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Undergraduate Economics Program

Dennis Epple, Head of Economics
Carol B. Goldburg, Executive Director of Undergraduate Economics
Program Office: Tepper School of Business, Room 139
E-mail: econprog@andrew.cmu.edu
Advising Appointment Online Scheduler: http://tinyurl.com/tepper-econadvising
http://www.tepper.cmu.edu/undergraduate-economics

At its most fundamental level, economics is the study of how scarce resources are allocated. What will be produced and consumed, how much, and by whom? These questions are central to the well-being of people throughout the world. Economists identify, model, and analyze problems with the objective of developing practical and efficient solutions to challenges confronting society. Economists are also active participants in the processes and institutions through which economic policies are implemented. In the public arena sphere, economists contribute to design of programs and incentive systems to foster efficient implementation of policies. In the private sector, economists bring modeling and data-analytic skill to bear, both in identifying ways to enhance productive efficiency within the firm and in developing strategies to enhance effectiveness of the firm as it competes in the global marketplace. Increasingly, economists are taking advantage of advances in technology to design new exchange systems in applications as diverse as global electronic markets, kidney exchanges, pollution control, and school choice mechanisms.

Carnegie Mellon University enjoys a rich history of innovative research in the field of economics. The university has a distinctive culture that fosters collaborative, problem-oriented, theoretically rigorous, and empirically tested research. The success of this distinctive approach is manifest in the international recognition accorded past and present faculty, including nine Nobel Prizes in Economics. In the classroom, faculty bring the same rigorous, innovative approach to help develop the tremendous intellectual potential and analytic skills of students who are drawn to study economics at Carnegie Mellon. Project courses and hands-on applications in classes enable our students to gain valuable practical experience in honing their skills in economic reasoning, modeling, and data analysis.

The Undergraduate Economics Program has a unique position at Carnegie Mellon University. It is the sole undergraduate program that is a joint program of the Tepper School of Business and the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences. The combination of research strength (Tepper has been home to nine Nobel Laureates in Economics) and commitment to liberal arts and interdisciplinary studies (Dietrich has "the most creative general education program of any American university” – New York Times) provides our undergraduates with a world-class economics program.

Economics majors are considered members of both colleges and enjoy the full support and services of both. Undergraduate economics students should consult the program's website and handbook for details about applicable Tepper and Dietrich academic policies and procedures.

Educational Objectives

The Undergraduate Economics Program offers a range of degrees in economics designed to develop strong analytical skills and a solid foundation in the discipline of economics. More specifically, measurable objectives for our economics curriculum are the following:

  • Students should be able to identify, explain, and use economic concepts, theories, models, and data-analytic techniques.
  • Students should acquire and use knowledge of economics, mathematics, statistics, and computing flexibly in a variety of contexts, providing the foundation for success in graduate studies and careers in the public and private sectors. 
  • Students should be able to apply their economic tools to formulate positions on a wide range of social and economic problems and engage effectively in policy debates.
  • Students should use the investigative skills necessary for conducting original economic research and participating effectively in project teams.
  • Students should be able to deliver effective presentations in which they combine visual communication design with oral arguments and/or the written word.

Advising

The Undergraduate Economics Program is committed to providing students with the opportunity to have meaningful and informative discussions about their academic, intellectual, and career interests with a wide range of advisors and mentors.  In college, advising meetings are not the same thing as "being sent to the principal's office" in high school.  Instead, advising meetings are extended discussions which may address both immediate and long-term interests, concerns, and desires/needs.  Students pursuing a degree in economics are assigned an economics advisor who meets with them on a regular basis.  Any CMU undergraduate student interesting in taking an economics courses is invited to meet with an economics advisor.  To facilitate scheduling advising meetings, please use the online appointment scheduler.

The economics curriculum is cumulative; higher-level courses build upon the foundations learned in the core course.  This results in students needing to be aware of course-sequencing and the schedule of classes.  Students are encouraged to meet frequently with their Undergraduate Economics Program academic advisor to ensure that their courses fulfill the requirements towards their degree and are appropriately sequenced. Historically, successful students typically checked-in with their advisor frequently and sought the advice of their academic advisor in selecting courses, pursuing additional degrees, and planning ahead for study abroad. 

First-Year Advising

Most first-year students who major in economics enter the Carnegie Mellon University as Dietrich College students, and are assigned a Dietrich College Academic Advisory Center (AAC) advisor.  Students who are considering majoring in economics are encouraged to contact the Undergraduate Economics Program academic advisors so that they will have access to program resources; program-level advising; and the community of faculty, staff, and students.

First–year students are not expected to know which degree option they wish to pursue. For this reason, the first–year curricula are quite similar for the four primary degrees awarded by the program. As students become involved in their course work, participate in the extra– and co–curricular activities sponsored by the Undergraduate Economics Program, and discussions with faculty and economics advisors, the decision of which degree to pursue becomes evident.

Study Abroad

The Undergraduate Economics Program encourages students to consider enriching their undergraduate experience by studying abroad at some point during their undergraduate tenure. Studying abroad is widely defined as either study, work, internship, volunteer, or research opportunities abroad during your college career. Studying abroad provides students with not only more awareness of cultural literacies, but it further enhances their education by providing them with the opportunity to compare and contrast different economies and regimes. Many students consider their study abroad experience to be a watershed moment in their studies. With a bit of careful planning, study abroad can be worked into most any economics student's 4-year schedule.

