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Department of Chemistry

Hyung J. Kim, Head
Karen H. Stump, Director of Undergraduate Studies
Office: Doherty Hall 1316
http://www.chem.cmu.edu

Carnegie Mellon provides a family-like but very vibrant and interdisciplinary environment for science students. One of our major strengths is that most of our undergraduate students in chemistry and related fields get involved in research in faculty labs early on and get hands-on experience in cutting-edge research, some even as freshmen. Our curriculum is both fluid and innovative to give students broad background and in-depth knowledge in chemistry and interdisciplinary areas. — Dr. Hyung J. Kim

Chemistry is an area of science involved with the study of the properties and reactions of substances ranging from living cells to subatomic particles. It is at the center of many sciences, providing the fundamental knowledge and tools needed to address many of society's needs and to explore the unknown. Fields as diverse as genetic engineering and nanotechnology look to chemistry when they look to the future, for that is where the ultimate in understanding — the molecular level — resides.

The chemistry profession is extraordinarily diverse, with career opportunities available in the chemical, petroleum, renewable energy, nuclear power, plastics, metals, and pharmaceutical industries. Chemistry plays an increasingly important role in the rapidly expanding biomedical and biotechnology industries. In addition to careers in industry and academia, many chemists find challenging careers in the public sector in the laboratories of the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Agriculture, the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the Department of Energy as well as in consulting.

Chemistry is a particularly suitable major for pre-medical and other pre-health profession students. Medical schools look favorably on the rigorous reasoning skills chemists develop, as evidenced by an excellent record for student admission to advanced education in these areas. An increasing number of our graduates are seeking careers in dentistry, pharmacy or pharmacology. The Health Professions Program advises all Carnegie Mellon students considering careers in health fields. (See Health Professions Program description in this catalog for more information.) Chemistry is particularly attractive to pre-law majors anticipating a career in a legal department in a chemical industry, in patent, intellectual property or environmental law. Students interested in industrial careers often combine their chemistry program with undergraduate courses in business administration or go on to study for an M.B.A.

The Department offers two degrees: the B.S. and the B.A. One third of the courses for the B.A. degree are free electives that may be taken in any of the departments of the University and therefore offer a high degree of flexibility. For the B.S. degree, electives normally are technical courses in chemistry or related fields of sciences, such as biology, physics, mathematics, or computer science, although they can be in other non-technical areas as well. It is possible to have all of the technical requirements completed after the junior year in both degree programs, allowing students the flexibility to combine electives in the senior year into a focused program of specialization. Students interested in graduate studies in chemistry may enroll in graduate lecture courses. Those desiring immediate job placement may be interested in one or more of the formal options that supplement the chemistry B.S. degree. These are described in detail later. Carnegie Mellon has one of the strongest polymer science programs in the world and the undergraduate polymer science option offers training that is particularly valuable for an industrial career. The Computational Chemistry option provides students with expertise in scientific computing that is highly sought after by employers in the pharmaceutical industry.

An honors program is offered for highly motivated undergraduates. It is designed primarily for students who wish to undertake a strong research-intensive program of study in contemporary chemistry. The program B.S. in Chemistry with Departmental Honors requires the completion of at least one graduate level course in chemistry, a research project, and the writing and defense of a bachelor's honors thesis. An advanced track leading to the B.S. in Chemistry with Departmental Honors together with a Masters Degree in Chemistry involves completion of five graduate level courses and a more extensive thesis research project. This track is especially attractive to students who have earned advanced placement credit in one or more science and/or mathematics courses at Carnegie Mellon. With enough advanced placement credit or by carrying heavier than usual course loads, students can complete the Honors/M.S. degree program in 8 semesters.  The majority of openings in the chemical industry presently are at the Bachelors and Masters degree levels.

Additional majors (double majors) are available with nearly all other departments provided the student can fit the required courses into the schedule. Generally, all the requirements for both departments must be met for an additional major (except for some courses with similar content). Students interested in biochemistry, for example, could pursue a B.S. in Chemistry with an Additional Major in Biological Sciences. Programs are also available that lead to the degree B.S. in Chemistry with a minor in another discipline such as biological sciences, physics, mathematics, computer science, engineering studies, business administration and certain departments in the H&SS (Humanities and Social Sciences) college. Requirements for most minor programs are described by individual departments in this catalog. However, it is recommended that students who are interested in pursuing a minor as part of their degree consult with the department involved for current requirements and further guidance. Dual degree programs are available in which students receive two separate undergraduate degrees from two different departments in the University. These require students to complete at least 90 units of work per additional degree in addition to the units required for the first degree. Several five-year programs have been developed to allow a Carnegie Mellon undergraduate student to earn both a B.S. in Chemistry and a Master of Science degree in fields such as Health Care Policy and Management or Biotechnology Management.

Study abroad exchange programs are available for chemistry majors and programs of one to two semesters can generally be accommodated without delaying time to graduation beyond 8 semesters. One example of a formal exchange program is spending two semesters at École Polytechnique Féderále de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland. A language program of 3 months duration during the summer is available to students at no extra tuition cost. Study abroad is encouraged by the chemistry department and also can be arranged on an individual basis at universities throughout the world including Europe, Asia, Africa, New Zealand, and Australia during both the academic year and the summer. Some students also participate in short term study abroad experiences during winter or spring break for example. Students interested in study abroad should consult with their academic advisor and the MCS Study Abroad Advisor.  

One of the most attractive features of the Department of Chemistry is the opportunity for students to interact with prominent research scientists in entry-level as well as advanced courses and in research. Since the spring of 2003, undergraduate laboratory instruction takes place in a new state-of-the-art facility located in Doherty Hall. Participation in undergraduate research is encouraged and qualified students may begin projects as early as their second year.  Chemistry majors interested in beginning research should consult with the Director of Undergraduate Studies to begin the process of identifying a research mentor.  Approximately 90 to 98% of the graduating chemistry majors during the past five years have taken part in research either for pay or for credit as part of their undergraduate training. Chemistry majors have been very successful in obtaining Small Undergraduate Research Grants (SURG) and Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF) from the University to help support their research projects. Undergraduate and research laboratories are equipped with the latest scientific instrumentation. The use of computational tools is emphasized throughout the curriculum.
 

Program Outcomes

The faculty members of the Department of Chemistry have approved the following as a statement of our learning outcomes for recipients of an undergraduate degree in chemistry.

