Michael Trick, Dean
Selma Limam Mansar, Associate Dean for Education
Undergraduate Office: CMB 1098
http://www.qatar.cmu.edu/

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar is Carnegie Mellon's first and only undergraduate branch campus. Since 2004, it exists as part of a collaborative effort with the Qatar Foundation to bring outstanding American educational programs to the Middle East.

Degree Offerings

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar offers five academic programs: Biological Sciences, Business Administration, Computer Science, Computational Biology, and Information Systems. To examine the requirements for those degrees, see their respective main campus college sections elsewhere in the Undergraduate Catalog. The purpose of this section is to describe the CMU-Q policies that are independent from those of the Pittsburgh campus and outline procedures that are common to students in all programs in Qatar.

Major Sample Schedules

Sample schedules for how CMU-Q students nominally track through the academic programs can be found on the CMU-Q website as follows:

Business Administration Tracks and Advisors

For Class of 2017 and 2018: The Business Administration program requires its students to fulfill the requirements of a track (a sequence of courses in a particular discipline).  The following tracks are offered at Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar:  

  • Entrepreneurship (advisor: Tom Emerson)
  • Finance (advisor: Fuad Farooqi)
  • General Management (advisor: George White)
  • Manufacturing Management and Consulting (advisor: Patrick McGinnis)
  • Marketing (advisor: Peter Stuettgen)

For subsequent classes, students will complete a minimum of one concentration and three additional Business and Economics electives, which may add up to a second concentration.  A final concentration for Qatar campus will be determined as courses become available.  For advice on specific requirements, contact Patrick McGinnis.

Information Systems Content Areas

The Information Systems program requires its students to complete a minimum of 27 units of a content area. For advice on specific requirements, contact Daniel Phelps. The following content areas are offered at Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar:  

  • Computing and Information Systems & Technology
  • Social and Global Systems
  • User-Centered Information Design
  • Applied Informatics

Minors

In addition to the major degree programs, Carnegie Mellon  also offers a number of minors.  Minors typically consist of six courses that provide the student with a substantial exposure to the core of that academic discipline.  As with the major programs, the requirements of these minors are set by their respective departments on the main campus:

  • Arabic Studies (advisor: Zeinab Ibrahim)
  • Biology (advisor: Annette Vincent)
  • Business Administration (advisor: George White)
  • Computational Biology (advisors: Valentin Ilyin)
  • Computer Science (advisor: Khaled Harras)
  • Economics (advisor: Patrick McGinnis)
  • English Studies (advisor: Ludmila Hyman)
  • Ethics (advisor: David Gray)
  • Global Systems and Management (advisor: Daniel Phelps)
  • History (advisor: Ben Reilly)
  • Information Systems (advisor: Daniel Phelps) [only offered in Qatar]
  • Mathematical Sciences (advisor: Hasan Demirkoparan)
  • Professional Writing (advisor: Susan Hagan)
  • Psychology (advisor: Crista Crittenden)
  • Student-Defined Minors (contact Selma Limam Mansar for initial declaration)

Academic Standards and Actions

Academic Standards

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar complies with common University policies unless otherwise noted. The curriculum requirements for the Biological Sciences, Business Administration, Computer Science, Computational Biology, and Information Systems majors are set by the respective departments of the Mellon College of Science, Tepper School of Business, the School of Computer Science, and the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences on the main campus.  At the university level, the same academic standards, policies, and actions apply to all programs at CMU-Q as at the Pittsburgh campus.

Graduation Requirements

Residency

Candidate for a Bachelor's degree must complete a minimum of four semesters of full-time study, or the equivalent of part-time study, comprising at least 180 units of coursework at Carnegie Mellon.