Preparation for Professional School Programs

Many economics students will attend professional graduate school programs (e.g., DDS, JD, MBA, MD, MPP, M.Sc. Finance, etc.) immediately after graduation or within the first five years of earning their undergraduate degree.  Students who are considering applying to professional graduate schools are encouraged to meet with an economics advisor early in their career at CMU. The economics advisors can provide structure and information that are invaluable during a student's intellectual and career exploration.  Knowing that the choice of courses, student achievement,  extra- and co-curricular activities, professional school entrance exam test scores (e.g., GMAT, LSAT, MCAT, etc), and faculty recommendations are key determinants of acceptance into these varied programs, the economics advisors will help you plan your time at CMU.

Preparation for Ph.D. Programs in Economics

The Undergraduate Economics Program has been successful in preparing students for admission into the nation's most competitive doctoral programs.  The life of a researcher (whether in academia or in the private research sector) requires a set of skills that undergraduate students will begin to acquire through course work, research, and focused conversations with faculty and advisors.   Doctoral programs in economics are looking for specific analytical skills.  Key determinants of acceptance into these programs are the choice of courses, student achievement, research experience, graduate school entrance exam test scores (specifically the GRE), and faculty recommendations.  Students who are considering pursuing a higher academic degree are encouraged to meet an economics advisor early in their career at CMU.   Interested students are encouraged to look at the B.S. in Economics and Mathematical Sciences curriculum. 


Curricula

In order to accommodate students’ wide variety of goals, four primary degree programs are available: Bachelor of Arts in Economics, Bachelor of Science in Economics, Bachelor of Science in Economics and Mathematical Sciences (jointly administered by the Department of Mathematics and the Undergraduate Economics Program), and Bachelor of Science in Economics and Statistics (jointly administered by the Department of Statistics and the Undergraduate Economics Program).

The four major degree programs have been designed to provide students with a solid understanding of the central theories and analytical tools of the field of economics, while maintaining the flexibility necessary to meet the needs of a diversity of career paths. The four degrees produce strong analytical thinkers who are able to model and analyze complex problems. Graduates of the Undergraduate Economics Program gain employment as economic analysts in both the private and public sectors; pursue advanced professional degrees in business, law, and public policy; as well as enter into Ph.D. programs in economics, statistics, finance, and related fields.

For students who major in other academic fields, additional major programs in Economics and in Economics and Statistics and two minor degree program in Economics and in Innovation, Economics, and Entrepreneurship are available. Information about these degrees can be found following the discussions about the major curricula.
 

Major Degree Requirements and Sample Schedules

In addition to completing a minimum 360 units and fulfilling both the Dietrich General Education requirements and all University requirements, recipients of an undergraduate degree in economics must complete courses in mathematics, probability and statistics, writing, economic theory, and economic analysis, as well as a set of advanced electives and other specialized courses. It is important for students to realize that degree requirements are actually the "minimum" set of degree requirements. In fact, most economics students take more courses in their major than is strictly required.

Following the list of requirements for each degree are sample four-year course schedules for a student pursuing an undergraduate degree in economics.  As there are many different ways of completing the requirements, students are strongly encouraged to meet with an economics advisor to tailor their courses to their own particular needs. Students are responsible for ensuring that they understand all of the program requirements and that they meet the necessary conditions for graduation. When planning course schedules, students must give consideration to all prerequisite and co-requisite requirements.

In addition to meeting university and college graduation requirements, the Undergraduate Economics Program has the additional requirement:  Economics courses counting towards any economics primary degree, additional major, or minor must be completed with a grade of “C” or higher.  All economics and business administration courses counting towards the Innovation, Economics, and Entrepreneurship minor must be completed with a grade of "C" or higher.


B.A. in Economics

The B.A. in Economics provides a strong foundation in economic analysis and quantitative methods.  The curriculum's breadth incorporates the study of political, historical, and social institutions so that students may use the economic toolkit to address the current challenges humanity faces.  Built into the degree is the opportunity to study political, historical, cultural, and social institutions from other CMU departments; these courses are referred to as "Special Electives". The advanced data analysis component of the B.A. in Economics Curriculum pays additional attention to ordinal data and the study of surveys. The capstone of the curriculum is the Senior Project course where students use their qualitative and quantitative skills to contribute to the body of knowledge in empirical, experimental, and/or theoretical studies.  Students pursuing this degree will be well-equipped to pursue graduate work (professional and academic), enter directly into the business world, or pursue public service.

B.A. in Economics Curriculum (Total Number of Units for the Major: 173/182)

Mathematics Prerequisites (19 units)
Courses Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus
Passing the MCS assessment test is an acceptable alternative to completing 21-120.
10
21-256Multivariate Analysis9
Sophomore Economics Colloquium (1 unit)
Units
73-450Economics Colloquium1
Writing Requirement (9 units)
Units
73-270Writing for Economists9
Economic Theory Requirements (27 units)
Units
73-100Principles of Economics9
73-230Intermediate Microeconomics *9
73-240Intermediate Macroeconomics9
*21-256 is currently a corequisite for 73-230. Beginning in Fall 2015, 21-256 will be a prerequisite.
Economic History Requirement (9 Units)
Units
73-310Evolution of Economic Ideas and Analysis9
Quantitative Analysis Requirements (36 Units)
Units
36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice9
or 36-207 Probability and Statistics for Business Applications
or 70-207 Probability and Statistics for Business Applications
36-202Statistical Methods9
or 36-208 Regression Analysis
or 70-208 Regression Analysis
73-407Fundamentals of Statistical Modeling9
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
Advanced Economics Electives (36 Units)

Students must take four advanced elective courses.  Advanced elective courses are those numbered 73-300 through 73-495 (excluding 73-310 Evolution of Economic Ideas and Analysis, 73-363 Econometrics, 73-407 Fundamentals of Statistical Modeling, and 73-450 Economics Colloquium) as well as selected courses designated by the Program offered by other departments/programs.  Additionally, students may work with their advisor to structure alternative sets of courses to meet these requirements based on their particular interests, subject to course availability. 

