Department of Chemistry Courses

Note on Course Numbers

Each Carnegie Mellon course number begins with a two-digit prefix which designates the department offering the course (76-xxx courses are offered by the Department of English, etc.). Although each department maintains its own course numbering practices, typically the first digit after the prefix indicates the class level: xx-1xx courses are freshmen-level, xx-2xx courses are sophomore level, etc. xx-6xx courses may be either undergraduate senior-level or graduate-level, depending on the department. xx-7xx courses and higher are graduate-level. Please consult the Schedule of Classes each semester for course offerings and for any necessary pre-requisites or co-requisites.

09-101 Introduction to Experimental Chemistry
Summer: 3 units
This is a seven week chemistry laboratory course that is designed to introduce students to some basic laboratory skills, techniques, and equipment commonly used in experimental chemical investigations. The experiments will apply concepts in organic synthesis, quantitative analysis using visible spectrophotometry, kinetics, acid-base chemistry, thermochemistry, transition metal chemistry, chromatography, and protein biochemistry. 1 hr. lec., 3 hrs. lab.
09-103 Atoms, Molecules and Chemical Change
Fall: 9 units
This is a one-semester introductory college level course designed for non-science and engineering majors who have had a high school course in chemistry. Students with primary or additional majors in MCS, CIT or SCS will not be allowed to enroll. Chemistry topics will be introduced on an as needed basis in the contexts of air pollution, the ozone layer, global warming, acid rain, safe drinking water, alternative energy sources, plastics, and drug design. Students will apply concepts in topics such as the classification of matter, the relationship between matter and energy, atomic theory and the Periodic Table, chemical bonding, molecular shapes, molecular polarity, interparticle forces, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, properties of aqueous solutions, acid-base chemistry, redox chemistry, and organic chemistry. Students will gain an understanding of how chemistry impacts major environmental, social, political, and economic issues that we encounter daily. They will also learn to apply chemical concepts to new situations or contexts. Students with credit for 09-105 or more advanced chemistry courses will not be allowed to enroll in this course. 3 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec.
09-105 Introduction to Modern Chemistry I
Fall and Spring: 10 units
This course begins with a very brief survey of some fundamental principles of chemistry and a presentation of chemically interesting applications and sophisticated problems. These will form the basis for introducing the relationships between the structure of molecules and their chemical properties and behavior. The subject matter will include principles of atomic structure, chemical bonding, intermolecular interactions and molecular structures of organic and inorganic compounds including some transition metal complexes. Relevant examples will be drawn from such areas as environmental, materials, and biological chemistry. 3 hrs. lec, 2 hrs. rec.
09-106 Modern Chemistry II
Fall and Spring: 10 units
This course provides an overview of thermodynamics, kinetics and chemical equilibrium. Topics include the flow of energy in chemical systems; the spontaneity of chemical processes, i.e. entropy and free energy; the mechanisms and rates of chemical reactions; and the use of chemical equilibrium to reason about acid-base chemistry, solubility and electrochemistry. Applications include the energy economy, biological systems and environmental chemistry. 3 hrs. lec., 2 hrs. rec.
Prerequisites: 09-107 or 09-105
09-107 Honors Chemistry: Fundamentals, Concepts and Applications
Fall: 10 units
This is an honors introductory course designed to provide students with a rigorous coverage of general chemistry in the context of grand challenges in the field. Traditional topics, such as equilibrium, kinetics, acid-base chemistry, and quantum chemistry, will be discussed through current research on nucleic acid-based therapeutics, atmospheric chemistry of pollutants, and catalysts for the production of solar fuels. The approach will integrate traditional lectures and readings from the textbook with discussions of journal articles, on-line content on research methods, and guest lectures from CMU faculty in these areas. This course assumes strong preparation in chemistry (AP Chemistry score of 3 or greater; IB Chemistry score of 5 or greater; SAT II Chemistry exam with a score of 700 or greater) and will be offered at an accelerated pace. The goal is to teach core principles of chemistry while exposing students to the diversity of modern chemical research and how it is addressing grand challenges facing society. 3 hrs. lec., 2 hrs. rec.
09-108 The Illusion and Magic of Food
Fall: 6 units
Have you ever wondered how your morning orange juice when squeezed fresh from the fruit spoils after few hours while the one from the market lasts much longer without apparent alteration? How is that ground meat looks so red on the outside and unpleasantly brown in the inside? What is the nutritional value of milk and honey? Want to know how fruit flies helped to discover ways to make better-smelling beer? Why is wine normally stored in a dark glass bottle? These and many more questions will be answered in this course, not only by the instructor but also through the students research and curiosity. This course will introduce chemistry concepts on an as-needed basis but it will remain at the level of high school chemistry. We expect to help the student understand what food is made of, its nutritional value, how it is processed to offer longer shelf life, and how this may affect critical components. The topics will vary depending of the students motivation in learning about different concepts related to the food industry, from processing to analysis to packaging and appearance, we plan to discuss interesting things in every class and finish the course with a broad knowledge of what is on our table and better criteria to select our food. 3 hrs. lec.
09-109 Kitchen Chemistry Sessions
Intermittent: 3 units
Ever wanted to boil water in ice? Cook an egg so the yolk is set but the white still runny? Lick a lemon or drink vinegar but have it taste?sweet? Make "caviar" from fruit juice and noodles from yogurt? Explore the science of molecular gastronomy through the lectures and demonstrations that reveal the chemistry and biochemistry of food ingredients and their preparation. Then use a kitchen as your "laboratory" to test hypotheses and delve into molecular cooking - you may just get to eat your lab results. For this course high school background in chemistry would help but nothing more advanced is required. Concepts will be discussed on a need to know basis. Students with stronger chemistry backgrounds should enroll in 09-209. 3 hrs. lec. and lab
09-122 Molecular Tools for Biological and Chemical Studies
Spring: 6 units
The increased fluorescence of certain molecules, also known as dyes, can signal their binding to a specific biological target such as DNA. This phenomenon finds important application in the biological and medicinal field where dyes are used as molecular tools. For example, fluorescent dyes can be used to detect the expression of a gene; survival of cells; site of accumulation of a metabolite and many of them are used in diagnostics. This course is aimed at offering a hands-on laboratory experience in the interface of chemistry and biology, so called bioorganic chemistry. The student's project will be to prepare a dye, thiazole orange, that will show increased fluorescence upon binding DNA or a protein, thus, signaling the binding event. A dye designed to prevent DNA binding will be tested alongside to highlight how molecular design works. Molecular size and geometry are important elements in the design of molecules that specifically bind biological targets; 3D molecular modeling software (freeware) and hand-held models will be used to analyze how these factors play a role in target-dye interaction.
