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BXA Intercollege Degree Programs

http://www.cmu.edu/interdisciplinary

Mission Statement

The BXA Intercollege Degree Programs are designed for students who want to turn talent and passion into viable professions for the future through a challenging academic regimen. BXA students pursue their goals with the help of multifaceted advising, innovative pedagogical strategies, and a focus on the impact arts have on technology and vice versa.

The goal of the Bachelor of Humanities and Arts (BHA), the Bachelor of Science and Arts (BSA), and the Bachelor of Computer Science and Arts (BCSA) BXA Intercollege Degree Programs is to allow a select group of students who demonstrate interest and accomplishment in the fine arts and the humanities, social sciences or natural sciences, computer science, and emerging media to explore beyond the traditional academic major, or integrate more than one field of study across disciplines. These programs foster the creativity of students who explore innovative approaches to the academic environments of two colleges. By merging the components in the arts and humanities, natural sciences, or computer science into an interdisciplinary/multidisciplinary study, a unique, complex product is born. BXA students produce new information, challenging questions, and innovative theory. BXA students are models of independence, motivation, and well-rounded scholarship as humanists, scientists, and artists at the same time.

In the context of the Carnegie Mellon University environment, the BXA Intercollege Degree Programs hold a special role. BXA provides access to four strong colleges that offer specialized training with expert faculty and researchers. The BXA Programs challenge students to utilize those resources as they explore and develop their own approach to interdisciplinary studies in the fine arts and the humanities and social sciences, the natural and mathematical sciences, or computer science.

BXA students balance courses in their CFA concentration with courses in their academic concentration, as well as BXA-specific courses. These BXA-specific courses give students the opportunity to integrate their areas of concentration by focusing on interdisciplinary approaches and arts-based research techniques. The curricula in the concentration areas provide students with a solid disciplinary foundation upon which they can draw for interdisciplinary projects.

A BXA Intercollege degree prepares students for graduate study and careers in an enormous variety of fields, including traditional graduate training in the arts as well as academic areas, positions in arts and education non-profits such as museums and foundations, and technical positions with media and technology companies.

 

Program Objectives

The skills developed by BXA students span the creative, the technical, the academic, and the practical. The objective of the BXA Intercollege Program is to prepare graduates for careers in which they will draw on their creative and academic skills to create, educate, communicate, and innovate across disciplines.

Students who complete the BXA curriculum will graduate with the following skills:

  • Foundational knowledge and technical expertise in the CFA concentration area and the DC/MCS/SCS concentration area
  • Ability to describe the connections between these concentrations and how the student integrates them
  • Ability to communicate ideas textually, visually, and orally
  • Knowledge of how the concentration disciplines intersect with history, society, and culture from local and global perspectives
  • Ability to use cognitive, behavioral, and ethical dimensions within the concentration disciplines to make decisions on individual and social levels
  • Experience in engaging in art research to produce new knowledge both within the CFA concentration and the DC/MCS/SCS concentration
  • Experience in designing, researching, and completing a large-scale, object-based project that integrates both areas of concentration

Bachelor of Humanities and Arts Degree Program

Carnegie Mellon University offers an intercollege degree that combines the strengths of the College of Fine Arts (CFA) and the College of Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences (DC). The intercollege degree, called the Bachelor of Humanities and Arts (BHA), offers depth of study in both the fine arts and the humanities, social and behavioral sciences. The BHA Degree Program enables a student to receive broader exposure to the humanities and liberal arts than is generally possible through a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in CFA, while obtaining deeper and more substantial training in the fine arts than is generally possible through a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree in DC. Students receive extensive training in one or more of the fine arts disciplines as well as related advanced training in areas such as writing, social sciences, behavioral sciences, or cultural studies. The program also provides enough flexibility to allow students to explore other areas of interest. The most important aspect of the BHA Program is for students to blend their interests, and to explore the connections between their chosen disciplines.

The BHA curriculum is divided into three parts: 1) General Education coursework, 2) CFA concentration coursework, and 3) DC concentration coursework.

Students choose their fine arts concentration from among the five schools in CFA: Architecture, Art, Design, Drama, or Music. A student must meet the entry requirements for the particular CFA school of their choice. While in the BHA Program, a student may change their CFA concentration only if they pass all admission requirements for that particular school.

Students choose their humanities or social/behavioral sciences concentration from the list of majors and minors offered by DC.

The BHA Degree Program is governed by faculty and administrators from both colleges and led by the director of the BXA Intercollege Degree Programs. The director and academic advisor of the BXA Intercollege Degree Programs are the primary advisors and liaisons between CFA and DC. Students receive extensive advising support. Each student has two additional academic advisors: an advisor in the admitting school of CFA for their fine arts concentration, and an advisor in DC for their humanities/social sciences concentration. This network of advisors guides each student through their curriculum. 

 

Masters of Arts Management (MAM) Option

BHA students who have an interest in arts management and wish to go on for an advanced degree may select courses in their sophomore and junior years to prepare them for this area. A student in the junior year may apply to the Accelerated Master's Program with the School of Public Policy & Management at Heinz College. In this program students take both graduate and undergraduate courses in the senior year, earn the BHA degree, and continue on for an additional year to complete the work for the Masters of Arts Management (MAM) degree.

BHA Curriculum

Units
I. BHA General Education111
II. DC Concentration81
III. CFA Concentration108
IV. Free Electives78
Total BHA Degree Requirements378

 

I. BHA General Education (GenEd) 

(14 courses, 111 units minimum)
  • Communicating: Language and Interpretations (3 courses, 27 units minimum, 76-101 required, two approved modern language courses required)
  • Reflecting: Societies and Cultures (1 course, 9 units minimum, 79-104 required)
  • Modeling: Mathematics and Experiments (1 course, 9 units minimum)
  • Deciding: Social Sciences and Values (3 courses, 27 units minimum, 36-201 required)
  • BXA Freshman Interdisciplinary Seminar (1 course, 9 units, 52-190 or 52-399 required)
  • BXA Junior Seminar (1 course, 9 units, 52-410 required)
  • BXA Junior Portfolio Review (complete 1 required review, 0 units, 52-391 required)
  • BXA Capstone Project (2 courses, 18 units, 52-401 & 52-402 required)
  • Computing @ Carnegie Mellon (1 mini-course, 3 units, required in first semester)
Communicating: Language and Interpretations (3 courses, complete 27 units minimum)

Courses in this category give special attention to the study of language as interpretation, expression and argument within and across multiple discourses. Students examine language for its internal logics and structures.

76-101Interpretation and Argument -REQUIRED9
(various topics by section) www.cmu.edu/hss/english/first_year/index.html
82-xxxModern Languages -REQUIRED18
Complete two courses taught in a language offered by the Modern Language Department. A wide selection of courses are offered in Arabic, Chinese Studies, European Studies, French and Francophone Studies, German Studies, Hispanic Studies, Italian, Japanese Studies, Russian Studies, and Spanish. Students must complete two courses in the same language. Languages taught at other institutions are also acceptable (with advisor approval).
Reflecting: Societies and Cultures (1 course, complete 9 units minimum)

This category emphasizes the study of history, society, and culture from local and global perspectives.

79-104Global Histories -REQUIRED9
(various topics by section) http://www.history.cmu.edu/undergraduate/fall.html
Modeling: Mathematics and Experiments (1 course, complete 9 units minimum)

Courses in this category stress the interplay of mathematical (formal) theories and experimental work. Some courses investigate the internal structure of theories, whereas others use them as models for producing real-world knowledge. Such models may be drawn from a variety of disciplines including the natural sciences, but also, for example, psychology and computer science. The interactions between theorizing and experimenting (observing) can be understood within an intellectual framework that invites comparative assessment. Select one course from the following course options:

Mathematics

21-110Problem Solving in Recreational Mathematics9
21-111Calculus I10
21-112Calculus II *10
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation *10
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
21-256Multivariate Analysis *9
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions *9
80-110Nature of Mathematical Reasoning9
80-210Logic and Proofs9
80-211Logic and Mathematical Inquiry9
80-212Arguments and Logical Analysis9

Natural Science

03-121Modern Biology9
03-122Organismic Botany *9
03-125Evolution and History of Life *9
03-203Bench to Bedside: Process of Regenerative Therapeutics6
03-231Biochemistry I *9
03-232Biochemistry I *9
09-101Introduction to Experimental Chemistry3
09-103Atoms, Molecules and Chemical Change9
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
09-106Modern Chemistry II *10
09-217Organic Chemistry I *9
09-218Organic Chemistry II *9
09-221Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis *12
09-222Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis *12
12-201Geology9
33-100Basic Experimental Physics6
33-104Experimental Physics9
33-106Physics I for Engineering Students *12
33-107Physics II for Engineering Students *12
33-111Physics I for Science Students *12
33-112Physics II for Science Students *12
33-114Physics of Musical Sound9
33-115Physics for Future Presidents9
33-124Introduction to Astronomy9
33-131Matter and Interaction I *12
33-132Matter and Interactions II *12
33-211Physics III: Modern Essentials *10
33-213Mini-Course in Special Relativity *4
33-224Stars, Galaxies and the Universe *9
33-355Nanoscience and Nanotechnology *9

Other Courses

02-223How to Analyze Your Own Genome9
05-291HCI for Computer Scientists *12
05-413Human Factors9
06-100Introduction to Chemical Engineering *12
09-109Kitchen Chemistry Sessions3
09-209Kitchen Chemistry Sessions *3
12-100Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering *12
15-110Principles of Computing10
15-121Introduction to Data Structures *10
18-100Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering *12
19-101Introduction to Engineering and Public Policy *12
24-101Fundamentals of Mechanical Engineering *12
27-100Engineering the Materials of the Future *12
33-120Science and Science Fiction9
36-202Statistical Methods *9
42-101Introduction to Biomedical Engineering *12
80-220Philosophy of Science9
80-222Measurement and Methodology9
80-226Revolutions in Science9
80-312Philosophy of Mathematics *9
80-313Philosphical Logic *9
80-322Philosophy of Physics9
80-323Philosophy of Biology9
85-355Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience *9
85-370Perception *9
85-392Human Expertise *9
85-406Autism: Psychological and Neuroscience Perspectives *9
85-412Cognitive Modeling *9
85-414Cognitive Neuropsychology *9
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing *9
85-423Cognitive Development *9
85-429Cognitive Brain Imaging *9
88-360Behavioral Economics *9
88-391Technology and Economic Growth9
99-238Materials, Energy and Environment9

* Indicates co-requisites and/or prerequisites required.

Deciding: Social Sciences and Values (3 courses, complete 27 units minimum)

The theme of this category is the exploration of cognitive, behavioral and ethical dimensions of decision-making on both the individual and social level. Making decisions requires a broad understanding of human rationality and social interaction. Some courses examine the critical collection and analysis of data for achieving such an understanding, whereas others emphasize the historical development of policies and values, which form the matrix for decision-making.