Special Electives (27 Units)

Students must take three special elective courses in the humanities and social sciences.  The complete list of courses designated as special electives is available to current students at MyTepper.  The  list below is representative of the courses that qualify as "Special Electives"; this is not an exhaustive list of qualifying courses. In particular, the graduate courses from Heinz College which open to B.A. in Economics students are not presented.

Course List
Representative List of "Special Elective" Courses Units
79-221Development and Democracy in Latin America9
79-246Industrial America9
79-300History of American Public Policy9
79-335Drug Use and Drug Policy9
79-375China's Environmental Crisis9
79-386Entrepreneurs in Africa, Past, Present and Future9
80-130Introduction to Ethics9
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-235Political Philosophy9
88-260Organizations9
80-305Rational Choice9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
80-348Health Development and Human Rights9
88-365Behavioral Economics and Public Policy9
88-387Social Norms and Economics9
88-412Energy, Climate Change, and Economic Growth in the 21st Century9
Senior Work (9 Units; 18 Units for students working on an honors thesis in economics)
Units
73-497Senior Project9
or 73-500
  & 73-501
Tepper College Honors Thesis I
   and Tepper College Honors Thesis II
or 66-501
  & 66-502
H&SS Senior Honors Thesis I
   and H&SS Senior Honors Thesis II

 Sample Schedule for B.A. in Economics

The sample schedule below is an illustration of how students might plan their four-year schedules.  This schedule has been designed to highlight the following characteristics of the degree program: 1) the work load is roughly 45-50 units per semester, hence there is no need for course overloading;  and 2) room has been built into the schedule that would allow students to pick up additional degrees and/or study abroad.  It is important for students to realize that degree requirements are the actually the "minimum" set of degree requirements.  In fact, most economics students take more courses in their major than is strictly required.

FreshmanSophomore
FallSpringFallSpring
21-120 Differential and Integral Calculus21-256 Multivariate Analysis73-240 Intermediate Macroeconomics73-270 Writing for Economists
36-201 Statistical Reasoning and Practice36-202 Statistical Methods73-450 Economics Colloquium73-407 Fundamentals of Statistical Modeling
73-100 Principles of Economics73-230 Intermediate Microeconomics"Special Elective"Economics Elective
-----*73-155 Legonomics: Building Blocks of Economic Analysis**----------
--------------------
-----

JuniorSenior
FallSpringFallSpring
73-310 Evolution of Economic Ideas and Analysis36-303 Sampling, Survey and Society73-497 Senior ProjectEconomics Elective
Economics ElectiveEconomics Elective----------
"Special Elective""Special Elective"----------
--------------------
--------------------

*In each semester, ----- represents courses that are not directly required for the major.

** While not required, 73-155 is strongly recommended.


B.S. in Economics 

The B.S. in Economics provides a strong foundation in economic theory and advanced quantitative analysis.  The curriculum focuses on using "real-world" data to forecast behavior and to investigate the relationships between observed phenomenon and economic models.  Combining these sophisticated economic modeling data analytic skills with our wide range of upper-level economic electives provides students with a rigorous analytical foundation that will allow them to pursue any career that interests them.  The capstone of the curriculum is the Senior Project course where students use their qualitative and quantitative skills to contribute to the body of knowledge in empirical, experimental, and/or theoretical studies.  Students completing this degree will be well-equipped to pursue graduate work (professional and academic) or enter directly into the business world or public service.

B.S. in Economics Curriculum (Total Number of Units for the Major: 156/165)

Mathematics Requirement (29 Units)
Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus
Passing the MCS assessment test is an acceptable alternative to completing 21-120.
10
21-256Multivariate Analysis9
or 21-259 Calculus in Three Dimensions
21-122Integration and Approximation *10
or 21-127 Concepts of Mathematics
or 21-257 Models and Methods for Optimization
*Students are encouraged to meet with an economics advisor to determine which course best fits their interests
Sophomore Colloquium (1 Unit)
Units
73-450Economics Colloquium1
Quantitative Analysis Requirements (27 Units)
Units
36-225Introduction to Probability Theory9
or 36-217 Probability Theory and Random Processes
or 21-325 Probability
36-226Introduction to Statistical Inference9
73-363Econometrics9
Writing Requirement (9 Units)
Units
73-270Writing for Economists9
Economic Theory Requirements (27 Units)
Units
73-100Principles of Economics9
73-230Intermediate Microeconomics *9
73-240Intermediate Macroeconomics9
*21-256 is currently a corequisite for 73-230. Beginning in Fall 2015, 21-256 will be a prerequisite.
Advanced Economics Electives (54 Units)

Students must take six advanced elective courses.  Advanced elective courses are those numbered 73-300 through 73-495 (excluding 73-363 Econometrics, 73-407 Fundamentals of Statistical Modeling, and 73-450 Economics Colloquium). For the purpose of these requirements, the Undergraduate Economics Program may also designate as advanced electives courses from other departments/programs.  Additionally, students may work with their advisor to structure alternative sets of courses to meet these requirements based on their particular interests, subject to course availability. 

