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Department of Biological Sciences

John L. Woolford, Interim Department Head
Maggie Braun, Assistant Department Head for Undergraduate Affairs
Undergraduate Office: Doherty Hall 1320
http://www.cmu.edu/bio

A major revolution is occurring in the field of biological sciences. Biology is undergoing unprecedented technological advances in biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, genetics, molecular biology, developmental biology, neuroscience and computational biology. Carnegie Mellon's Department of Biological Sciences is nationally recognized as one of the outstanding departments in these areas. Advances in basic research are already being used to solve problems, not only in medicine and public health, but also in areas such as agriculture, forestry, mining, energy, and in industrial and pharmaceutical manufacturing processes. The department provides its students with an education that has both intellectual breadth and depth of exposure to modern research biology. This education can be used to gain employment immediately after graduation in government, industry or academic research laboratories, or to pursue graduate studies in a variety of areas such as science, medicine, public health, law, or business. A degree in biological sciences provides excellent preparation for medical school or other graduate programs in the health professions. These students are aided by the Carnegie Mellon Health Professions Program (HPP), an advisory and resource service for all Carnegie Mellon students who are considering careers in the health care field. (See the HPP section in this catalog or www.cmu.edu/hpp for more information.)

The department offers a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in Biological Sciences. This program has a distinctive core curriculum that provides a foundation in biology, chemistry, computer science, mathematics, and physics. In addition to the core courses, the program includes six biology electives, five free electives as well as eight humanities, social science and fine arts electives. With these electives, students can shape a degree program according to their own interests and career goals. For students who have an interest in a particular field of biology and wish to have a specialized focus, the department offers options in biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, computational biology, developmental biology, genetics, molecular biology and neuroscience that provide the relevant training in each area. The options are especially recommended for students who are considering graduate school in one of these areas. The B.S. in Biological Sciences/Neuroscience Track is available to those students who wish to pursue an in-depth study of neuroscience.

In this exciting era that includes the influence of biology and the life sciences on many fields from medicine to law, the in-depth exposure to multiple disciplines provides opportunities for students to prepare for involvement at the forefront of emerging new fields, markets, and policy changes. The Department of Biological Sciences at Carnegie Mellon is working at these new interfaces through interdisciplinary research and educational programs. Innovative interdisciplinary degrees which are offered by the department include the inter-college B.S. degrees in Computational Biology and Neuroscience as well as an unified B.S. degree in Biological Sciences and Psychology. Students also explore interdisciplinary studies through the Science and Humanities Scholars program, or pursue interests at the interface between the arts and sciences through the Bachelor of Science and Arts (B.S.A.) degree program combining biological sciences with a discipline in the College of Fine Arts.  A stand-alone Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree is available for students who wish to expand their educational training into other fields.  Many students choose to broaden their education by pursuing minors and additional majors in disciplines throughout the university, not just within the Mellon College of Science.

One of the most important features of the Department of Biological Sciences is the opportunity for undergraduate students to interact with faculty. Providing a solid foundation to scientific practice is critical; therefore, the department offers first-year students a variety of inquiry-based, hands-on courses that incorporate a wide range of topics and interests within Biological Sciences. These courses kick-start the transformation of science students to scientists. We encourage our students to get to know their faculty through one of these courses, or through mentored, independent research projects in the faculty laboratories.  Our faculty members are prominent research scientists who also teach beginning and advanced courses. The upper level teaching laboratories are located in the same building as the faculty research laboratories and share scientific equipment. We encourage students to make themselves aware of the research areas of the faculty and to develop research projects with faculty. While such research is usually most important in the senior year, it may begin earlier in a student's undergraduate training. The department has an Honors Program in Research Biology to facilitate a more intensive involvement in research for eligible students. During the past four years, more than 80 percent of the undergraduate biology majors have worked with faculty on their research and, in some cases, have been co-authors of research papers and have given presentations at national meetings.

As of the fall of 2011, the Department of Biological Sciences offers B.S. degrees in Biological Sciences as well as Computational Biology at Carnegie Mellon University in Doha, Qatar.  Students enrolled in either of these degree programs will also complete the requirements outlined below.  However, a limited number of required courses for the CMU-Qatar program are offered through a collaboration with the Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar.For a listing of how the degree requirements are fulfilled for students enrolled in Doha, please consult the CMU-Qatar website (https://www.qatar.cmu.edu/curriculum-bs). 