36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice -REQUIRED9
36-207Probability and Statistics for Business Applications *9
36-220Engineering Statistics and Quality Control *9
36-247Statistics for Lab Sciences *9
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society *9
73-100Principles of Economics9
73-230Intermediate Microeconomics *9
79-313Objects of Value9
79-342Introduction to Science and Technology Studies9
80-130Introduction to Ethics9
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-208Critical Thinking9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-230Ethical Theory9
80-235Political Philosophy9
80-241Ethical Judgments in Professional Life9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-247Ethics and Global Economics9
80-270Philosophy of Mind9
80-271Philosophy and Psychology9
80-305Rational Choice9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy *9
80-324Philosophy Economics9
80-335Deliberative Democracy: Theory and Practice9
80-337Philosophy Politics & Economics9
80-341Computers, Society and Ethics9
80-348Health Development and Human Rights9
80-405Game Theory9
80-430Ethics and Medical Research9
80-447Global Justice9
85-102Introduction to Psychology9
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
85-213Human Information Processing and Artifical Intelligence *9
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-221Principles of Child Development9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-251Personality9
85-261Abnormal Psychology9
85-395Applications of Cognitive Science9
88-104Decision Processes in American Political Institutions9
88-120Reason, Passion and Cognition9
88-363Behavioral Economics Theory *9
88-365Behavioral Economics and Public Policy *9
88-388Psychological Models of Decision Making *9

* Indicates co-requisites and/or prerequisites required.

BXA Freshman Interdisciplinary Seminar (1 course, 9 units)

The BXA Freshman Research Seminar introduces first-year students to the field of interdisciplinary work and arts-based research. Students engage with theoretical and practical readings from across the various concentrations, with particular emphasis on aesthetic theory. Guest lectures complement the weekly readings by giving insight into practical implementations of these ideas. Students will conceive, research, and create a final project to be presented at the end of the semester. BXA internal transfer students should register for 52-399 BXA Interdisciplinary Seminar to fulfill the interdisciplinary requirement.

52-190BXA Freshman Interdisciplinary Seminar -REQUIRED9
or 52-399 BXA Interdisciplinary Seminar
BXA Junior Seminar: Music from an Ancient Land, Traditional, Folk, and Contemporary Music of Iran (1 course, 9 units)

The Iranian civilization is one of the oldest continuing civilizations in the world. Music has played an important role in the continuation and preservation of this ancient culture. In this course, the traditional, folk, and contemporary music of Iran will be studied and discussed. The focal point of the course will be the Persian modal system, the Dástgâh. Starting with a historical survey of the ancient and medieval Persian music. different aspects of the Dástgâh system will be demonstrated and discussed. In addition, religious music and folk music of Iran as well as Iranian contemporary music will be discussed during the course. Course topic may vary each semester.

52-410BXA Junior Seminar -REQUIRED9
BXA Junior Portfolio Review (complete 1 required review, 0 units)

To better assess the progress and accomplishments of BXA students as they enter their final year, students submit a portfolio for review during the spring semester junior year. Students should work with their BXA advisor and their concentration faculty advisors to assemble a portfolio that represents their academic and creative accomplishments over the course of their college career. This portfolio should also include a reflective essay in which students evaluate how they integrated their two areas of interest, and how they will extend that integration into the BXA Capstone Project in the senior year.

Students should identify their own specific goals for their academic career and how they are fulfilling them in this reflective essay, as well as how they evaluate their performance in light of the programs' broader pedagogical goals. Students in the BXA program should be working toward being able to:

  • describe the connections between their chosen concentration disciplines and to integrate them into their work
  • communicate ideas in writing, visual expression, and oral expression
  • discuss the intersection of history, society, and culture from local and global perspectives
  • synthesize mathematical theories and experimental work to produce real-world knowledge
  • use cognitive, behavioral, and ethical dimensions to make decisions on individual and social levels
52-391BXA Junior Portfolio Review -Spring -REQUIRED (pass/no pass)0
BXA Capstone Project (2 courses, 18 units)

The BXA Capstone Project gives BXA students the opportunity to demonstrate the extent of their interdisciplinary work over the course of their academic career. The Capstone Project should include elements that span the student’s CFA and DC concentrations (for BHA students), CFA and MCS concentrations (for BSA students), or CFA and SCS concentrations (for BCSA students). The project can be either a scholarly or creative endeavor, and may take one of many possible forms (e.g., a written thesis, a compilation of creative work or works, an experiment and report, a computer program or animation, etc.).

The BXA Capstone sequence covers both semesters of a student’s senior year. In the fall, students are enrolled in 52-401 BXA Capstone Project I I (9 units), which meets weekly to discuss strategies for managing research, planning the project, and larger theoretical issues related to interdisciplinary work. At the end of the fall course, students will have produced a Capstone Project proposal, an annotated bibliography, and multiple versions of their project pitch. In the spring, students enroll in 52-402 BXA Capstone Project II II (9 units), which has no required classroom time. Instead, students spend the semester doing the research and foundational work necessary for the project, as well as meeting with their faculty and BXA advisors as they create their Capstone Project and prepare to present it at the annual Meeting of the Minds Undergraduate Research Symposium held each May.

52-401BXA Capstone Project I -Fall -REQUIRED (course attendance required)9
52-402BXA Capstone Project II -Spring -REQUIRED (DNM, independent study)9
Computing @ Carnegie Mellon (1 mini-course, 3 units)

This is a mini-course, pass/no pass, to be completed in the first semester.

99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon -REQUIRED3
or 99-102 Computing @ Carnegie Mellon
or 99-103 Computing @ Carnegie Mellon

 

II. Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences Concentration

(9 courses, 81 units minimum)

Each student meets individually with a BHA DC Academic Advisor to design an 81 unit DC concentration based on existing DC majors/minors. Please refer to the DC section of this catalog to review the individual majors and minors offered. Curriculum for several BHA DC concentration options are outlined below and others will be made available in the BXA office throughout the academic year.

A completed DC Concentration Sheet must be approved by the concentration faculty advisor and submitted to the BXA office by the end of the student’s sophomore year.

Anthropology (81 units minimum)

The BHA concentration in Anthropology offers students training in a wide range of ethnographic methods along with a highly developed theoretical understanding of culture. Students examine the evolution, depth, and complexities of ethnography, and explore notions of “culture” in diverse settings, over time and across space. In today’s world, students are increasingly aware of the importance of developing a sophisticated approach to culture and its articulation with changes in the domains of the arts, technology, economics, and politics. The BHA concentration in Anthropology provides students with the tools to link artistic practices to various aspects of globalization.

Students in the Anthropology concentration are required to take an introductory course and a
methods/theory course (18 units), two regional courses and two topical courses (36 units), two advanced language courses (18 units), and complete a culminating capstone/independent study (9 units).

Introductory and Methods Courses (2 courses, 18 units)

79-297Dilemmas and Controversies in Anthropology9
79-311Introduction to Anthropology9
79-379Extreme Ethnography9
79-380Ethnographic Methods9

Anthropological Perspectives (4 courses, 36 units)

Students gain knowledge of specialized theoretical and regional topics by choosing four from the following (36 units):

79-220Caribbean: Cultures and Histories9
79-235Caribbean Cultures9
79-261Chinese Culture and Society9
79-262Modern China9
79-278Rights to Representation: Indigenous People and their Media9
79-295Race Relations in the Atlantic World9
79-299Trafficking Persons: Children in a Global Context9
79-313Objects of Value9
79-315Hawai`i: America's Pacific Island State9
79-317Art, Anthropology and Empire9
79-332Medical Anthropology9
79-375China's Environmental Crisis9

Note: Courses that count toward this category may be taken at another university, and the units transferred
to the BHA Concentration under the guidance of the BHA Anthropology faculty advisor.

Language Courses (2 courses, 18 units)

Every student is expected to take two upper level (intermediate or above) language courses (18 units). These courses deepen the immersion in a culture or society that the Anthropology concentration provides a student, and should coordinate with the regional courses selected for the concentration.

Capstone/Independent Study (1 course, 9 units)

Every student is required to do a culminating research project; this may be part of an advanced course (9 units). Students should work with the BHA Anthropology faculty advisor to determine the best method for completing the capstone research project. This project may be complementary to the BHA Capstone Project sequence (52-401 and 52-402) that is completed in the senior year.

Creative Writing (81 units minimum)

In the Creative Writing concentration, BHA students develop their talents in writing fiction, poetry, and other imaginative forms. While studying with faculty members who are practicing poets and prose writers, students read widely in literature, explore the resources of their imaginations, sharpen their critical and verbal skills, and develop a professional attitude toward their writing. The Creative Writing program is based on a conservatory model, made up of faculty and students who have an intense commitment to their work.

Students in the Creative Writing concentration are required to take two of the introductory Survey of Forms courses, ideally in their sophomore year. Choices include Poetry (76-265), Fiction (76-260), Screenwriting (76-269), and Nonfiction (76-261). In order to proceed into the upper level courses in the major (and in each of the genres), students must do well in these introductory courses (receive a grade of A or B). After completing the Survey of Forms courses, students take four workshops in fiction, poetry, screenwriting, or nonfiction. At least two of the workshops must be taken in a single genre. In the writing workshops, students develop their critical and verbal abilities through close writing and analysis of poems, stories, and other literary forms. Their work is critiqued and evaluated by peers and the faculty.

Survey of Forms Courses (2 courses, 18 units)

76-260Survey of Forms: Fiction9
76-261Survey of Forms: Creative Nonfiction9
76-265Survey of Forms: Poetry9
76-269Survey of Forms: Screenwriting9

Note: A student must receive a grade of A or B in the Survey of Forms class in a specific genre in order to be eligible to enroll in a workshop of that genre. A student who receives a grade of C in a Survey of Forms course may enroll in a related workshop only with the permission of the workshop professor. A student who receives a D or R in Survey of Forms may not take a workshop in that genre.

Creative Writing Workshops (4 courses, 36 units)

Complete four Creative Writing workshops, at least two in a single genre. Workshops in all genres may be taken more than once for credit.

76-365Beginning Poetry Workshop9
76-460Beginning Fiction Workshop9
76-462Advanced Fiction Workshop9
76-464Creative Nonfiction Workshop9
76-465Advanced Poetry Workshop9
76-469Advanced Screenwriting Workshop9
76-4xxElective Workshops (various forms)9

English Electives (3 courses, 27 units)

Complete three courses from the English Department’s offerings. Reading in Forms classes are recommended, as is 76-306 Editing and Publishing. Please consult the list of courses published each semester by the Department for current offerings. Students should discuss curriculum choices with the Creative Writing advisor to determine the best electives for their focus in Creative Writing.

Decision Science (81 units minimum)

Decision Science is grounded in theories and methods drawn from psychology, economics, philosophy, statistics, and management science. Courses in the BHA concentration in Decision Science cover the three aspects of decision science: (a) normative analysis, creating formal models of rational choice; (b) descriptive research, studying how cognitive, emotional, social, and institutional factors affect judgment and choice, and (c) prescriptive interventions, seeking to improve judgment and decision making. In addition to gaining a broad education in the principles of judgment and decision making, students with a concentration in Decision Science gain broadly applicable skills in research design and analysis. They also have the chance to think about and discuss decision making in many different areas.

Disciplinary Perspectives (5 courses, 45 units)

85-211Cognitive Psychology9
88-120Reason, Passion and Cognition
(freshman or sophomore year)
9
88-220Policy Analysis I9
88-223Decision Analysis and Decision Support Systems9
88-302Behavioral Decision Making9

Research Methods (2 courses, 18 units)

36-202Statistical Methods9
88-251Empirical Research Methods9

Electives (2 courses, 18 units)

Complete at least 18 units from the following categories of courses. The selected courses may be from one category or from any combination of categories. Note that not all elective courses are offered every year. At least one of these courses (9 units) must be a Department of Social and Decision Sciences course (88-xxx).