Senior Work (9 Units; 18 Units for students working on an honors thesis in economics)
Units
73-497Senior Project9
or 73-500
  & 73-501
Tepper College Honors Thesis I
   and Tepper College Honors Thesis II
or 66-501
  & 66-502
H&SS Senior Honors Thesis I
   and H&SS Senior Honors Thesis II

Sample Course Schedule for the B.S. in Economics 

The sample schedule below is an illustration of how students might plan their four-year schedules.  This schedule has been designed to highlight the following characteristics of the degree program: 1) the work load is roughly 45-50 units per semester, hence there is no need for course overloading; and 2) room has been built into the schedule that would allow students to pick up additional degrees and/or study abroad.  It is important for students to realize that degree requirements are the actually the "minimum" set of degree requirements.  In fact, most economics students take more courses in their major than is strictly required.

FreshmanSophomore
FallSpringFallSpring
21-120 Differential and Integral Calculus21-256 Multivariate Analysis36-225 Introduction to Probability Theory36-226 Introduction to Statistical Inference
36-201 Statistical Reasoning and Practice73-230 Intermediate Microeconomics73-240 Intermediate Macroeconomics73-270 Writing for Economists
73-100 Principles of Economics73-155 Legonomics: Building Blocks of Economic Analysis**73-450 Economics ColloquiumEconomics Elective
-----*-----Third Mathematics CourseEconomics Elective
---------------

JuniorSenior
FallSpringFallSpring
73-363 EconometricsEconomics Elective73-497 Senior ProjectEconomics Elective
Economics Elective-----Economics Elective-----
--------------------
--------------------
--------------------

 *In each semester, ----- represents courses not directly required for the major.

**While not required, 73-155 is strongly recommended.


B.S. in Economics and Mathematical Sciences

The B.S. in Economics and Mathematical Sciences is a collaborative effort between the Department of Mathematical Sciences and the Undergraduate Economics Program. Combining advanced mathematics with advanced economic theory is the hallmark of this curriculum. The curriculum provides students with courses that complement and develop depth of understanding of economic theory, applied economics, and applied mathematics. This degree offers an integrated curriculum, guiding students through a program of coursework that exploits and builds upon the synergies between mathematics and economics. This degree program equips students with the mathematical tools that are essential for success in Ph.D. programs in economics; mathematics; and key functional areas of business including finance, accounting, marketing, and information systems. Students pursuing this degree will be well prepared for the beginning of their research careers in academia, government, and industry. There are a limited number of student openings in this program; interested students may apply as early as their sophomore year.  Acceptance is based on academic performance and initiative while at Carnegie Mellon.

B.S. in Economics and Mathematical Sciences Curriculum (Total Number of Units for the Major: 230)

Economic Theory Requirements (27 Units)
Units
73-100Principles of Economics9
73-230Intermediate Microeconomics *9
73-240Intermediate Macroeconomics9
*21-256 is currently a corequisite for 73-230. Beginning in Fall 2015, 21-256 will be a prerequisite.
 Quantitative Analysis Requirements (36 Units)
Units
36-225Introduction to Probability Theory9
or 36-217 Probability Theory and Random Processes
or 21-325 Probability
36-226Introduction to Statistical Inference9
36-401Modern Regression9
73-363Econometrics9
 Mathematical Sciences Requirements (85 Units)
Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus
Passing the MCS assessment test is an acceptable alternative to completing 21-120.
10
21-122Integration and Approximation10
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
21-228Discrete Mathematics9
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
or 21-256 Multivariate Analysis
21-260Differential Equations9
21-355Principles of Real Analysis I9
21-356Principles of Real Analysis II9
 Programming Requirement (10 Units)
Units
15-110Principles of Computing10
 Writing Requirement (9 Units)
Units
73-270Writing for Economists9
Advanced Economic Electives (36 Units)

Students must take four advanced economics elective courses. Advanced Elective courses are those courses numbered 73-300 through 73-495, (excluding 73-363 Econometrics, 73-407 Fundamentals of Statistical Modeling, and 73-450 Economics Colloquium) as well as courses designated by the Undergraduate Economics Program which are offered by other departments/programs.  Students are encouraged to work with their advisors to structure a set of courses which meet these requirements based on their particular interests, subject to course availability.

Recommended Advanced Economics Electives:

73-310Evolution of Economic Ideas and Analysis9
73-315Market Design9
73-338Financial Crises and Risk9
73-347Game Theory for Economists9
Mathematical Science Depth Electives (27 Units)

Students must take three advanced mathematics depth courses. Students are encouraged to work with their advisors to structure a set of courses which meet these requirements based on their particular interests, subject to course availability.

Recommended Mathematical Science Depth Electives: 

21-292Operations Research I9
21-329Set Theory9
21-365Projects in Applied Mathematics9
21-366Topics in Applied Mathematics9
21-371Functions of a Complex Variable9
21-374Field Theory9
21-441Number Theory9
21-484Graph Theory9
21-499Undergraduate Research Topic9

Note: Only one of the following three courses may count towards the required Mathematical Sciences Depth Electives: 21-365, 21-366, or 21-499.

Sample Course Schedule for the B.S. in Economics and Mathematical Sciences

The sample schedule below is an illustration of how students might plan their four-year schedules.  This schedule has been designed to highlight the following characteristics of the degree program: 1) the work load is roughly 45-50 units per semester, hence there is no need for course overloading;  2) room has built into the schedule that would allow students to pick up additional degrees and/or study abroad; and 3) the demands of this degree require students to carefully plan their degree program while keeping in mind the college-level and university-level graduation requirements.  It is important for students to realize that degree requirements are the actually the "minimum" set of degree requirements.  In fact, most economics students take more courses in their major than is strictly required.