Upon graduation recipients of the BS or BA degree in Chemistry will:

Foundational knowledge/theory
  • Have a firm foundation in the quantitative and computational thinking that underlies chemistry, including use of modern computational tools.
  • Have a firm foundation in the theories and models that form the basis for reasoning about molecular systems.
  • Understand how the different subdisciplines of chemistry relate to and complement one another.
  • Be able to apply chemical reasoning across disciplines, such as biology, environmental science, materials science, nanotechnology, and engineering.
Practical/Experimental
  • Understand that chemistry is fundamentally an experimental science, and be able to identify or create an appropriate model, formulate a hypothesis, choose an appropriate set of tools and techniques, and design an experiment that tests the hypothesis and analyze the results from that experiment drawing sound scientific conclusions from the results obtained.
  • Be proficient in the use of both classical and modern tools for analysis of chemical systems.
  • Be able to design and carry out synthesis of both organic and inorganic systems.
  • Be able to use experience and knowledge gained through theoretical and practical design projects to conduct further research.
  • Know and follow the proper procedures and regulations for safe handling and use of chemicals and chemical equipment.
Communication
  • Be able to convey information, both orally and in writing, to a range of audience levels and for a variety of purposes.
  • Understand how scientific information is shared between peers in modern science, including responsible conduct for acknowledging prior and current contributions.
  • Be able to locate, identify, understand and critically evaluate the chemical literature.
  • Develop the interpersonal skills to function cooperatively in a team setting.
Society and ethics
  • Understand the opportunities and consequences of chemistry for the environment and society for both the short term and for long-term sustainability.
  • Understand and apply ethics and values to all professional activities.
Professional development
  • Develop an understanding of career opportunities both within and outside of chemistry, including through contacts with faculty, the career and professional development center and alumni.
  • Be prepared to pursue a life and career that builds on their experiences at Carnegie Mellon to achieve their personal goals and to contribute positively to society.

B.S. in Chemistry

The majority of undergraduate degrees awarded by the Department of Chemistry are Bachelor of Science degrees.  This degree program provides the most appropriate preparation for further graduate study and for research and development or analytical positions in industry.  The curriculum provides a strong foundation in the fundamental areas of study in chemistry: organic, physical, inorganic and analytical chemistry, along with a rich set of research-focused, instrumentation intensive laboratory experiences aligned with those areas. Students interested in less technical areas of employment or graduate study in areas such as business, policy or law may find the Bachelor of Arts degree a more suitable alternative.

 

Curriculum - B.S. in Chemistry and Requirements for  an Additional Major in Chemistry

The MCS curriculum requires seven Science Core Courses to be completed by the end of the junior year. These are: 21-120 Differential and Integral Calculus, 21-122 Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation or21-124 Calculus II for Biologists and Chemists, 33-111 Physics I for Science Students, 33-112 Physics II for Science Students, 09-105 Introduction to Modern Chemistry I, 03-121 Modern Biology,and 15-110 Principles of ComputingIn the sample curriculum given below for chemistry majors, six of these are in the first year. Students should take the last Science Core Course as early as possible and if possible by the end of their sixth semester.

Freshman Year
Fall Units
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
33-111Physics I for Science Students12
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
 44

Students interested in majoring in chemistry should consider enrolling in the 3-unit lab course 09-101 Introduction to Experimental Chemistry, in the fall or spring semester of the first year. Although not required, the laboratory course is recommended for chemistry majors.

Spring Units
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
21-122Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation10
or 21-124 Calculus II for Biologists and Chemists
33-112Physics II for Science Students
(those interested in the Health Professions should take 03-121, Modern Biology)
12
xx-xxxH&SS Distribution Course 19
15-110Principles of Computing10
 51
Sophomore Year
Fall Units
09-201Undergraduate Seminar I1
09-219Modern Organic Chemistry10
09-221Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis12
03-121Modern Biology
(those interested in the health professions may want to take physiology, 42-202, if they have completed Modern Biology)
9
xx-xxxH&SS Distribution Course 29
Free Elective9
 50

Spring Units
09-202Undergraduate Seminar II: Safety and Environmental Issues for Chemists1
09-204Professional Communication Skills in Chemistry
(It is recommended that this course be completed prior to taking 09-321, Lab III.)
3
09-220Modern Organic Chemistry II10
09-222Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis12
09-348Inorganic Chemistry
(Students wishing to pursue careers in the health professions may wish to take biochemistry, 03-232, and delay inorganic until the junior year spring semester)
10
xx-xxxH&SS Distribution Course 39
 45
Junior Year
Fall Units
09-301Undergraduate Seminar III1
09-231Mathematical Methods for Chemists9
09-321Laboratory III: Molecular Design and Synthesis12
09-344Physical Chemistry (Quantum): Microscopic Principles of Physical Chemistry9
09-331Modern Analytical Instrumentation9
xx-xxxH&SS/CFA Elective 1 (of 4)9
 49

This fall semester is challenging with 4 required chemistry classes.  There are ways to alleviate the load by moving classes into the senior year.  09-321 could be moved to the fall of the senior year. Since Lab III is not a prerequisite for 09-322 Laboratory IV this change will not require that Lab IV be delayed until the senior year. 09-331 and/or 09-344 can also be moved into the fall of the senior year.  However both classes are prerequisites for 09-322 Laboratory IV: Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics, so delaying either would move 09-322 to the second semester of the senior year.  It is best to discuss your options with your advisor in order to craft a plan that is best for you.

Spring Units
09-302Undergraduate Seminar IV1
09-322Laboratory IV: Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics12
09-345Physical Chemistry (Thermo): Macroscopic Principles of Physical Chemistry9
09-xxxChemical Elective (see Notes on Electives)9
xx-xxxH&SS/CFA Elective 2 (of 4)9
 40
Senior Year
Fall Units
09-401Undergraduate Seminar V1
09-xxxChemical Elective (see notes on electives)9
xx-xxxFree Electives27
xx-xxxH&SS/CFA Elective 3 (of 4)9
 46

Spring Units
09-402Undergraduate Seminar VI3
xx-xxxElectives36
xx-xxxH&SS/CFA Elective 4 (of 4)9
 48

Certain non-technical courses from Business Administration, Heinz College, and EPP also may be used to fulfill the non-technical elective requirement. A listing of approved and non-approved courses for the H&SS/CFA electives is available at the following web site, www.cmu.edu/mcs/education/edu_HSSFA.html, or see the Mellon College of Science section in this catalog for the Humanities and Social Sciences and Fine Arts Requirements. For example accounting, finance, production, and statistics courses may NOT be used. Also, 85-219 Biological Foundations of Behavior may NOT be used as an elective in the H&SS/CFA category. These courses are considered to be technical classes. If in doubt, check with your advisor.

 

Distribution of Units for the B.S. Degree and Requirements for An Additional Major in Chemistry

Minimum Total Chemistry Units 163; See distribution below

Required Chemistry Courses* Units
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
09-204Professional Communication Skills in Chemistry3
09-219Modern Organic Chemistry10
09-220Modern Organic Chemistry II10
09-231Mathematical Methods for Chemists9
09-331Modern Analytical Instrumentation9
09-344Physical Chemistry (Quantum): Microscopic Principles of Physical Chemistry9
09-345Physical Chemistry (Thermo): Macroscopic Principles of Physical Chemistry9
09-348Inorganic Chemistry10
09-221Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis12
09-222Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis12
09-321Laboratory III: Molecular Design and Synthesis12
09-322Laboratory IV: Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics12
09-xxxChemistry Seminars8
09-xxxChemistry Electives18

* These, plus 33-111 Physics I for Science Students and 33-112 Physics II for Science Students, are the required courses for students earning an additional major in chemistry.