09-201 Undergraduate Seminar I
Fall: 1 unit
Issues and topics of importance to beginning chemistry majors are discussed in this course. It provides a general introduction to the facilities, faculty and programs of the Department of Chemistry and introduces students to career and research opportunities in the field of chemistry. Enrollment limited to students majoring in chemistry. 1 hr.
09-202 Undergraduate Seminar II: Safety and Environmental Issues for Chemists
Spring: 1 unit
Issues and topics focused on laboratory safety are discussed in this class. The topics are selected to supplement information covered in 09-221, Laboratory I. This course is intended to provide the necessary safety training for students wishing to undertake undergraduate research projects in the laboratory and is taught in collaboration with the Office of Environmental Health and Safety. Enrollment is limited to chemistry majors. 1 hr.
09-204 Professional Communication Skills in Chemistry
Spring: 3 units
This required course for chemistry majors promotes development of written and oral communication skills in various formats within the discipline. Students are expected to develop these skills by becoming more familiar with the style and format of the chemical literature, current topics in chemistry, and research projects in the Department. Other learning outcomes include developing critical reading skills, providing effective feedback to peers' written and oral communication, demonstrating the ability to revise written work, and using chemical structure drawing software. 1 hr. lec.
Prerequisite: 09-221
09-207 Techniques in Quantitative Analysis
Fall: 9 units
09-207 is the first of two chemistry lab courses required for the BS and BA degrees in biological sciences and the intercollege major in biological sciences and psychology. It is also suitable for fulfilling the requirement for two general chemistry labs for admission to programs in the health professions. The experimental work emphasizes the techniques of quantitative chemical analysis. Included are projects dealing with a variety of instrumental and wet chemical techniques. A mixture of individual and partner experiments concluding with one team experiment is conducted during the semester. In addition to laboratory techniques, safety, and written communication skills are emphasized.
Prerequisite: 09-106
09-208 Techniques for Organic Synthesis and Analysis
Intermittent: 9 units
09-208 is the second of two chemistry laboratory courses required for the BS in biological sciences and the intercollege major in psychology and biological sciences. It is also suitable for fulfilling the requirement for the laboratory experience for application to programs in the health professions. The course emphasizes experimental work in separations, synthesis, and analysis of organic compounds, including chromatography and spectroscopy. Written communication skills will be developed by means of laboratory reports and essays. 1 hr lec, 5 hrs lab
Prerequisites: (09-219 or 09-217) and (09-221 or 09-207)
09-209 Kitchen Chemistry Sessions
Intermittent: 3 units
Ever wanted to boil water in ice? Cook an egg so the yolk is set but the white still runny? Lick a lemon or drink vinegar but have it taste?sweet? Make "caviar" from fruit juice and noodles from yogurt? Explore the science of molecular gastronomy through the lectures and demonstrations that reveal the chemistry and biochemistry of food ingredients and their preparation. Then use a kitchen as your "laboratory" to test hypotheses and delve into molecular cooking - you may just get to eat your lab results. Students enrolling in this course are assumed to have a college level background in chemistry including introductory organic chemistry. Students without a solid chemistry background should take the lower level 09-109. 3 hrs. lec. and lab
Prerequisites: 09-217 or 09-219
09-214 Physical Chemistry
Spring: 9 units
This is a one-semester course intended primarily for students majoring in Biological Sciences, students pursuing a B.A. degree program in Chemistry, and students in the B.S.A.program with a concentration in chemistry. The course focuses on thermodynamics, transport and reaction rates and their application to chemical and biological systems. Emphasis is given to attaining a good fundamental understanding of entropy and free energy. This is more a concepts than skills building course. Topics include applications of thermodynamics to chemical and biochemical equilibria, electrochemistry, solutions, and chemical kinetics. 3 hrs. lec. Prerequisites: 09106 and 21122 and (33111 or 33106)
Prerequisites: 09-106 and (21-122 or 21-124) and (33-121 or 33-141 or 33-106 or 33-111)
09-215 Chemistry Tech I to Lab I Transition
Fall and Spring: 3 units
09-215 is a 3-unit course intended for students who have taken 09-207, Techniques in Quantitative Analysis, who decide later in their academic experience that they wish to pursue a degree or an additional major in chemistry. The chemistry major requires a 12-unit lab class, 09-221 Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis. This course will utilize self-study and problem solving to introduce or reinforce key concepts covered in 09-221 that are not introduced or are de-emphasized in 09-207. Students will also propose an idea for an independent lab-based project and carry it through all stages of development but not perform the actual lab work. The project development will require written work products as well as an oral presentation. The course must be completed before the last semester of the students degree program.
Prerequisite: 09-207 Min. grade C
09-216 Chemistry Tech II to Lab II Transition
Fall: 3 units
09-216 is a 3-unit course intended for students who have taken 09-208, Techniques in Organic Synthesis and Analysis, who decide later in their academic experience that they wish to pursue a degree or an additional major in chemistry. The chemistry major requires a 12-unit lab class, 09-222 Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis. This course will utilize self-study and problem solving to introduce or reinforce key concepts covered in 09-222 that are not introduced or are de-emphasized in 09-208.
09-217 Organic Chemistry I
Fall: 9 units
This course presents an overview of structure and bonding as it pertains to organic molecules. Selected topics include: introduction to functional group chemistry, stereochemistry, conformational analysis, reaction mechanisms and use of retrosynthetic analysis in the development of multistep syntheses. Methods for structure determination of organic compounds by modern spectroscopic techniques are introduced. 3 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec.
Prerequisites: 09-105 or 09-107
09-218 Organic Chemistry II
Spring: 9 units
This course further develops many of the concepts introduced in Organic Chemistry I, 09-217. Emphasis is placed on the utilization of reaction mechanisms for understanding the outcome of chemical transformations, and the employment of a wide variety of functional groups and reaction types in the synthesis of organic molecules. Also included in the course will be special topics selected from the following; polymers and advanced materials, biomolecules such as carbohydrates, proteins and nucleic acids, and drug design. 3 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec.
Prerequisites: 09-217 or 09-219
09-219 Modern Organic Chemistry
Fall: 10 units
Traditional introductory organic chemistry courses present structure, reactivity, mechanisms and synthesis of organic compounds. Students taking 09-219 will be exposed to the same topics, but presented in greater depth and broader context, with applications to allied fields such as (1) polymer and materials science, (2) environmental science and (3) biological sciences and medicine. This will be accomplished through an extra 50 minute lecture period, where more advanced topics and applications will be discussed. Topics will include computational chemistry, green chemistry, chiral separations, photochemistry, reaction kinetics, controlled radical polymerizations and petroleum cracking. Students who complete 09-219 will have a strong foundation in organic chemistry as well as a sophisticated understanding of how organic chemistry is currently practiced. 4 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec.