Biological and Behavioral Aspects of Decision Making:

85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-352Evolutionary Psychology9
85-355Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience9
85-414Cognitive Neuropsychology9
85-442Health Psychology9
88-360Behavioral Economics9
88-365Behavioral Economics and Public Policy9
88-377Attitudes and Persuasion9
88-386Desires and Decisions9

Managerial and Organizational Aspects of Decision Making:

70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-381Marketing I9
70-460Mathematical Models for Consulting9
70-481Marketing Research9
88-221Policy Analysis II9
88-341Organizational Communication9
88-419Negotiation9
88-444Public Policy and Regulation9
88-451Policy Analysis Senior Project12
or 88-452 Policy Analysis Senior Project

Philosophical and Ethical Perspectives on Decision Making:

19-426Environmental Decision Making9
80-208Critical Thinking9
80-241Ethical Judgments in Professional Life9
80-305Rational Choice9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9

Economic and Statistical Methods for Decision Science:

70-460Mathematical Models for Consulting9
73-347Game Theory for Economists9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-337Philosophy Politics & Economics9
80-405Game Theory *9
88-316Game Theory *9
88-360Behavioral Economics9
88-387Social Norms and Economics9
88-424Decision Theory and Rational Choice9

* 80-405 and 88-316 are different courses and are not cross-listed.

Decision Science and Public Policy:

88-221Policy Analysis II9
88-365Behavioral Economics and Public Policy9
88-405Risk Perception and Communication9
88-408Attitudes the Media and Conflict in International Relations9
88-412Economics of Global Warming9
88-444Public Policy and Regulation9
88-451Policy Analysis Senior Project12
or 88-452 Policy Analysis Senior Project

Research Methods for Decision Science:

36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
70-460Mathematical Models for Consulting9
85-340Research Methods in Social Psychology9
88-252Empirical Research for Social Science and Policy9
88-402Modeling Complex Social Systems9
Ethics, History, and Public Policy (81 units minimum)

The BHA concentration in Ethics, History, and Public Policy (EHPP) provides students with a rigorous, interdisciplinary humanistic and social-scientific education. The concentration in EHPP encourages the development of a broad technical skill set that will benefit students in whatever career they ultimately choose to pursue. Students with a concentration in EHPP learn how to analyze and construct arguments; to evaluate evidentiary statements; to persuade people to agree with their particular claims; to conduct research under time and resource constraints; and to craft policies that address real world problems in a way that is sensitive both to history and competing sets of values. Comprised of courses in the departments of History, Philosophy, Economics, and Decision Science, the BHA concentration in EHPP encourages specialization, internship experiences, and research in a wide range of policy areas.

Economics Requirement (1 course, 9 units)

Choose one of the following:

73-100Principles of Economics9
88-220Policy Analysis I9

History Core (2 courses, 21 units)

79-200Introduction to Historical Research12
79-300History of American Public Policy9

Philosophy Core (3 courses, 27 units)

Choose one course from three of the four categories below. No more than 18 units at the 100-level may be counted toward this requirement.

Ethics (9 units):

80-130Introduction to Ethics9
80-230Ethical Theory9

Political Philosophy (9 units):

80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-235Political Philosophy9

Foundations of Social Science (9 units):

80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
80-337Philosophy Politics & Economics9

Applied Philosophy (9 units):

80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-241Ethical Judgments in Professional Life9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-247Ethics and Global Economics9
80-341Computers, Society and Ethics9
80-344Management, Environment, and Ethics9
80-348Health Development and Human Rights9
80-447Global Justice9

Elective Courses (3 courses, 27 units)

Choose any three courses from any of the following categories:

Engineering and Public Policy:

19-424Energy and the Environment9
19-426Environmental Decision Making9
19-448Science, Technology & Ethics9

Business:

70-311Organizational Behavior9
70-321Negotiation and Conflict Resolution9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-364Business Law9
70-365International Trade and International Law9
70-430International Management9

Economics:

73-148Environmental Economics9
73-310Evolution of Economic Ideas and Analysis9
73-357Regulation: Theory and Policy9
73-358Economics of the Environment and Natural Resources9
73-359Benefit-Cost Analysis9
73-365Firms, Market Structures, and Strategy9
73-372International Money and Finance9
73-375History of Money and Monetary Policy9
73-408Law and Economics9
73-476American Economic History9

English:

76-492Rhetoric of Public Policy9

History:

79-221Development and Democracy in Latin America9
79-231American Foreign Policy: 1945-Present9
79-233The United States and the Middle East since 19459
79-242African American History: Reconstruction to the Present9
79-267The Soviet Union in World War II: Military, Political and Social History9
79-288Bananas, Baseball, and Borders: A History of Latin America - US Relations9
79-303Pittsburgh and the Transformation of Modern Urban America6
79-305Juvenile Delinquency: Images, Realities, Public Policy, 1825-19679
79-306Delinquency, Crime, and Juvenile Justice: 1970's to the Present9
79-320Women, Politics, and Protest9
79-331Body Politics: Women and Health in America9
79-333Biology and Society: Evolution Animal Experimentation and Eugenics9
79-334Law, Ethics, and the Life Sciences9
79-335Drug Use and Drug Policy9
79-338Education and Social Reform9
79-339Juvenile Delinquency and Film (1920-1950)6
79-342Introduction to Science and Technology Studies9
79-359Sustainable Innovations: Ideas, Policies & Technologies to Make a Better Planet9
79-368Poverty, Charity, and Welfare9
79-371African American Urban History9
79-374American Environmental History: Critical Issues9
79-383Epidemic Disease and Public Health9
79-389Stalin and Stalinism9

Philosophy:

80-241Ethical Judgments in Professional Life9
80-256Modern Moral Philosophy9
80-305Rational Choice9
80-341Computers, Society and Ethics9
80-344Management, Environment, and Ethics9
80-405Game Theory9

Social and Decision Sciences:

88-104Decision Processes in American Political Institutions9
88-181Topics in Law: 1st Amendment9
88-223Decision Analysis and Decision Support Systems9
88-343Economics of Technological Change9
88-345Perspectives on Industrial Research and Development9
88-347Complex Technological Systems: Past, Present, and Future9
88-371Entrepreneurship, Regulation and Technological Change9
88-387Social Norms and Economics9
88-423Institutions, Entrepreneurship, and Innovation9
88-444Public Policy and Regulation9

Note: Other elective courses may be approved at the discretion of the EHPP faculty advisor and should be noted on a student's DC Concentration Sheet.

Linguistics (81 units minimum)

The BHA Concentration in Linguistics combines courses from the departments of English, Modern Languages, Philosophy and Psychology and the Language Technologies Institute. Linguistics is the study of human language, and it encompasses a broad spectrum of research questions, approaches and methodologies. Some linguists are concerned with the cognitive aspects of language learning, production and comprehension; some are concerned with language as a social and cultural phenomenon; others engage in the analysis of linguistic form and meaning, some from a functional and others from a formal perspective. There are also computational approaches to linguistics with both applied and theoretical goals.

Introductory Course (1 course, 9 units)

80-180Nature of Language9

Fundamental Skills Courses (2 courses, 18 units)

Take one course each in two of the following three areas:

Sounds:

80-282Phonetics and Phonology9

Structure:

76-389Rhetorical Grammar9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-283Syntax and Discourse9

Meaning:

76-385Introduction to Discourse Analysis9
80-381Meaning in Language9
80-383Language in Use9

Breadth Courses (2 courses, 18 units)

Take one course from each of the following two areas:

Language Learning and Language Cognition:

76-420Process of Reading and Writing9
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-585Topics in Second Language Acquisition9
85-354Infant Language Development9
85-421Language and Thought9

Discourse, Society and Culture:

76-318Communicating in the Global Marketplace9
76-385Introduction to Discourse Analysis9
76-386Language & Culture9
82-273Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture9
82-305French in its Social Contexts9
82-311Arabic Language and Culture I9
82-312Arabic Language and Culture II9
82-333Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture9

Elective Courses (4 courses, 36 units)

Take four additional electives. These can be additional courses from the Fundamental Skills courses or Breadth courses listed above, or any other course which is approved by the Director as a linguistics elective. Listed below are the additional electives taught on a regular basis. Additional appropriate courses are offered irregularly or on a one-off basis. The Director will provide students with a list of possible electives each semester, and will assist students in selecting electives which are consistent with their goals and interests.

11-411Natural Language Processing12
11-716Graduate Seminar on Dialog Processing6
11-721Grammars and Lexicons12
11-722Grammar Formalisms12
11-761Language and Statistics12
11-762Language and Statistics II12
15-492Special Topic: Speech Processing12
76-373Topics in Rhetoric: Argument9
76-378Literacy: Educational Theory and Community Practice9
76-451Topics in Language Study9
76-476Rhetoric of Science9
80-281Language and Thought9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
80-382Linguistics of Germanic Languages9
82-345Introduction to Hispanic Literary and Cultural Studies9
82-373Structure of the Japanese Language9
82-378Japanese Conversation Analysis9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
82-442Analysis of Spoken Spanish9
82-444The Structure of Spanish9
82-476Japanese Discourse Analysis9
82-480Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism9
82-488Lanuage Learing in a Study Abroad Context9

Language Requirement

Students must successfully complete two semesters of consecutive language courses. Students may not test out of this requirement. However, language courses taken at other institutions or as part of a study abroad program will typically substitute for a semester of language study.

Professional Writing (81 units minimum)

Professional Writing combines liberal and professional education with a strong foundation in rhetorical studies. The concentration in Professional Writing has a strong career orientation and is specifically designed to prepare students for successful careers as writers and communications specialists in a range of fields: publishing, government, journalism, the non-profit sector, education, public and media relations, corporate communications, advocacy writing, and the arts. The concentration is designed to develop articulate and reflective communications professionals with both the skills needed to enter and negotiate current work contexts (including writing for the web and other digital media) and the analytic and problem-solving skills needed to understand and keep pace with cultural and technological change.

Foundation Courses (4 courses, 36 units)

76-26xSurvey of Forms (Nonfiction, Fiction, Poetry, or Screenwriting)9
76-271Introduction to Professional and Technical Writing9
76-373Topics in Rhetoric: Argument9
76-390Style9

Rhetoric/Language Studies Course (1 course, 9 units)

Students with a concentration in Professional Writing complete one course from designated Rhetoric courses offered and advertised each semester by the English Department. Rhetoric courses focus on understanding the role of language and language practices in both personal and professional contexts. Courses emphasize the relationships between texts and their contexts and pay particular attention to textual features, meaning, processes of reading and writing, and the ways in which language practices vary over time and across situations and cultures. The courses also equip students with explicit techniques for analyzing, understanding, and exploring language practices. The Rhetoric/Language Studies courses may also be taken as part of the concentration requirements for 3 additional, Advanced Writing/Rhetoric courses and include but are not limited to the following list.