B.S. Biological Sciences

The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Biological Sciences is built around a core program and elective units as detailed in the following section.

Degree Requirements:
Biological Sciences Units
03-121Modern Biology9
03-231Biochemistry I9
03-240Cell Biology9
03-201/202Undergraduate Colloquium for Sophomores2
03-250Introduction to Computational Biology12
or 03-251 AND 03-252
03-330Genetics9
03-343Experimental Techniques in Molecular Biology12
03-344Experimental Biochemistry12
or 03-345 Experimental Cell and Developmental Biology
03-411Topics in Research1
03-412Topics in Research1
03-xxxBiological Sciences Electives 154
Total Biology units130

1 Details on electives can be found in the "Biological Sciences Electives" section (see               below).

Mathematics, Physics and Computer Science Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration and Approximation10
or 21-124 Calculus II for Biologists and Chemists
33-111Physics I for Science Students12
33-112Physics II for Science Students12
15-110Principles of Computing 210
99-10xComputing at Carnegie Mellon3
Total Science units57

2 15-112 Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science or 02-201 Programming for Scientistscan substitute for 15-110 towards the completion of the Programming course requirement.

Chemistry Units
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
09-217Organic Chemistry I9
or 09-219 Modern Organic Chemistry
09-218Organic Chemistry II9
or 09-220 Modern Organic Chemistry II
09-221Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis12
09-222Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis12
Total Chemistry units62
Elective Units Units
Free Electives39
Dietrich College/CFA Electives72
Total Elective units111

360Minimum number of units required for degree:

Biological Sciences Electives

The following specifications apply to Biological Sciences electives:

  • At least 18 units must be at the 03-3xx level or above, exclusive of 03-445 Undergraduate Research and 03-370 Principles of Biotechnology.

  • Up to three interdisciplinary electives may count as biology electives.

  • Up to 18 units of 03-445 Undergraduate Research may count as general biology electives; a maximum of 36 units can count for the minimum units required for graduation.

  • Courses in biology taken through cross-registration or study abroad at another university may count as electives if prior permission is obtained from the Carnegie Mellon Department of Biological Sciences advisor.

Departmental Electives Group
03-115/116Phage Genomics Research6
03-124Modern Biology Laboratory9
03-125Evolution9
03-126Cellular Response to the Environment4
03-127How Biological Experiments Work - A Project Course9
03-161Molecules to Mind9
03-230Intro to Mammalian Physiology9
03-260Neurobiology of Disease9
03-326Evolution of Regulatory Genomics4.5
03-327Phylogenetics9
03-350Developmental Biology9
03-362Cellular Neuroscience9
03-363Systems Neuroscience9
03-364Developmental Neuroscience9
03-370Principles of Biotechnology9
03-390Molecular and Cellular Immunology9
03-391Microbiology9
03-392Microbiology Laboratory6
03-439Introduction to Biophysics9
03-442Molecular Biology9
03-445Undergraduate ResearchVar.
03-511Computational Molecular Biology and Genomics9
03-512Computational Methods for Biological Modeling and Simulation9
03-534Biological Imaging and Fluorescence Spectroscopy9
03-545Honors Research9
03-620Techniques in Electron Microscopy9
03-709Applied Cell and Molecular Biology12
03-711Computational Molecular Biology and Genomics12
03-712Computational Methods for Biological Modeling and Simulation12
03-713Bioinformatics Data Integration Practicum6
03-726Evolution of Regulatory Genomics6
03-727Phylogenetics12
03-730Advanced Genetics12
03-740Advanced Biochemistry12
03-741Advanced Cell Biology12
03-742Molecular Biology12
03-744Membrane Trafficking9
03-751Advanced Developmental Biology12
03-762Advanced Cellular Neuroscience12
03-763Advanced Systems Neuroscience12
03-770Principles of Biotechnology12
03-791Advanced Microbiology12
03-871Structural Biophysics12
Interdisciplinary Electives Group
Up to three of the following courses may count as biology electives:
09-518Bioorganic Chemistry: Nucleic Acids and Carbohydrates9
09-519Bioorganic Chemistry: Peptides, Proteins and Combinatorial Chemistry9
09-521Bioinorganic Chemistry9
09-535Applied topics in Macromolecular and Biophysical Techniques9
15-211Fundamental Data Structures and Algorithms12
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
21-260Differential Equations9
36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice9
36-247Statistics for Lab Sciences9
42-202Physiology9
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9