Prerequisites: 09-107 or 09-105
09-220 Modern Organic Chemistry II
Spring: 10 units
This course builds on 09-219 by introducing students to additional functional groups, chemical reaction mechanisms and synthetic strategies commonly used in the practice of organic chemistry. Advanced topics to be presented during the extra lecture will include multidimensional NMR spectroscopy, enantioselective synthesis, ionic polymerization, bioorganic and medicinal chemistry, natural products chemistry and toxicology. Students who complete 09-220 will have a strong foundation in synthetic, mechanistic and structural organic chemistry and will understand how this applies to human health and the environment. 4 hrs. lec, 1 hr. rec.
Prerequisite: 09-219
09-221 Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis
Fall and Spring: 12 units
This course is the first in a sequence of four laboratory courses on experimental aspects of chemistry required for the B.S. degree in chemistry. The experimental work emphasizes the techniques of quantitative chemical analysis. Included are projects dealing with a variety of instrumental and wet chemical techniques. The course is project-oriented with the experiments becoming more complex, requiring greater student input into the experimental design as the semester progresses. A mixture of individual and team experiments are conducted during the semester. In addition to techniques, safety, written and oral communication skills, and effective teamwork are emphasized. 2 hrs. lec., 6 hrs. lab.
Prerequisite: 09-106
09-222 Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis
Fall and Spring: 12 units
In this second course in the laboratory sequence, students acquire laboratory skills relevant to synthesis and purification of organic compounds, as well as the practical use of chromatography and spectroscopy. Students will also further develop technical writing skills through preparation of lab reports. 2 hrs. lec., 6 hrs. lab.
Prerequisites: (09-217 or 09-219) and 09-221
09-224 Supramolecular Chemistry
Intermittent: 3 units
Supramolecular chemistry involves the use of noncovalent bonding interactions to assemble molecules into stable, well-defined structures. This course will provide students with an introduction to this exciting field of research, which is finding increasing applications in the biological and materials sciences, nanotechnology and medicine. Students will be introduced to essential background concepts such as types of noncovalent bonding and strategies for the design of supramolecular assemblies. Readings from monographs and classroom lectures by the instructor will cover this material. Students will then begin to read about applications of supramolecular chemistry from the scientific literature, learning to compare articles, to evaluate the quality of the data and interpretations reached by the authors, to use the knowledge gained from these readings and discussions to predict the outcomes of related experiments, and to ultimately be able to design their own experiments to answer research questions. Meeting hours set by instructor, enrollment limited with priority given to sophomore chemistry majors.
Prerequisites: 09-219 Min. grade C or 09-217 Min. grade C
09-225 Climate Change: Chemistry, Physics and Planetary Science
Fall: 9 units
Understanding the essential features of climate and climate change is a critical tool for modern citizens and modern scientists. In addition, the prevalence of climate skepticism in modern political discourse requires of citizens that they be able to think critically about a technical subject and also be able to distinguish reliable scientific experts from advocates. In this course we shall examine the climate of terrestrial planets (specifically Earth and Venus) through geological time and to the present, considering geochemical methods used to determine atmospheric composition over Earths history (specifically the onset of oxygen in the atmosphere as well as the relationship between carbon dioxide and global temperature over geological timescales. The shorter climate history of Venus will be considered as a counter example, where the brightening dim young sun overwhelmed negative feedbacks in the weathering cycle, leading to a runaway greenhouse amplified by complete evaporation of the onetime Venus ocean. Throughout the course, we will consider climate change driven by human activity since the industrial revolution as a unifying theme.
Prerequisites: (09-107 or 09-105) and (33-141 or 33-121 or 33-151)
09-231 Mathematical Methods for Chemists
Fall: 9 units
This course covers mathematical techniques that are important in the chemical sciences. The techniques will be covered in the context of chemical phenomena, and combine topics from 3-dimensional calculus, differential equations, linear algebra and statistics. This course does not count towards the minor in chemistry. 3 hrs. lec.
Prerequisites: 09-106 and (21-122 or 21-124)
09-301 Undergraduate Seminar III
Fall: 1 unit
Students attend seminars on current topics in chemistry. Students are sent a menu of choices for each week of the semester and may select topics of interest. Enrollment is restricted to students majoring in chemistry. 1 hr.
09-302 Undergraduate Seminar IV
Spring: 1 unit
Students attend seminars presented by senior chemistry majors. Students provide peer evaluations of the seminars and through the process students become familiar with special topics in chemistry. The course establishes what should be included in a good seminar. This seminar courses is one of 6 required for the chemistry major. If a schedule conflict exists, students may, with permission of the instructor, attend other chemistry seminars or make other arrangements to fulfill the requirement. 1 hr.
09-321 Laboratory III: Molecular Design and Synthesis
Fall: 12 units
In this third course in the laboratory sequence, students will learn a variety of more advanced techniques for organic synthesis and characterization, and will gain experience with developing and designing synthetic procedures. Student writing skills are further reinforced through preparation of detailed lab reports. 2 hrs. lec., 6 hrs. lab.
Prerequisites: (09-218 or 09-220) and 09-222
09-322 Laboratory IV: Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics
Spring: 12 units
This laboratory course is devoted to physical chemistry experiments, which involve the use of modern spectroscopic instrumentation to probe the optical and magnetic properties of molecules. The experiments include the use of high-resolution infrared, laser Raman, NMR, EPR, fluorescence, and UV-visible spectroscopies. Additional experiments demonstrate methods for measuring enzyme-catalyzed reaction rate constants, and the use of scanning probe microscopy for imaging and characterization of biological macromolecules.Throughout the course the students will learn how to use computer algebra packages for rigorous data analysis and modeling and will develop the skills in basic electronics, and vacuum techniques. 2 hrs. lec., 6 hrs. lab.
Prerequisites: 09-221 and 09-344
09-323 Bioorganic Chemistry Laboratory
12 units
Bioorganic chemistry is concerned with the action of synthesized compounds on biological systems. In order to maximize the likelihood of identifying a biologically active compound, synthetic libraries are often employed, requiring extensive familiarity with simple, efficient chemical coupling steps and protecting group chemistry. In this inquiry based laboratory course, using a process that mimics the current practice in drug discovery by pharmaceutical companies, students will rationally design a compound library in hopes of finding a compound active against a selected biological target, search for active compounds in the library, and then quantitatively characterize any identified compounds for activity. Working in small groups, students will develop proposals for and execute the target assay selected, the library synthesis, and the screening approach. Students will write reports summarizing the results in each phase of the course. Throughout the course, students will be introduced to concepts relevant to industrial scientific research, including regulatory compliance, quality control and assurance, and intellectual property.