76-318Communicating in the Global Marketplace9
76-319Environmental Rhetoric9
76-355Leadership, Dialogue, and Change9
76-378Literacy: Educational Theory and Community Practice9
76-385Introduction to Discourse Analysis9
76-386Language & Culture9
76-387Narrative & Argument9
76-389Rhetorical Grammar9
76-419Communication Revolutions & Technologies9
76-420Process of Reading and Writing9
76-451Topics in Language Study9
76-457Topics in Rhetoric9
76-476Rhetoric of Science9
76-491Rhetorical Analysis9
76-492Rhetoric of Public Policy9

Advanced Writing/Rhetoric Courses (3 courses, 27 units minimum)

Students with a concentration in Professional Writing complete three Advanced Writing/Rhetoric
courses at the 300- or 400-level. Options for these courses include all of the Rhetoric/Language Studies courses listed above plus the writing-focused courses listed below. Additional courses that fulfill these requirements are advertised on a semester-by-semester basis. For help in choosing which of the possible options are most appropriate for various professional goals – journalism, writing for new media, editing and publishing, public relations/corporate communications, or science and technical writing – consult your English Department advisor and the “Selected Core Courses & Electives for PW Majors” advising sheet available through the English Department. All students with a concentration in PW, regardless of their career focus, are encouraged to take 76-391 Document Design and 76-487 Web Design (in conjunction with the 3-unit 76-488 Web Design Lab) to extend their skills in writing for print to include information design for digital media. Both courses focus on the role of the writer in these specializations and provide lab instruction in the relevant software and related computer skills.

39-605Engineering Design Projects12
76-301InternshipVar.
76-359Planning and Testing Documents9
76-360Literary Journalism Workshop9
76-372Topics in Journalism9
76-375Magazine Writing9
76-389Rhetorical Grammar9
76-391Document Design12
76-395Science Writing9
76-396Non-Profit Advocacy9
76-397Major Works of Modern Fiction9
76-472Advanced Journalism9
76-474Software Documentation9
76-479Marketing, Public Relations, and Corporate Communications9
76-481Writing for Multimedia12
76-487Web Design
(take with 76-488 Web Design Lab, 3 units)
9
76-491Rhetorical Analysis9
76-494Healthcare Communications9

English Elective (1 course, 9 units)

Students with a concentration in Professional Writing complete one additional course from the English Department’s offerings. This course should be one that focuses on the relationships between texts and their cultural and historical contexts. Courses in literature, cultural studies, rhetoric, and media studies that meet this requirement are advertised on a semester-by-semester basis. The English Elective may be any course offered by the Department with the exception of 76-270 Writing for the Professions and 76-272 Language in Design, both of which are designed for non-majors and overlap with 76-271 Introduction to Professional and Technical Writing. Students with a concentration in PW are additionally encouraged to supplement their PW coursework with 76-300 Professional Seminar (3 units) to learn more about internship and career options in professional writing. 76-300 meets once per week and is offered every fall semester.

Psychology (81 units minimum)

Psychology is a science that embraces both biological and social sciences. It is a science concerned with establishing principles and laws regarding the ways in which people think, feel, and behave through the scientific study of human behavior. Students with a concentration in Psychology are expected not only to learn about findings already established by psychologists, but also to become proficient in the investigation and analysis of behavior. This includes observing behavior, formulating hypotheses, designing experiments to test these hypotheses, running experiments, performing statistical analyses, and writing reports.

Breadth Courses (4 courses, 36 units)

To gain familiarity with the breadth of the field of Psychology, students take 85-102 Introduction to Psychology and three survey courses.

Required Intro Course:

85-102Introduction to Psychology9

Survey Courses:

85-211Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-213 Human Information Processing and Artifical Intelligence
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-221Principles of Child Development9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-251Personality9

Research Methods and Statistics (2 courses, 18 units)

Students complete one course in Research Methods (9 units). The corresponding survey course is
prerequisite for this course.

85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
85-320Research Methods in Developmental Psychology9
85-340Research Methods in Social Psychology9

The following Statistics course is a prerequisite or co-requisite for all the Research Methods courses. This Statistics course counts toward the Psychology concentration.

36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences -Fall9

Advanced Courses (3 courses, 27 units)

Complete any three advanced courses or seminars in Psychology numbered higher than 85-341 (excepting 85-480, 85-482, 85-484,85-505, 85-506, 85-507, 85-508).

 

III. College of Fine Arts Concentration

(number of courses vary, 108 units minimum)

BHA students choose one of the following concentrations:

  • Architecture (108 units)
  • Art (108 units)
  • Design (108 units)
  • Drama (108 units)
  • Music (108 units)
Architecture Concentration (108 units minimum)

Architecture Required Courses (52 units minimum)

48-100Architecture Design Studio: Foundation I -Fall10-12
or 48-095 Spatial Concepts for Non-Architects I
48-120Introduction to Digital Media I -Fall6
48-125Introduction to Digital Media II -Spring6
48-1xxAnalog Media I -Fall6
48-1xxAnalog Media II -Spring6
48-240Historical Survey of World Architecture and Urbanism I -Spring9
48-241Survey of Architectual History II -Fall9

Architecture Electives (56 units minimum)
Choose 56 elective Architecture units in consultation with the Architecture advisor.

Art Concentration (108 units minimum)

PORTFOLIO REVIEW REQUIRED FOR ADMISSION

Concept Studios (2 courses, 20 units)
Complete two courses:

60-101Concept Studio I10
60-201Concept Studio II10
60-202Concept Studio III10
60-203Concept Studio: EcoArt10
60-204Concept Studio: Networked Narrative10

Media Studios (3 courses, 30 units)
Complete three courses:

60-1502D Media Studio: Drawing10
60-1602D Media Studio: Imaging10
60-2502D Media Studio: Painting10
60-2512D Media Studio: Print Media10
60-130-60-1303-D Media Studio I-I
(complete two minis, 5 units each)
10
60-131-60-1313D Media Studio II-II
(complete two minis, 5 units each)
10
60-110Electronic Media Studio I10
60-210Electronic Media Studio II10

Advanced Studios (4 courses, 40 units)
Complete four courses. Courses may be offered in the fall and/or spring. Students may take courses in any media area (ETB, SIS, CP or DP3). They may take all courses in one media area if a focus is desired.

60-410 - 60-429 Advanced Electronic and Time-Based Work (ETB)10
60-430 - 60-447 Advanced Sculpture, Installation and Site-Work (SIS)10
60-448 - 60-449 Advanced Contextual Practice (CP)10
60-450 - 60-498 Advanced Drawing, Painting, Print Media and Photography (DP3)10
60-499Studio Independent Study (one only)10

Art History/Theory (2 courses, 18 units)

60-205Modern Visual Culture 1789-19609
60-206Contemporary Visual Culture 1960 - Present9

Review Requirement (complete 2 required reviews, 0 units)
A review is required at the end of the sophomore and senior years. Pass/no pass only.

60-200Sophomore Review -Spring0
60-400Senior Review -Spring0
Design Concentration (108 units minimum)

PORTFOLIO REVIEW REQUIRED FOR ADMISSION

Options available in the following areas, to be selected in the sophomore year:
1) Communication Design, 2) Industrial Design

Required Courses for Both Concentration Options (78 units)

51-101Design Studio I -Fall, Freshman year9
51-102Design Studio II -Spring, Freshman year9
51-103Design Workshop -Fall, Freshman year3
51-104Design Workshop II -Spring, Freshman year3
51-121Design Drawing I -Fall, Freshman year9
51-122Design Drawing II -Spring, Freshman year9
51-132Introduction to Photo Design -Spring, Freshman year4.5
51-134Photo Design II -Spring, Freshman year4.5
51-171Human Experience in Design -Fall, Sophomore year9
51-241How People Work -Fall, Sophomore year9
51-271Design History I -Fall, Sophomore year9

Work with Design Advisor in the Sophomore Year to Form Concentration Option
(30 units minimum):

Communication Design Required Courses (21 units)

51-201CD Studio I: Communicating with Type -Fall9
51-203Communication Design Computer Lab -Fall3
51-229Digital Photographic Imaging -Fall9

Choose 9 additional Design units in consultation with the Design advisor.

Industrial Design Required Courses (18 units)

51-211Generation of Form: Industrial Design I9
51-243Prototyping4.5
51-251Digital Prototyping4.5

Choose 12 additional Design units in consultation with the Design advisor.

Drama Concentration (108 units minimum)

AUDITION/INTERVIEW REQUIRED FOR DIRECTING OR DRAMATURGY CONCENTRATION OPTION. PORTFOLIO REVIEW/INTERVIEW REQUIRED FOR DESIGN OR PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION OPTION.

Options available in the following areas: 1) Design, 2) Directing, 3) Dramaturgy, 4) Production Technology and Management

There is no BHA Acting or Musical Theatre option.

Required Courses for All Concentration Options (20 units)

54-175-54-176Conservatory Hour-Conservatory Hour
(1 unit each)
2
54-177Foundations of Drama I6
or 54-178 Foundations of Drama I
54-281Foundations of Drama II
(prerequisite: 48-177 or 54-178)
6
or 54-282 Foundations of Drama II
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism6

Work with Drama Faculty Advisor to Form Concentration Option (88 units minimum):

Design Required Courses (26 units)

54-151-54-152Stagecraft-Stagecraft
(15 units + 11 units)
26

Choose 62 additional Design units in consultation with the Design faculty advisor.

Directing Required Courses (49-52 units)

54-121-54-122Directing I: Sources-Directing I: Sources18
54-221-54-222Directing II: Fundamentals-Directing II: Fundamentals
(6 or 9 units + 9 units)
15-18
54-159-54-160Production Symposium I-I12
54-517-54-518Director's Colloquium-Director's Colloquium
(four times, 4 units total)
2

Choose 36-39 additional Directing units in consultation with the Directing faculty advisor.

Dramaturgy Required Courses (53 units)

54-109Dramaturgy 1: Approaches to Text9
54-184Dramaturgy 2: History and Practice9
54-160Production Symposium I -Spring6
54-200Dramaturgy Forum
(two times, 2 units total) -Fall
1
54-387Dramaturgy : Production I9
54-xxxDramaturgy 3, 4, 5 or 6 (take two in any order during the sophomore, junior, and senior years)18

Choose 35 additional Dramaturgy units in consultation with the Dramaturgy faculty advisor.

Production Technology and Management Required Courses (26 units)

54-151-54-152Stagecraft-Stagecraft
(15 units + 11 units)
26

Choose 62 additional PTM units in consultation with the PTM faculty advisor.

Music Concentration (108 units minimum)

AUDITION REQUIRED FOR MUSIC PERFORMANCE CONCENTRATION OPTION. PORTFOLIO REVIEW/INTERVIEW REQUIRED FOR MUSIC COMPOSITION, MUSICOLOGY & CULTURAL STUDIES, OR MUSIC TECHNOLOGY CONCENTRATION OPTION.

Options available in the following areas: 1) Music Performance (instrumental, piano, organ, voice), 2) Music Composition 3) Musicology & Cultural Studies, 4) Music Technology

Required Course for All Concentration Options (9 units)

57-152Harmony I9

Music Performance and Music Composition Required Courses (76 units)

57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-181Solfege I3
57-173Survey of Western Music History9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians
(co-requisite: 57-173)
1
57-69xBXA Studio (4 semesters) 36
57-xxxMajor Ensemble (4 semesters) 24

Choose 23 additional Music units in consultation with the Music advisor.