09-107 Honors Chemistry: Fundamentals Concepts and Applications, may be taken instead of 09-105 .

Students who transfer into the department and have taken 09-217 Organic Chemistry I and/or 09-218 Organic Chemistry II, will be required to complete units of 09-435 Independent Study Chemistry, 1 unit per course, under the supervision of the instructor(s) for 09-219 and/or 09-220 in order to master the course content missed in this course sequence.

Chemistry courses required for the BS degree and the additional major in chemistry that are numbered 09-2xx or higher must be taken at Carnegie Mellon University.  Exceptions must be requested of and approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies.  In general such requests will be approved only under unusual or extenuating circumstances.

Other RequirementsUnits
Biology9
Computer Science10
Mathematics20
Physics24
Humanities and Social Sciences or Fine Arts courses72
Free Electives59
Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
Minimum number of units required for the degree:360

The above B.S. curriculum recommends a range of 40–51 units/semester to meet the minimum degree requirement. Students are strongly encouraged to take extra elective courses (except in the first semester of the freshman year) in whatever subjects they wish in order to enrich their backgrounds and enhance their educational experience.

 

Notes on Electives

Chemistry Electives

A minimum of 18 units of chemical electives is required.

Chemistry electives can be satisfied by 09-445 Undergraduate Research,  or by most other chemistry courses 09-3xx or higher, undergraduate or graduate level, for which the student has the necessary prerequisites, or by 03-231/03-232 Biochemistry. 09-435 Independent Study Chemistry may only be used to fulfill this requirement with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Certain interdisciplinary courses (e.g. 39-xxx) relating to chemistry can also be used with the approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. The scheduling of these electives can vary and students should check with the department offering the course to see which courses are offered in any given year or semester and with the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Chemistry to ascertain whether the course is an acceptable chemistry elective.

Free Electives

Free electives are defined as including any course offered by Carnegie Mellon except those in science or engineering fields that are primarily intended for non-majors. A maximum of 9 units total of Physical Education, StuCo and/or ROTC courses combined can be counted as free elective units. The Chemistry Department does not require technical electives.

 

Options for the B.S. in Chemistry

The curriculum for the degree Bachelor of Science in Chemistry permits students to take a number of elective courses in chemistry and other fields, particularly in the junior and senior years. Students may wish to complete a group of elective courses from several specialty areas, called “options,” to complement their technical education. Each option will complement the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry and will provide students with expertise in a specific area not covered by the normal undergraduate curriculum. Options are noted on the student's transcript but not on the diploma.

For each of the following options, the student should refer to the previous description of the curriculum for the B.S. in chemistry. Required courses are unchanged, and the courses that should be taken as electives for each option are listed below. Chemistry courses within an option also count towards fulfillment of the chemistry elective requirement for the B.S. degree.

A student who completes the recommended courses for any of these options will receive a certificate from the Department of Chemistry at Commencement as formal evidence of the accomplishment and a notation of this will be made on the student's transcript.

BIOCHEMISTRY OPTION Units
03-231/232Biochemistry I9
03-330Genetics9
03-344Experimental Biochemistry12
xx-xxxElective in Biochemistry
Elective course may be chosen from the following list
03-439Introduction to Biophysics9
09-518Bioorganic Chemistry: Nucleic Acids and Carbohydrates9
09-519Bioorganic Chemistry: Peptides, Proteins and Combinatorial Chemistry9
09-535Applied topics in Macromolecular and Biophysical Techniques9
03-740Advanced Biochemistry12

 

POLYMER SCIENCE OPTION Units
06-466Experimental Polymer Science9
09-502Organic Chemistry of Polymers9
09-509Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules9
09-xxxElective in Polymer Science9
Elective course may be chosen from the following list
09-531Polymer Science9
09-445Undergraduate Research
(in a polymer area as approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies)
Var.
27-324Introduction to Polymer Science and Engineering9
Other upper level courses in chemistry, biomedical engineering, materials science engineering or the colloids, polymers and surfaces program may be used with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies

 

COLLOIDS, POLYMERS and SURFACES OPTION (offered jointly with the Department of Chemical Engineering) Units
06-426Experimental Colloid Surface Science9
06-466Experimental Polymer Science9
09-509Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules9
06-607Physical Chemistry of Colloids and Surfaces9

 

MATERIALS CHEMISTRY OPTION Units
27-100Engineering the Materials of the Future12
27-201Structure of Materials9
Two Elective Courses of at least 9 units each from the list below
27-202Defects in Materials9
09-445Undergraduate Research
(in a materials area as approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies)
9
09-502Organic Chemistry of Polymers9
09-509Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules9
09-531Polymer Science9
27-xxxMSE course approved by Director of Undergraduate Studies

 

ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY OPTION Units
09-510Introduction to Green Chemistry9
09-524Environmental Chemistry9
Two elective courses of at least 9 units each from the list below
19-424Energy and the Environment9
19-426Environmental Decision Making9
19-440Combustion and Air Pollution Control9
12-100Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering12
09-520Global Atmospheric Chemistry: Fundamentals and Data Analysis Methods9
06-630Atmospheric Chemistry, Air Pollution and Global Change12
19-650Climate and Energy: Science, Economics and Public Policy9
12-651Air Quality Engineering9
12-657Water Resources Engineering9
12-702Fundamentals of Water Quality Engineering12

 

MANAGEMENT OPTION Units
73-100Principles of Economics9
70-101Introduction to Business Management9
70-122Introduction to Accounting9
70-364Business Law9

 

COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY OPTION Units
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
or 15-150 Principles of Functional Programming
09-560Computational Chemistry12
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
xx-xxxOne Upper Level Computational Elective Course from the list below
15-210Parallel and Sequential Data Structures and Algorithms12
15-213Introduction to Computer Systems12
15-214Principles of Software Construction: Objects, Design, and Concurrency12
33-241Introduction to Computational Physics9
03-250Introduction Computational Biology12
09-701Quantum Chemistry I12
09-702Statistical Mechanics and Dynamics12


 

B.S. in Chemistry with Departmental Honors

Outstanding students with an interest in research are encouraged to consider the Honors program by the beginning of the junior year. The program combines a modified B.S. curriculum with close faculty-student contact in an individual research project, concluding with the student's presentation and defense of a bachelor's honors thesis to a Thesis Committee.

The B.S. in Chemistry with Departmental Honors curriculum follows the general sequence of courses that is listed for the B.S. degree. Students are strongly urged to complete all seven of the Science Core Courses as early as possible. The honors program specifies that one of the two chemistry electives be a 12-unit graduate course, numbered 09-7xx or higher, and that of the remaining electives required, at least two be undergraduate research (18 units) and one be 09-455 Honors Thesis (taken for 6 units). Students will be encouraged to do more than the minimum amount of research, so stipends from the research advisor or other sources are sometimes available for summer B.S. honors research.