Prerequisites: (09-220 or 09-218) and 09-222
09-331 Modern Analytical Instrumentation
Fall: 9 units
This course will cover all aspects of analytical instrumentation and its application to problems in materials, environmental, and biological chemistry. Topics covered will include mass spectrometry, optical spectroscopies and NMR. In addition, the course will emphasize how to select an analytical method appropriate to the problem at hand, how to optimize the signal to noise obtained by a measurement, and the quantitative analysis of experimental data. Some basic electronics will be covered as well. 3 hrs. lec.
Prerequisites: 09-222 and (33-122 or 33-142)
09-344 Physical Chemistry (Quantum): Microscopic Principles of Physical Chemistry
Fall: 9 units
The measurement and theoretical description of the properties of atoms and molecules are presented. The elementary principles of quantum chemistry are developed. The many types of spectroscopy used to study atoms and molecules are described. Methods of atomic structure determination are discussed. The structure and properties of solids are also presented. The basic results of statistical chemistry are outlined and a brief connection to thermodynamics is made. 3 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec.
Prerequisites: (09-105 or 09-107) and (33-106 or 33-141 or 33-111 or 33-121)
09-345 Physical Chemistry (Thermo): Macroscopic Principles of Physical Chemistry
Spring: 9 units
The measurement and theoretical descriptions of the equilibrium properties of chemical systems are presented. Chemical thermodynamics is introduced at the upper division level. The phases of matter are discussed. The quantitative treatment of mixtures is developed. The detailed description of chemical equilibrium is elaborated. The measurement and theoretical description of the nonequilibrium properties of chemical systems are presented. Elementary transport properties are introduced. The principles of classical chemical kinetics are developed in great detail. 3 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec.
Prerequisites: 09-106 and (21-259 or 09-231)
09-347 Advanced Physical Chemistry
Fall: 12 units
09-347 Advanced Physical Chemistry Fall: 12 units A course of study designed to provide the microscopic basis of concepts encountered in the field of chemical engineering. The properties of macroscopic materials are calculated in terms of the microscopic properties of atoms and molecules. Both classical and quantum approaches are employed. The thermodynamic properties are developed in terms of the chemical potentials of the constituent particles. The transport properties are calculated using molecular dynamics and Brownian dynamics. Classical chemical kinetics is fully developed and applied to complex reactions. Rate constants are calculated for simple reactions in gases and solutions. The course enrollment is limited to chemical engineering majors. 4 hrs. lec.
Prerequisites: (06-151 or 06-221) and (06-262 or 06-155) and 09-106 and (33-122 or 33-112 or 33-107 or 33-142)
09-348 Inorganic Chemistry
Spring: 10 units
The focus of this class is understanding the properties of the elements and of the inorganic compounds. The electronic structure of elements is discussed as the basis for the element's organization in the Periodic Table and for their properties. The systematic chemistry of main group elements and of transition metals is presented. The number of inorganic compounds is extremely large and their properties are extremely diverse. Therefore in this course, the presentation of physical and chemical properties of inorganic compounds is based upon the observation of the trends in the respective properties and the relation between these trends and the place of the elements in the Periodic Table. 3 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec.
Prerequisites: (09-107 or 09-105) and 21-120
09-401 Undergraduate Seminar V
Fall: 1 unit
Students attend seminars on current topics in chemistry. Students are sent a menu of choices for each week of the semester and may select topics of interest. Enrollment is restricted to students majoring in chemistry. 1 hr.
09-402 Undergraduate Seminar VI
Fall and Spring: 3 units
Students enrolled in this course present a 20 - 30 minute oral report on a current topic in chemistry. This may be from the student's research work or a special chemistry topic of general interest. Presentations or papers prepared for other courses are not acceptable for this purpose. Thoroughness in the use of the chemical literature is emphasized. The use of presentation aids such as PowerPoint is required. Other students in the class submit written evaluations of the presentation. Talks are recorded for viewing by the student and instructor as a means of providing individualized feedback about presentation skills. A seminar presentation is required of all chemistry majors. No exceptions possible. Enrollment is limited to students majoring in chemistry. 1 hr.
09-435 Independent Study Chemistry
All Semesters
The course allows students to earn academic credit for concentrated study in a topic area developed in conjunction with and monitored by a faculty member in the Department of Chemistry. These topics are distinct from projects that would rise to the level of undergraduate research either because they are in unrelated areas distinct from the faculty member's research interests or may constitute the investigation and compilation of existing information from a variety of resources and may not be expected to result in the generation of new information as is a reasonable expected outcome in undergraduate research (likely is not publishable).
09-445 Undergraduate Research
Fall and Spring
Properly qualified students may undertake research projects under the direction of members of the faculty, normally 6 to 12 hrs/week. A written, detailed report describing the project and results is required. Course may be taken only with the consent of a faculty research advisor in chemistry or on occasion in another department provided that the project is chemical in nature and with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. The number of units taken generally corresponds to the actual number of hours the student actually spends in the lab doing research during the week. Maximum number of units taken per semester is 18.
09-455 Honors Thesis
Fall and Spring
Students enrolled in the departmental honors program (B.S. with Departmental Honors or combined 4-year B.S./M.S. degree) are required to enroll in this course to complete the honors degree requirements. A thesis written in an acceptable style describing an original research project, and a successful oral defense of the thesis topic before a THesis Committee are required. Limited to students accepted into the honors program. (B.S. Honors candidates normally enroll for 6 units; B.S./M.S. candidates enroll for 15 units.)
09-502 Organic Chemistry of Polymers
Spring: 9 units
A study of the synthesis and reactions of high polymers. Emphasis is on practical polymer preparation and on the fundamental kinetics and mechanisms of polymerization reactions. Topics include: relationship of synthesis and structure, step-growth polymerization, chain-growth polymerization via radical, ionic and coordination intermediates, copolymerization, discussions of specialty polymers and reactions of polymers. 09-509, Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules, is excellent preparation for this course but is not required. 3-6 hrs. lec. (Graduate Course: 12 units, 09-741)
Prerequisites: 09-218 or 09-220
09-507 Nanoparticles
Intermittent: 9 units
This course discusses the chemistry, physics, and biology aspects of several major types of nanoparticles, including metal, semiconductor, magnetic, carbon, and polymer nanostructures. For each type of nanoparticles, we select pedagogical examples (e.g. Au, Ag, CdSe, etc.) and introduce their synthetic methods, physical and chemical properties, self assembly, and various applications. Apart from the nanoparticle materials, other topics to be briefly covered include microscopy and spectroscopy techniques for nanoparticle characterization, and nanolithography techniques for fabricating nano-arrays. The course is primarily descriptive with a focus on understanding major concepts (such as plasmon, exciton, polaron, etc.). The lectures are power point presentation style with sufficient graphical materials to aid students to better understand the course materials. Overall, this course is intended to provide an introduction to the new frontiers of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Students will gain an understanding of the important concepts and research themes of nanoscience and nanotechnology, and develop their abilities to pursue highly disciplinary nanoscience research. The course should be of interest and accessible to advanced undergraduates and graduate students in fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. 3 hrs. lec.
