Department of Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC)

Spencer Petersen, Capt, USAF
Office: 2927 Cathedral of Learning, University of Pittsburgh
E-mail: afrotc@pitt.edu
Phone: (412) 624-6358
Website: http://www.afrotc.pitt.edu

"Air Force ROTC is a college program offered at more than 1,100 colleges and universities across the U.S. It prepares you to become an Air Force Officer while earning a college degree. And it gives you the opportunity to get the tuition money you need. But more than that—it’s a challenge, a head start on a lifetime of success, within the Air Force and in everything you choose to do. In Air Force ROTC, you’ll make the most of your college experience. You’ll hone your time-management skills, analytical skills and physical fitness. It won’t be easy. But if you’re up to the challenge, the rewards will last a lifetime."

- http://www.afrotc.com

The local AFROTC program is administered by the Department of Aerospace Science at the University of Pittsburgh. This program is available to undergraduate students at fourteen “cross-town” universities via enrollment through agreement with the University of Pittsburgh. Students must have at least six semesters (three full academic years) of school remaining to successfully complete AFROTC graduation requirements. Upon successful completion of university academic and ROTC requirements, students will earn a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the US Air Force.

Students will complete one or two years in the General Military Course (GMC) before competing for an enrollment allocation into a four-week summer leadership training program. After completion of the summer training program, students are enlisted into the Professional Officer Course (POC), where they will take on role leading anywhere from 10–50 of their fellow cadets in weekly activities. Students are under NO contractual obligation to the Air Force until entering the POC or accepting an Air Force scholarship. In addition to the academic portion of the curriculum, each student attends a weekly two-hour, hands-on “laboratory” that tests both their followership and leadership abilities amongst their peers. This lab is used to practice various leadership and management techniques and groom students into future military leaders. Three and three-and-a-half year scholarships are available to qualified students in certain areas of study. Most AFROTC scholarships cover tuition plus lab fees, books, plus each scholarship awardee receives a tax free monthly stipend that ranges between $300–500 per month.

Department of Military Science (Army ROTC)

Andrew Loeb, Lieutenant Colonel,  U.S. Army
Office:  Bellefield Hall, Room 409, University of Pittsburgh

The Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) program supporting Carnegie Mellon University is located at the University of Pitts-burgh.  It exists to train the future officer leadership of the United States Army and offers opportunities and challenges that can put college students on the fast track to success in life.  ROTC provides a combination of academics and important hands-on training, in addition to physical and mental challenges that will help students succeed in college and beyond.  Through the training in ROTC, students will develop the confidence, self-esteem, motivation and leadership skills they will need regardless of their career plans.

The Four-Year Program

The traditional Four-Year program is divided into two parts.  The Basic Course is taken in the freshman and sophomore years.  There is no commitment for non-scholarship students at this level. Upon success-ful completion of the Basic Course, students are eligible for the Advanced Course, taken in the junior and senior years.  At the beginning of the Advanced Course, students will decide whether or not they wish to become officers in the Army and enter into a formal contract.  During the summer between the junior and senior years, students are required to attend the the Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC). Upon successful completion of a University degree and the Army ROTC program, students are commissioned into the United States Army as a Second Lieutenant.

The Two-Year Program

If the first two years of ROTC are not taken, students can attend the Leader’s Training Course (LTC) during the summer between the sophomore and junior year.  This camp will qualify students to begin the Advanced Course in their junior year or in the first year of a two-year graduate program.  Or, if students have served in the active duty military, attended a military academy for one year, participated in JROTC for three years or belong to a Army National Guard or Army Reserve unit, they already qualify for entrance into the Advanced Course.

The Alternative Entry Program

The Alternative Entry Program is designed for academic junior students with no prior qualifying military training but are otherwise qualified.  This option allows students to contract into the Advanced Course without receiving placement credit for the basic course. Students accepted into this program must complete the Leader’s Training Course and the Leader Development and Assessment Course during the summer months.