FreshmanSophomore
FallSpringFallSpring
21-120 Differential and Integral Calculus15-110 Principles of Computing21-122 Integration and Approximation21-241 Matrices and Linear Transformations
36-201 Statistical Reasoning and Practice21-256 Multivariate Analysis21-127 Concepts of Mathematics36-226 Introduction to Statistical Inference
73-100 Principles of Economics73-230 Intermediate Microeconomics36-225 Introduction to Probability Theory73-270 Writing for Economists
-----*-----73-240 Intermediate MacroeconomicsEconomics Elective
---------------

JuniorSenior
FallSpringFallSpring
21-260 Differential Equations21-355 Principles of Real Analysis I21-228 Discrete Mathematics21-356 Principles of Real Analysis II
73-363 EconometricsEconomics Elective36-401 Modern Regression-----
Economics ElectiveMathematics ElectiveMathematics Elective-----
Economics Elective---------------
Mathematics Elective---------------

*In each semester, ----- represents courses not directly required for the major.  Please note that students pursuing the B.S. in Mathematical Sciences and Economics must fulfill the Mellon College General Education requirements and not the Dietrich College General Education requirements.


B.S. in Economics and Statistics

Academic Advisor: Rebecca Nugent
For questions about Economics courses contact: Carol Goldburg or Kathleen Conway
For questions about Statistics courses contact: Rebecca Nugent or Paige Houser

Office: Baker Hall 132A
Email: acadcoord@stat.cmu.edu

The Major in Economics and Statistics provides an interdisciplinary course of study aimed at students with a strong interest in the empirical analysis of economic data. With joint curriculum from the Department of Statistics and the Undergraduate Economics Program, the major provides students with a solid foundation in the theories and methods of both fields. Students in this major are trained to advance the understanding of economic issues through the analysis, synthesis and reporting of data using the advanced empirical research methods of statistics and econometrics. Graduates are well positioned for admission to competitive graduate programs, including those in statistics, economics and management, as well as for employment in positions requiring strong analytic and conceptual skills - especially those in economics, finance, education, and public policy.

The requirements for the B.S. in Economics and Statistics are the following:

I. PREREQUISITES                                                                                       38-39 UNITS

1. Mathematical Foundations                                                                                                            38-39 units

Calculus

21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10

and one of the following three:

21-122Integration and Approximation10
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
21-257Models and Methods for Optimization9

and one of the following:

21-256Multivariate Analysis9
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9

Note: Passing the MSC 21-120 assessment test is an acceptable alternative to completing 21-120.

Note: Taking both 21-111 and 21-112 is equivalent to 21-120. The Mathematical Foundations total is then 48-49 units. The Economics and Statistics major would then total 201-202 units.

Linear Algebra

One of the following three courses:

21-240Matrix Algebra with Applications10
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
21-242Matrix Theory10

Note: 21-241 and 21-242 are intended only for students with a very strong mathematical background.

2. Economics Foundations                                                                                                                        9 units
73-100Principles of Economics9
3. Statistical Foundations                                                                                                                        18 units
36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice9

and one of the following:

36-202Statistical Methods9
36-208Regression Analysis9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences9
Or extra statistical elective**

*Acceptable equivalents for 36-201 are 36-207 (70-207), 36-220 and 36-247.

**Students who enter the program with 36-225/36-226 should discuss options with their advisors.

II. DISCIPLINARY CORE                                                                                   126 UNITS

1. Economics Core                                                                                                                                     36 units
73-230Intermediate Microeconomics *9
73-240Intermediate Macroeconomics9
73-270Writing for Economists9
73-363Econometrics9

 *Starting Fall 2015 21-256 or 21-259 will be a prerequisite for 73-230.

2. Statistics Core                                                                                                                                        36 units
36-225Introduction to Probability Theory *#9

 and one of the following two courses:

36-226Introduction to Statistical Inference *9
36-326Mathematical Statistics (Honors) *9

and both of the following two courses:

36-401Modern Regression *9
36-402Advanced Methods for Data Analysis9

 *In order to be a major in good standing, a grade of C or better is required in 36-225 (or equivalents), 36-226 or 36-326 and 36-401.  Otherwise you will not be allowed to continue in the major.

#It is possible to substitute 36-217 or 21-325 for 36-225. (36-225 is the standard introduction to probability, 36-217 is tailored for engineers and computer scientists, and 21-325 is a rigorous Probability Theory course offered by the Department of Mathematics.)

3. Computing                                                                                                                                                   9 units
36-350Statistical Computing *9

*A higher level Computer Science course approved by your Academic Advisor may be used as a substitute.

4. Advanced Electives                                                                                                                                45 units

Students must take three advanced Economics elective courses (numbered 73-300 through 73-495, excluding 73-363, 73-407 and 73-450) and two advanced Statistics elective courses (numbered 36-303, 36-315, 36-350 or 36-410 through 36-495).

Total number of units for the major                                                        191-192 units

Total number of units for the degree                                                              360 units

Recommendations for Prospective PhD Students

Students interested in pursuing a PhD in Statistics or Biostatistics (or related programs) after completing their undergraduate degree are strongly recommended to take additional Mathematics courses, perhaps with Mathematical Sciences as the Concentration Area .  They should see a faculty advisor as soon as possible. Students should consider 36-326 Mathematical Statistics (Honors) as an alternative to 36-226. Although 21-240 Matrix Algebra with Applications is recommended for Statistics majors, students considering PhD programs may wish to take 21-241 Matrices and Linear Transformations or 21-242 Matrix Theory instead.  Additional courses should include both 21-127 Concepts of Mathematics and 21-355 Principles of Real Analysis I.