At any time before the spring term of the senior year, candidates for the B.S. in chemistry may apply to be admitted for candidacy to the Honors B.S. program. Applications are available through the Director of Undergraduate Studies. To be accepted, students will be expected to have shown excellent performance in class work – normally at least a 3.2 average QPA. Upon acceptance into the program, a Thesis Committee must be identified, which will monitor the progress of the student. The committee shall consist of at least one member of the Honors Committee to be appointed by the chair, the student's research advisor and a third faculty member agreed upon by the student and advisor. This third member can be from another department or institution and can be tenure track, teaching track or research track faculty. It is the student's responsibility to contact the proposed third member of their committee and confirm their participation.

A written thesis suitable for an Honors B.S. degree is required and should be a clear exposition in proper scientific format of a research project done for at least 18 units of credit in 09-445 Undergraduate Research. The student's Thesis Committee will evaluate the thesis and will require that each student participate in a public oral presentation or defense of the thesis before it approves the Honors degree. The written thesis must be supplied to the members of the student's Thesis Committee no later than 1 week prior to the scheduled public defense.  The defense is usually scheduled to take place during April or early May of the senior year and the Director of Undergraduate Studies will coordinate the selection of a suitable date. Students completing the B.S. with Departmental Honors in Chemistry will receive MCS College Honors as well.

The designations of MCS College Honors and Departmental Honors are noted on the transcript but not on the diploma.  Only University Honors are noted on the diploma.
 

Honors B.S./M.S. Program in Chemistry

Outstanding students seeking an advanced degree are encouraged to apply for admission to the B.S./M.S. Honors program as early as they can but only after having made some progress on a research project that could eventually be suitable for production of a Master's level thesis. Please note that this degree is available only with the B.S. in chemistry and cannot be obtained by students pursuing a B.A. degree in chemistry. Most commonly, applications are submitted during the second half of the sophomore year or early in the junior year. Applications are available through the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Participants will have the opportunity to earn in four years not only the degree B.S. in Chemistry with Departmental Honors, but also the degree Master of Science in Chemistry. This program is highly research intensive and is not appropriate for all students. Requirements include completing five graduate level courses as electives. (See notes on Honors B.S./M.S. electives.)

The schedule of courses for the B.S./M.S. program generally moves as many courses as possible forward in the curriculum, though this is not a requirement. When possible, all Science Core Courses should be completed in the freshman year. This gives the student the following advantages: 1) greater perspective in selection of a research advisor, 2) greater maturity in performing independent research, and 3) the possibility of initiating the graduate course sequence in the junior year. Students can achieve this accelerated schedule through advanced placement or summer school though neither is a requirement.

Upon acceptance into the program, a Thesis Committee must be identified, which will monitor the progress of the student. The committee shall consist of at least one member of the Honors Committee appointed by the committee chair, the student's research advisor and a third faculty member agreed upon by the student and advisor. This third member can be from another department or institution and can be tenure track, teaching track or research track faculty. It is the student's responsibility to contact the third member of their committee and confirm their participation.

The student is expected to keep the research advisor selected by May of the sophomore year for the duration of the thesis project. Summer thesis research for 10 weeks after the sophomore and junior years is strongly suggested to assist the student in completing research of sufficient quantity and quality to complete their thesis. Students normally will be given stipends for their summer work either by their research advisor or by competing for a summer fellowship. A minimum of 3 semesters of undergraduate research is required (normally 10 units/semester), though this is rarely sufficient as the sole research experience, as is participation in group seminars during the junior and senior years. Students must present their research at least once at the Sigma Xi competition at Meeting of the Minds, the annual Carnegie Mellon undergraduate research symposium, typically at the end of the junior year. In addition students must meet with their Thesis Committee each fall to update the committee on their progress and in the fall of the senior year must prepare a written summary of their research progress to date (5 pages) and their plans for the academic year (1 page). This report must state clearly what stage the work is in; it must be clear what work is complete and ready for publication.

At the start of the spring semester of the senior year, the student must submit a draft of the introduction for their thesis and a detailed outline of their methods, results and discussion sections to the Director of Undergraduate Studies who also chairs the Honors Committee. This will be distributed by the department and reviewed by the student's Thesis Committee.

Each student is required to submit a formal Masters Degree dissertation to the Chemistry Department in April of the senior year or at least one week prior to the date set for the thesis defense. The Thesis Committee will evaluate the written thesis and students are required to present their final oral defense of the project before the Thesis Committee. The defense is usually scheduled to take place during April or early May of the senior year and the Director of Undergraduate Studies will coordinate the selection of a suitable date. The public defense is followed by a private question and answer session with the Thesis Committee.

The dissertation, written in proper scientific format, should describe the research project in considerable detail and must withstand the scrutiny of the Thesis Committee with respect to completeness. It need not be as extensive nor contain the element of student originality characteristic of a Ph.D. thesis; however it must contain results and conclusions that are of a high enough quality to be accepted as a publication in a respected research journal. The student should refer to the ACS Style Guide for recommendations on appropriate presentation and formatting of written text, tables, graphs, and figures. As for all M.S. degree candidates in the Department, the dissertation must be approved by the faculty member in charge of the work.

Research productivity is the most important criterion for success at the evaluation points, but QPA is a strong secondary criterion. While we expect that most students will maintain a QPA of 3.5, a minimum of 3.2 must be maintained to remain in the program and will be acceptable only with a strong record of research. Candidates must also maintain a QPA of at least 3.0 in the five graduate level courses required for the degree.

Students who complete this program will receive the designations of Departmental Honors and MCS College Honors.  These are designated on the transcript, not on the diploma.  Only University Honors are denoted on the diploma.

Students completing the requirements for this degree receive two diplomas, one for the B.S. degree and another for the M.S. degree.  Since this is a combined degree program both degrees are awarded at the same time; the two degrees cannot be separated in time.

Notes on Honors B.S./M.S. Electives

The B.S./M.S. Honors degree requires the completion of five graduate level courses. These normally are 12-unit courses. However, in order not to penalize interdisciplinary studies which may be essential to a good thesis, up to three of the five required graduate chemistry courses may be advanced undergraduate (9-unit) courses in MCS and/or approved CIT departments. All advanced undergraduate level courses used to satisfy this requirement must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Curriculum - B.S. with Departmental Honors / M.S. in Chemistry

First Year
Fall Units
03-121Modern Biology9
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
33-111Physics I for Science Students12
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
 53

Students interested in majoring in chemistry should consider enrolling in the 3-unit lab course 09-101 Introduction to Experimental Chemistry,  in the fall or spring semester of the freshman year. Although not required, the laboratory course is recommended for chemistry majors.