Curriculum

Freshman Year Units
30-101Introduction to Military Leadership - Fall5
30-102Foundations of Leadership- Spring5
Sophomore Year Units
30-201Leadership Dynamics and Application- Fall5
30-202Applications in Leadership and Combat Power- Spring5
Junior Year Units
30-301Basic Leader Planning and Combat Operations- Fall5
30-302Advanced Leader Planning and Combat Operations- Spring5
Leadership Development & Assessment Course (six-week required summer camp)
Senior Year Units
30-401Progressive Leadership Theory and Applications- Fall5
30-402Transition to the Profession of Arms- Spring5

Army ROTC Scholarships

Army ROTC offers four, three and two year full scholarships with additional annual allowances of $900 for books and a monthly stipend.  High school, undergraduate and incoming two-year graduate students are eligible to apply. For application and information call ROTC at the University of Pittsburgh at (412) 624-6254/6197.

The Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP)

This program allows students to become members of the Army National Guard or the Army Reserves while enrolled in Army ROTC. Students in the Advanced Course who are SMP are paid for their Guard/Reserve training.  The benefit of this program is that students in the Advanced Course are able to act as Army officers in their National Guard or Reserve unit, receiving valuable leadership experience.

Summer Programs

Leadership Development & Assessment Course 
This 35-day camp is a requirement for all contracted students. Students attend the summer between their junior and senior year. Students are placed in various leadership positions throughout Camp and their skills and abilities will be tested and evaluated in preparation of a commission in the United States Army.  All expenses are paid by the Army.  Students are paid while attending.

Leader’s Training Course
This 35-day camp is taken as a prerequisite for entry into the Advanced Course if the Basic Course cannot be fulfilled.  It is taken the summer before the junior year.  All expenses are paid by the Army. Students are paid while attending.


Army Adventure Training
ROTC students may participate in Airborne School, Air Assault School, Northern Warfare School and Mountain Warfare School the summer before the sophomore and junior year.  These courses range from two to four weeks and students must arrive in top physical condition.  All expenses are paid by the Army.

Extracurricular Activities

Rangers
Army ROTC students are eligible to participate in the Cadet Ranger Club.  The Club conducts physically and mentally challenging extracurricular training to promote fitness, teamwork, self-confidence and fellowship.  Training includes physical fitness, rappelling, rope bridging, tactics, hiking, climbing, weapons training and orienteering.
Scabbard & Blade
National Honor Society consisting of cadets/midshipmen from Army, Air Force and Naval ROTC.
Rho Tau Chi
Military fraternity established for the members of the various branches of ROTC.  Purpose is to draw together cadets to increase communication and feelings of goodwill between the Cadet Corps and the community.  Cadets participate in a variety of community service projects.
Color Guard
Dedicated group of Army ROTC cadets who train and perform to present the American flag and Army colors at football and basketball games and various community events.

Department of Naval Science (Naval ROTC)

Thomas M. Calabrese, Captain, U.S. Navy
Office:  4615 Forbes Avenue

The Department of Naval Science was established 16 December 1987. Its mission is to prepare young men and women mentally, morally, and physically, and to instill in them the highest qualities of duty, honor, and loyalty, in preparation for leadership positions in the naval service.

Carnegie Mellon’s Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) is designed for young men and women who are seeking a challenging academic experience and who desire to serve their country as officers in the Navy or Marine Corps after graduation.

NROTC midshipmen lead the same campus life as other Carnegie Mellon students.  They make their own arrangements for room and board, choose a preferred area of study and participate in extracurricular activities.  Midshipmen wear civilian clothes to classes but wear uniforms one day of the week.  NROTC students are active in all facets of university life; many are in positions of leadership in student government, on varsity and intramural sports teams, in campus clubs, and other student organizations.  The NROTC program seeks students who are bright, ambitious, enthusiastic leaders whose lives are enriched by their education at Carnegie Mellon and by their involvement in NROTC.