Prospective PhD students should also consider additional courses among 21-228 Discrete Mathematics, 21-260 Differential Equations, 21-341 Linear Algebra, and 21-356 Principles of Real Analysis II.

Sample Program

The following sample program illustrates one way to satisfy the requirements of the Economics and Statistics Major.  Keep in mind that the program is flexible and can support other possible schedules (see footnotes below the schedule).

FreshmanSophomore
FallSpringFallSpring
21-120 Differential and Integral Calculus21-259 Calculus in Three Dimensions21-122 Integration and Approximation21-240 Matrix Algebra with Applications
36-201 Statistical Reasoning and Practice36-202 Statistical Methods36-225 Introduction to Probability Theory36-226 Introduction to Statistical Inference
73-100 Principles of Economics-----73-230 Intermediate Microeconomics73-240 Intermediate Macroeconomics
-----*---------------
--------------------

JuniorSenior
FallSpringFallSpring
36-350 Statistical Computing36-402 Advanced Methods for Data AnalysisStatistics ElectiveEconomics Elective
36-401 Modern Regression73-270 Writing for EconomistsEconomics ElectiveStatistics Elective
73-363 EconometricsEconomics Elective----------
--------------------
--------------------

*In each semester, ----- represents other courses (not related to the major) which are needed in order to complete the 360 units that the degree requires.

Prospective PhD students might add 21-127 fall of sophomore year, replace 21-240 with 21-241, add 21-260 in spring of junior year and 21-355 in fall of senior year.

Students who elect Economics and Statistics as a second major must fulfill all Economic and Statistics degree requirements. Majors in many other programs would naturally complement a Statistics Major, including Business Administration, Social and Decision Sciences, Policy and Management, History and Policy, and Psychology.

With respect to double-counting courses, it is departmental policy that students must have at least six courses (three Economics and three Statistics) that do not count for their primary major. If students do not have at least six, they typically take additional advanced electives.

Students are advised to begin planning their curriculum (with appropriate advisors) as soon as possible. This is particularly true if the other major has a complex set of requirements and prerequisites.


Supplemental Programs

Honors Program in Economics

Outstanding students are eligible for the honors programs in both the Tepper School of Business and the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences.  For more information, consult the Dietrich Honors Program website.

The Tepper Senior Honors Program in Economics provides qualified students with the opportunity to engage in original research during their senior year at Carnegie Mellon. The primary rewards of participating in the Honors Program in Economics are three-fold. First comes the satisfaction of undertaking and completing an original piece of research.  Working independently or with a faculty member to identify a research question and claim ownership of its discovery process is a rewarding experience. Second is the opportunity to challenge oneself intellectually. The third advantage is the opportunity to graduate with Tepper Honors. For many, this process of intellectual inquiry and knowledge creation is the highlight and culmination of their undergraduate academic experience.

Students are invited into the Tepper Senior Honors Program in Economics during their junior year. Invitation is based on academic achievement at Carnegie Mellon University, ability to work independently, and tenacity of spirit.

Accelerated Master’s Degree Programs

Accelerated Master’s Degree programs enable exceptional students to earn both an undergraduate degree and a masters degree by remaining one additional year at Carnegie Mellon.  The Heinz College of Public Policy and Management offers four professional accelerated masters degree programs: a Master of Science in Arts Administration, Master of Science of Health Care and Policy Management, Master of Information Systems Management, and Master of Science in Public Policy and Management. The Tepper School of Business offers one accelerated professional degree, a Master in Business Administration.


Dual Degree in Economics

A student pursuing a primary degree outside of the department may obtain a dual degree by completing all of the requirements for the B.S. in Economics or the B.S. in Economics and Statistics along with the Dietrich College general education requirements.  In addition, the student’s total units completed must be at least 90 units in excess of the requirement for the student’s other degree(s) or at least 450 units, whichever is greater. Interested students should meet with an economics advisor.

Additional Major in Economics Curriculum

All university students are eligible to pursue an additional major in economics in conjunction with a major in any department in the university other than economics.  The requirements for the Additional Major in Economics are the same as those for the B.S. in Economics, except that the Dietrich College General Education requirements are waived.  In order to avoid “double counting” issues, students are encouraged to meet with an economics advisor. When courses are shared across degrees, students pursuing an Additional Major in Economics are asked to take additional advanced economics electives.

Additional Major in Economics and Statistics Curriculum

All university students are eligible to pursue a major in economics and statistics in conjunction with a major in any department in the university other than statistics or economics.The requirements for the Additional Major in Economics in Statistics are the same as those for the B.S. in Economics and Statistics, except that the Dietrich College General Education requirements are waived.  In order to avoid “double counting” issues, students are encouraged to meet with an economics or statistics advisor. When courses are shared across degrees, students pursuing an Additional Major in Economics and Statistics are asked to take additional advanced economics or statistics electives.


Minor in Economics

The Minor in Economics degree program provides students with a solid understanding of economic theory and data analysis.

All university students are eligible to pursue the Minor in Economics in conjunction with a major in any other department in the university. In order to avoid “double counting” issues, students are encouraged to meet with an economics advisor.  When courses are shared across degrees, students pursuing a minor in Economics are asked to take additional advanced economics electives. 

All economics course counting towards the minor must be completed with a grade of "C" or higher. 