Prerequisites: (33-107 or 33-112) and 09-106
09-509 Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules
Fall: 9 units
This course develops fundamental principles of polymer science. Emphasis is placed on physio-chemical concepts associated with the macromolecular nature of polymeric materials. Engineering aspects of the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of these materials are discussed in relation to chain microstructure. Topics include an introduction to polymer science and a general discussion of commercially important polymers; molecular weight; condensation and addition synthesis mechanisms with emphasis on molecular weight distribution; solution thermodynamics and molecular conformation; rubber elasticity; and the rheological and mechanical properties of polymeric systems. (This course is also listed as 06-609. Graduate Course: 12 units, 09-715) 3 hrs. lec.
Prerequisites: 09-345 or 09-347
09-510 Chemistry and Sustainability
Spring: 9 units
This course aims to educate students in the foundations of systematic leadership for building a sustainable world. Many sustainability challenges are associated with commercial chemicals and with operational modes of the chemical enterprise. For scientists, effectiveness in solving the technical challenges and redirecting cultural behavior is the defining substance of sustainability leadership. The course aims to challenge students to analyze and understand the root causes of unsustainability, especially in the technological dimension, to imagine a more sustainable world and to begin to define personal leadership missions. Students will be introduced to sustainability ethics as the foundation stone of transformative sustainability leadership, to the Collins ?Sustainability Compass? and ?Code of Sustainability Ethics? and to the Robért/Broman ?Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD)?as powerful guiding tools. The Collins ?Bookcase of Green Science Challenges? organizes the technical content. It systematizes the major chemical sustainability challenges of our time: clean synthesis, renewable feed-stocks, safe energy, elemental pollutants, persistent molecular toxicants and endocrine disruptors. Focal areas will be the technical, toxicological and cultural histories of elemental and molecular pollutants and endocrine disruptor (ED) science?EDs represent the single greatest sustainability challenge of everyday chemicals. The graded substance will take the form of take-home work. Students will primarily read key books and articles and will summarize and personally evaluate the material in essay assignments. The course is intended for upper level undergraduates and graduates. There are no other prerequisites. The class is limited to 25 students. The 09-510 assignments are common to both undergraduate and graduate classes offerings. (Graduate course 12 units 09-710) 3 hrs. lec.
Prerequisites: 09-105 or 09-107
09-517 Organotransition Metal Chemistry
Intermittent: 9 units
The first half of this course focuses on the fundamentals of structure and bonding in organotransition metal complexes and how the results can be used to explain, and predict, chemical reactivity. The latter half of the course covers applications, and more specifically, homogeneous catalysts for industrial processes and organic synthesis. (Graduate Course: 12 units, 09-717)
Prerequisite: 09-348
09-518 Bioorganic Chemistry: Nucleic Acids and Carbohydrates
Fall: 9 units
This course will introduce students to new developments in chemistry and biology, with emphasis on the synthesis, structural and functional aspects of nucleic acids and carbohydrates, and their applications in chemistry, biology and medicine. Later in the course, students will have the opportunity to explore cutting-edge research in this exciting new field that bridges chemistry with biology. Students will be required to keep abreast of the current literature. In addition to standard homework assignments and examinations, students will have the opportunity to work in teams to tackle contemporary problems at the forefront of chemistry and biology. The difference between the 09-518 (9-unit) and 09-718 (12-unit) is that the latter is a graduate level course. Students signed up for 09-718 will be required to turn in an original research proposal at the end of the course, in addition to all the other assignments. (Graduate Course: 12 units, 09-718) 3 hrs. lec.
Prerequisites: (03-121 or 03-151) and (09-220 or 09-218)
09-519 Bioorganic Chemistry: Peptides, Proteins and Combinatorial Chemistry
Spring: 9 units
This course will introduce students to new developments in chemistry and biology, with emphasis on the synthesis, structural and functional aspects of peptides, proteins and small molecules. Basic concepts of bioorganic chemistry will be presented in the context of the current literature and students will have the opportunity to learn about the experimental methods used in various research labs. An introduction to combinatorial chemistry in the context of drug design and drug discovery will also be presented. Students will be required to keep abreast of the current literature. Homeworks and team projects will be assigned on a regular basis. The homework assignments will require data interpretation and experimental design; and team projects will give students the opportunity to work in teams to tackle contemporary problems at the interface of chemistry and biology. Students enrolled in the graduate level course (09-719) will be required to turn in an original research proposal at the end of the course, in addition to the homework assignments, midterm, and final exam that are required for the undergraduate course. (Graduate Course: 12 units 09-719) 3 hrs. lec.
Prerequisites: (03-151 or 03-121) and (09-220 or 09-218)
09-521 Metals in Biology: Function and Reactivity
Intermittent: 6 units
Metal ions play important roles in many biological processes, including photosynthesis, respiration, global nitrogen cycle, carbon cycle, antibiotics biosynthesis, gene regulation, bio-signal sensing, and DNA/RNA repair, just to name a few. Usually, metal ions are embedded in protein scaffold to form active centers of proteins in order to catalyze a broad array of chemical transformations, which are essential in supporting the biological processes mentioned above. These metal containing proteins, or metalloproteins, account for half of all proteins discovered so far. In this course, the relation between the chemical reactivity and the structure of metalloproteins will be discussed in detail. The main focus is to illustrate the geometric and electronic structure of metal centers and their interactions with the protein environment in governing the chemical reactivity of metalloproteins. The applications of these principles in designing biomimetic/bioinspried inorganic catalysts and in engineering metalloproteins bearing novel chemical reactivity will also be discussed. The basic principles of the frequently utilized physical methods in this research area will also be introduced, which include optical absorption spectroscopy, Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies, Mössbauer spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), X-ray absorption and diffraction techniques.