Cumulative QPA

To be eligible to graduate, undergraduate students must complete all course requirements for their program with a cumulative Quality Point Average of at least 2.0 for all courses taken.  For undergraduate students who enrolled at Carnegie Mellon as freshmen and whose freshman grades cause the cumulative QPA to fall below 2.0, this requirement is modified to be a cumulative QPA of at least 2.0 for all courses taken after the freshman year.  Note, however, the cumulative QPA that appears on the student's final transcript will be calculated based on all grades in all courses taken, including freshman year.  Some programs may have additional QPA requirements in order to graduate.  Students are encouraged to confirm all graduation requirements with their academic advisor.

University Honors

Students maintaining a cumulative QPA of at least 3.5 after seven semesters of full-time enrollment or raising their QPA to 3.5 upon completing their graduation requirements in their final semester will graduate with University Honors.

Academic Actions

Students carrying either a full-time course load (defined as 36 or more units) or a part-time course load (defined as fewer than 36 units) are subject to academic actions.

Dean's List

Students earn Dean's List recognition in a given semester by achieving one of two minimum standards. They must either earn a semester QPA of 3.75 or higher (while taking at least 36 factorable units and receiving no incomplete grades) or earn a semester QPA of 3.50 or higher (while taking at least 45 factorable units and receiving no incomplete grades).  The CMU-Q Dean's List is calculated uniformly for all students across all majors due to the fact that CMU-Q majors are drawn from four different Pittsburgh colleges with varying Dean's List criteria.

Other Academic Actions

Students are subject to academic actions if they fail to meet the minimum standards toward their degree.

Minimum Standards

The minimum standards are defined as follows:

  • First year students: a semester QPA of at least 1.75.
  • Beyond the first year: a semester QPA and a cumulative QPA (excluding the first year) of at least 2.0.
  • Students who begin a semester enrolled in 36 or more units and later drop below 36 units are subject to academic actions regardless of their semester QPA.
Probation

Probation occurs when a student's semester record fails to meet the minimum standards described above. The term of a probation is one semester as a full-time student. Students are removed from probation if they complete at least 36 units and:

  • For a first year student, probation is removed at the end of the second semester if the second semester’s QPA is 1.75 or above.
  • For students in the third or above semesters, probation is removed if they raise their cumulative QPA above 2.00, and achieve a semester QPA of 2.0 or higher (excluding the first year).
Probation Continued

Occasionally, a student's probation may be continued if the student's cumulative record does not meet minimum standards, but his or her semester record suggests that the student may do so by the end of the next semester. This action is normally taken only when a student's semester QPA is above 2.0 but their cumulative QPA is not yet above 2.0.

Suspension

A student who fails to meet the minimum standards described above at the end of the probation semester will be suspended.

  • A first-year student will be suspended if the QPA from each semester is below 1.75.
  • A student in the third or subsequent semester of study will be suspended if the semester factor or the cumulative factor (excluding the first year) is below 2.00 for two consecutive semesters.

Suspension is for a minimum of one year and the student is required to follow University procedures for departing from campus. At the end of the year, the student may petition to return to CMU-Q by:

  • Receiving permission in writing from the Associate Dean for Education to resume their studies. This permission would normally be granted after the student would produce evidence for fulfilling return conditions (if any) and for taking convincing steps to ameliorate the cause of the suspension. To get approval to resume their studies, the student must demonstrate that they are better prepared to perform above the minimum standards for graduation than before they were suspended.
  • Completing a Return from Leave of Absence Form from Enrollment Services.

Students coming back from suspension are placed on Probation for the semester of their return.

Students who have been suspended or have withdrawn are required to absent themselves from the campus within a maximum of two days after the action and to remain off the campus for the duration of the time specified. This action includes debarment from part-time or summer courses at the university for the duration of the period of the action. Suspended students may not hold student jobs with the university.

Drop

A student who fails to meet minimum standards at any point after returning from a suspension is subject to a drop action. A drop action is a permanent severance; the student is required to follow University procedures for departing from campus and may not enroll again in the future.

The typical progression of academic actions is Probation, Suspension, then Drop but the intent of the academic actions are to take measures that are in the student's best interest, and therefore the school may bypass one or more of these steps in an unusual case and suspend or drop a student without prior probation.

