Josh Centor, Director of Athletics
Office: 204 Skibo Gymnasium

Intercollegiate Athletics

Carnegie Mellon emphasizes excellence in its intercollegiate athletic programs as well as in its classrooms. The University strongly believes that academic and athletic excellence can successfully coexist.  It also believes that intercollegiate athletics are important in student life and can become a key part of the educational experience.  Professional and social endeavors after graduation also benefit from university experiences as a student-athlete.

Carnegie Mellon sports teams have competed intercollegiately since the early 1900s.  In the past 15 years, the program has experienced extensive success.  The Tartans have won 81 conference championships and competed in over 108 national championships since 1976.  This success has been achieved while meeting all of the academic requirements of demanding programs and without athletic scholarships.

In 1986, Carnegie Mellon became a charter member of the University Athletic Association (UAA), a nine-team league of similar institutions with regard to academic and athletic programs.  The UAA, a national association which geographically reaches as far north as Massachusetts, as far south as Atlanta and as far west as St. Louis and Chicago, sponsors intercollegiate competition in 24 sports including 12 for men and 12 for women.  UAA members include Brandeis University, Case Western Reserve University, Carnegie Mellon University, Emory University, New York University, the University of Chicago, the University of Rochester and Washington University in St. Louis.

Carnegie Mellon, like the other seven UAA members, is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Its intercollegiate teams compete on the Division III level, which prohibits athletic scholarships and operates under the true meaning of amateurism.  Student-athletes who play at the varsity level are students first and athletes second.  All students, both athletes and non-athletes, are treated equally with regard to admission and financial aid policies.  Carnegie Mellon fully supports a policy of equity in resources and opportunities for women and men.

The university fields competitive teams in 17 sports.  The Tartans compete in football, men’s and women’s soccer, men’s and women’s cross-country, men’s and women’s tennis, women’s volleyball, men’s and women’s basketball, men’s and women’s swimming, men’s and women’s indoor and outdoor track and field, and golf.

Carnegie Mellon’s intercollegiate program has consistently produced winners.  The Tartans’ football team has won 15 conference championships, has a string of 33 consecutive winning seasons, and has appeared in the NCAA Division III Championship playoffs six times.  In 1979, Carnegie Mellon was awarded the Lambert Trophy as the best small college team in the northeast.  The men’s cross country won the conference championship in 2005 going on and placing 8th at nationals that same season.  The team also has had a 12th and 9th place finish at nationals.  The women’s cross country won the 1998 conference and went on to place 4th nationally.

A freshman computer science major on the men’s tennis team won the NCAA National singles title in 2000 and Carnegie Mellon’s top doubles team also was selected to play in the nationals.  The men’s program garnered their highest team ranking ever in 2006 at 11th nationally.  The women’s tennis team has recently produced national ranked players in the NCAA competition and in 2005 had a sophomore claim the ITA National Small College Championship while earning the James O’ Hara Sargent Sportsmanship Award.  Both men’s and women’s swimming and track and field teams annually qualify a number of athletes for the national championships.  Swimming recently has produced a national champion and the men’s track and field team has won back-to-back conference championships. 

To provide excellence in the athletic program, the department employs full-time coaches in all varsity sports.  Intercollegiate competition begins with the first football and soccer games in early September and ends with the UAA track and field, golf and tennis championships in late April.  Students with athletic skills in any of the above mentioned sports are welcome to become members of the team.  Participation is open to all students.  Inquiries may be directed to the appropriate coach at the:

Department of Athletics, Skibo Gymnasium
Carnegie Mellon University
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 268-8551



In addition to providing for its more formal programs and teams, Carnegie Mellon’s athletic facilities are available for use by individual students on an extensive seven-day per week schedule.

The Cohon University Center has facilities for swimming, basketball, volleyball, badminton, cardio and strength equipment, squash, racquetball. Skibo Gymanisum is an area for recreation basketball and badminton. Gesling Stadium provides soccer, football and track facilities. Tennis courts, located between the University Center and Margaret Morrison, are lighted for night play.  During the school year they are open for use by students, faculty and staff.

These facilities are available to any student, faculty or staff person with a valid Carnegie Mellon ID. For hours, please contact the Athletic Office at (412) 268-1236, or visit our website.

Physical Education

The Department of Physical Education provides an elective program with an emphasis on personal fitness and lifetime recreation, thus preparing students for physical activity after the college years.  Most classes are offered on a mini-course system with each class running seven weeks in length.