Spring Units
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
21-122Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation10
or 21-124 Calculus II for Biologists and Chemists
33-112Physics II for Science Students12
xx-xxxH&SS Distribution Course 19
15-110Principles of Computing10
 51
Sophomore Year
Fall Units
09-219Modern Organic Chemistry10
03-121Modern Biology9
09-221Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis12
09-201Undergraduate Seminar I1
xx-xxxH&SS Distribution Course 29
Undergraduate Research9.0
 50


Spring Units
09-202Undergraduate Seminar II: Safety and Environmental Issues for Chemists1
09-204Professional Communication Skills in Chemistry3
09-222Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis12
09-220Modern Organic Chemistry II10
09-348Inorganic Chemistry10
xx-xxxH&SS Distribution Course 39
 45


Summer
10 weeks Honors Research recommended
Junior Year
Fall Units
09-301Undergraduate Seminar III1
09-231Mathematical Methods for Chemists9
09-321Laboratory III: Molecular Design and Synthesis12
09-344Physical Chemistry (Quantum): Microscopic Principles of Physical Chemistry9
09-331Modern Analytical Instrumentation9
xx-xxxH&SS/CFA Elective 1 (of 4)9
 49


Spring Units
09-302Undergraduate Seminar IV1
09-322Laboratory IV: Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics12
09-445Undergraduate Research10
09-xxxGraduate Chemistry Course (see notes on Honors B.S./M.S. electives)12
09-345Physical Chemistry (Thermo): Macroscopic Principles of Physical Chemistry9
xx-xxxH&SS/CFA Elective 2 (of 4)9
 53


Summer
10 weeks Honors Research recommended
Senior Year
Fall Units
09-401Undergraduate Seminar V1
09-445Undergraduate Research10
09-xxxGraduate Chemistry Course12
09-xxxGraduate Chemistry Course12
xx-xxxH&SS/CFA Elective 3 (of 4)9
 44


Spring Units
09-402Undergraduate Seminar VI3
09-455Honors Thesis15
09-xxxGraduate Chemistry Course12
09-xxxGraduate Chemistry Course12
xxx-xxx H&SS/CFA Elective 4 (of 4)9
 51

Certain non-technical courses from Business Administration, Heinz College, and EPP also may be used to fulfill the non-technical elective requirement. A listing of approved and non-approved courses for the H&SS/CFA electives is available at the following web site, www.cmu.edu/mcs/education/edu_HSSFA.html, or see the Mellon College of Science section in this catalog for the Humanities and Social Sciences and Fine Arts Requirements. For example accounting, finance, production, and statistics courses may NOT be used. Also, 85-219 Biological Foundations of Behavior may NOT be used as an elective in the H&SS/CFA category. These courses are considered to be technical classes. If in doubt, check with your advisor.

Distribution of Units for the B.S. with Honors/M.S. Degrees

Minimum Total Chemistry Units (250, See distribution below)

Required Chemistry Courses Units
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
09-204Professional Communication Skills in Chemistry3
09-219Modern Organic Chemistry10
09-220Modern Organic Chemistry II10
09-231Mathematical Methods for Chemists9
09-331Modern Analytical Instrumentation9
09-344Physical Chemistry (Quantum): Microscopic Principles of Physical Chemistry9
09-345Physical Chemistry (Thermo): Macroscopic Principles of Physical Chemistry9
09-348Inorganic Chemistry10
09-221Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis12
09-222Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis12
09-321Laboratory III: Molecular Design and Synthesis12
09-322Laboratory IV: Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics12
09-xxxChemistry Seminars8
Undergraduate Research (2 summers also recommended)30
Graduate chemistry courses (see Notes on B.S./M.S. Electives) 51-60
09-455Honors Thesis15

09-107 Honors Chemistry: Fundamentals Concepts and Applications, may be taken instead of 09-105 .

Students who transfer into the department and have taken 09-217 Organic Chemistry I, and/or 09-218 Organic Chemistry II, will be required to complete units of 09-435 Independent Study Chemistry, 1 unit per course, under the supervision of the instructor(s) for 09-219 and/or 09-220 in order to master the course content missed in this course sequence.

Chemistry courses required for the BS/MS degree that are numbered 09-2xx or higher must be taken at Carnegie Mellon University.  Exceptions must be requested of and approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies.  In general such requests will be approved only under unusual or extenuating circumstances.

Other RequirementsUnits
Biology9
Computer Science10
Mathematics20
Physics24
Humanities and Social Sciences or Fine Arts courses72
Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
Free Electives0-9
Minimum number of units required for degrees:388

B.A. in Chemistry

The curriculum for the B.A. degree provides students with the opportunity to take a substantial number of elective and non-technical courses. Certain chemistry, math, and other technical courses required for the B.S. degree are replaced by free electives, making this degree an ideal choice for those who wish to earn an additional major with one of the departments in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, College of Fine Arts, or with the Business Administration program, though this is not a requirement. It is also attractive for students wishing to pursue careers in dentistry or pharmacy, career paths that require a broader preparation at the undergraduate level. It is not possible to combine the B.A. degree in chemistry with an additional B.A. degree in another department in MCS (e.g. Biological Sciences). Students may earn one or more of the options as described for B.S. degree candidates, providing they complete the courses listed.

The suggested curriculum recommends that the required technical courses be completed at the earliest opportunity, however students have considerable flexibility to postpone these courses in favor of electives, allowing compatibility with the programs of other departments. In designing such programs for a minor or additional major with chemistry, students should note that certain required chemistry courses only are offered in specific semesters, not both. These include the Fall-only courses 09-219 Modern Organic Chemistry and 09-321 Laboratory III: Molecular Design and Synthesis and the Spring-only courses 09-214 Physical Chemistry, 09-220 Modern Organic Chemistry II, 09-348 Inorganic Chemistry, and 09-204 Professional Communication Skills in Chemistry. Also, in some cases, a course that is normally scheduled for the fall may be changed to a spring course (or the inverse) due to a departmental curriculum change.
 

Curriculum - B.A. in Chemistry

First Year
Fall Units
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
33-111Physics I for Science Students12
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
 44

Students interested in majoring in chemistry should consider enrolling in the 3-unit lab course 09-101 Introduction to Experimental Chemistry, in the Fall or Spring semester of the freshman year. Although not required, the laboratory course is recommended for chemistry majors.

Spring Units
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
21-122Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation10
or 21-124 Calculus II for Biologists and Chemists
33-112Physics II for Science Students12
xx-xxxH&SS Distribution Course 19
15-110Principles of Computing10
 51
Sophomore Year
Fall Units
09-201Undergraduate Seminar I1
09-219Modern Organic Chemistry10
09-221Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis12
xx-xxxFree Elective9
xx-xxxH&SS Distribution Course 29
 41


Spring Units
09-202Undergraduate Seminar II: Safety and Environmental Issues for Chemists1
09-204Professional Communication Skills in Chemistry3
09-220Modern Organic Chemistry II10
09-222Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis12
09-214Physical Chemistry9
xx-xxxH&SS Distribution Course 39
 44
Junior Year
Fall Units
09-301Undergraduate Seminar III1
09-321Laboratory III: Molecular Design and Synthesis12
03-121Modern Biology9
09-xxxChemistry Elective9
xx-xxxFree Elective9
xx-xxxH&SS/CFA Elective 1 (of 4)9
 49


Spring Units
09-302Undergraduate Seminar IV1
09-348Inorganic Chemistry10
09-xxxChemistry Elective9
xx-xxxFree Elective9
xx-xxxFree Elective9
xx-xxxH&SS/CFA Elective 2 (of 4)9
 47
Senior Year
Fall Units
09-401Undergraduate Seminar V1
xx-xxxFree Electives36
xx-xxxH&SS/CFA Elective 3 (of 4)9
 46


Spring Units
09-402Undergraduate Seminar VI3
xx-xxxFree Electives28
xx-xxxH&SS/CFA Elective 4 (of 4)9
 40

Certain non-technical courses from Business Administration, Heinz College, and EPP also may be used to fulfill the non-technical elective requirement. A listing of approved and non-approved courses for the H&SS/CFA electives is available at the following web site, www.cmu.edu/mcs/education/edu_HSSFA.html, or see the Mellon College of Science section in this catalog for the Humanities and Social Sciences and Fine Arts Requirements. For example accounting, finance, production, and statistics courses may NOT be used. Also, 85-219 Biological Foundations of Behavior may NOT be used as an elective in the H&SS/CFA category. These courses are considered technical classes. If in doubt, check with your advisor.