Minor in Economics (Total Number of Units for the Minor: 82/91)

Mathematics Requirements (19 Units)
Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-256Multivariate Analysis9
Economic Theory Requirements (18/27 Units)
Units
73-100Principles of Economics9
73-230Intermediate Microeconomics *9
73-240Intermediate Macroeconomics9
*21-256 is currently a corequisite for 73-230. Beginning in Fall 2015, 21-256 will be a prerequisite.

*Some students may choose to focus their minor in microeconomics theory and applications.  These student may elect not to take 73-240 Intermediate Macroeconomics, and instead, replace it with an additional advanced economics elective.

Quantitative Analysis Requirements (18/27 Units)

The quantitative analysis path is often determined by the major requirements.  The sequence is designed to give students an understanding of probability theory, regression analysis, and quantitative economic analysis.  Students are encouraged to talk with an economics advisor to determine which requirements best complement their primary fields of study.

Option One Units
36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice9
36-202Statistical Methods9
or 36-309 Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences
73-407Fundamentals of Statistical Modeling9
Option Two
70/36-207Probability and Statistics for Business Applications9
70/36-208Regression Analysis9
73-407Fundamentals of Statistical Modeling9
Option Three
36-220Engineering Statistics and Quality Control9
73-407Fundamentals of Statistical Modeling9
Option Four
36-217Probability Theory and Random Processes9
or 36-225 Introduction to Probability Theory
36-202Statistical Methods9
or 36-309 Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences
or 36-226 Introduction to Statistical Inference
73-407Fundamentals of Statistical Modeling9
Advanced Economics Electives (18/27 Units)

Students must take two advanced elective courses. Advanced elective courses are those numbered 73-300 through 73-495 (excluding 73-363 Econometrics, 73-407 Fundamentals of Statistical Modeling, and 73-450 Economics Colloquium) as well as courses designated by the program offered by other departments/programs. Additionally, students may work with their economics advisor to structure alternative sets of courses to meet these requirements based on their particular interests, subject to course availability.
 

Minor in Innovation, Economics, and Entrepreneurship

Innovation (both technological and social) and entrepreneurship are the catalytic forces behind modern economic growth.   Today, both developing and developed countries are looking for ways to promote and sustain growth. This minor builds on study of the behavior of individuals and firms to foster an understanding of how organizations manage innovation and learning, how firms and the market respond to technological change, and how entrepreneurs are able to turn ideas into goods and services and new markets.

All university students are eligible to pursue the Minor in Innovation, Economics, and Entrepreneurship in conjunction with any major in the university. The curriculum consists of six courses of which five core courses are required and the sixth course  may be chosen from a list of options from across the University.

In order to avoid “double counting” issues, students are encouraged to meet with an economics advisor.  When courses are shared across degrees, students pursuing a minor in Innovation, Economics, and Entrepreneurship are asked to take additional advanced economics electives. 

All economics and business administration courses counting towards the minor must be completed with a grade of "C" or higher.

Minor in Innovation, Economics, and Entrepreneurship (Total Number of Units for the Minor: 73/85)

Mathematics Requirements (19 Units)
Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-256Multivariate Analysis9
or 21-259 Calculus in Three Dimensions
Required Core (45/54 Units)
Units
70-415Introduction to Entrepreneurship9
70-437Organizational Learning and Strategic Management9
70-438Commercialization and Innovation9
73-365Firms, Market Structures, and Strategy9
73-407Fundamentals of Statistical Modeling9

Note: Students who have completed 73-363 or 36-401 are exempted from 73-407.

Electives* (9 Units)
05-320Social Web12
08-533Privacy, Policy, Law and Technology9
73-315Market Design9
73-465Technology Strategy9
73-474The Economics of Ideas: Growth, Innovation and Intellectual Property9
73/70-449Social, Economic and Information Networks9

*This is not an exhaustive list of qualifying courses. In particular, the graduate courses from Heinz College, Human Computer Interaction, Information Networking Institute, and Institute for Software Research which are open to the Minor in Innovation, Economics, and Entrepreneurship students are not presented.  The complete list of eligible designated as special electives is available to current students at MyTepper.


Academic Standards and Policies

Undergraduate economics students are in the unique position of belonging to two CMU colleges, Marianna Brown Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences and the Tepper School of Business. To find a detailed description of policies governing economics students, please consult the undergraduate section of MyTepper