Prerequisites: (09-344 or 09-347 or 09-214 or 09-345) and 09-348
09-522 Oxidation and Inorganic Chemistry
Intermittent: 9 units
The roles of metal complexes in chemical and biochemical oxidations will be presented. Special attention is given to processes involving the activation of molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide by metal complexes and metalloenzymes from a mechanistic viewpoint. Much attention is devoted to kinetic methods of investigation of homogeneous reactions and mechanisms of oxidative catalysis. For this reason, a mini course on mechanisms of chemical reactions in solution is integrated. Redox properties and electronic structures of metal complexes will be reviewed. The relationships between electronic structures, catalytic properties, and oxidation reactivity of biologically relevant metal complexes will be provided. Mechanistic pathways of oxidation by peroxidases, cytochrome P-450, and other metalloenzymes will be described. (Graduate course: 09-722, 12-units) 3 hrs. lec.
Prerequisite: 09-348
09-524 Environmental Chemistry
Spring: 9 units
Environmental pollutants are common consequences of human activities. These chemicals have a wide range of deleterious effects on the environment and people. This course will introduce students to a range of major environmental pollutants, with a particular focus on persistent organic pollutants. We will use chemical principles including thermodynamics, kinetics, photochemistry, organic reaction mechanisms, and structure-activity relationships to understand the environmental fate of major classes of pollutants. The transport of chemicals through the environment and their partitioning between air, water, soil, and people will be described. The major environmental reaction pathways (oxidation, photolysis, hydrolysis, reduction, metabolism) of common pollutants will be explored. This will provide students with the necessary knowledge to predict the chemical fate of environmental pollutants, and improve their understanding of the environmental impacts of their everyday chemical use and exposure. Specific topics include water quality, photochemical smog, organic aerosols, atmospheric chemistry and global climate change, toxicity of pesticides, and heterogeneous and multiphase atmospheric chemistry. The 12-unit course is intended for graduate students that want to explore aspects of the course more deeply. This includes additional requirements including a final term paper and in-class presentation, and additional advanced questions on the homework assignments.
Prerequisites: 09-219 or 09-217
09-525 Transition Metal Chemistry
Intermittent: 9 units
This class covers fundamental concepts in Transition Metal Chemistry, including coordination numbers and stereochemistry, electronic structure, physical properties, and aspects of chemical reactivity of transition elements and their complexes. Point group theory is used to link the geometric and electronic structures of high symmetry coordination compounds. Analysis of the electronic structure of low symmetry coordination complexes is based on the Angular Overlap Model. In choosing coordination complexes that are discussed in class, special emphasis is given to those that are relevant for the fields of research of students enrolled in the class, such as supramolecular chemistry, nanotechnology, and metal-based catalysis. Students learn about the choice and relevance of modern questions posed by researchers in these fields and the modern methods and techniques used to answer the questions. Students learn also in this course how to use the Cambridge Crystallographic Database, a repository of structural data for more than 200,000 compounds, and how to use Mathematica to solve chemical problems. No prior knowledge of this software is required. (Graduate Course: 12 units, 09-725) 3 hrs. lec.
Prerequisite: 09-348
09-529 Introduction to Sustainable Energy Science
Fall: 9 units
This course focuses on the chemistry aspects of sustainable energy science. It introduces the major types of inorganic and molecular materials for various important processes of energy conversion and storage, such as photovoltaics, fuel cells, water splitting, solar fuels, batteries, and CO2 reduction. All the energy processes heavily rely on innovations in materials. This course is intended to offer perspectives on the materials/physical chemistry that are of importance in energy processes, in particular, how the atomic and electronic structures of materials impact the energy harvesting and conversion. In current energy research, intense efforts are focused on developing new strategies for achieving sustainable energy through renewable resources as opposed to the traditional oil/coal/gas compositions. This course offers students an introduction to the current energy research frontiers with a focus on solar energy conversion/storage, electrocatalysis and artificial photosynthesis. The major types of materials to be covered include metals, semiconductors, two-dimensional materials, and hybrid perovskites, etc. The material functions in catalysis, solar cells, fuel cells, batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen production and storage are also discussed in the course. The lectures are power-point presentation style with sufficient graphical materials to aid students to better understand the course materials. Demo experiments are designed to facilitate student learning.
Prerequisites: 09-106 and (33-151 or 33-141 or 33-121) and (33-152 or 33-142 or 33-122) and (27-201 or 09-348 or 27-796)
09-531 Polymer Science
Fall: 9 units
Polymer science is a vibrant multidisciplinary activity. It uses the methods of chemistry, physics, chemical engineering, materials science and biology to create a coherent picture of the macromolecular world. This course is a survey of this field of endeavor suitable for Senior chemistry majors, or other students with a desire for a broad knowledge of the science and engineering of polymers. It covers a thorough description of the field, the synthetic chemistry of macromolecules, the physical chemistry of macromolecules, and the principles of polymer engineering and processing.
Prerequisites: (09-219 or 09-217) and (09-347 or 09-345 or 09-214)
09-534 Chemical Approaches to Energy Conversion & Storage
Spring: 9 units
Solar energy and electrical energy from renewable resources need to be stored to resolve intermittency issues. Energy can be stored through charge transfer, changes in chemical bonding, or in electric polarization. This course will introduce students to general aspects of energy-storage technologies using these strategies, integrating scientific and engineering perspectives to discuss thermodynamics, mechanisms of energy storage, and fundamental aspects of efficiency, capacity, and power delivery. Then we will explore current and experimental technologies, covering supercapacitors, batteries, and water-splitting catalysts. By the end of the course, students will be able to apply chemical principles to understand energy-storage technologies and gain knowledge of important classes of these systems. Students enrolled in 09-734 (rather than 09-534) will also be required to write a 15-page NSF style proposal. 3 hrs. lec.
Prerequisites: (09-217 or 09-219) and (09-345 or 09-347 or 27-215 or 24-324 or 33-341)
09-535 Applied topics in Macromolecular and Biophysical Techniques
Fall: 9 units
Applications of physical chemistry are widespread. Physical chemical principles are fundamental to the methods used to sequence human genome, obtain high resolution structures of proteins and complex nucleic acids e.g., ribosome, and further provides the framework to predict how molecules fold in 3-dimension, how the different domains interact (inter- and intra-molecular interactions) to perform biological functions. The principles that were discussed in theory in undergraduate physical chemistry classes, will be applied in order to understand the molecular structures and dynamics in nucleic acids and proteins, and to more advanced molecular motors. In the last decade major advances have been made through single-molecule studies that provide finer details of macromolecules in action. This course aims to teach and apply physical chemistry as related to biological problems.