This program of more than 30 courses is designed for all students, from the beginner to those students who have already developed some skill. Courses include personal fitness, racquetball, tennis, golf, weight training, karate, aerobic fitness, and yoga.  Instruction is also provided in several team sports.  Carnegie Mellon also provides courses for American Red Cross certification in the four levels of swimming (beginners, intermediate, swimmers, and life guarding), and First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). 

Intramural Sports

For those who seek another level of competition or just like to participate and have fun, the Intramural Program provides recreation and relaxation for all students, faculty and staff, regardless of the degree of their natural athletic skills.  The university prides itself on an intramural program which annually involves 6,000 students. Men and women, both graduate and undergraduate, compete in more than 20 different activities.  Major sports include flag football, soccer, volleyball, floor hockey. basketball, and softball.  A few of our popular tournaments are ultimate frisbee, dodgeball, tennis, and badminton.

Through participation in this program, students are able to keep physically fit, put to good use various learned skills, and develop leadership, team play and sportsmanship. Intramural activities, like all sports endeavors, contribute to physical development, good health, and a sound state of mind, while providing keen competition and team spirit. In addition, intramurals possess an inherent flexibility that allows for a limited commitment of time in light of academic priorities. The intramural program permits students from all departments to meet and socialize on an informal basis.

Fitness and Wellness

The university is well aware that fitness is a vital contributor to an individual’s well-being and productivity.  For this reason the department is committed to providing the entire campus community with the opportunity and resources to keep fit for the new century.

The Fitness and Wellness program provides educational services, programs, workshops and seminars. Programs include cardio-respiratory fitness, muscular strength, blood pressure and stress reduction. Workshops include the topics of nutrition, weight control, stress management and lower back care and prevention.  The Group X program provides over 30 exercise classes per week ranging from yoga and pilates to zumba and spinning.

Note on Course Numbers

Each Carnegie Mellon course number begins with a two-digit prefix which designates the department offering the course (76-xxx courses are offered by the Department of English, etc.). Although each department maintains its own course numbering practices, typically the first digit after the prefix indicates the class level: xx-1xx courses are freshmen-level, xx-2xx courses are sophomore level, etc. xx-6xx courses may be either undergraduate senior-level or graduate-level, depending on the department. xx-7xx courses and higher are graduate-level. Please consult the Schedule of Classes each semester for course offerings and for any necessary pre-requisites or co-requisites.

Physical Education Courses

69-005 Rec Sports
Fall and Spring: 3 units
Rec sports is a class that will incorporate sports from our intramural program. The class will focus on a variety sports including: flag football, soccer, basketball, dodgeball, softball and additional recreational games.
69-101 Racquetball
Fall and Spring: 3 units
This course is designed to aid in developing the fundamental skills involved in racquetball. Techniques, rules and strategy are stressed. It is hoped that the student will develop a reasonable level of proficiency to enable participation on a leisure-time basis.