Four-Year Scholarship Program

The four-year scholarship program provides full tuition and university fees, $750 for textbooks per year, uniforms, and a $250 per month tax-free subsistence allowance to students during their freshman year.  This stipend then increases to $300 during their sophomore year, $350 for their junior year and $400 for their senior year.  Midshipmen must complete the university-approved curriculum of their choice, including courses in calculus and calculus-based physics (Navy Option Only), and specified courses in naval science subjects.  Paid summer training periods are also provided.  Scholarships are awarded on the basis of a nationwide competition before the start of the freshman year.  Midshipmen commissioned through the scholarship programs become officers in the Navy or Marine Corps and incur a four-year active duty obligation in a selected area of the naval service.
Tweedale Scholarship Program
This scholarship program provides the same benefits as the four-year program, but is targeted toward currently enrolled students who have completed at least one, but not more than four semesters, and who are pursuing technical majors. This program allows a highly-qualified engineering, physics, chemistry, or mathematics student who has never applied for a NROTC scholarship in the past to be considered for this scholarship. Solid academic standing within his or her field of study is required, including a ranking within the top half of students pursuing his or her chosen course of study. If nominated by the Professor of Naval Science for this scholarship, the student will generally receive a scholarship decision within 5 working days from submission. Midshipmen commissioned through the scholarship programs become officers and incur a four-year active duty obligation in a selected area of the naval service.
College (Non-Scholarship) Programs in NROTC
Qualified students may participate in NROTC as college program (non-scholarship) midshipmen and earn commissions in the Navy or Marine Corps Reserve upon graduation.  The active duty obligation for this program is three years.  Students receive all naval science textbooks and uniforms. Additionally, if awarded advanced standing during their junior and senior years, they receive a tax-free subsistence monthly allowance of $350 and $400 respectively.  A paid summer training period is provided between the junior and senior year. College program students may compete for three- and two-year scholarships described in the following paragraph.
College Program Three- and Two-Year Scholarships
Three-year scholarships are available on a competitive basis to those qualifying college program (non-scholarship) NROTC students who have demonstrated leadership and academic excellence during their freshman or sophomore year and are nominated for the scholarship by the Professor of Naval Science.  Scholarship benefits are identical to those provided by the four-year scholarship program.  Active duty obligation is four years upon commissioning in a selected area of the naval service.
Two-Year National Scholarship Program
Sophomores who have not participated in the NROTC program may apply for a nationally competitive two-year NROTC scholarship. The two-year scholarship program provides the same benefits as the four-year program for a period of 20 months.  Students must apply for this program no later than February of their sophomore year.  Students selected for this program attend the Naval Science Institute during the summer before their junior year to complete required naval science course material.   A paid summer training period is provided between the junior and senior years.  Commissionees incur a four-year active duty obligation upon graduation in a selected area of the naval service.

Curriculum

The sequence of naval science courses is the same for all officer candidates for the first three semesters.  Midshipmen accepted into the Marine Corps option program will have curriculum variations starting with their third year.  Additionally, some candidates may be required to complete courses in American military affairs, national security policy, English, mathematics, and/or the physical sciences.  Descriptions of the course requirements for each candidate classification (scholarship/college program) may be obtained from the Department of Naval Science office.
All scholarship and college program students are required to attend a weekly 1.5 hour Naval Laboratory (32-100) where professional orientation, military drill, physical fitness, and leadership are emphasized. Guest speakers from the Fleet are frequent participants in these laboratories.
Naval Science courses are open to all students.  Since these are required courses for NROTC students, they will be given priority in enrollment.  Remaining spaces will be filled through the normal university registration process.