Musicology & Cultural Studies Required Courses (45 units)

57-283Music History I9
57-284Music History II9
57-285Music History III9
57-189Introduction to Repertoire and Listening for Musicians3
57-190Repertoire and Listening for Musicians I
(co-requisite: 57-283)
3
57-289Repertoire and Listening for Musicians II
(co-requisite: 57-284)
3
57-290Repertoire and Listening for Musicians III
(co-requisite: 57-285)
3
57-611Independent Study in History6

Choose 36 units from:

57-209The Beatles9
57-306World Music6
57-377Psychology of Music9
57-412Opera Since Wagner9
57-414Music and Nature9
57-415Globalization of Classical Music USA Turkey, Japan6
57-477Music of the Spirit6
57-478Survey of Historical Recording6
57-480History of Black American Music Seminar6
Graduate Musicology courses may be taken with instructor permission.

Choose 18 additional Music units in consultation with the Music advisor.

Music Technology Required Courses (40 units)

57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
57-181Solfege I3
57-173Survey of Western Music History9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians
(co-requisite: 57-173)
1
57-337Sound Recording6
57-347Electronic and Computer Music6
57-xxxIndependent Study in Music Technology or Sound Recording9

Choose 36 units from:

57-153Harmony II9
57-182Solfege II3
57-283Music History I9
57-284Music History II9
57-285Music History III9
57-190Repertoire and Listening for Musicians I
(co-requisite: 57-283)
3
57-289Repertoire and Listening for Musicians II
(co-requisite: 57-284)
3
57-290Repertoire and Listening for Musicians III
(co-requisite: 57-285)
3
57-338Sound Editing and Mastering6
57-438Multitrack Recording9

Choose 23 additional Music units in consultation with the Music advisor.

 

IV. Free Electives

(approximately 9 courses, 78 units)

Take any Carnegie Mellon course. Many BHA students use their electives to broaden or deepen their concentrations. A maximum of 9 units of physical education and/or military science may be counted toward this requirement. Physical education and military science courses will not be calculated in a student's QPA.

Bachelor of Science and Arts Degree Program

Carnegie Mellon University recognizes that there are students who are naturally gifted in both the fine arts and the natural sciences or mathematics. In order to accommodate students who want to pursue an education simultaneously in these areas, we offer a degree that combines the strengths of the College of Fine Arts (CFA) and the Mellon College of Science (MCS). The intercollege degree, called the Bachelor of Science and Arts (BSA), is a rigorous program that offers a unique group of qualified students the opportunity to develop their talents and interests in an area of the fine arts and an area of the natural sciences or mathematics.

The BSA curriculum is divided into three parts: 1) BSA Core requirements, 2) CFA concentration coursework, and 3) MCS concentration coursework.

Students choose their fine arts concentration from among the five schools in CFA: Architecture, Art, Design, Drama or Music. A student must meet the entry requirements for the particular CFA school of their choice. While in the BSA Program, a student may change their CFA concentration only if they pass all admission requirements for that particular school.

Students choose their science concentration from among the four departments in MCS: Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Mathematical Sciences, or Physics.

The BSA Degree Program is governed by faculty and administrators from both colleges and led by the director of the BXA Intercollege Degree Programs. The director and academic advisor of the BXA Intercollege Degree Programs are the primary advisors and liaisons between CFA and MCS. Students receive extensive advising support. Each student has two additional academic advisors: an advisor in the admitting school of CFA for their fine arts concentration, and an advisor in MCS for their natural sciences/mathematics concentration. This network of advisors guides each student through their curriculum.

BSA Curriculum

Units
I. BSA Core135
II. MCS Concentration120-134
III. CFA Concentration108
IV. Free Electives3-17
Total BSA Degree Requirements380

 

I. BSA Core

(16 courses, 135 units minimum)
  • Writing/Expression (1 course, 9 units, 76-101 required)
  • Cultural Analysis (1 course, 9 units minimum)
  • Economic, Political, & Social Institutions OR Cognition, Choice & Behavior (1 course, 9 units minimum)
  • Two additional courses from one of the following departments: English, History, Modern Languages, Philosophy, or Psychology (2 courses, 18 units minimum)
  • Mathematics (2 courses, 20 units, 21-120 and 21-122 required)        
  • Science (3 courses, 31 units, 03-121, 09-105, and 33-111 required)
  • BXA Freshman Interdisciplinary Seminar (1 course, 9 units, 52-190 or 52-399 required)
  • BXA Junior Seminar (1 course, 9 units, 52-410 required)
  • BXA Junior Portfolio Review (complete 1 required review, 0 units, 52-391 required)
  • BXA Capstone Project (2 courses, 18 units, 52-401 & 52-402 required)
  • Computing @ Carnegie Mellon (1 mini-course, 3 units, required in first semester) 
Writing/Expression (1 course, 9 units)

Broadly considered, language is a tool used to communicate, as well as a way to organize non-visual and non-mathematical thinking. This requirement focuses on the social nature of language and the ways in which writing constitutes thinking.

76-101Interpretation and Argument -REQUIRED9
(various topics by section) www.cmu.edu/hss/english/first_year/index.html
Cultural Analysis (1 course, complete 9 units minimum)

This category explores definitions of culture and the role culture plays in producing different actions and institutions as well as the roles of institutions, systems and human actions in shaping cultural contexts. Listed below are examples of courses that meet the requirement for this category.

57-173Survey of Western Music History9
57-209The Beatles9
70-342Managing Across Cultures *9
76-227Comedy9
76-232African American Literature *9
76-239Introduction to Film Studies *9
76-241Introduction to Gender Studies9
79-104Global Histories9
79-202Flesh and Spirit: Early Modern Europe, 1400-17509
79-20520th Century Europe9
79-207Development of European Culture9
79-221Development and Democracy in Latin America9
79-229Origins of the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1880-19489
79-230Arab-Israeli Conflict and Peace Process since 19489
79-240The Development of American Culture9
79-241African American History: Africa to the Civil War9
79-242African American History: Reconstruction to the Present9
79-255Irish History9
79-261Chinese Culture and Society9
79-265Russian History: From the First to the Last Tsar9
79-266Russian History: From Communism to Capitalism9
79-281Introduction to Religion9
79-307Religion and Politics in the Middle East9
79-310Religions of China9
79-311Introduction to Anthropology9
79-345The Roots of Rock and Roll, 1870-19709
79-350Early Christianity9
79-368Poverty, Charity, and Welfare9
80-100Introduction to Philosophy9
80-250Ancient Philosophy9
80-251Modern Philosophy9
80-253Continental Philosophy9
80-254Analytic Philosophy9
80-255Pragmatism9
80-276Philosophy of Religion9
82-2xxAny 200 level or greater course from Modern Languages

* Indicates co-requisites and/or prerequisites required.

Economic, Political & Social Institutions OR Cognition, Choice, and Behavior (1 course from either category, complete 9 units minimum)

 
Economic, Political & Social Institutions

This category examines the ways in which institutions organize individual preferences and actions into collective outcomes using model-based reasoning.

19-101Introduction to Engineering and Public Policy *12
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society *9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics *9
70-420Entrepreneurship for Scientists9
73-100Principles of Economics9
79-20520th Century Europe9
79-306Delinquency, Crime, and Juvenile Justice: 1970's to the Present9
79-330Medicine and Society9
79-335Drug Use and Drug Policy9
79-341The Cold War in Documents and Film9
79-374American Environmental History: Critical Issues9
79-377Food, Culture, and Power: A History of Eating9
80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-226Revolutions in Science9
80-235Political Philosophy9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-276Philosophy of Religion9
80-341Computers, Society and Ethics9
82-305French in its Social Contexts *9
88-104Decision Processes in American Political Institutions9
88-110Experiments with Economic Principles9
88-205Comparative Politics9
99-238Materials, Energy and Environment9

* Indicates co-requisites and/or prerequisites required.

Cognition, Choice, and Behavior

This category use model-based analysis to broaden an understanding of human thinking, choices, and behavior on an individual basis across a variety of settings.

80-100Introduction to Philosophy9
80-130Introduction to Ethics9
80-150Nature of Reason9
80-180Nature of Language9
80-208Critical Thinking9
80-220Philosophy of Science9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-222Measurement and Methodology9
80-230Ethical Theory9
80-241Ethical Judgments in Professional Life9
80-270Philosophy of Mind9
80-271Philosophy and Psychology9
80-312Philosophy of Mathematics *9
85-102Introduction to Psychology9
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
85-221Principles of Child Development9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-251Personality9
85-261Abnormal Psychology9
85-390Human Memory9
88-120Reason, Passion and Cognition9

* Indicates co-requisites and/or prerequisites required.

Complete TWO additional courses from one of the following departments (2 courses, complete 18 units minimum)
  • English
  • History
  • Modern Languages
  • Philosophy
  • Psychology
Mathematics (2 courses, 20 units)
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation10
Science (3 courses, 31 units)
03-121Modern Biology9
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
33-111Physics I for Science Students12
BXA Freshman Interdisciplinary Seminar (1 course, 9 units)

The BXA Freshman Research Seminar introduces first-year students to the field of interdisciplinary work and arts-based research. Students engage with theoretical and practical readings from across the various concentrations, with particular emphasis on aesthetic theory. Guest lectures complement the weekly readings by giving insight into practical implementations of these ideas. Students will conceive, research, and create a final project to be presented at the end of the semester. BXA internal transfer students should register for 52-399 BXA Interdisciplinary Seminar to fulfill the interdisciplinary requirement.

52-190BXA Freshman Interdisciplinary Seminar -REQUIRED9
or 52-399 BXA Interdisciplinary Seminar
BXA Junior Seminar: Music from an Ancient Land, Traditional, Folk, and Contemporary Music of Iran (1 course, 9 units)

The Iranian civilization is one of the oldest continuing civilizations in the world. Music has played an important role in the continuation and preservation of this ancient culture. In this course, the traditional, folk, and contemporary music of Iran will be studied and discussed. The focal point of the course will be the Persian modal system, the Dástgâh. Starting with a historical survey of the ancient and medieval Persian music. different aspects of the Dástgâh system will be demonstrated and discussed. In addition, religious music and folk music of Iran as well as Iranian contemporary music will be discussed during the course. Course topic may vary each semester.

52-410BXA Junior Seminar -REQUIRED9
BXA Junior Portfolio Review (complete 1 required review, 0 units)

To better assess the progress and accomplishments of BXA students as they enter their final year, students submit a portfolio for review during the spring semester junior year. Students should work with their BXA advisor and their concentration faculty advisors to assemble a portfolio that represents their academic and creative accomplishments over the course of their college career. This portfolio should also include a reflective essay in which students evaluate how they integrated their two areas of interest, and how they will extend that integration into the BXA Capstone Project in the senior year.

Students should identify their own specific goals for their academic career and how they are fulfilling them in this reflective essay, as well as how they evaluate their performance in light of the programs' broader pedagogical goals. Students in the BXA program should be working toward being able to:

  • describe the connections between their chosen concentration disciplines and to integrate them into their work
  • communicate ideas in writing, visual expression, and oral expression
  • discuss the intersection of history, society, and culture from local and global perspectives
  • synthesize mathematical theories and experimental work to produce real-world knowledge
  • use cognitive, behavioral, and ethical dimensions to make decisions on individual and social levels
52-391BXA Junior Portfolio Review -Spring -REQUIRED (pass/no pass)0
BXA Capstone Project (2 courses, 18 units)

The BXA Capstone Project gives BXA students the opportunity to demonstrate the extent of their interdisciplinary work over the course of their academic career. The Capstone Project should include elements that span the student’s CFA and DC concentrations (for BHA students), CFA and MCS concentrations (for BSA students), or CFA and SCS concentrations (for BCSA students). The project can be either a scholarly or creative endeavor, and may take one of many possible forms (e.g., a written thesis, a compilation of creative work or works, an experiment and report, a computer program or animation, etc.).