Options for the B.S. in Biological Sciences

Students who wish to specialize in a particular area of biology can do so through a set of departmentally defined options. A student who completes the required biology electives for any option can have up to two noted on his or her transcript. Options need not be declared. The elective courses required for each of the options are listed below.

Biochemistry Option

Required Biology Electives:

03-740Advanced Biochemistry12
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
or 21-260 Differential Equations

Any ONE of the following courses:

09-518Bioorganic Chemistry: Nucleic Acids and Carbohydrates9
09-519Bioorganic Chemistry: Peptides, Proteins and Combinatorial Chemistry9
09-521Bioinorganic Chemistry9

Recommended Biology Electives:

03-442Molecular Biology9
03-534Biological Imaging and Fluorescence Spectroscopy9
03-439Introduction to Biophysics9
03-871Structural Biophysics12

Biophysics Option

Required Biology Electives:

03-740Advanced Biochemistry12
03-439Introduction to Biophysics9
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
or 21-260 Differential Equations

Recommended Biology Electives:

03-534Biological Imaging and Fluorescence Spectroscopy9
03-871Structural Biophysics12

Cell Biology Option

Required Biology Electives:

03-350Developmental Biology9
03-741Advanced Cell Biology12

Any ONE of the following courses:

03-362Cellular Neuroscience9
03-390Molecular and Cellular Immunology9

Computational Biology Option

Required Biology Electives:

03-711Computational Molecular Biology and Genomics12
15-210Parallel and Sequential Data Structures and Algorithms12

Any ONE of the following courses:

36-247Statistics for Lab Sciences9
21-260Differential Equations9
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10

Recommended Biology Electives:

03-512Computational Methods for Biological Modeling and Simulation9
15-451Algorithm Design and Analysis12
09-560Computational Chemistry12

Developmental Biology Option

Required Biology Electives:

03-350Developmental Biology9
03-442Molecular Biology9
03-751Advanced Developmental Biology12

Recommended Biology Electives:

03-326Evolution of Regulatory Genomics4.5
03-741Advanced Cell Biology12

Genetics Option

Required Biology Electives:

03-326Evolution of Regulatory Genomics4.5
03-327Phylogenetics9
03-442Molecular Biology9
03-730Advanced Genetics 312

3 Minimum grade of B in 03-330 required.
 

Recommended Biology Electives:

03-391Microbiology9

Molecular Biology Option

Required Biology Electives:

03-442Molecular Biology9
09-518Bioorganic Chemistry: Nucleic Acids and Carbohydrates9
03-726Evolution of Regulatory Genomics6
03-727Phylogenetics12

Recommended Biology Electives:

03-390Molecular and Cellular Immunology9
03-391Microbiology9
03-730Advanced Genetics12

Neuroscience Option

Required Biology Electives:

03-362Cellular Neuroscience 49
03-363Systems Neuroscience 49

Any ONE of the following courses:

42-202Physiology9
03-260Neurobiology of Disease9
03-350Developmental Biology9
03-364Developmental Neuroscience9
03-534Biological Imaging and Fluorescence Spectroscopy9
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9

 4. One of these courses must be completed at the Graduate Level (Complete either 03-762 or 03-763).

B.S. Biological Sciences/Neuroscience Track

The Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences/Neuroscience Track provides an option for those Biological Sciences majors who are interested in an intensive curricular focus in neuroscience. The requirements of the Track are the same as those listed for the B.S. in Biological Sciences with the following changes to the biological sciences elective requirements:

Degree Requirements:
03-362Cellular Neuroscience9
03-363Systems Neuroscience9
03-761Neural Plasticity9

Plus three of the following electives:

03-260Neurobiology of Disease9
03-350Developmental Biology9
03-364Developmental Neuroscience9
03-534Biological Imaging and Fluorescence Spectroscopy9
15-385Introduction to Computer Vision6
15-386Neural Computation9
42-202Physiology9
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
85-213Human Information Processing and Artifical Intelligence9
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9

B.S. Computational Biology

The Bachelor of Science in Computational Biology is listed in the Intercollege section of this catalog. It is a joint degree program offered between the Mellon College of Science and the School of Computer Science.  Current MCS students interested in pursuing this degree should contact Dr. Maggie Braun (DH 1320).  More information can also be found on the CMU Computational Biology website.

B.S. Neuroscience

The Bachelor of Science in Neuroscience is listed in the Intercollege section of this catalog. It is a joint degree program offered between the Mellon College of Science and the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences.  Current MCS students interested in pursuing this degree should contact Dr. Maggie Braun (DH 1320).  More information can also be found on the CMU Neuroscience website.

B.S. Biological Sciences and Psychology

This major is intended to reflect the interdisciplinary nature of current research in the fields of biology and psychology, as well as the national trend in some professions to seek individuals broadly trained in both the social and natural sciences.

Note: Students entering from the College of Humanities and Social Sciences will earn a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and Biological Sciences. Students in the Mellon College of Science will earn a Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences and Psychology. Students in the joint Science and Humanities Scholars (SHS) program can complete the SHS educational core and choose either departmental order for their diploma.

Depending on a student's home college (H&SS or MCS), General Education (GenEd) requirements will be different. GenEd requirements for H&SS and MCS are found on their respective Catalog pages.

Degree Requirements:
Biological Sciences Units
03-121Modern Biology9
03-231Biochemistry I9
03-240Cell Biology9
03-330Genetics9
03-343Experimental Techniques in Molecular Biology12
03-411Topics in Research1
03-412Topics in Research1
03-xxxGeneral Biology Elective9
03-3xxAdvanced Biology Elective9
03-3xxAdvanced Biology Elective9
Total Biology units77
Mathematics, Statistics, Physics and Computer Science Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration and Approximation10
or 21-124 Calculus II for Biologists and Chemists
36-247Statistics for Lab Sciences9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences9
33-111Physics I for Science Students12
15-110Principles of Computing *10
99-10xComputing at Carnegie Mellon3
Total Science units63
Chemistry Units
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
09-217Organic Chemistry I9
or 09-219 Modern Organic Chemistry
09-218Organic Chemistry II9
or 09-220 Modern Organic Chemistry II
09-221Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis12
09-222Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis12
Total Chemistry units62
Psychology Courses Units
85-102Introduction to Psychology9
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-2xxSurvey Psychology Courses **18
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-340 Research Methods in Social Psychology
or 85-320 Research Methods in Developmental Psychology
85-3xxAdvanced Psychology Electives18
Total Psychology units63

 ** Excluding 85-261 Abnormal Psychology

Additional Advanced Elective

9 units(Choose one of the following courses)

85-3xxAdvanced Psychology Elective9
or
03-3xxAdvanced Biology Elective9

Additional Laboratory or Research Methods

9-12 units(Choose one of the following courses)

03-344Experimental Biochemistry12
03-345Experimental Cell and Developmental Biology12
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
85-320Research Methods in Developmental Psychology9
85-340Research Methods in Social Psychology9
Elective Units Units
Free Electives33-36
Dietrich College/CFA Electives36
Total Elective units69-72

360

Minimum number of units required for degree:

B.A. Biological Sciences

The Department of Biological Sciences offers a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree that is intended for students who wish to combine their interest in science with their interest(s) in other discipline(s) across campus.  The requirements for the B.A. degree are distributed as follows:

Degree Requirements:
Biological Sciences Units
03-121Modern Biology9
03-231Biochemistry I9
03-240Cell Biology9
03-201/202Undergraduate Colloquium for Sophomores2
03-330Genetics9
03-343Experimental Techniques in Molecular Biology12
or 03-124 Modern Biology Laboratory
03-411Topics in Research1
03-412Topics in Research1
03-xxxGeneral Biology Electives 518
03-3xxAdvanced Biology Electives 618
Total Biology units88

5,6 Please see description and requirements for electives under the B.S. in Biological            Sciences section of this Catalog.