Naval Professional Academic Courses

Freshman Year Units
32-100Naval Laboratory3
32-101Introduction to Naval Science6
32-102Seapower and Maritime Affairs6
Sophomore Year Units
32-200Naval Laboratory3
32-201Leadership & Management9
32-212Navigation *9
Junior Year Units
32-300Naval Laboratory3
32-310Evolution Of Warfare **9
32-311Naval Ship Systems I-Engineering *9
32-312Naval Ship Systems II-Weapons *9
Senior Year
32-400Naval Laboratory3
32-402Leadership and Ethics9
32-410Amphibious Warfare/Operations & The Fundamentals of Maneuver Warfare **9
32-411Naval Operations and Seamanship *9

Footnotes:

* Required of students in the Navy Option

** Required of students in the Marine Option

All other courses are required of all students in the program.

Note on Course Numbers

Each Carnegie Mellon course number begins with a two-digit prefix which designates the department offering the course (76-xxx courses are offered by the Department of English, etc.). Although each department maintains its own course numbering practices, typically the first digit after the prefix indicates the class level: xx-1xx courses are freshmen-level, xx-2xx courses are sophomore level, etc. xx-6xx courses may be either undergraduate senior-level or graduate-level, depending on the department. xx-7xx courses and higher are graduate-level. Please consult the Schedule of Classes each semester for course offerings and for any necessary pre-requisites or co-requisites.

ROTC Courses

Department of Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC) Courses

31-101 Foundations of the United States Air Force
Fall: 3 units
AS100 is a survey course designed to introduce cadets to the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Featured topics include: mission and organization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer opportunities, and an introduction to communication skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences.
31-102 Foundations of the United States Air Force
Spring: 3 units
AS100 is a survey course designed to introduce cadets to the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Featured topics include: mission and organization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer opportunities, and an introduction to communication skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences.
31-105 Air Force Leadership Laboratory
All Semesters
The AS100 and AS200 Leadership Laboratory courses (LLABs) include a study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and ceremonies, and military commands. The LLAB also includes studying the environment of an Air Force officer and learning about areas of opportunity available to commissioned officers. The AS300 and AS400 LLABs consist of activities classified as leadership and management experiences. They involve the planning and controlling of military activities of the cadet corps, and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other oral and written communications. LLABs also include interviews, guidance, and information, which will increase the understanding, motivation, and performance of other cadets.
31-106 Air Force Leadership Laboratory
All Semesters
The AS100 and AS200 Leadership Laboratory courses (LLABs) include a study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and ceremonies, and military commands. The LLAB also includes studying the environment of an Air Force officer and learning about areas of opportunity available to commissioned officers. The AS300 and AS400 LLABs consist of activities classified as leadership and management experiences. They involve the planning and controlling of military activities of the cadet corps, and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other oral and written communications. LLABs also include interviews, guidance, and information, which will increase the understanding, motivation, and performance of other cadets.
31-107 Air Force Leadership Laboratory
All Semesters
The AS100 and AS200 Leadership Laboratory courses (LLABs) include a study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and ceremonies, and military commands. The LLAB also includes studying the environment of an Air Force officer and learning about areas of opportunity available to commissioned officers. The AS300 and AS400 LLABs consist of activities classified as leadership and management experiences. They involve the planning and controlling of military activities of the cadet corps, and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other oral and written communications. LLABs also include interviews, guidance, and information, which will increase the understanding, motivation, and performance of other cadets.
