play as those characters in adventurers with their peers, and will eventually design their own encounters and run their own games as Dungeon Masters. While we would recommend students purchasing the 4e Rulebooks for this class, all relevant references can be made using the D&D wiki which we will provide a link to in the course. NOTICE: Students will be charged $3 for a set of dice, unless students have their own dice sets. The students keep the dice sets after the course.
98-314 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Introduction to Bollywood
Intermittent: 3 units
The Hindi-language movie industry, also known as Bollywood, is one of the largest and most influential film industries in the world with a global audience. The goal of this course is to provide students with a basic knowledge of modern popular Hindi films and their cultural and historical significance. We will examine the intersection of contemporary Indian culture and film through genres typically different than those found in Hollywood, such as the masala film. To supplement course discussions, we will watch successful Hindi films from the last 30 years. Each class will consist of a short discussion/lecture followed by the viewing of a movie.
98-315 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): Masculinity in the Wild
Intermittent: 3 units
Navigating the world today as a man seems to be more difficult than it used to. Should men cry? Should they be tough and strong? Does a man need to always hold the door open for a woman? Theres a lot to talk about when it comes to being a man in America in 2017, and this course is the place to do it. Although this course is about masculinity, it is open to people of all genders. We will answer various questions about manhood from what is masculinity to where do masculinity and feminism intersect and how does my manhood intersect with other parts of my identity? There is no expectation for students to have any prior knowledge or background about masculinity. This course will prove to you that being a man is about more than knowing how to change a tire.
98-316 Student Taught Courses (StuCo): What's Up Doc? Mel Blanc & the Looney Toons Gang
Intermittent: 3 units
"What's Up, Doc?" will be an exploration of Mel Blanc and his voice characterizations throughout his career. Known as "The Man of a Thousand Voices," Mel Blanc is considered a master of creating cartoon voices such as Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and Porky Pig. This StuCo will also examine the current voice characterization of The Looney Tunes characters in recent adaptations of The Looney Tunes.