Distribution of Units for the B.A. Degree

Minimum Total Chemistry Units 124; See distribution below:

Required Chemistry Courses Units
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
09-204Professional Communication Skills in Chemistry3
09-219Modern Organic Chemistry10
09-220Modern Organic Chemistry II10
09-214Physical Chemistry9
or 09-344 Physical Chemistry (Quantum): Microscopic Principles of Physical Chemistry
or 09-345 Physical Chemistry (Thermo): Macroscopic Principles of Physical Chemistry
09-348Inorganic Chemistry10
09-221Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis12
09-222Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis12
09-321Laboratory III: Molecular Design and Synthesis12
09-xxxChemistry Seminars8
09-xxxChemistry Electives18

09-107 Honors Chemistry: Fundamentals Concepts and Applications, may be taken instead of 09-105.

09-322 Laboratory IV: Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics may be taken in lieu of 09-321 Laboratory III: Molecular Design and Synthesis.  However the student must complete the necessary pre- and co-requisites of 09-231, 09-344, 09-331 and 09-345.  In this case 09-331 and 09-344 will count as chemistry electives towards the degree.

Students who transfer into the department and have taken 09-217 Organic Chemistry I, and/or 09-218 Organic Chemistry II, will be required to complete units of 09-435 Independent Study Chemistry, 1 unit per course, under the supervision of the instructor(s) for 09-219 and/or 09-220 in order to master the course content missed in this course sequence.

Chemistry courses required for the B.A. degree that are numbered 09-2xx or higher must be taken at Carnegie Mellon University.  Exceptions must be requested of and approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies.  In general such requests will be approved only under unusual or extenuating circumstances.

Other RequirementsUnits
Biology9
Computer Science10
Mathematics20
Physics24
Humanities and Social Sciences or Fine Arts courses72
Free Electives98
Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
Minimum number of units for the degree360

The above B.A. curriculum recommends an average course load of 40–51 units/semester. The total units will exceed the 360 unit minimum, but students are strongly encouraged to take the extra elective courses in whatever subjects they wish in order to enrich their backgrounds and enhance their educational experience.

Notes on Electives

Chemistry Electives

A minimum of 18 units of chemical electives is required.

Chemical electives can be satisfied by 09-445 Undergraduate Research, or by most other chemistry courses 09-3xx or higher, undergraduate or graduate, for which the student has the necessary prerequisites, or by 03-231/03-232 Biochemistry I. 09-435 Independent Study Chemistry, may only be used to fulfill this requirement with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Certain interdisciplinary courses (e.g. 39-xxx) relating to chemistry can also be used with permission by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. The scheduling of these electives can vary and students should check with the department offering the course to see which courses are offered in any given year or semester and with the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Chemistry to ascertain whether the course is an acceptable chemistry elective.

Free Electives

Free electives are defined as including any course offered by Carnegie Mellon except those in science or engineering fields that are primarily intended for non-majors. A maximum of 9 units total of Physical Education and/or ROTC courses combined can be counted as free elective units. The Chemistry Department does not require technical electives.

Requirements for a Minor in Chemistry 

In order for a student to receive a minor in Chemistry in conjunction with a B.S. or B.A. degree from another (primary) department, the successful completion of six courses as distributed below is required. Students pursuing the minor must inform the Chemistry Department of their intentions in writing using the MCS form for declaration of a minor so that the minor designation can be approved prior to graduation. The form may be obtained in the department office, DH 1317 or from the MCS undergraduate web page, http://www.cmu.edu/mcs/undergrad/advising/forms/index.html. It should be completed and submitted to the Director of Undergraduate Studies no later than the end of the course add period of the final semester prior to graduation.  If you decide at a later date not to complete the minor, it would be helpful to notify the Director of Undergraduate Studies so that it can be removed from your record. Minors are listed on the transcript but not on the diploma.

A. Four Required Core Courses
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
09-221Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis12
09-217Organic Chemistry I9-10
or 09-219 Modern Organic Chemistry
Choice of one of the following courses:
09-214Physical Chemistry9
09-344Physical Chemistry (Quantum): Microscopic Principles of Physical Chemistry9
09-345Physical Chemistry (Thermo): Macroscopic Principles of Physical Chemistry9
09-347Advanced Physical Chemistry12
09-348Inorganic Chemistry10

Courses in this group that are not used to satisfy Part A core courses may be used to satisfy elective course requirements in part B below, if they are not required by the student's primary department. However the only combination of physical chemistry courses (09-344, 09-345, 09-347 and 09-214 ) that is allowed is 09-344 and 09-345.

Enrollment in 09-347 is only open to students majoring in chemical engineering.

B. Two Elective Courses from the following list.
09-344Physical Chemistry (Quantum): Microscopic Principles of Physical Chemistry9
or 09-214 Physical Chemistry
09-345Physical Chemistry (Thermo): Macroscopic Principles of Physical Chemistry9
09-348Inorganic Chemistry10
09-222Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis12
09-218Organic Chemistry II9
03-231/232Biochemistry I9
09-xxxApproved Upper Level Chemistry Course (must be 09-3xx or higher)

Courses in this section (part B above) can not be counted toward the minor if they are required in any way by the student's primary department or towards an additional major or minor other than as a free elective. For example, students majoring in Biological Sciences can not double count 03-231 (or 03-232), 09-222, or 09-218 (or 09-220) toward the elective courses for the minor in chemistry. Chemical engineering majors can not count 03-231 (or 03-232) or a chemistry course that is used to satisfy that department's required chemistry or advanced chem/biochem elective. Also, chemical engineering majors can not use 09-344, 09-345 or 09-214 due to the similarity of these courses to 09-347 Advanced Physical Chemistry, which is required by the chemical engineering department.

09-231 Mathematical Methods for Chemists, does not count towards the minor in chemistry. The undergraduate research courses 09-445 Undergraduate Research and 09-435 Independent Study Chemistry cannot be used for the minor.

Transfer credit will be accepted only for 09-106 and 09-217.  All other classes towards the chemistry minor must be completed at Carnegie Mellon University.