31-108 Air Force Leadership Laboratory
All Semesters
The AS100 and AS200 Leadership Laboratory courses (LLABs) include a study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and ceremonies, and military commands. The LLAB also includes studying the environment of an Air Force officer and learning about areas of opportunity available to commissioned officers. The AS300 and AS400 LLABs consist of activities classified as leadership and management experiences. They involve the planning and controlling of military activities of the cadet corps, and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other oral and written communications. LLABs also include interviews, guidance, and information, which will increase the understanding, motivation, and performance of other cadets.
31-201 The Evolution of Air and Space Power
Fall: 3 units
The AS200 course designed to examine general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective. Utilizing this perspective, the course covers a time period from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age global positioning systems of the Persian Gulf War. Historical examples are provided to extrapolate the development of Air Force capabilities (competencies), and missions (functions) to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today's USAF air and space power. Furthermore, the course examines several fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension: e.g. Principles of War and Tenets of Air and Space Power. As a whole, this course provides the cadets with a knowledge level understanding for the general element and employment of air and space power, from an institutional doctrinal and historical perspective. In addition, the students will continue to discuss the importance of the Air Force Core Values with the use of operational examples and historical Air Force leaders and will continue to develop their communication skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences.
31-202 The Evolution of Air and Space Power
Spring: 3 units
The AS200 course designed to examine general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective. Utilizing this perspective, the course covers a time period from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age global positioning systems of the Persian Gulf War. Historical examples are provided to extrapolate the development of Air Force capabilities (competencies), and missions (functions) to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today's USAF air and space power. Furthermore, the course examines several fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension: e.g. Principles of War and Tenets of Air and Space Power. As a whole, this course provides the cadets with a knowledge level understanding for the general element and employment of air and space power, from an institutional doctrinal and historical perspective. In addition, the students will continue to discuss the importance of the Air Force Core Values with the use of operational examples and historical Air Force leaders and will continue to develop their communication skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences.
31-301 Air Force Leadership Studies
Fall: 9 units
AS300 is a study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and the communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving students the opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles of this course.
31-302 Air Force Leadership Studies
Spring: 9 units
AS300 is a study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and the communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving students the opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles of this course.
31-401 National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty
Fall: 9 units
AS400 examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Within this structure, continued emphasis is given to refining communication skills. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences, giving students the opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles of this course.
31-402 National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty
Spring: 9 units
AS400 examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Within this structure, continued emphasis is given to refining communication skills. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences, giving students the opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles of this course.