Chemistry Units
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
09-217Organic Chemistry I9
or 09-219 Modern Organic Chemistry
09-218Organic Chemistry II9
or 09-220 Modern Organic Chemistry II
09-221Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis12
Total Chemistry units50
Mathematics, Physics, and Computer Science Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration and Approximation10
or 21-124 Calculus II for Biologists and Chemists
33-111Physics I for Science Students12
33-112Physics II for Science Students12
15-110Principles of Computing 710
99-10xComputing at Carnegie Mellon3
Total Science units57

7 15-112 Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science can substitute for 15-110 towards completion of the Programming course requirement. 

Elective courses Units
Dietrich College/CFA Electives72
Free Electives99-102
Total Elective units171-174

360Minimum number of units required for degree:

Masters Degree in Computational Biology

Students who are interested in more advanced training in this emerging field may want to consider the Master of Science Program in Computational Biology. For more information about this program, contact the Biological Sciences Graduate Programs Office (bio-gradoffice@andrew.cmu.edu).

Honors Program in Research Biology

The departmental Honors Program offers an opportunity to become extensively involved in research. The program requires students to conduct an independent project and to prepare a formal thesis that is written and defended in the senior year. This program does not preclude a student from completing any of the options within the department nor is it the only way in which students can participate in undergraduate research, although it is excellent preparation for graduate studies.

Minor in Biological Sciences

All university students are eligible to pursue a minor in biological sciences in conjunction with a major in any other department in the university. A minimum of six biological sciences courses (and two chemistry prerequisites) must be completed to fulfill the minor in biological sciences. The curriculum includes four required courses and two elective courses as specified below. Units awarded for undergraduate research are not applicable to elective courses. Courses taken in other departments or colleges will be considered on an individual basis.

Courses for the Minor in Biological Sciences
Units
Prerequisites:
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
09-217Organic Chemistry I9
Required courses:
03-121Modern Biology9
03-231/232Biochemistry I9
03-240Cell Biology9
03-330Genetics9
03-xxxGeneral Biology Elective9
03-3xxAdvanced Biology Elective9

 73Minimum number of units required for the Minor in Biological Sciences:

Minor in Neuroscience

The curriculum within the Neuroscience minor will allow students from various disciplines to gain fundamental knowledge of neuroscience concepts. The interdisciplinary nature of the coursework echoes the nature of the field itself; students will select courses from the natural, social, and computer sciences. Neuroscientists not only require foundational knowledge of molecular, cellular, and systems neuroscience, but they should also understand the behavioral significance and appreciate how computational work and imaging techniques can aid in clarifying normal and abnormal functioning of these fundamental processes.

Students pursuing the minor in Neuroscience will:

    • Acquire foundational knowledge of the basic biological foundations of the nervous system,         from the cellular through systems levels.

    • Understand the effects of basic neurological function on behavior, including cognition.

    • Gain an appreciation of the interdisciplinary nature of the field of neuroscience.

NOTE: Because the curriculum within this minor may overlap with some degree requirements, no more than 2 courses fulfilling Neuroscience Minor requirements may count towards the requirements of a student’s major or other minor.

Courses required for the Neuroscience minor:
Units

Required courses (4):

03-121Modern Biology
prerequisite for 03-362 and 03-363
9
03-362Cellular Neuroscience9
03-363Systems Neuroscience9
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9

Distribution Requirements: Three courses, including at least 1 from each of the following categories:

Approaches to Neuroscience Category
15-386Neural Computation9
15-883Computational Models of Neural Systems12
85-412Cognitive Modeling9
85-414Cognitive Neuropsychology9
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing9
85-429Cognitive Brain Imaging9
Cognitive Neuroscience Category
03-260Neurobiology of Disease9
03-364Developmental Neuroscience9
15-486Artificial Neural Networks12
85-211Cognitive Psychology *9
85-356Music and Mind: The Cognitive Neuroscience of Sound9
85-370Perception9
85-390Human Memory9
85-406Autism: Psychological and Neuroscience Perspectives9