The BXA Capstone sequence covers both semesters of a student’s senior year. In the fall, students are enrolled in 52-401 BXA Capstone Project I I (9 units), which meets weekly to discuss strategies for managing research, planning the project, and larger theoretical issues related to interdisciplinary work. At the end of the fall course, students will have produced a Capstone Project proposal, an annotated bibliography, and multiple versions of their project pitch. In the spring, students enroll in 52-402 BXA Capstone Project II II (9 units), which has no required classroom time. Instead, students spend the semester doing the research and foundational work necessary for the project, as well as meeting with their faculty and BXA advisors as they create their Capstone Project and prepare to present it at the annual Meeting of the Minds Undergraduate Research Symposium held each May.

52-401BXA Capstone Project I -Fall -REQUIRED (course attendance required)9
52-402BXA Capstone Project II -Spring -REQUIRED (DNM, independent study)9
Computing @ Carnegie Mellon (1 mini-course, 3 units)

This is a mini-course, pass/no pass, to be completed in the first semester.

99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon -REQUIRED3
or 99-102 Computing @ Carnegie Mellon
or 99-103 Computing @ Carnegie Mellon

 

II. MCS Concentration 

(number of courses vary, 120-134 units)

BSA students choose one of the following concentrations:

  • Biological Sciences (120 units)
  • Chemistry (124 units)
  • Mathematical Sciences (122 units)
  • Physics (134 units)
Biological Sciences Concentration (120 units minimum)

Biological Sciences Required Courses (102 units minimum)

03-231Biochemistry I9
or 03-232 Biochemistry I
03-240Cell Biology9
03-330Genetics9
03-124Modern Biology Laboratory9
or 03-343 Experimental Techniques in Molecular Biology
03-201/202Undergraduate Colloquium for Sophomores2
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
09-217Organic Chemistry I9
09-218Organic Chemistry II9
09-221Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis12
09-222Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis12
33-112Physics II for Science Students12

Biological Sciences Electives (2 courses, 18 units)
One course must be an advanced elective selected from 03-3xx or higher, excluding 03-445.

Chemistry Concentration (124 units minimum)

Chemistry Required Courses (106 units)

09-106Modern Chemistry II10
09-219Modern Organic Chemistry10
09-220Modern Organic Chemistry II10
09-214Physical Chemistry9
or 09-344 Physical Chemistry (Quantum): Microscopic Principles of Physical Chemistry
or 09-345 Physical Chemistry (Thermo): Macroscopic Principles of Physical Chemistry
09-348Inorganic Chemistry10
09-221Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis12
09-222Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis12
09-321Laboratory III: Molecular Design and Synthesis12
09-204Professional Communication Skills in Chemistry3
09-201-09-202-09-301Undergraduate Seminar I - Undergraduate Seminar II: Safety and Environmental Issues for Chemists - Undergraduate Seminar III3
09-402Undergraduate Seminar VI3
33-112Physics II for Science Students12

Advanced Chemistry Electives (2 courses, 18 units)
May be any upper level chemistry course, 09-3xx or higher, or Biochemistry I, 03-231 or 03-232, with the exception of 09-435 Independent Study, which can be used only by permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. 

Mathematical Sciences Concentration (122 units minimum)

Mathematical Sciences Required Courses (86 units minimum)
(Reasonable substitutions within the core program will be allowed.)

15-110Principles of Computing10
21-127Concepts of Mathematics
(prerequisite for 15-211)
10
21-228Discrete Mathematics9
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
or 21-341 Linear Algebra
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
21-260Differential Equations9
21-355Principles of Real Analysis I9
21-373Algebraic Structures9
33-112Physics II for Science Students12

Mathematical Sciences Electives (2 courses, 18 units)
Students with a music focus should take 21-372 Partial Differential Equations and Fourier Analysis.

Mathematical Sciences, Statistics, or Computer Science Electives (2 courses, 18 units)
May be computer science course above the 100-level, mathematical science courses beyond the calculus sequence, and statistics courses at the level of 36-225 or higher. 

Physics Concentration (134 units minimum)

Physics Required Courses (116 units)

21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
33-104Experimental Physics9
33-112Physics II for Science Students12
33-201Physics Sophomore Colloquium I -Fall2
33-202Physics Sophomore Colloquium II -Spring2
33-211Physics III: Modern Essentials10
33-228Electronics I10
33-231Physical Analysis10
33-232Mathematical Methods of Physics10
33-234Quantum Physics10
33-301Physics Upperclass Colloquium I -Fall1
33-302Physics Upperclass Colloquium II -Spring1
33-331Physical Mechanics I10
33-338Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism I10
33-340Modern Physics Laboratory10
33-341Thermal Physics I10

Physics Electives (2 courses, 18 units)
Two courses to be pre-approved by the Physics Department.

33-xxxTwo Physics Electives18

NOTE: 33-114 Physics of Musical Sound (9 units) is highly recommended for students with a Music concentration.

 

III. College of Fine Arts Concentration

(number of courses vary, 108 units minimum)

BSA students choose one of the following concentrations:

  • Architecture (108 units)
  • Art (108 units)
  • Design (108 units)
  • Drama (108 units)
  • Music (108 units)
Architecture Concentration (108 units minimum)

Architecture Required Courses (52 units minimum)

48-100Architecture Design Studio: Foundation I -Fall10-12
or 48-095 Spatial Concepts for Non-Architects I
48-120Introduction to Digital Media I -Fall6
48-125Introduction to Digital Media II -Spring6
48-1xxAnalog Media I -Fall6
48-1xxAnalog Media II -Spring6
48-240Historical Survey of World Architecture and Urbanism I -Spring9
48-241Survey of Architectual History II -Fall9

Architecture Electives (56 units minimum)
Choose 56 elective Architecture units in consultation with the Architecture advisor.

Art Concentration (108 units minimum)

PORTFOLIO REVIEW REQUIRED FOR ADMISSION

Concept Studios (2 courses, 20 units)
Complete two courses:

60-101Concept Studio I10
60-201Concept Studio II10
60-202Concept Studio III10
60-203Concept Studio: EcoArt10
60-204Concept Studio: Networked Narrative10

Media Studios (3 courses, 30 units)
Complete three courses:

60-1502D Media Studio: Drawing10
60-1602D Media Studio: Imaging10
60-2502D Media Studio: Painting10
60-2512D Media Studio: Print Media10
60-130-60-1303-D Media Studio I-I
(complete two minis, 5 units each)
10
60-131-60-1313D Media Studio II-II
(complete two minis, 5 units each)
10
60-110Electronic Media Studio I10
60-210Electronic Media Studio II10

Advanced Studios (4 courses, 40 units)
Complete four courses. Courses may be offered in the fall and/or spring. Students may take courses in any media area (ETB, SIS, CP or DP3). They may take all courses in one media area if a focus is desired.

60-410 - 60-429 Advanced Electronic and Time-Based Work (ETB)10
60-430 - 60-447 Advanced Sculpture, Installation and Site-Work (SIS)10
60-448 - 60-449 Advanced Contextual Practice (CP)10
60-450 - 60-498 Advanced Drawing, Painting, Print Media and Photography (DP3)10
60-499Studio Independent Study (one only)10

Art History/Theory (2 courses, 18 units)

60-205Modern Visual Culture 1789-19609
60-206Contemporary Visual Culture 1960 - Present9

Review Requirement (Complete 2 required reviews, 0 units)
A review is required at the end of the sophomore and senior years. Pass/no pass only.

60-200Sophomore Review -Spring0
60-400Senior Review -Spring0
Design Concentration (108 units minimum)

PORTFOLIO REVIEW REQUIRED FOR ADMISSION

Options available in the following areas, to be selected in the sophomore year:
1) Communication Design, 2) Industrial Design

Required Courses for Both Options (78 units)

51-101Design Studio I -Fall, Freshman year9
51-102Design Studio II -Spring, Freshman year9
51-103Design Workshop -Fall, Freshman year3
51-104Design Workshop II -Spring, Freshman year3
51-121Design Drawing I -Fall, Freshman year9
51-122Design Drawing II -Spring, Freshman year9
51-132Introduction to Photo Design -Spring, Freshman year4.5
51-134Photo Design II -Spring, Freshman year4.5
51-171Human Experience in Design -Fall, Sophomore year9
51-241How People Work -Fall, Sophomore year9
51-271Design History I -Fall, Sophomore year9

Work with Design Advisor in the Sophomore Year to Form Concentration Option
(30 units minimum):

Communication Design Required Courses (21 units)

51-201CD Studio I: Communicating with Type -Fall9
51-203Communication Design Computer Lab -Fall3
51-229Digital Photographic Imaging -Fall9

Choose 9 additional Design units in consultation with the Design advisor.

Industrial Design Required Courses (18 units)

51-211Generation of Form: Industrial Design I9
51-243Prototyping4.5
51-251Digital Prototyping4.5

Choose 12 additional Design units in consultation with the Design advisor.

Drama Concentration (108 units minimum)

AUDITION/INTERVIEW REQUIRED FOR DIRECTING OR DRAMATURGY CONCENTRATION OPTION. PORTFOLIO REVIEW/INTERVIEW REQUIRED FOR DESIGN OR PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION OPTION.

Options available in the following areas: 1) Design, 2) Directing, 3) Dramaturgy, 4) Production Technology and Management

There is no BSA Acting or Musical Theatre option.

Required Courses for All Concentration Options (20 units)

54-175-54-176Conservatory Hour-Conservatory Hour
(1 unit each)
2
54-177Foundations of Drama I6
or 54-178 Foundations of Drama I
54-281Foundations of Drama II
(prerequisite: 54-177 or 54-178)
6
or 54-282 Foundations of Drama II
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism6

Work with Drama Faculty Advisor to Form Concentration Option (88 units minimum):

Design Required Courses (26 units)

54-151-54-152Stagecraft-Stagecraft
(15 units + 11 units)
26

Choose 62 additional Design units in consultation with the Design faculty advisor.

Directing Required Courses (49-52 units)

54-121-54-122Directing I: Sources-Directing I: Sources18
54-221-54-222Directing II: Fundamentals-Directing II: Fundamentals
(6 or 9 units + 9 units)
18
54-159-54-160Production Symposium I-I12
54-517-54-518Director's Colloquium-Director's Colloquium
(four times, 4 units total)
2

Choose 36-39 additional Directing units in consultation with the Directing faculty advisor.

Dramaturgy Required Courses (53 units)

54-109Dramaturgy 1: Approaches to Text9
54-184Dramaturgy 2: History and Practice9
54-160Production Symposium I -Spring6
54-200Dramaturgy Forum
(two times, 2 units total) -Fall
1
54-387Dramaturgy : Production I9
54-xxxDramaturgy 3, 4, 5 or 6 (take two in any order during the sophomore, junior, and senior years)18

Choose 35 additional Dramaturgy units in consultation with the Dramaturgy faculty advisor.

Production Technology and Management Required Courses (26 units)

54-151-54-152Stagecraft-Stagecraft
(15 units + 11 units)
26

Choose 62 additional PTM units in consultation with the PTM faculty advisor.