Department of Military Science (Army ROTC) Courses

30-101 Introduction to Military Leadership
Fall: 5 units
In this course, students will be introduced to the fundamentals of Army leadership, management and basic military skills. The course emphasizes the Army's "Principles of Leadership" and familiarizes the student with rifle marksmanship, orienteering and map reading, rappelling, basic lifesaving skills and the wear of the Army uniform. In addition, students will enhance their time management, decision-making and physical fitness abilities. Each student must participate in physical training, field training exercises and is expected to wear the Army uniform, which will be provided.
30-102 Foundations of Leadership
Spring: 5 units
This course is a continuation of the subjects and skills taught in 30101. In addition to extending the student's abilities in the areas of leadership, orienteering and map reading, lifesaving and other basic military concepts, the course also introduces the student to the employment of military units. Individual topics covered include the Army's emerging technological enhancements, the Army organization and structure and the wartime policies and principles. Each student must participate in physical training, field training exercises and is expected to wear the Army uniform, which will be provided.
30-201 Leadership Dynamics and Application
Fall: 5 units
In this course, students will delve more deply ino the Army's leadership and management techniques, including the application of those techniques in faculty-supervised practical exercises. The course also seeks to enhance the student's abilities in orienteering and map reading, terrain analysis, advanced lifesaving techniques and physical fitness. Students are introduced to the values that define the United States Army as an American institution, and each student continues to enhance his or her physical development under the supervision of the faculty. Each student must participate in physical training, field training exercises and is expected to wear the Army uniform, which will be provided.
30-202 Applications in Leadership and Combat Power
Spring: 5 units
This course continues the study of the topics covered in 30201 and focuses upon practical application of the leadership and management techniques learned in the fall semester. The student develops and applies advanced map reading, terrain analysis, problem-solving and decision-making skills in practical exercises. Additionally, the student is introduced to the Army's formal orders process, used to maneuver and sustain Army forces on the modern battlefield. Each student must participate in physical training, field training exercises and is expected to wear the Army uniform, which will be provided.
30-301 Basic Leader Planning and Combat Operations
Fall: 5 units
This course offers an in-depth analysis and focused practical application of leadership and management techniques. The emphasis in the course is on leader development and the goal is to enhance the student's ability to perform effectively in a stressful decision-making environment. As such, time management, decision-making, advanced military skills, troop-leading procedures and advanced physical training are emphasized. The course requires participation in a demanding physical training program to prepare contracted students for the Army's R.O.T.C. Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC). Each student must participate in field training exercises and is expected to wear the Army uniform, which will be provided. Prerequisites: Class is open only to contracted students. Veterans with two or more years of service may enroll with approval.
30-302 Advanced Leader Planning and Combat Operations
Spring: 5 units
This course builds upon the foundation laid in the fall semester with the objective of fully preparing contracted students for participation in the Army's challenging R.O.T.C. Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC). The course extends and enhances the student's leadership, management, communication, fitness and basic military skills in preparing the student for commissioning as an officer in the United States Army. Practical exercises are used to reinforce all of the skills that the student has developed over the course of the military science instruction. Each student must participate in physical training, field training exercises and is expected to wear the Army uniform, which will be provided. Prerequisites: Class is open only to contracted students. Veterans with two or more years of service may enroll with approval.
30-401 Progressive Leadership Theory and Applications
Fall: 5 units
This course is the first of two semester courses that serve as a capstone designed to transition the student from cadet to U.S. Army officer. Students are assigned to command and staff positions within the cadet battalion, corresponding to those found in United States Army units. Students perform the duties of the staff or command as assigned and interact with the other cadets as part of a functioning command organization. In addition to studying the operations and organizations of the U.S. Army, students are required to plan and execute the required training and activities in leading the underclasss cadets. A variety of topics of current interest are covered. Guest speakers are commonly invited to discuss their military experiences or their perspectives on military-related topics. Each student must participate in physical training, field training exercises and is expected to wear the Army uniform, which will be provided. Prerequisites: Class is open only to contracted students.
30-402 Transition to the Profession of Arms
Spring: 5 units
This capstone course completes the transition from cadet to Army officer and concludes with the student's commissioning into the United States Army. During the semester, students continue to act in accordance with their assigned staff and command responsibilities and they prepare for their duties as a Lieutenant in the Army. This course covers personal and performance counseling, evaluation of subordinate leaders and team-building skills as well as military justice and discipline. Students bring to bear all of the skills and knowledge that they have accrued over the prior semesters in the Department of Military Science. Each student must participate in physical training, field training exercises and is expected to wear the Army uniform, which will be provided. Prerequisites: Class is open only to contracted students.