Course Website:
69-102 Weight Training
Fall and Spring: 3 units
This course is designed to provide the opportunity for the inexperienced student to learn the effectiveness of a carefully planned weight-training program as a method of body development and the contributing benefit to performance in many sports.
69-103 Advanced Recovery & Restoration
Spring: 3 units
This course is designed to provide the opportunity for the physically active student to learn the effectiveness of a carefully planned recovery and restoration techniques as a method of body development and the contributing benefit to performance in many sports.
69-104 Practical Application of Sports Nutrition for Competitive Athletes
Spring: 3 units
This course will cover the following topics: macronutrient overview, specific overview of fats, carbohydrates, and protein, vitamin and minerals, nutritional needs for strength/power and endurance athletes, pre/during/post training nutritional needs for strength/power and endurance athletes, and other topics. FOR UNDERGRAD STUDENTS ONLY.
69-105 Agility & Circuit Training
Spring: 3 units
This course is designed to train the entire body combining fitness and core body work. We will do jumping and agility exercises to increase explosiveness and foot speed. Circuit training will be used to strengthen your core, arm, and leg muscles and will provide a cardiovascular workout.
69-106 Intro to Recreation
Fall: 3 units
This is a basic level class for first-year students only. This class is designed to teach students various fitness and recreational activities available to them on campus.
69-107 Walking for Fitness
Fall: 3 units
This course is an aerobic conditioning activity. A fast paced walk that is less wear and tear on your joints than what a running program will do.
69-110 Personal Fitness
Fall and Spring: 3 units
This course will be a conditioning course prescribed partially by the individual with assistance from the instructor to insure that the desired results will be achieved or at least pursued correctly. Individual goals will be the main concern. Stretching, aerobics, weight training and nutrition will be discussed.
69-112 Fitness Fusion
Fall and Spring: 3 units
A fun power-packed workout designed to introduce all aspects of fitness. This class combines simple exercises including cardio endurance with dynamic balance and stabilization. The class will fuse fitness while maximizing the benefits offered by training with concise, innovative, and effective exercises for the whole body. Every few weeks another aerobic activity will be added. We will start slowly so you can experience progressions and advance your training. During the fusion of strength, core, and flexibility, we will use a variety of "toys" to enhance your fun and fitness while fusing the total package of mind, body, and spirit.
69-113 Beginning Karate
Fall and Spring: 3 units
Beginning Karate teaches traditional Tang Soo Do (Korean Karate) by Master C. S. Kim and assistant instructors with specific standards and goals designed to help each student maximize potential as an individual, as well as a martial artist. Students will learn stretching and basic stances as well as blocking, punching, kicking, knee and elbow strikes, and open-handed techniques such as knife-hands. Proper etiquette will also be taught.
69-114 Intermediate Karate
Fall and Spring: 3 units
Intermediate Karate teaches a higher level of the traditional martial arts with specific standards and goals designed to help each student maximize potential as an individual, as well as a martial artist. Through traditional Tang Soo Do (Korean Karate) taught by Master C. S. Kim and assistant instructors, you will find many opportunities to gain specific knowledge which will apply not only in your martial arts training, but also in the improvement of your daily quality of life.
69-120 Topics in Health and Physical Activity
Fall and Spring: 3 units
This is a weekend course which will be held in November. Date will be set soon. (Saturday and Sunday roughly 9:00 am-4:00 pm). This course is designed to expose students to a comprehensive overview of what it means to be healthy, including: stress management strategies, healthy eating habits, importance of sleep, and the benefits of various exercise methods. The course will be presented using both a traditional lecture style, and hands-on practice. A few outside speakers will be brought in to speak in their area of expertise. Students should come prepared to exercise. More information will be sent to students before class begins.
69-129 Rape Agression Defense Systems (RAD)
Fall and Spring: 3 units
Self Defense for Women - is a course specifically designed to increase women's awareness of potential sexual assault and to provide physical techniques to respond to such an act. It is intended for women only because it is believed that the presence of males in class (other than instructors or other authorized persons) can alter the emotional and physical responses of women to class material and thereby hinder their ability to reach course objectives. It is of the utmost importance that women be able to maximize their opportunity to learn in the company of like-minded students. The core of the course is based upon the principles of the Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.)which was conceived and developed by Larry N. Nadeau. His goal in developing R.A.D. is also its motto: "To develop and enhance the options of self-defense, so they may become viable considerations to the woman who is attacked." This course is composed of three sections: risk reduction principles, physical defense techniques, and simulation. Risk reduction principles include a thorough review of personal self-awareness & the environment, whether in the home, neighborhood, or unfamiliar community. Physical defense techniques include the introduction to bodily strikes with hands, kicks with the feet, and defenses against grabs & holds. Simulation is the activity that attempts to incorporate, via physical demonstration, all emotional & physical techniques that have been taught through the acting out of scenarios involving instructors (padded/protected) as attackers, and students (padded/protected) responding to the assault.
69-130 Beginning Tennis
Fall and Spring: 3 units
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the rules of tennis and to develop the skills needed to become proficient for recreational play. During the first half of the course, all tennis strokes will be covered and reviewed in detail. The second half of the course will focus mostly on competitive games and match-play.
69-131 Volleyball
Spring: 3 units
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the rules of volleyball and to develop the skills needed to become proficient for recreational play.
69-132 Advanced Tennis
Fall: 3 units
This course will consist mainly of tennis drills and discussions related to singles, doubles, and match strategy. In addition to being able to successfully execute all tennis strokes, students should also already have significant tennis match experience.
69-134 Beginning Golf
Fall and Spring: 3 units
This course is designed to give the student all the skills necessary to play a satisfactory game of golf. The long game, the short game and putting are covered. It is a leisure time sport that is challenging and can be used by the student for the rest of his/her life.
69-135 Soccer Skills
Spring: 3 units
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the rules of soccer and to develop the skills needed to become proficient for recreational play.
69-136 Basketball Skills
Fall and Spring: 3 units