*NOTE: 85-213 may be used instead of 85-211 when offered

Minimum number of units required for the Neuroscience Minor:                            63

Transfer credit for Modern Biology

Students wishing to transfer credit for 03-121 Modern Biology from another institution must meet the following requirements:

  1. The course in question should have at least an 80% match in topics with 03-121. Topics in 03-121 cover the genetic, molecular, cellular, developmental, and evolutionary mechanisms that underlie biological processes and include: Cell theory; Cell chemistry; Cell structure; Function and structure of proteins, DNA, RNA, lipids and carbohydrates; Cell respiration and fermentation; The cell cycle; Cell-cell interactions and communication; Transcription; Translation; RNA processing in Eukaryotes; DNA replication; DNA mutation and repair; Meiosis; Mitosis; and Regulation of Gene Expression.

    This information is sometimes available in the course description, but more detail is often found in a course syllabus.
     
  2. The textbook used in the transfer course should be at a comparable level to S. Freeman (2010) "Biological Science, Vol. 1 (The Cell, Genetics, and Development)," Fourth Edition, Pearson Benjamin Cummings, ISBN 0-321-61347-3.
     
  3. Introductory level courses that focus on other biology areas (i.e. anatomy, physiology, ecology, evolution, and/or development) will not be accepted for 03-121 credit. These courses may receive credit for a general biology elective.
     
  4. Students should contact their departmental academic advisor for the transfer credit approval process in their college.

Faculty

ALISON L. BARTH, Professor – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.MOHAMED BOUAOUINA, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D.,Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.DANIEL BRASIER, Lecturer – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.MAGGIE BRAUN, Assistant Teaching Professor and Assistant Department Head for Undergraduate Affairs – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.MARCEL BRUCHEZ, Associate Professor in Biological Sciences and Chemistry, Associate Director of MBIC – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.AMY L. BURKERT, Teaching Professor and Vice Provost for Education – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.JASON M. D'ANTONIO, Lecturer and Director of the Health Professions Program – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.CARRIE B. DOONAN, Teaching Professor and Director of Undergraduate Laboratories – Ph.D., University of Connecticut; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.EMILY DRILL, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.M. DANNIE DURAND, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.CHARLES A. ETTENSOHN, Professor – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.ARYN GITTIS, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.ERIC W. GROTZINGER, Teaching Professor and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Affairs for MCS – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.DAVID D. HACKNEY, Professor – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.VERONICA F. HINMAN, Associate Professor – Ph.D., University of Queensland; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.CHIEN HO, Professor and Director of NMR Center of Pittsburgh – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.JEFFREY O. HOLLINGER, Professor of Biological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., D.D.S., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.KEN HOVIS, Assistant Teaching Professor, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.VALENTIN ILYIN, Associate Teaching Professor of Computational Biology at CMU-Qatar – Ph.D.,Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.JONATHAN W. JARVIK, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.LINDA R. KAUFFMAN, Teaching Professor – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.SANDRA KUHLMAN, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., Univeristy of Kentucky; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.FREDERICK LANNI, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.CHRISTINA H. LEE, Associate Professor – Ph.D., University of California, San Francisco; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.ADAM D. LINSTEDT, Professor – Ph.D., University of California, San Francisco; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.A. JAVIER LOPEZ, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Duke University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.BROOKE M. MCCARTNEY, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Duke University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.C. JOEL MCMANUS, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.JONATHAN S. MINDEN, Professor – Ph.D., Albert Einstein College of Medicine; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.AARON P. MITCHELL, Professor – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.ROBERT F. MURPHY, Professor of Biological Sciences and Department Head of Computational Biology – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.MANOJKUMAR PUTHENVEEDU, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.GORDON S. RULE, Professor and Associate Dean for Research, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.RUSSELL S. SCHWARTZ, Professor – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.SHOBA SUBRAMANIAN, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.JOSEPH P. SUHAN, Lecturer – M.A., Hofstra University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.NATHAN N. URBAN, Professor and Interim Provost – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.ANNETTE VINCENT, Assistant Teaching Professor, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., National University of Singapore; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.LINDA VISOMIRSKI-ROBIC, Lecturer – Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.ALAN S. WAGGONER, Professor and Director of MBIC – Ph.D., University of Oregon; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.JOHN L. WOOLFORD JR., Interim Department Head, Professor, and Co-Director of CNAST – Ph.D., Duke University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.