Department of Naval Science (Naval ROTC) Courses

32-100 Naval Laboratory
Fall and Spring: 3 units
Military drill, physical fitness, and leadership seminars.
32-101 Introduction to Naval Science
Fall: 6 units
A general introduction to the naval profession and to concepts of Seapower. Instruction emphasizes the mission, organization, and warfare components of the Navy and Marine Corps. Included is an overview of officer and enlisted ranks and rates, training and education, and career patterns. The course also covers naval courtesy and customs, military justice, leadership, and nomenclature. This course exposes the student to the professional competencies required to become a naval officer.
32-102 Seapower and Maritime Affairs
Spring: 6 units
This course surveys US naval history from its European origins to the present with emphasis on major developments and the geopolitical forces shaping these developments. Also included is discussion of the theories and writings of naval historian and strategist Alfred Thayer Mahan. The course will finish by covering present day concerns in seapower and maritime affairs including the economic and political issues of merchant marine commerce, the law of the sea, the navy and merchant marine of the former Soviet Union (FSU), and a comparison of US and FSU maritime strategies to include the rise and decline of the Soviet Navy.
32-200 Naval Laboratory
Fall and Spring: 3 units
Military drill, physical fitness, and leadership seminars.
32-201 Leadership & Management
Fall: 9 units
This course is a comprehensive advanced-level study of organizational behavior and management. Topics include a survey of the management functions of planning, organizing, and controlling; an introduction to individual and group behavior in organizations; an extensive study of motivation and leadership. Major behavioral theories are explored in detail. Practical applications are explored by the use of experiential exercises, case studies, and laboratory discussions. Other topics developed include decision-making, communication, responsibility, authority and accountability.
32-212 Navigation
Spring: 9 units
An in-depth study of piloting and an introduction to celestial navigation theory. Students learn piloting skills including the use of charts, visual and electronic aids, and the theory and operation of magnetic and gyro compasses. Students develop practical skills in both piloting and celestial navigation. Other topics include tides, currents effects of wind and weather, plotting, use of navigation instruments, types and characteristics of electronic navigation systems, and the typical day's work in navigation. Also included is a study of the international and inland rules of the nautical road, relative motion, vector analysis theory, and relative motion problems.
32-300 Naval Laboratory
Fall and Spring: 3 units
Military drill, physical fitness, and leadership seminars.
32-310 Evolution Of Warfare
Spring: 9 units
This course is to provide the student with a very basic understanding of the art and concepts of warfare from the beginning of recorded history to the present day. The intent of the curriculum is to familiarize the student with an understanding of the threads of continuity and the interrelations of political, strategic, operational, tactical, and technical levels of war from the past, while bringing into focus the application of these same principles and concepts to the battlefields of today and the future.
32-311 Naval Ship Systems I-Engineering
Fall: 9 units
A detailed study of ship characteristics and types including ship design, hydrodynamic forces, stability, compartmentalization, propulsion, electrical and auxiliary systems, interior communications, ship control, and damage control. Included are basic concepts of the theory and design of steam, gas turbine, internal combustion, and nuclear propulsion. Shipboard safety and firefighting are also discussed.
32-312 Naval Ship Systems II-Weapons
Spring: 9 units
This course outlines the theory and employment of weapons systems. The student explores the processes of detection, evaluation, threat analysis, weapon selection, delivery, guidance and explosives. Fire control systems and major weapon types are discussed, including capabilities and limitations. The physical aspects of radar and underwater sound are described in detail. The facets of command, control, and communications are explored as a means of weapons system integration.
32-400 Naval Laboratory
Fall and Spring: 3 units
Military drill, physical fitness, and leadership seminars.
32-402 Leadership and Ethics
Spring: 9 units
The study of naval junior officer responsibilities. The course exposes the student to a study of ethics, decision making and responsibility as well as counseling methods, military justice administration, naval human resources management, directives and correspondence, naval personnel administration, material management and maintenance and supply systems. This capstone course in the NROTC curriculum builds on and integrates the professional competencies developed in prior course work and professional training.
32-410 Amphibious Warfare/Operations & The Fundamentals of Maneuver Warfare
Fall: 9 units
A historical survey of the development of amphibious doctrine and the conduct of amphibious operations. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of amphibious warfare in the twentieth century, especially during World War II. Focus is applied to four main themes: political/strategic situation, sea-to-land transitions, tactics ashore, and development of amphibious technology. Present day potential and limitations on amphibious operations, including the rapid deployment force concept, are explored.
32-411 Naval Operations and Seamanship
Fall: 9 units
Designed as an introduction to naval operations and shipboard evolutions, vessel behavior and characteristics in maneuvering, applied aspects of ship handling, and afloat communications. This course builds upon the information presented in Navigation 32-212, Engineering 32-311, and Weapons Systems 32-312. An understanding of the nautical rules of the road, relative motion and vector analysis are utilized in discussion regarding the conduct of naval operation to include formation tactics and ship employment. The student will also be introduced to the various components of naval warfare and their role in sea control and power projection missions within naval and joint operations.

Naval ROTC Faculty

JEFF CORAN, Captain, USN – M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.