Music Concentration (108 units minimum)

AUDITION REQUIRED FOR MUSIC PERFORMANCE CONCENTRATION OPTION. PORTFOLIO REVIEW/INTERVIEW REQUIRED FOR MUSIC COMPOSITION, MUSICOLOGY & CULTURAL STUDIES, OR MUSIC TECHNOLOGY CONCENTRATION OPTION.

Options available in the following areas: 1) Music Performance (instrumental, piano, organ, voice), 2) Music Composition 3) Musicology & Cultural Studies, 4) Music Technology

Required Course for All Concentration Options (9 units)

57-152Harmony I9

Music Performance and Music Composition Required Courses (76 units)

57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-181Solfege I3
57-173Survey of Western Music History9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians
(co-requisite: 57-173)
1
57-69xBXA Studio (4 semesters)36
57-xxxMajor Ensemble (4 semesters)24

Choose 23 additional Music units in consultation with the Music advisor.

Musicology & Cultural Studies Required Courses (45 units)

57-283Music History I9
57-284Music History II9
57-285Music History III9
57-189Introduction to Repertoire and Listening for Musicians3
57-190Repertoire and Listening for Musicians I
(co-requisite: 57-283)
3
57-289Repertoire and Listening for Musicians II
(co-requisite: 57-284)
3
57-290Repertoire and Listening for Musicians III
(co-requisite: 57-285)
3
57-611Independent Study in History6

Choose 36 units from:

57-209The Beatles9
57-306World Music6
57-377Psychology of Music9
57-412Opera Since Wagner9
57-414Music and Nature9
57-415Globalization of Classical Music USA Turkey, Japan6
57-477Music of the Spirit6
57-478Survey of Historical Recording6
57-480History of Black American Music Seminar6
Graduate Musicology courses may be taken with instructor permission.

Choose 18 additional Music units in consultation with the Music advisor.

Music Technology Required Courses (40 units)

57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
57-181Solfege I3
57-173Survey of Western Music History9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians
(co-requisite: 57-173)
1
57-337Sound Recording6
57-347Electronic and Computer Music6
57-xxxIndependent Study in Music Technology or Sound Recording9

Choose 36 units from:

57-153Harmony II9
57-182Solfege II3
57-283Music History I9
57-284Music History II9
57-285Music History III9
57-190Repertoire and Listening for Musicians I
(co-requisite: 57-283)
3
57-289Repertoire and Listening for Musicians II
(co-requisite: 57-284)
3
57-290Repertoire and Listening for Musicians III
(co-requisite: 57-285)
3
57-338Sound Editing and Mastering6
57-438Multitrack Recording9

Choose 23 additional Music units in consultation with the Music advisor. 

 

IV. Free Electives

(approximately 1-2 courses, 3-17 units)

Take any Carnegie Mellon course. A maximum of 9 units of physical education and/or military science may be counted toward this requirement. Physical education and military science courses will not be calculated in a student's QPA. 

Bachelor of Computer Science and Arts Degree Program

Carnegie Mellon University recognizes that there are students who are naturally gifted in both the fine arts and computer science. In order to accommodate students who want to pursue an education simultaneously in these areas, we offer a degree that combines the strengths of the College of Fine Arts (CFA) and the School of Computer Science (SCS). The intercollege degree, called the Bachelor of Computer Science and Arts (BCSA), is a rigorous program that offers a unique group of qualified students the opportunity to develop their talents and interests in an area of the fine arts and computer science.

The BCSA curriculum is divided into three parts: 1) BCSA Core requirements, 2) CFA concentration coursework, and 3) SCS concentration coursework.

Students choose their fine arts concentration from among the five schools in CFA: Architecture, Art, Design, Drama or Music. A student must meet the entry requirements for the particular CFA school of their choice. While in the BCSA Program, a student may change their CFA concentration only if they pass all admission requirements for that particular school.

The BCSA Degree Program is governed by faculty and administrators from both colleges and led by the director of the BXA Intercollege Degree Programs. The director and academic advisor of the BXA Intercollege Degree Programs are the primary advisors and liaisons between CFA and SCS. Students receive extensive advising support. Each student has two additional academic advisors: an advisor in the admitting school of CFA for their fine arts concentration, and an advisor in SCS for their computer science concentration. This network of advisors guides each student through their curriculum. 

 

BCSA Curriculum

Units
I. BCSA Core121
II. SCS Concentration111
III. CFA Concentration108-118
IV. BCSA Free Electives30-40
Total BCSA Degree Requirements380

I. BCSA Core

(15 courses, 121 units minimum)
  • Writing/Expression (1 course, 9 units, 76-101 required)
  • Cultural Analysis (1 course, 9 units minimum)
  • Mathematics (2 courses, 19 units minimum, 21-120 and either 21-122 or 21-241 required), Probability (1 course, 9 units minimum required)
  • Science (2 courses, 18 units minimum)
  • Engineering (In consultation with your academic advisor, an engineering course could substitute for one of the two Science requirements.)
  • Economic, Political, & Social Institutions OR Cognition, Choice & Behavior (1 course, 9 units minimum)
  • One additional course from one of the following departments: English, History, Modern Languages, Philosophy, or Psychology (1 course, 9 units minimum)
  • BXA Freshman Interdisciplinary Seminar (1 course, 9 units, 52-190 or 52-399 required)
  • BXA Junior Seminar (1 course, 9 units, 52-410 required)
  • BXA Junior Portfolio Review (complete 1 required review, 0 units, 52-391 required)
  • BXA Capstone Project (2 courses, 18 units, 52-401 & 52-402 required)
  • Computing @ Carnegie Mellon (1 mini-course, 3 units, required in first semester)
Writing/Expression (1 course, 9 units)

Broadly considered, language is a tool used to communicate, as well as a way to organize non-visual and non-mathematical thinking. This requirement focuses on the social nature of language and the ways in which writing constitutes thinking.

76-101Interpretation and Argument -REQUIRED9
(various topics by section) www.cmu.edu/hss/english/first_year/index.html
Cultural Analysis (1 course, complete 9 units minimum)

This category explores definitions of culture and the role culture plays in producing different actions and institutions as well as the roles of institutions, systems and human actions in shaping cultural contexts. Listed below are examples of courses that meet the requirement for this category.

57-173Survey of Western Music History9
70-342Managing Across Cultures *9
76-227Comedy9
76-232African American Literature *9
76-239Introduction to Film Studies *9
76-241Introduction to Gender Studies9
79-104Global Histories9
79-207Development of European Culture9
79-240The Development of American Culture9
79-241African American History: Africa to the Civil War9
79-242African American History: Reconstruction to the Present9
79-261Chinese Culture and Society9
79-281Introduction to Religion9
79-311Introduction to Anthropology9
79-330Medicine and Society9
79-345The Roots of Rock and Roll, 1870-19709
79-350Early Christianity9
79-368Poverty, Charity, and Welfare9
80-100Introduction to Philosophy9
80-250Ancient Philosophy9
80-251Modern Philosophy9
80-253Continental Philosophy9
80-254Analytic Philosophy9
80-255Pragmatism9
80-276Philosophy of Religion9
82-3xxAny 300 level or greater course from Modern Languages

* Indicates co-requisites and/or prerequisites required.

Mathematics & Probability (3 courses, 29 units minimum)

Choose two mathematics courses (20 units minimum):

21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation10
or 21-241 Matrices and Linear Transformations

Choose one probability course (9 units minimum):

15-359Probability and Computing12
21-325Probability9
36-217Probability Theory and Random Processes9
36-225Introduction to Probability Theory9
Science (2 courses, 18 units minimum)

Choose two courses from the following list:

03-121Modern Biology9
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
33-111Physics I for Science Students12
Engineering

In consultation with your academic advisor, an engineering course could substitute for one of the two Science requirements.

Economic, Political & Social Institutions OR Cognition, Choice & Behavior (1 course from either category, complete 9 units minimum)
 
Economic, Political & Social Institutions

This category examines the ways in which institutions organize individual preferences and actions into collective outcomes using model-based reasoning.

36-303Sampling, Survey and Society *9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics *9
73-100Principles of Economics9
79-335Drug Use and Drug Policy9
79-374American Environmental History: Critical Issues9
80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-235Political Philosophy9
80-341Computers, Society and Ethics9
88-104Decision Processes in American Political Institutions9
88-110Experiments with Economic Principles9
88-205Comparative Politics9
88-220Policy Analysis I9

 * Indicates co-requisites and/or prerequisites required.

Cognition, Choice, and Behavior

This category use model-based analysis to broaden an understanding of human thinking, choices, and behavior on an individual basis across a variety of settings.

70-311Organizational Behavior *9
80-130Introduction to Ethics9
80-150Nature of Reason9
80-180Nature of Language9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-230Ethical Theory9
80-241Ethical Judgments in Professional Life9
80-270Philosophy of Mind9
80-271Philosophy and Psychology9
80-275Metaphysics9
80-281Language and Thought9
85-102Introduction to Psychology9
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
85-221Principles of Child Development9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-251Personality9
85-261Abnormal Psychology9
88-120Reason, Passion and Cognition9
88-260Organizations9

* Indicates co-requisites and/or prerequisites required.

Complete ONE additional course from one of the following departments (1 course, complete 9 units minimum)
  • English
  • History
  • Modern Languages
  • Philosophy
  • Psychology
BXA Freshman Interdisciplinary Seminar (1 course, 9 units)

The BXA Freshman Research Seminar introduces first-year students to the field of interdisciplinary work and arts-based research. Students engage with theoretical and practical readings from across the various concentrations, with particular emphasis on aesthetic theory. Guest lectures complement the weekly readings by giving insight into practical implementations of these ideas. Students will conceive, research, and create a final project to be presented at the end of the semester. BXA internal transfer students should register for 52-399 BXA Interdisciplinary Seminar to fulfill the interdisciplinary requirement.

52-190BXA Freshman Interdisciplinary Seminar -REQUIRED9
or 52-399 BXA Interdisciplinary Seminar
BXA Junior Seminar: Music from an Ancient Land, Traditional, Folk, and Contemporary Music of Iran (1 course, 9 units)

The Iranian civilization is one of the oldest continuing civilizations in the world. Music has played an important role in the continuation and preservation of this ancient culture. In this course, the traditional, folk, and contemporary music of Iran will be studied and discussed. The focal point of the course will be the Persian modal system, the Dástgâh. Starting with a historical survey of the ancient and medieval Persian music. different aspects of the Dástgâh system will be demonstrated and discussed. In addition, religious music and folk music of Iran as well as Iranian contemporary music will be discussed during the course. Course topic may vary each semester.

52-410BXA Junior Seminar -REQUIRED9
BXA Junior Portfolio Review (complete 1 required review, 0 units)

To better assess the progress and accomplishments of BXA students as they enter their final year, students submit a portfolio for review during the spring semester junior year. Students should work with their BXA advisor and their concentration faculty advisors to assemble a portfolio that represents their academic and creative accomplishments over the course of their college career. This portfolio should also include a reflective essay in which students evaluate how they integrated their two areas of interest, and how they will extend that integration into the BXA Capstone Project in the senior year.