Prerequisites: (09-214 or 09-347 or 09-345) and (03-121 or 03-231 or 03-232)
09-560 Computational Chemistry
Fall: 12 units
Computer modeling is playing an increasingly important role in chemical, biological and materials research. This course provides an overview of computational chemistry techniques including molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics, electronic structure theory and continuum medium approaches. Sufficient theoretical background is provided for students to understand the uses and limitations of each technique. An integral part of the course is hands on experience with state-of-the-art computational chemistry tools running on graphics workstations. This course I can count towards coursework requirements for chemistry PhD candidates. 3 hrs. lec.
Prerequisites: 09-214 or 09-347 or 09-344 or 09-345
09-604 Introduction to Chemical Kinetics
Spring: 6 units
Empirical description of the time evolution of chemical reactions. Inductive derivation of kinetic rate laws from actual data. Deductive derivation of kinetic rate laws from proposed mechanisms. Gas phase reactions, catalyzed reactions, enzyme kinetics. Theories of kinetic rate constants for gas phase reactions: unimolecular and bimolecular. Theories of solution phase reactions. Absolute reactions rate theory. Diffusion controlled reactions. Kinetics in highly viscous media. Activation energy and entropy. Volume of activation.
09-611 Chemical Thermodynamics
Fall: 6 units
A focused course on chemical thermodynamics. The basic thermodynamic functions will be introduced and discussed. The formal basis for thermochemistry will be presented. Single component phase equilibrium will be considered. The thermodynamic basis of solutions will be developed and applied to separation methods. The fundamental basis of chemical equilibrium will be developed and applied to a wide variety of reactions. Finally, a few special topics such as self-assembled systems will be presented. This is a graduate level course in chemistry and presumes the appropriate undergraduate preparation.
Prerequisites: 09-345 and 09-231
09-614 Spectroscopy
Intermittent: 6 units
This is a course exclusively in optical methods, both time resolved and steady state. In addition to methodology, spectral interpretation in terms of group theory will be discussed. The time-dependent formalism of quantum mechanics will also be introduced. Molecules in gas phase and condensed phase will be discussed. Frequent use will be made of the current literature. Background consisting of undergraduate physical chemistry is assumed. This course has a prerequisite 09-344, Quantum Chemistry or permission of the instructor.
09-701 Quantum Chemistry I
Fall: 12 units
The main topics to be covered will include exploration of the Schroedinger equation, operators, particle in the box, harmonic oscillator and hydrogen atom, tunneling, Stern-Gerlach experiment and quantum mechanical postulates, time-independent and time-dependent perturbation theory, matrix diagonalization. The student will learn to master the fundamental concepts and techniques of quantum mechanics. The parallel mini course Mathematical Analysis for Chemistry will provide the necessary mathematical background.
09-702 Statistical Mechanics and Dynamics
Intermittent: 12 units
This course will address the application of statistical mechanics to chemical systems. Topics to be discussed include the calculation of thermodynamic functions, phase transitions and chemical equilibrium, calculation of the transport properties of gases and liquids and the elementary theory of chemical kinetics.
Prerequisites: (09-611 or 09-344) and 09-231 and 09-701
09-705 Chemosensors and Biosensors
Intermittent: 12 units
Chemosensors and biosensors rely on "recognition" and "signaling" elements to transduce a molecular-scale binding event into an observable signal. Students in this course will be introduced to current research and technology for detecting chemical and biological analytes in a variety of contexts, including environmental testing, biological probing and medical diagnostics. Recognition elements ranging from small organic molecules to antibodies will be presented, while various detection modes, including fluorescence, gravimetric and colorimetric, that illustrate different signaling elements will be discussed and compared. Issues to be addressed include sensitivity, selectivity and efficiency. Each sensor will be analyzed in terms of the physical chemistry, organic chemistry and/or biochemistry underlying its function. This is a graduate level course that may also be appropriate for upper level undergraduates in chemistry and the biological sciences. The material in 09-518/09-519 or 09-718/09-719 would be appropriate background material for this course. 3 hrs. lec.
Prerequisites: (03-121 or 03-231 or 03-232) and (09-220 or 09-218)
09-710 Chemistry and Sustainability
Spring: 12 units
This course aims to educate students in the foundations of systematic leadership for building a sustainable world. Many sustainability challenges are associated with commercial chemicals and with operational modes of the chemical enterprise. For scientists, effectiveness in solving the technical challenges and redirecting cultural behavior is the defining substance of sustainability leadership. The course aims to challenge students to analyze and understand the root causes of unsustainability, especially in the technological dimension, to imagine a more sustainable world and to begin to define personal leadership missions. Students will be introduced to sustainability ethics as the foundation stone of transformative sustainability leadership, to the Collins ?Sustainability Compass? and ?Code of Sustainability Ethics? and to the Robért/Broman ?Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD)?as powerful guiding tools. The Collins ?Bookcase of Green Science Challenges? organizes the technical content. It systematizes the major chemical sustainability challenges of our time: clean synthesis, renewable feed-stocks, safe energy, elemental pollutants, persistent molecular toxicants and endocrine disruptors. Focal areas will be the technical, toxicological and cultural histories of elemental and molecular pollutants and endocrine disruptor (ED) science?EDs represent the single greatest sustainability challenge of everyday chemicals. The graded substance will take the form of take-home work. Students will primarily read key books and articles and will summarize and personally evaluate the material in essay assignments. The course is intended for upper level undergraduates and graduates. There are no other prerequisites. The class is limited to 25 students. The 09-510 assignments are common to both undergraduate and graduate classes offerings and 09-710 students will engage in additional projects. 3 hrs. lec.
Prerequisites: 09-105 or 09-107
09-711 Physical Organic Chemistry
Fall: 12 units
This course introduces students to the study of structure and reactivity of organic compounds from a physical and theoretical standpoint. Students will learn the fundamentals of molecular orbital theory along with some practical applications to aromaticity and anti-aromaticity. Methods are described for the study of reaction mechanisms by means of physical methods such as kinetics, isotope effects, substituent effects, and solvent effects. Important reactive intermediates are described, along with detection methods. This course may be suitable for upper level undergraduates in chemistry with the appropriate background in organic chemistry and physical chemistry. 3 hrs. lec.