Other Regulations Affecting Student Status
Adding a Class

Students may add classes to their schedule under the following rules:

  1. Students may add a full-semester course through the first 10 class days of the semester.

  2. Students may add half-semester (mini) courses through the first 5 class days of the course.
     

Dropping/Withdrawing from a Class

Students who wish to drop a course (without receiving a “W” grade on the transcript) must do so before the published CMU-Q Drop deadline (shortly after mid-semester grades are published). After that date, students may withdraw from a course up to the last day of classes and receive a “W” grade on their transcript. After the last day of classes student may not withdraw from a class.  All drops/withdrawals must be consistent with remaining a full-time student, that is, a student carrying a full-time course load (at least 36 units) as of the last day to add (the 10th class day of the semester) may not drop/withdraw below 36 units after that time.

Course Overloads

A normal maximum load for a CMU-Q student is 51 units.  In order to overload (i.e., take more than 51 units but no more than 63), a student must have attained a QPA of at least 3.0 in the previous semester, or have a cumulative QPA of 3.0.  A student wishing to pursue a greater number of units must petition the Associate Dean for Education to do so.

Non-Carnegie Mellon Courses

Carnegie Mellon University offers students the opportunity to take courses for credit through a cross-registration program and through the receipt of transfer credit from other accredited institutions. The Carnegie Mellon transcript will include information on such courses as follows:

Carnegie Mellon courses and courses taken through the university’s cross-registration program will have grades recorded on the transcript and be factored into the QPA. All other courses will be recorded on this transcript indicating where the course was taken, but no grade will be reported. Such courses will not be taken into account for academic actions, honors or QPA calculations. (Note: Suspended students may take courses elsewhere with prior approval; however, they will not receive transfer credit.)

Cross Registration

Courses offered for cross-registration are those taken through an agreement with Texas A&M University at Qatar; Georgetown School of Foreign Service in Qatar; Northwestern University in Qatar; Virginia Commonwealth University in Qatar; and Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar that full-time students at Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar can take up to one class a semester at their schools. Cross-registration requires the completion of a cross-registration form with the appropriate signatures from the home and host institutions. Completion of the form does not guarantee a space in the requested course. The agreement only applies during the regular academic year, normal course transfer rules apply in the summer.

Course Transfer

Students may receive credit for courses taken outside of Carnegie Mellon if they successfully petition the Associate Dean for Education in advance for permission.  Students must take these courses for a letter grade and instruction must be in English for non-language courses. Credit (but not the grade) will normally transfer for courses with a grade equivalent to at least a “B”. The class's course description must be a close match to the Carnegie Mellon course and from an accredited institution.  Students may not receive credit for any courses taken on-line unless there is some safeguard to ensure that the actual student took the course (e.g., a proctored final taken under supervision at CMU-Q).

Students may not receive credit for more than five non-CMU courses during their undergraduate career as a Carnegie Mellon student. Classes taken prior to enrolling in Carnegie Mellon, during study abroad semesters, and as cross registration with other education City schools do not count toward the course transfer limit. All students must meet the University's residency requirement of completing at least 180 units of Carnegie Mellon coursework.

Campus Exchange and Transfer

Campus Exchange

CMU-Q and Pittsburgh students in good academic standing (not on Probation/Suspension) may study on the other campus for one semester on a space available basis and with the approval of both the home and host departments.  Space constraints on both campuses may force programs to limit the number of students who can exchange in any given semester.  CMU-Q students may study abroad for a second semester at another institution (not CMU Pittsburgh) if an appropriate additional study abroad opportunity arises and their academic advisor agrees.

Summer studies in Pittsburgh are not subject to any constraint other than being in good academic standing (not on Probation/Suspension).

Transfer

Internally between majors at CMU-Q

Students may transfer between majors at CMU-Q on a space-available and academic performance basis. Students interested in transferring should consult with the Associate Dean for Education and the academic advisor of the new major.  First-year students may not apply for transfer until they receive their spring mid-semester grades.