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the rules of basketball and to develop the skills needed to become proficient for recreational play.
69-137 Ultimate Frisbee
Fall: 3 units
This class is designed to teach basic Frisbee skills. This class is a great conditioning/cardio class with high energy. It is a fun team game to play.
69-139 Indoor Soccer Skills
Spring: 3 units
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the rules of soccer and to develop the skills needed to become proficient for recreational play.
69-140 Squash
Fall and Spring: 3 units
This course is designed to aid in developing the fundamental skills involved in squash. Techniques, rules and strategy are stressed.
69-141 Beginning Soccer
Spring: 3 units
This class is designed for beginner soccer players. This class will teach you soccer skills and techniques to become a better player.
69-142 Beginning Fencing
Spring: 6 units
This course will cover the basic skills needed for fencing with the foil. Footwork, attacks, and defenses will be practiced. Competition rules and strategies will be discussed. Students will fence each other and the instructor in almost every class.
69-143 Floor Hockey/Dodgeball
Spring: 3 units
This class is designed to teach two team sports that are fun and great exercise. Both classes will be taught basic skills to succeed in the games.
69-144 Diamond Sports
Spring: 3 units
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the rules of softball and wiffleball and to develop the skills needed to become proficient for recreational play. Students will play each other or the instructor in almost every class.
69-145 Sports Officiating
Fall and Spring: 3 units
The sports officiating class is an introduction to the rules and mechanics for a variety of Intramural Sports. Students will learn how to properly officiate basketball, flag football, soccer, and softball. Class sessions will be a combination of interactive lectures and hands-on game experience.
69-146 Team Handball
Fall: 3 units
Team Handball or European Handball - This is an introductory level class that will cover the basics of the sport including the rules, organization, and basic game play. Students will be expected to learn the rules and participate in play on a daily basis.
69-150 Beginning Swimming
Fall: 3 units
This basic course is designed to equip the non-swimmer with fundamental skills and knowledge to assure reasonable safety in, on or about the water. Areas covered include the basic swimming strokes, basic diving, safe and efficient entry into the water, and some elementary forms of rescue.
69-151 Introduction to Yoga
Fall and Spring: 3 units
This course is designed for the beginning yoga student who wants to gain a solid foundation of yoga poses and the benefits a yoga practice has to offer. The course is also for those who have experience in Yoga and want to practice and improve their basic skills.
69-153 Lifeguard Training
Spring: 3 units
This class is the American Red Cross Lifeguard Training course. Students who complete certification will be eligible to be employed as lifeguards. Attendance is required. There will be a $90.00 fee for this class from the American Red Cross. This fee will be deducted from the student's account once the status of the student is "enrolled and attending this class."
69-155 Cardio Fitness/Sculpt
Fall and Spring: 3 units
A total body fitness class for men and women that incorporates stretching for flexibility, exercises for strength and movement to increase cardiovascular improvement.
69-156 First Aid/CPR
Spring: 3 units
A basic course in treatment and care of injuries in emergency situations. Topics will include legal liability, prevention of injuries, nutrition and cardiovascular conditioning. The course will conclude with theoretical and practical application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Upon completion of the course students will receive Red Cross Certification. There will be a fee for this class of $15.00. This fee will be deducted from the student's account.
69-157 Swimming Stroke Improvement
Fall: 3 units
This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to learn the elements of good swimming. A wide range of strokes, basic diving, safety, endurance, and versatility in the water will be covered for all students. Experienced swimmers will have the opportunity to perfect their strokes.
69-160 Swim-Fit
Fall and Spring: 3 units
Must be able to complete a 1000 yard swim (40 laps) prior to entering the class ; this is not a learn-to-swim class. Pre and post timed swims, deep water treading, lap swimming interval training. Average workout is around 2000 yards.
69-165 Cycling Core
Fall and Spring: 3 units
Indoor cycling classes are riding on a stationary bike while getting a great workout, experiencing several styles of training, and listening to music. All are welcome—beginner to advanced—you set the workout pace to various intensities. This course is for those participants who want to gain knowledge and experience of riding for endurance, speed work, race training, strength training, and/or visionary riding. Each class will be formatted to take the rider to their levels of advancement—beginner to advanced—all doing the same workout. Bikes are provided. No prior bike experience is necessary. No special footwear required—bike shoes are welcome—and tennis shoes at least are a must. Come along for the ride of a lifetime while having fun and getting into shape.
69-167 Beginning Ballroom Dance
Spring: 2 units
This class provides an overview of six American Style Ballroom Dances: Foxtrot, Waltz, Tango, Cha Cha, Rumba, Swing. Participants will learn three or four basic step patterns in each dance, the timing of each pattern, leading and following principles and the unique characteristics of each dance. At the end of this course, participants will be able to dance comfortably at a social dance. It is recommended that suede bottomed dance shoes be worn, but not required.
69-175 African-Brazilian Dance
Fall: 2 units
Learn movements and dances from West Africa and Brazil. Students will build strength, alignment, and stamina while experiencing the joy of dancing to the exciting and mesmerizing music of these regions.
69-176 Non-Majors Jazz
Spring: 3 units
This class is designed for those students who would like to continue their study in jazz but are not enrolled in the CFA department. They will learn the basics and progression movements in the area of jazz dancing. This is for all levels of participants.
69-195 Emergency Medical Technician
Spring: 6 units
The Emergency Medical Technician course enhances students' prior knowledge of Emergency Medicine, and enables students to take the National Registry EMT Certification exam and become certified at the state level. This course is cross-enrolled through the Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC) and will require registration with CCAC prior to the first day of class. This will require an approximately $250 fee. Due to state laws and classroom hours requirements, all lectures are mandatory. Although listed as a Mini3/Full Semester, this class will begin on Monday, January 12th and have its last meeting on Thursday, March 26th. This class will also meet on Saturday, January 31st and Saturday February 21st from 8:00am-5:00pm. There will be one additional Saturday session for vehicle extraction during the month of March, this date will be announced in class. The following prerequisites are required to enroll in this class: Successful completion of an Emergency Medical Responder course within one year of the beginning of this class; NIMS 100 and 700 level certification (can be taken online); AHA BLS HCP Certification (Can be taken through CMU EMS). Please email with any questions you might have.