Other Programs

As part of the undergraduate degree program, chemistry majors have the opportunity to pursue various special programs at Carnegie Mellon to enrich their academic experience. These include but are not limited to: programs with the College of Fine Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, the H. John Heinz College of Public Policy and Management; Interdisciplinary Majors and Minors including Health Care Policy and Management. For more details, see the Tailoring Your Education portion of the Mellon College of Science section in this catalog.

 

Transfer Credit for Chemistry Courses

  1. Requests for transfer credit for chemistry classes taken at other institutions should be made to Karen Stump, the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Chemistry.  Students making such requests should follow the policies and procedures in place within their home colleges in assembling materials for such requests.  Consult with your advisor on the appropriate steps.
  2. At minimum requests must be accompanied by a complete syllabus including the textbook that will be used, a detailed list of topic areas and an indication of whether or not the course is part of the curriculum for science majors at the other institution. 

  3. No transfer credit will be awarded for the laboratory classes required for the chemistry major at Carnegie Mellon University, 09-221, 09-222, 09-321 and 09-322.  Requests for transfer credit for 09-101, Introduction to Experimental Chemistry, will be accepted with the appropriate documentation.

  4. In assessing the suitability of courses for transfer credit, the following factors are considered:

    • The rigor of the course must be comparable to that offered at Carnegie Mellon.  This is usually assessed via the textbook used and the amount of time spent on topic areas. 
    • The topic areas should match to a degree of at least 80% those covered in the comparable course at Carnegie Mellon University.
       
  5. 09-105 Introduction to Modern Chemistry I focuses primarily on structure and bonding. Detailed topics include the following:
    • History and Conceptual Basis of Modern Chemistry
    • Radiation, Quantum Mechanics, and Atomic Structure
    • Periodic Table and Trends in Elemental Properties (including discussion of exceptions to trends)
    • Bonding (bond polarity)
    • Lewis Structures (octet rule and exceptions; formal charge)
    • Resonance Structures
    • Molecular shapes
    • Molecular Polarity
    • Naming compounds
    • Interparticle (intermolecular) forces and comparing physical properties from them
    • Valence Bond (Localized Electron) and Molecular Orbital Theory
    • Determining number of moles and chemical formulas
    • Writing and balancing chemical equations (in particular completing combustion and double displacement reactions – including acid-base and precipitation reactions)
    • Stoichiometry – limiting reactant and percentage yield
    • Gases (mainly ideal) and stoichiometric applications involving them
    • Phase transitions
    • Solutions (determining concentrations, dilution problems, stoichiometric applications, application of solubility rules to determine if a precipitate forms)
    • Acid-base reactions and titrations
    • Oxidations Numbers and Redox Reactions/Titrations (including balancing redox reactions)
    • Colligative Properties; Mixtures and Distillation
    • Transition Metal Complexes and Crystal Field Theory (including crystal field stabilization energy and optical properties)
  6. 09-106 Modern Chemistry II focuses primarily on thermodynamics, kinetics and equilibrium.  Detailed topic areas include the following.
    • Thermochemistry and Thermodynamics (First, Second, and Third Laws, with gas expansion/compression applications, including reversible, adiabatic processes)
    • Internal energy, enthalpy, entropy, Gibbs Free energy, and determination of spontaneity
    • Kinetics : Determination of rate, order, rate laws (including application of pseudo-rate laws, application of integrated rate law to determine order, relationship between time and amount in a reaction, and half-life
    • Reaction mechanisms – applying fast equilibrium and steady-state approximations to determine rate law consistent with mechanism
    • Chemical Equilibrium : determination of Q and K expressions, determination of direction in which reaction proceeds to achieve equilibrium (using Q and Le Chatelier’s principles, quantitative calculations to determine K or amounts at various stages, dependence of K on temperature, relationship between Gibbs Free energy, Q, and K)
    • Acid-Base Equilibria: writing dissociation equilibrium reactions and acid-base “neutralization” reactions, autoionization of water (determination of pH and pOH, use of Kw), writing Ka  and Kb expressions from dissociation equilibria, quantitative equilibrium calculations for weak acids and bases, titrations between strong species, strong-weak species, and weak-weak species, buffers (calculations of pH and amounts, including how to make a buffer), polyprotic species (quantitative applications and titrations), solubility and precipitation equilibria, determination of Ksp expressions and quantitative applications of those expressions, complex ion formation equilibria, emphasis is placed on equilibrium problems that involve multiple types of simultaneous equilibria
    • Electrochemistry: Electrochemical cell notation and writing half-reactions from it, Faraday constant to connect number of moles of electrons / reaction amounts with current, connection  of Gibbs Free Energy to cell voltage (potential) at equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions, determination of K’s (acid-base, solubility constants) or amounts using Nernst equation in concentration cells (K for cell reaction)

Faculty

CATALINA ACHIM, Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.BRUCE A. ARMITAGE, Professor of Chemistry, Co-Director Center for Nucleic Acids Science and Technology – Ph.D., University of Arizona; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.STEFAN BERNHARD, Associate Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., University of Fribourg (Switzerland); Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.MARK E. BIER, Research Professor and Director, Center for Molecular Analysis – Ph.D., Purdue University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.EMILLE BOMINAAR, Associate Research Professor – Ph.D., University of Amsterdam (The Netherlands); Carnegie Mellon, 1994–.MARCEL P. BRUCHEZ, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biological Sciences, Associate Director, Molecular Biosensor and Imaging Center – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.TERRENCE J. COLLINS, Teresa Heinz Professor in Green Chemistry, Director, Institute for Green Science – Ph.D., University Auckland, (New Zealand); Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.SUBHA R. DAS, Associate Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Auburn University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.NEIL M. DONAHUE, Professor of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy, Director, Center for Atmospheric Particle Studies – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.REBECCA FREELAND, Associate Dean for Special Projects, Mellon College of Science and Associate Head, Department of Chemistry – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.ROBERTO GIL, Research Professor and Director, NMR Facility – Ph.D., Córdoba National University (Argentina); Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.SUSAN T. GRAUL, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Purdue University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.YISONG (ALEX) GUO, Assistant Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., University of California at Davis; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.MICHAEL P. HENDRICH, Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., University of Illinois; Carnegie Mellon, 1994–.RONGCHAO JIN, Associate Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.HYUNG J. KIM, Professor of Chemistry and Head, Department of Chemistry – Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.TOMASZ KOWALEWSKI, Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland); Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.MARIA KURNIKOVA, Associate Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.MIGUEL LLINAS, Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1976–.DANITH LY, Associate Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Georgia Tech; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.MAUMITA MANDAL, Assistant Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Center for Cellular and Molecular Biology (India); Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.KRZYSZTOF MATYJASZEWSKI, J.C. Warner University Professor of Natural Sciences and Director, Center for Macromolecular Engineering – Ph.D., Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland); Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.TERRANCE B. MURPHY, Teaching Professor at Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar – Ph.D., University of Washington; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.ECKARD MüNCK, Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Technical University of Darmstadt, (Germany); Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.KEVIN NOONAN, Assistant Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., University of British Columbia (Canada); Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.GARY D. PATTERSON, Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.LINDA A. PETEANU, Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.GLORIA SILVA, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (Argentina); Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.KAREN H. STUMP, Teaching Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies and Laboratories – M.S., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.RYAN SULLIVAN, Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.LEONARD VUOCOLO, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.GARRY F. P. WARNOCK, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.NEWELL WASHBURN, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.DAVID YARON, Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.