Between CMU-Q and Carnegie Mellon, Pittsburgh

Most majors in Pittsburgh have very few open spaces for transfer students.  As a result, decisions about transfer to any major in Pittsburgh will be made by the receiving department, are highly competitive, and are not likely.  It has historically been very difficult to be granted transfer to Pittsburgh.

Transfers to CMU-Q from other Universities

Transfer students from other universities must apply through the Admissions Office at Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar.  The Admissions Office, the Associate Dean for Education, and the program director will determine if there is space available in the desired program and if the student's past academic performance warrants admission. 

Faculty

AMAL AL-MALKI, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., University of London; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.

CHADI AOUN, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., University of New South Wales; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.

RAVICHANDRA BACHU, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., The City University of New York; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.

ILKER BAYBARS, Professor; Deputy Dean Emeritus, Tepper School of Business; George Leland Bach Chair – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.

HOUDA BOUAMOR, Visiting Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D. , Université Paris Sud; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.

MOHAMED BOUAOUINA, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Pierre and Marie Curie University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.

STEPHEN CALABRESE, Visiting Associate Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.

ANIS CHARFI, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Technische Universitat Darmstadt; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.

ALEXANDER CHEEK, Assistant Teaching Professor – Master of Design, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.

BENJAMIN COLLIER, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.

CRISTA CRITTENDEN, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.

HASAN DEMIRKOPARAN, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Michigan State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.

GIANNI DI CARO, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Université Libre de Bruxelles; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.

MUHAMMAD FUAD FAROOQI, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Richard Ivey School of Business; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.

JOHN GASPER, Visiting Assistant Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.

DAVID GRAY, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.

SUSAN HAGAN, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.

MAHER HAKIM, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.

MOHAMMAD HAMMOUD, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.

KHALED HARRAS, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D, University of California-Santa Barbara; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.

ERIK HELIN, Special Lecturer – M.A., Eastern Michigan University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.

ADAM HODGES, Visiting Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of Colorado, Boulder; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.

LUDMILA HYMAN, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.

ZEINAB IBRAHIM, Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Georgetown University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.

VALENTIN ILYIN, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.

LANSINE KABA, Distinguished Visiting Professor – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.

CHRISTOS KAPOUTSIS, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.

NIRAJ KHARE, Visiting Assistant Professor – Ph.D., Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.

DIVAKARAN LIGINLAL, Teaching Professor – Ph.D., University of Arizona-Tucson; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.

TERESA MACGREGOR, Librarian and Director of Library – MSLS, University of Kentucky; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.

SELMA LIMAM MANSAR, Teaching Professor and Associate Dean for Education – Ph.D., National Polytechnic Institute of Grenoble; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.

J. PATRICK MCGINNIS, Distinguished Career Professor – M.A., Pittsburg State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.

THOMAS MITCHELL, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.

JOHN O'BRIEN, Associate Professor and Associate Dean – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.

JOYCE OATES, Visiting Instructor – Ph.D., American University; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.

KEMAL OFLAZER, Teaching Professor and Associate Dean for Research – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.

MARION OLIVER, Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.

SILVIA PESSOA, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.

DANIEL PHELPS, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Florida State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.

SAQUIB RAZAK, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., SUNY-Binghamton; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.

BENJAMIN REILLY, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.

GISELLE REIS, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D. , Technische Universität Wien; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.

DUDLEY REYNOLDS, Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Indiana University-Bloomington; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.

GORDON RULE, Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.

ALICIA SALAZ, Reference and Instruction Librarian – D.Ed., University of Liverpool; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.

PETER STUETTGEN, Visiting Assistant Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.

RAY TSAI, Professor of Practice – Ph.D., University of North Texas; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.

STEPHEN VARGO, Visiting Assistant Teaching Professor – MBA, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.

ANNETTE SHOBA VINCENT, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., National University of Singapore; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.

GEORGE WHITE, Distinguished Career Professor – Ph.D., University of Oregon; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.

ZELEALEM YILMA, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.

IHAB YOUNIS, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.