Affiliated Faculty

BRUCE A. ARMITAGE, Professor of Chemistry and Co-Director of CNAST – Ph.D., University of Arizona; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.ZIV BAR-JOSEPH, Associate Professor of Computer Science and Machine Learning – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.PHIL G. CAMPBELL, Research Professor at the Institute for Complex Engineering Systems – Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.KRIS DAHL, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.WILLIAM F. EDDY, Professor of Statistics – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1976–.ALEX EVILEVITCH, Associate Professor of Physics – Ph.D., Lund University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.T.D. JACOBSEN, Assistant Director and Principal Research Scientist at the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation – Ph.D., Washington State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.ROBERT W. KIGER, Distinguished Service Professor and Botany Professor and the History of Science Director and Principal Research Scientist for the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation – Ph.D., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.CHRISTOPHER J. LANGMEAD, Associate Professor of Computer Science – Ph.D., Dartmouth College; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.PHILIP R. LEDUC, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.CARL R. OLSON, Professor of the CNBC – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.FREDERICK H. UTECH, Principal Research Scientist at the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation – Ph.D., Washington University; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.ERIC P. XING, Associate Professor of Computer Science, Language Technologies Institute, and Machine Learning – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.GE YANG, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering and the Lane Center for Computational Biology – Ph.D., University of Minnesota, Twin Cities; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.

Adjunct Faculty

JON W. JOHNSON, Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Pittsburgh – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.KARL KANDLER, Professor of Otolaryngology and Neurobiology at the University of Pittsburgh – Ph.D., University of Tubingen, Germany; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.CYNTHIA LANCE-JONES, Associate Professor of Neurobiology at the University of Pittsburgh – Ph.D., University of Massachusetts; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.CYNTHIA M. MORTON, Associate Curator and Head of Botany at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History – Ph.D., New York Botanical Garden/CUNY; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.PETER L. STRICK, Co-Director of CNBC and Distinguished Professor of Neurobiology at the University of Pittsburgh – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.D. LANSING TAYLOR, President and Chief Executive Officer of Cellumen, Inc. – Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.EDDA THIELS, Assistant Professor of Neurobiology at the University of Pittsburgh – Ph.D., Indiana University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.GEORGE S. ZUBENKO, Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.

Emeriti Faculty

PETER B. BERGET, Professor Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.WILLIAM R. MCCLURE, Professor Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.JOHN F. NAGLE, Professor of Biological Sciences and Physics – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.JAMES F. WILLIAMS, Professor Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 1976–.C. ROY WORTHINGTON, Professor Emeritus – Ph.D., Adelaide University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.