Emeriti

GUY C. BERRY, University Professor of Chemistry and Polymer Science, Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1960–.AKSEL A. BOTHNER-BY, Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1958–.ALBERT A. CARETTO JR., Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Rochester; Carnegie Mellon, 1959–.JOSEF DADOK, Professor of Chemical Instrumentation, Emeritus – Ph.D., Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.MORTON KAPLAN, Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1970–.PAUL J. KAROL, Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.ROBERT L. KAY, Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 1963–.STUART W. STALEY, Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.ROBERT F. STEWART, Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.CHARLES H. VAN DYKE, Associate Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 1963–.

Adjunct Faculty

COLIN HORWITZ, Adjunct Research Professor of Chemistry and Chief Technology Officer, GreenOx Catalysts – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.JOHN PETERSON MYERS, CEO and Chief Scientist of Environmental Health Services – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; .JAMES PETERSON, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh – Ph.D., University of Essex (United Kingdom); .

Courtesy

MICHAEL BOCKSTALLER, Associate Professor of Materials Science Engineering and Faculty of Chemistry – Ph.D., Johannes Gutenberg University (Germany); Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.ALEX EVILEVITCH, Associate Professor of Physics and Faculty of Chemistry – Ph.D., Lund University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.ANDREW GELLMAN, Thomas Lord Professor of Chemical Engineering and Head, Department of Chemical Engineering and Professor of Materials Science Engineering and Chemistry – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.GORDON RULE, Professor of Biological Sciences and Faculty of Biomedical Engineering and Chemistry – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.JAMES SCHNEIDER, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Faculty of Biomedical Engineering and Chemistry – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.ALAN S. WAGGONER, Professor of Biological Sciences, Director, Molecular Biosensor and Imaging Center and Faculty of Biomedical Engineering and Chemistry – Ph.D., University of Oregon; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.LYNN WALKER, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Faculty of Chemistry – Ph.D., University of Delaware; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.JOHN L. WOOLFORD JR., Professor of Biological Sciences and Co-Director of CNAST – Ph.D., Duke University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.

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Faculty

CATALINA ACHIM, Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.BRUCE A. ARMITAGE, Professor of Chemistry, Co-Director Center for Nucleic Acids Science and Technology – Ph.D., University of Arizona; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.STEFAN BERNHARD, Associate Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., University of Fribourg (Switzerland); Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.MARK E. BIER, Research Professor and Director, Center for Molecular Analysis – Ph.D., Purdue University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.EMILLE BOMINAAR, Associate Research Professor – Ph.D., University of Amsterdam (The Netherlands); Carnegie Mellon, 1994–.MARCEL P. BRUCHEZ, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biological Sciences, Associate Director, Molecular Biosensor and Imaging Center – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.TERRENCE J. COLLINS, Teresa Heinz Professor in Green Chemistry, Director, Institute for Green Science – Ph.D., University Auckland, (New Zealand); Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.SUBHA R. DAS, Associate Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Auburn University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.NEIL M. DONAHUE, Professor of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy, Director, Center for Atmospheric Particle Studies – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.REBECCA FREELAND, Associate Dean for Special Projects, Mellon College of Science and Associate Head, Department of Chemistry – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.ROBERTO GIL, Research Professor and Director, NMR Facility – Ph.D., Córdoba National University (Argentina); Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.SUSAN T. GRAUL, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Purdue University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.YISONG (ALEX) GUO, Assistant Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., University of California at Davis; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.MICHAEL P. HENDRICH, Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., University of Illinois; Carnegie Mellon, 1994–.RONGCHAO JIN, Associate Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.HYUNG J. KIM, Professor of Chemistry and Head, Department of Chemistry – Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.TOMASZ KOWALEWSKI, Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland); Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.MARIA KURNIKOVA, Associate Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.MIGUEL LLINAS, Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1976–.DANITH LY, Associate Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Georgia Tech; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.MAUMITA MANDAL, Assistant Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Center for Cellular and Molecular Biology (India); Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.KRZYSZTOF MATYJASZEWSKI, J.C. Warner University Professor of Natural Sciences and Director, Center for Macromolecular Engineering – Ph.D., Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland); Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.TERRANCE B. MURPHY, Teaching Professor at Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar – Ph.D., University of Washington; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.ECKARD MüNCK, Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Technical University of Darmstadt, (Germany); Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.KEVIN NOONAN, Assistant Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., University of British Columbia (Canada); Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.GARY D. PATTERSON, Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.LINDA A. PETEANU, Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.GLORIA SILVA, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (Argentina); Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.KAREN H. STUMP, Teaching Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies and Laboratories – M.S., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.RYAN SULLIVAN, Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.LEONARD VUOCOLO, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.GARRY F. P. WARNOCK, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.NEWELL WASHBURN, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.DAVID YARON, Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.

Emeriti

GUY C. BERRY, University Professor of Chemistry and Polymer Science, Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1960–.AKSEL A. BOTHNER-BY, Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1958–.ALBERT A. CARETTO JR., Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Rochester; Carnegie Mellon, 1959–.JOSEF DADOK, Professor of Chemical Instrumentation, Emeritus – Ph.D., Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.MORTON KAPLAN, Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1970–.PAUL J. KAROL, Professor of Chemistry – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.ROBERT L. KAY, Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 1963–.STUART W. STALEY, Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.ROBERT F. STEWART, Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.CHARLES H. VAN DYKE, Associate Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 1963–.

Adjunct Faculty

COLIN HORWITZ, Adjunct Research Professor of Chemistry and Chief Technology Officer, GreenOx Catalysts – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.JOHN PETERSON MYERS, CEO and Chief Scientist of Environmental Health Services – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; .JAMES PETERSON, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh – Ph.D., University of Essex (United Kingdom); .

Courtesy

MICHAEL BOCKSTALLER, Associate Professor of Materials Science Engineering and Faculty of Chemistry – Ph.D., Johannes Gutenberg University (Germany); Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.ALEX EVILEVITCH, Associate Professor of Physics and Faculty of Chemistry – Ph.D., Lund University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.ANDREW GELLMAN, Thomas Lord Professor of Chemical Engineering and Head, Department of Chemical Engineering and Professor of Materials Science Engineering and Chemistry – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.GORDON RULE, Professor of Biological Sciences and Faculty of Biomedical Engineering and Chemistry – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.JAMES SCHNEIDER, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Faculty of Biomedical Engineering and Chemistry – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.ALAN S. WAGGONER, Professor of Biological Sciences, Director, Molecular Biosensor and Imaging Center and Faculty of Biomedical Engineering and Chemistry – Ph.D., University of Oregon; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.LYNN WALKER, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Faculty of Chemistry – Ph.D., University of Delaware; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.JOHN L. WOOLFORD JR., Professor of Biological Sciences and Co-Director of CNAST – Ph.D., Duke University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.