SHANNON AGNEW, Assistant Women's Soccer Coach – Bachelor of Arts, University of Tampa; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.

GARY ALDRICH, Associate Head Track & Field Coach/Instructor – M.S., Slippery Rock University,Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.

MICHAEL BELMONTE, Assistant Men/Women Tennis – History, Duquesne; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.

TERRY BODNAR, Assistant Football Coach/Instructor – M.S., Indiana University of PA,Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.

BRANDON BOWMAN, Head Men's Soccer Coach – B.S., Centre College; Carnegie Mellon, 2017–.

JOSH CENTOR, Assistant Director of Athletics – B.A., Brandeis University,Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.

ALAN DEGENNARO, Strength and Conditioning CoachCarnegie Mellon, 2011–.

SARA GAUNTNER, Assistant Director of Athletics for Instructional Programs & Recreation & Aquatics Director/Instructor – M.S., Duquesne University,Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.

ANDREW GIRARD, Head Men's and Women's Tennis Coach/Instructor – B.S., Michigan Tech University,Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.

ALICIA GORMAN, Diving Coach, Director of Acquatics – B.S., University of Tennessee; Carnegie Mellon, 2017–.

ANDREW HELMS, Assistant Football Coach – B.S., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2017–.

JACQUIE HULLAH, Head Women's Basketball CoachCarnegie Mellon, 2011–.

KIM KELLY, Head Women's Volleyball Coach/Instructor – MBA, Mt. St. Mary's University,Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.

MATTHEW KINNEY, Head Swimming and Diving Coach/Instructor – M.S., Western Illinois,Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.

RICHARD LACKNER, Head Football Coach/Instructor – B.A., Carnegie Mellon,Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.

JEFF SIMMONS, Assistant Football Coach/Instructor – B.A., Geneva College; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.

PATTYE STRAGAR, Operations Manager for Fitness and Aquatics/Instructor – B.S., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.

YON STRUBLE, Head Men's Soccer Coach/Instructor – M.S., Georgia State; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.

TONY WINGEN, Head Men's Basketball Coach/Associate Athletic Director/Instructor – M.Ed., Springfield College; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.