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Faculty

ALISON L. BARTH, Professor – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.MOHAMED BOUAOUINA, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D.,Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.DANIEL BRASIER, Lecturer – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.MAGGIE BRAUN, Assistant Teaching Professor and Assistant Department Head for Undergraduate Affairs – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.MARCEL BRUCHEZ, Associate Professor in Biological Sciences and Chemistry, Associate Director of MBIC – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.AMY L. BURKERT, Teaching Professor and Vice Provost for Education – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.JASON M. D'ANTONIO, Lecturer and Director of the Health Professions Program – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.CARRIE B. DOONAN, Teaching Professor and Director of Undergraduate Laboratories – Ph.D., University of Connecticut; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.EMILY DRILL, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.M. DANNIE DURAND, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.CHARLES A. ETTENSOHN, Professor – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.ARYN GITTIS, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.ERIC W. GROTZINGER, Teaching Professor and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Affairs for MCS – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.DAVID D. HACKNEY, Professor – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.VERONICA F. HINMAN, Associate Professor – Ph.D., University of Queensland; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.CHIEN HO, Professor and Director of NMR Center of Pittsburgh – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.JEFFREY O. HOLLINGER, Professor of Biological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., D.D.S., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.KEN HOVIS, Assistant Teaching Professor, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.VALENTIN ILYIN, Associate Teaching Professor of Computational Biology at CMU-Qatar – Ph.D.,Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.JONATHAN W. JARVIK, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.LINDA R. KAUFFMAN, Teaching Professor – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.SANDRA KUHLMAN, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., Univeristy of Kentucky; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.FREDERICK LANNI, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.CHRISTINA H. LEE, Associate Professor – Ph.D., University of California, San Francisco; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.ADAM D. LINSTEDT, Professor – Ph.D., University of California, San Francisco; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.A. JAVIER LOPEZ, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Duke University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.BROOKE M. MCCARTNEY, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Duke University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.C. JOEL MCMANUS, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.JONATHAN S. MINDEN, Professor – Ph.D., Albert Einstein College of Medicine; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.AARON P. MITCHELL, Professor – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.ROBERT F. MURPHY, Professor of Biological Sciences and Department Head of Computational Biology – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.MANOJKUMAR PUTHENVEEDU, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.GORDON S. RULE, Professor and Associate Dean for Research, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.RUSSELL S. SCHWARTZ, Professor – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.SHOBA SUBRAMANIAN, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.JOSEPH P. SUHAN, Lecturer – M.A., Hofstra University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.NATHAN N. URBAN, Professor and Interim Provost – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.ANNETTE VINCENT, Assistant Teaching Professor, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., National University of Singapore; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.LINDA VISOMIRSKI-ROBIC, Lecturer – Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.ALAN S. WAGGONER, Professor and Director of MBIC – Ph.D., University of Oregon; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.JOHN L. WOOLFORD JR., Interim Department Head, Professor, and Co-Director of CNAST – Ph.D., Duke University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.

Affiliated Faculty

BRUCE A. ARMITAGE, Professor of Chemistry and Co-Director of CNAST – Ph.D., University of Arizona; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.ZIV BAR-JOSEPH, Associate Professor of Computer Science and Machine Learning – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.PHIL G. CAMPBELL, Research Professor at the Institute for Complex Engineering Systems – Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.KRIS DAHL, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.WILLIAM F. EDDY, Professor of Statistics – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1976–.ALEX EVILEVITCH, Associate Professor of Physics – Ph.D., Lund University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.T.D. JACOBSEN, Assistant Director and Principal Research Scientist at the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation – Ph.D., Washington State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.ROBERT W. KIGER, Distinguished Service Professor and Botany Professor and the History of Science Director and Principal Research Scientist for the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation – Ph.D., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.CHRISTOPHER J. LANGMEAD, Associate Professor of Computer Science – Ph.D., Dartmouth College; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.PHILIP R. LEDUC, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.CARL R. OLSON, Professor of the CNBC – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.FREDERICK H. UTECH, Principal Research Scientist at the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation – Ph.D., Washington University; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.ERIC P. XING, Associate Professor of Computer Science, Language Technologies Institute, and Machine Learning – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.GE YANG, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering and the Lane Center for Computational Biology – Ph.D., University of Minnesota, Twin Cities; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.

Adjunct Faculty

JON W. JOHNSON, Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Pittsburgh – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.KARL KANDLER, Professor of Otolaryngology and Neurobiology at the University of Pittsburgh – Ph.D., University of Tubingen, Germany; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.CYNTHIA LANCE-JONES, Associate Professor of Neurobiology at the University of Pittsburgh – Ph.D., University of Massachusetts; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.CYNTHIA M. MORTON, Associate Curator and Head of Botany at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History – Ph.D., New York Botanical Garden/CUNY; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.PETER L. STRICK, Co-Director of CNBC and Distinguished Professor of Neurobiology at the University of Pittsburgh – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.D. LANSING TAYLOR, President and Chief Executive Officer of Cellumen, Inc. – Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.EDDA THIELS, Assistant Professor of Neurobiology at the University of Pittsburgh – Ph.D., Indiana University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.GEORGE S. ZUBENKO, Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.

Emeriti Faculty

PETER B. BERGET, Professor Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.WILLIAM R. MCCLURE, Professor Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.JOHN F. NAGLE, Professor of Biological Sciences and Physics – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.JAMES F. WILLIAMS, Professor Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 1976–.C. ROY WORTHINGTON, Professor Emeritus – Ph.D., Adelaide University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.