Faculty

LAURENCE ALES, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.KATHARINE ANDERSON, Assistant Professor of Economics and Entrepreneurship – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.STEPHEN M. CALABRESE, Visiting Associate Professor of Economics, Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.KAREN B. CLAY, Associate Professor of Economics and Public Policy, H. J. Heinz III College – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.ROBERT M. DAMMON, Dean, Education; Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.TIMOTHY P. DERDENGER, Assistant Professor of Economics and Strategy – Ph.D., University of Southern California; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.KENNETH B. DUNN, Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., Purdue University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.DENNIS N. EPPLE, Thomas Lord University Professor of Economics; Head, Economics Programs – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.MARIA MARTA FERREYRA, Associate Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.CHRISTINA FONG, Senior Research Scientist in Social and Decision Sciences, Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences – Ph.D., University of Massachusetts; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.MARTIN GAYNOR, E.J. Barone Professor of Economics and Health Policy, H. J. Heinz III College – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.MARVIN GOODFRIEND, Friends of Allan Meltzer Professorship; Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Brown University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.RICHARD C. GREEN, Senior Associate Dean, Faculty and Research; Richard M. and Margaret S. Cyert Chair; Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.JOACHIM RYOHEI GROEGER, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., London School of Economics; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.ISA E. HAFALIR, Associate Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.BURTON HOLLIFIELD, PNC Professor of Finance; Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.KARAM KANG, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D. , University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.ONUR KESTEN, Associate Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Rochester; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.YAROSLAV KRYUKOV, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.FINN KYDLAND, The Richard P. Simons Distinguished Professorship; University Professor of Economics; Nobel Laureate (2004) – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.REBECCA LESSEM, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.BENNETT T. MCCALLUM, H. J. Heinz Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Rice University; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.ALLAN H. MELTZER, The Allan H. Meltzer University Professor of Political Economy – Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 1957–.ROBERT A. MILLER, Richard M. Cyert and Morris DeGroot Professor of Economics and Statistics – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.CHRISTOPH MUELLER, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.JOHN R. O'BRIEN, Associate Professor of Accounting and Experimental Economics – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.NICOLAS PETROSKY-NADEAU, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Quebec; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.DUANE J. SEPPI, BNY Mellon Professor of Finance; Head, Master of Science in Computational Finance – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.PATRICK W. SILEO, Associate Dean, Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar; Associate Teaching Professor of Economics and Finance, Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.CHRISTOPHER SLEET, Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.FALLAW B. SOWELL, Associate Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Duke University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.CHESTER S. SPATT, Pamela R. and Kenneth B. Dunn Professor of Finance – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.STEPHEN E. SPEAR, Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.CHRISTOPHER I. TELMER, Associate Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., Queen’s University (Canada); Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.SEVIN YELTEKIN, Associate Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.M. BUMIN YENMEZ, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.ARIEL ZETLIN-JONES, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D. , University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.

Visiting Faculty

SERRA BORANBAY-AKAN, Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.BILLIE MORROW DAVIS, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Economics – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.

Adjunct Faculty

CAROL B. GOLDBURG, Executive Director, Undergraduate Economics Program; Adjunct Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.ELIF INCEKARA HAFALIR, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.FREDERICK H. RUETER, Adjunct Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.C. SCOTT WYATT, Adjunct Professor of Business Communications – Ph.D., University of Minnesota, Twin Cities; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.BENJAMIN ZAMZOW, Adjunct Professor – Ph.D., University of Arizona; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.

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Faculty

LAURENCE ALES, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.KATHARINE ANDERSON, Assistant Professor of Economics and Entrepreneurship – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.STEPHEN M. CALABRESE, Visiting Associate Professor of Economics, Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.KAREN B. CLAY, Associate Professor of Economics and Public Policy, H. J. Heinz III College – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.ROBERT M. DAMMON, Dean, Education; Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.TIMOTHY P. DERDENGER, Assistant Professor of Economics and Strategy – Ph.D., University of Southern California; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.KENNETH B. DUNN, Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., Purdue University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.DENNIS N. EPPLE, Thomas Lord University Professor of Economics; Head, Economics Programs – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.MARIA MARTA FERREYRA, Associate Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.CHRISTINA FONG, Senior Research Scientist in Social and Decision Sciences, Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences – Ph.D., University of Massachusetts; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.MARTIN GAYNOR, E.J. Barone Professor of Economics and Health Policy, H. J. Heinz III College – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.MARVIN GOODFRIEND, Friends of Allan Meltzer Professorship; Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Brown University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.RICHARD C. GREEN, Senior Associate Dean, Faculty and Research; Richard M. and Margaret S. Cyert Chair; Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.JOACHIM RYOHEI GROEGER, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., London School of Economics; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.ISA E. HAFALIR, Associate Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.BURTON HOLLIFIELD, PNC Professor of Finance; Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.KARAM KANG, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D. , University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.ONUR KESTEN, Associate Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Rochester; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.YAROSLAV KRYUKOV, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.FINN KYDLAND, The Richard P. Simons Distinguished Professorship; University Professor of Economics; Nobel Laureate (2004) – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.REBECCA LESSEM, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.BENNETT T. MCCALLUM, H. J. Heinz Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Rice University; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.ALLAN H. MELTZER, The Allan H. Meltzer University Professor of Political Economy – Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 1957–.ROBERT A. MILLER, Richard M. Cyert and Morris DeGroot Professor of Economics and Statistics – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.CHRISTOPH MUELLER, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.JOHN R. O'BRIEN, Associate Professor of Accounting and Experimental Economics – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.NICOLAS PETROSKY-NADEAU, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Quebec; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.DUANE J. SEPPI, BNY Mellon Professor of Finance; Head, Master of Science in Computational Finance – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.PATRICK W. SILEO, Associate Dean, Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar; Associate Teaching Professor of Economics and Finance, Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.CHRISTOPHER SLEET, Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.FALLAW B. SOWELL, Associate Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Duke University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.CHESTER S. SPATT, Pamela R. and Kenneth B. Dunn Professor of Finance – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.STEPHEN E. SPEAR, Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.CHRISTOPHER I. TELMER, Associate Professor of Financial Economics – Ph.D., Queen’s University (Canada); Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.SEVIN YELTEKIN, Associate Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.M. BUMIN YENMEZ, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.ARIEL ZETLIN-JONES, Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D. , University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.

Visiting Faculty

SERRA BORANBAY-AKAN, Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.BILLIE MORROW DAVIS, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Economics – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.

Adjunct Faculty

CAROL B. GOLDBURG, Executive Director, Undergraduate Economics Program; Adjunct Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.ELIF INCEKARA HAFALIR, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.FREDERICK H. RUETER, Adjunct Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.C. SCOTT WYATT, Adjunct Professor of Business Communications – Ph.D., University of Minnesota, Twin Cities; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.BENJAMIN ZAMZOW, Adjunct Professor – Ph.D., University of Arizona; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.