Students should identify their own specific goals for their academic career and how they are fulfilling them in this reflective essay, as well as how they evaluate their performance in light of the programs' broader pedagogical goals. Students in the BXA program should be working toward being able to:

  • describe the connections between their chosen concentration disciplines and to integrate them into their work
  • communicate ideas in writing, visual expression, and oral expression
  • discuss the intersection of history, society, and culture from local and global perspectives
  • synthesize mathematical theories and experimental work to produce real-world knowledge
  • use cognitive, behavioral, and ethical dimensions to make decisions on individual and social levels
52-391BXA Junior Portfolio Review -Spring -REQUIRED (pass/no pass)0
BXA Capstone Project (2 courses, 18 units)

The BXA Capstone Project gives BXA students the opportunity to demonstrate the extent of their interdisciplinary work over the course of their academic career. The Capstone Project should include elements that span the student’s CFA and DC concentrations (for BHA students), CFA and MCS concentrations (for BSA students), or CFA and SCS concentrations (for BCSA students). The project can be either a scholarly or creative endeavor, and may take one of many possible forms (e.g., a written thesis, a compilation of creative work or works, an experiment and report, a computer program or animation, etc.).

The BXA Capstone sequence covers both semesters of a student’s senior year. In the fall, students are enrolled in 52-401 BXA Capstone Project I I (9 units), which meets weekly to discuss strategies for managing research, planning the project, and larger theoretical issues related to interdisciplinary work. At the end of the fall course, students will have produced a Capstone Project proposal, an annotated bibliography, and multiple versions of their project pitch. In the spring, students enroll in 52-402 BXA Capstone Project II II (9 units), which has no required classroom time. Instead, students spend the semester doing the research and foundational work necessary for the project, as well as meeting with their faculty and BXA advisors as they create their Capstone Project and prepare to present it at the annual Meeting of the Minds Undergraduate Research Symposium held each May.

52-401BXA Capstone Project I -Fall -REQUIRED (course attendance required)9
52-402BXA Capstone Project II -Spring -REQUIRED (DNM, independent study)9
Computing @ Carnegie Mellon (1 mini-course, 3 units)

This is a mini-course, pass/no pass, to be completed in the first semester.

99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon -REQUIRED3
or 99-102 Computing @ Carnegie Mellon
or 99-103 Computing @ Carnegie Mellon

 

II. SCS Concentration

School of Computer Science Concentration (111 units minimum)

Prerequisite

15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12

Computer Science Core Requirements (56 units)

15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
15-150Principles of Functional Programming10
15-210Parallel and Sequential Data Structures and Algorithms12
15-213Introduction to Computer Systems12
15-251Great Theoretical Ideas in Computer Science12

Concepts of Mathematics (10 units)

21-127Concepts of Mathematics
(co-requisite for 15-122; prerequisite for 15-150)
10

Applications Courses or CS Electives (5 courses, 45 units minimum)
Consult with the CS advisor to choose a minimum of five courses from the following list:

05-331Building Virtual Worlds
(12 units for CS concentration, 12 units for Art concentration)
24
05-391Designing Human Centered Software12
11-411Natural Language Processing12
15-214Principles of Software Construction: Objects, Design, and Concurrency12
15-237Special Topic: Cross-Platform Mobile Web Apps12
15-322Introduction to Computer Music9
15-323Computer Music Systems and Information Processing9
15-381Artificial Intelligence: Representation and Problem Solving9
15-415Database Applications12
15-437Web Application Development12
15-451Algorithm Design and Analysis12
15-462Computer Graphics12
15-463Computational Photography12
15-464Technical Animation12
15-465Animation Art and Technology12
15-466Computer Game Programming12
16-362Mobile Robot Programming Laboratory12
16-384Robot Kinematics and Dynamics12
16-385Computer Vision9
Others as appropriate with advisor's permission.

 

III. College of Fine Arts Concentration 

(number of courses vary, 108-118 units minimum)

BCSA students choose one of the following concentrations:

  • Architecture (108 units)
  • Art (118 units)
  • Design (108 units)
  • Drama (108 units)
  • Music (108 units)
Architecture Concentration (108 units minimum)

Architecture Required Courses (52 units minimum)

48-100Architecture Design Studio: Foundation I -Fall10-12
or 48-095 Spatial Concepts for Non-Architects I
48-120Introduction to Digital Media I -Fall6
48-125Introduction to Digital Media II -Spring6
48-1xxAnalog Media I -Fall6
48-1xxAnalog Media II -Spring6
48-240Historical Survey of World Architecture and Urbanism I -Spring9
48-241Survey of Architectual History II -Fall9

Architecture Electives (56 units minimum)
Choose 56 elective Architecture units in consultation with the Architecture advisor.

Art Concentration (118 units minimum)

PORTFOLIO REVIEW REQUIRED FOR ADMISSION

Concept Studios (2 courses, 20 units)
Complete two courses:

60-101Concept Studio I10
60-201Concept Studio II10
60-202Concept Studio III10
60-203Concept Studio: EcoArt10
60-204Concept Studio: Networked Narrative10

Media Studios (2 courses, 20 units)
Complete two courses:

60-1502D Media Studio: Drawing10
60-1602D Media Studio: Imaging10
60-2502D Media Studio: Painting10
60-2512D Media Studio: Print Media10
60-130-60-1303-D Media Studio I-I
(complete two minis, 5 units each)
10
60-131-60-1313D Media Studio II-II
(complete two minis, 5 units each)
10
60-110Electronic Media Studio I10
60-210Electronic Media Studio II10

Advanced Studios (6 courses, 60 units)
Complete six courses. Courses may be offered in the fall and/or spring. Students may take courses in any media area (ETB, SIS, CP or DP3). They may take all courses in one media area if a focus is desired.

60-410 - 60-429 Advanced Electronic and Time-Based Work (ETB)10
60-430 - 60-447 Advanced Sculpture, Installation and Site-Work (SIS)10
60-448 - 60-449 Advanced Contextual Practice (CP)10
60-450 - 60-498 Advanced Drawing, Painting, Print Media and Photography (PDP)10
60-499Studio Independent Study (one only)10

Art History/Theory (2 courses, 18 units)

60-205Modern Visual Culture 1789-19609
60-206Contemporary Visual Culture 1960 - Present9

Review Requirement (Complete 2 required reviews, 0 units)
A review is required at the end of the sophomore and senior years. Pass/no pass only.

60-200Sophomore Review -Spring0
60-400Senior Review -Spring0
Design Concentration (108 units minimum)

PORTFOLIO REVIEW REQUIRED FOR ADMISSION

Options available in the following areas, to be selected in the sophomore year:
1) Communication Design, 2) Industrial Design

Required Courses for Both Concentration Options (78 units)

51-101Design Studio I -Fall, Freshman year9
51-102Design Studio II -Spring, Freshman year9
51-103Design Workshop -Fall, Freshman year3
51-104Design Workshop II -Spring, Freshman year3
51-121Design Drawing I -Fall, Freshman year9
51-122Design Drawing II -Spring, Freshman year9
51-132Introduction to Photo Design -Spring, Freshman year4.5
51-134Photo Design II -Spring, Freshman year4.5
51-171Human Experience in Design -Fall, Sophomore year9
51-241How People Work -Fall, Sophomore year9
51-271Design History I -Fall, Sophomore year9

Work with Design Advisor in the Sophomore Year to Form Concentration Option
(30 units minimum):

Communication Design Required Courses (21 units)

51-201CD Studio I: Communicating with Type -Fall9
51-203Communication Design Computer Lab -Fall3
51-229Digital Photographic Imaging -Fall9

Choose 9 additional Design units in consultation with the Design advisor.

Industrial Design Required Courses (18 units)

51-211Generation of Form: Industrial Design I9
51-243Prototyping4.5
51-251Digital Prototyping4.5

Choose 12 additional Design units in consultation with the Design advisor.

Drama Concentration (108 units minimum)

AUDITION/INTERVIEW REQUIRED FOR DIRECTING OR DRAMATURGY CONCENTRATION OPTION. PORTFOLIO REVIEW/INTERVIEW REQUIRED FOR DESIGN OR PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION OPTION.

Options available in the following areas: 1) Design, 2) Directing, 3) Dramaturgy, 4) Production Technology and Management

There is no BHA Acting or Musical Theatre option.


Required Courses for All Concentration Options (20 units)

54-175-54-176Conservatory Hour-Conservatory Hour
(1 unit each)
2
54-177Foundations of Drama I6
or 54-178 Foundations of Drama I
54-281Foundations of Drama II
(prerequisite: 54-177 or 54-178)
6
or 54-282 Foundations of Drama II
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism6

Work with Drama Faculty Advisor to Form Concentration Option (88 units minimum):

Design Required Courses (26 units)

54-151-54-152Stagecraft-Stagecraft
(15 units + 11 units)
26

Choose 62 additional Design units in consultation with the Design faculty advisor.

Directing Required Courses (49-52 units)

54-121-54-122Directing I: Sources-Directing I: Sources18
54-221-54-222Directing II: Fundamentals-Directing II: Fundamentals
(6 or 9 units + 9 units)
18
54-159-54-160Production Symposium I-I12
54-517-54-518Director's Colloquium-Director's Colloquium
(four times, 4 units total)
2

Choose 36-39 additional Directing units in consultation with the Directing faculty advisor.

Dramaturgy Required Courses (53 units)

54-109Dramaturgy 1: Approaches to Text9
54-184Dramaturgy 2: History and Practice9
54-160Production Symposium I -Spring6
54-200Dramaturgy Forum
(two times, 2 units total) -Fall
1
54-387Dramaturgy : Production I9
54-xxxDramaturgy 3, 4, 5 or 6 (take two in any order during the sophomore, junior, and senior years)18

Choose 35 additional Dramaturgy units in consultation with the Dramaturgy faculty advisor.

Production Technology and Management Required Courses (26 units)

54-151-54-152Stagecraft-Stagecraft
(15 units + 11 units)
26

Choose 62 additional PTM units in consultation with the PTM faculty advisor.

Music Concentration (108 units minimum)

PORTFOLIO REVIEW/INTERVIEW REQUIRED FOR MUSIC COMPOSITION OR MUSIC TECHNOLOGY CONCENTRATION OPTION.

Options available in the following areas: 1) Music Composition, 2) Music Technology

Required Courses for Both Concentration Options (19 units)

57-152Harmony I9
57-173Survey of Western Music History9
57-188Repertoire and Listening for Musicians
(co-requisite: 57-173)
1

Music Composition Required Courses (66 units)

57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-181Solfege I3
57-69xBXA Studio (4 semesters)36
57-xxxMajor Ensemble (4 semesters)24

Choose 23 additional Music units in consultation with the Music advisor.

Music Technology Required Courses (30 units) 

57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
57-181Solfege I3
57-337Sound Recording6
57-347Electronic and Computer Music6
57-xxxIndependent Study in Music Technology or Sound Recording9

Choose 36 units from: 

57-153Harmony II9
57-182Solfege II3
57-283Music History I9
57-284Music History II9
57-285Music History III9
57-190Repertoire and Listening for Musicians I
(co-requisite: 57-283)
3
57-289Repertoire and Listening for Musicians II
(co-requisite: 57-284)
3
57-290Repertoire and Listening for Musicians III
(co-requisite: 57-285)
3
57-338Sound Editing and Mastering6
57-438Multitrack Recording9

Choose 23 additional Music units in consultation with the Music advisor.

 

IV. Free Electives

(approximately 3-4 courses, 30–40 units minimum)

Take any Carnegie Mellon course. A maximum of 9 units of physical education and/or military science may be counted toward this requirement. Physical education and military science courses will not be calculated in a student's QPA.

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