Prerequisites: 09-220 and 09-344
09-714 Advanced Organic Chemistry
Spring: 12 units
This course will expose the students to modern methods of organic synthesis including insights into the basis and mechanisms of chemical reactions. Topics include but are not limited to: modern spectroscopic analysis and structure determination, synthetic methods, retrosynthesis, organic reaction mechanisms, and references to separation techniques and some analytical methods. Upon completion of the course students should be able to design reaction schemes using scientific literature sources, evaluate their suitability for use in the lab and develop an aptitude in identifying the use of modern reagents that are more efficient, specific, safer and environmentally friendly. It is assumed that at minimum students will have completed at least two semesters of undergraduate coursework in organic chemistry and suggested that they have completed 09-222 and 09-321, the organic laboratory courses. 3 hrs. lec
Prerequisites: 09-218 or 09-220
09-716 Bioactive Natural Products
Spring: 12 units
This course is aimed at students with an interest in natural products research. Natural products are used as active components in medicinal products, as model compounds for further development into medicinally active drugs, as ingredients in food and for flavor and fragrances, among other very useful and interesting applications. An overview of the structural variety and activity of natural products will be presented along with their isolation and structural determination. Overall, the course will offer an introduction to the work that is customary in natural product research. This course will cover: Strategies to select the plant or marine material for study; main groups of natural products derived from plants; representative natural products derived from marine organisms; preparation of extracts and selection of active fractions, screening strategies; separation and purification of active components; bench-top bioassays and chemical assays and structure elucidation (especially 2D-NMR spectroscopy) Student's performance will be assessed by weekly assignments on the topics discussed in lecture and exams. 3 hrs. lec.
Prerequisites: (09-217 or 09-219) and (09-208 or 09-222)
09-720 Physical Inorganic Chemistry
Intermittent: 12 units
This course develops the principles of magnetochemistry and inorganic spectroscopy. Electronic absorption, magnetic circular dichroism, resonance raman, NMR, EPR, Mossbauer, magnetization and x-ray methods will be introduced with application towards the determination of electronic structures of transition metal complexes.
Prerequisites: 09-348 and 09-344 and 09-345
09-721 Metals in Biology: Function and Reactivity
Intermittent: 6 units
Metal ions play important roles in many biological processes, including photosynthesis, respiration, global nitrogen cycle, carbon cycle, antibiotics biosynthesis, gene regulation, bio-signal sensing, and DNA/RNA repair, just to name a few. Usually, metal ions are embedded in protein scaffold to form active centers of proteins in order to catalyze a broad array of chemical transformations, which are essential in supporting the biological processes mentioned above. These metal containing proteins, or metalloproteins, account for half of all proteins discovered so far. In this course, the relation between the chemical reactivity and the structure of metalloproteins will be discussed in detail. The main focus is to illustrate the geometric and electronic structure of metal centers and their interactions with the protein environment in governing the chemical reactivity of metalloproteins. The applications of these principles in designing biomimetic/bioinspried inorganic catalysts and in engineering metalloproteins bearing novel chemical reactivity will also be discussed. The basic principles of the frequently utilized physical methods in this research area will also be introduced, which include optical absorption spectroscopy, Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies, Mössbauer spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), X-ray absorption and diffraction techniques.
Prerequisites: (09-347 or 09-214 or 09-345 or 09-344) and 09-348
09-723 Proximal Probe Techniques: New Tools for Nanoscience & Nanotechnology
Intermittent: 12 units
Proximal probe techniques are revolutionizing physical and biological sciences, owing to their ability to explore and manipulate matter at the nanoscale, and to operate in various environments (including liquids). Proximal probe techniques rely on the use of nanoscale probes, positioned and scanned in the immediate vicinity of the material surface. Their development is often viewed as a first step towards nanotechnology, since they demonstrate the feasibility of building purposeful structures one atom or one (macro)molecule at a time. This course is designed for the students of chemistry, biology physics and engineering, who are interested in the fundamentals of proximal probe techniques and in their applications in various areas, converging into a rapidly developing, interdisciplinary field of nanoscience. It will provide physical background of such basic techniques as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), and Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM) and of their variants. Throughout the course, the working "virtual AFM" computer model will be assembled in classroom by each student and then used extensively to gain thorough understanding of AFM operation principles. Particular emphasis will be placed on modes of operation facilitating chemical contrast and contrast based on other material properties. (No prior experience with computer programming required). 3 hrs. lec.
Prerequisites: (21-124 or 09-231 or 21-122) and (09-345 or 09-322 or 09-331 or 09-344)
09-736 Transition Metal Catalysis for Organic and Polymer Synthesis
Intermittent: 12 units
Transition metal catalysts are invaluable in small molecule and polymer synthesis. The course will begin with a brief overview of organometallic chemistry and a discussion of fundamental organometallic reactions. Following this, a survey of some selected topics for the formation of small molecules and polymers will be presented. Some topics to be highlighted include: (1) Hydrogenation (2) Palladium Catalyzed Cross-Coupling (3) Epoxidation (4) Olefin Metathesis (5) Olefin Polymerization
Prerequisites: (09-218 or 09-220) and 09-348
09-737 Medicinal Chemistry and Drug Development
Spring: 12 units
Organic chemistry is an intimate part of the drug discovery and design processes in areas that include structure determination (NMR, mass spectrometry), synthesis, and determination of mechanisms of action. Once a promising compound (i.e. a ?lead?) has been identified in the laboratory, it is rarely ready to be used in the clinic. Complications include poor bioavailability, rapid degradation, and off-target effects. Students will learn about lead compound optimization through structural variations, cell-specific targeting and pro-drug strategies. Several examples will be presented to illustrate the role played by organic chemistry in the development of drugs used to treat a range of diseases, including cancer, HIV-AIDS, bacterial infections and heart disease.
Prerequisites: 09-220 or 09-218
09-760 Mechanical Behavior of Polymers
Spring: 12 units
This course is a graduate level course designed to prepare students for graduate research in polymer science. Based around a laboratory component, students will learn the lab skills needed to synthesize and fully characterize novel polymer materials. The classroom component will teach the theory behind the measurements made in lab, as well as an understanding of the best experiments to learn about the properties of the material. Emphasis will be placed on current literature and technical communication (written and oral). 3 hrs lec; 3 hrs lab
09-803 Chemistry of Gene Expression
Intermittent: 12 units
This course examines the chemical basis of biological reactions required for the propagation of genetic information stored in DNA and the organic chemistry principles behind the structure and function of nucleic acids.Main topics of lectures and class discussion will include the chemical and biochemical syntheses, properties and analyses of natural and modified nucleic acids to investigate cellular processes such as transcription, RNA splicing, other RNA regulation and translation; an introduction to the enzymatic strategies that accelerate these chemical reactions and a comparison of protein enzymes, ribozymes and other nucleic acid based enzymes in contemporary chemistry and biology. Students will learn to critically evaluate current scientific efforts that examine various aspects of chemistry and biological chemistry, the relationship between the structure and function of biomolecular systems, propose experiments to examine biological chemistry research problems and communicate these ideas and participate in scientific discussions and debates. 3 hrs. lec.
Prerequisites: (09-218 or 09-220) and (03-231 or 03-232)