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Dietrich College Interdisciplinary Minors

Dietrich College interdepartmental minors are programs whose content and components span two or more academic departments to form coherent patterns of study.

A number of interdepartmental minors are offered by Dietrich College and are, in general, available to all Carnegie Mellon undergraduate students. As well, there are numerous other minors offered by other colleges in the university that are generally available to Dietrich College students. The full list of minors available to Carnegie Mellon students is located in the catalog index under “Minors.”

Completion of the requirements for any of these minors is noted on the final transcript.

To declare a Dietrich College interdepartmental minor, students should contact the college's Academic Advisory Center (AAC) and the faculty advisor for that minor.

To discuss the possibility of declaring a non-Dietrich College minor, contact the advisor listed for the minor in question.

In general, unless noted, no course taken to fulfill requirements for these interdepartmental minors may apply toward any other program's requirements.

The Minor in African and African American Studies

Faculty Director: Edda L. Fields-Black
Undergraduate Advisor: Naum Kats
Office: Baker Hall 240

Mission

The African and African American Studies minor will expose students to the following regions: sub-Saharan Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean. Broad geographic coverage and a comparative framework encourage students to make connections between Africa and the African Diaspora, as well as among Diasporan communities. The minor offers undergraduate students the opportunity to undertake an empirical and theoretical examination of the cultural, political, social, and historical experiences of Africans and people of African descent. This unique minor brings together departments and colleges within the university and allows students to develop analytical skills particular to the arts, humanities, social sciences, public policy, and management. The African and African American Studies minor is also designed to allow students a considerable degree of freedom in their choice of electives and independent research projects, including opportunities to study and conduct research in a relevant foreign language.

Courses taken to fulfill requirements in other major or minor programs may not be applied to this minor.

Requirements
  • The minor is composed of 54 units - two core courses and four elective courses.
  • The elective courses must include one research course.
  • Students may take an additional two core courses as electives, but not more than four total courses.
  • Students must take courses in at least two of the four regions (African, African American, Latin American, and the Caribbean) between their core and elective courses.
18 unitsCore Courses
African
79-226Introduction to African History: Earliest Times to 17809
79-227Introduction to African History: 1780-19949

 

African American
76-232African American Literature9
76-332African American Literature: The African American Crime Novel9
79-241African American History: Africa to the Civil War9
79-242African American History: Reconstruction to the Present9

 

Caribbean
79-220Caribbean: Cultures and Histories9
36 unitsElective Courses
African
79-162Freshman Seminar: "Slavery" and "Freedom" in African History?9
79-225West African History in Film9
79-237Comparative Slavery9
79-290States/Stateless Societies and Nationalism in West Africa6
79-291Globalization in East African History6
79-385The Making of the African Diaspora *9
79-386Entrepreneurs in Africa, Past, Present and Future *9
82-304The Francophone World **9

 

African American
57-480/79-357History of Black American Music *6
76-333African American Studies9
76-432Advanced Seminar in African American Studies *9
79-237Comparative Slavery9
79-243African American Women's History9
79-304African Americans in Pittsburgh6
79-371African American Urban History9

 

Caribbean
79-235Caribbean Cultures9
79-237Comparative Slavery9
79-295Race Relations in the Atlantic World9
79-385The Making of the African Diaspora *9
82-304The Francophone World **9
82-454The Hispanic Caribbean: Rhyme, Reason and Song **9

 

Latin American
79-317Art, Anthropology, and Empire9
82-343Latin America: Language and Culture9
82-451Studies in Latin American Literature and Culture9

Notes:

* Denotes courses that require a research paper/project and fulfill requirement for research course

** Denotes courses taught in a foreign language


The Minor in Environmental Studies

Faculty Director: John Soluri
Office: Baker Hall 240
E-mail: jsoluri@andrew.cmu.edu

The minor in Environmental Studies draws on the expertise of faculty across several Carnegie Mellon colleges in order to provide students with an introduction to the interdisciplinary background and skills necessary to understand environmental problems and the means to mitigate them. It emphasizes three general areas: (1) natural science and technology; (2) social sciences; and (3) the humanities and arts.  Coursework covers key environmental topics related to energy, pollution, and biological diversity; and a project course experience geared toward policy analysis and formulation.

Note that some courses carry prerequisites and/or reserve seats for primary majors.  Students interested in pursuing the minor should meet with the Faculty Director to map out a course of study.  Double counting follows guidelines set by the Dietrich College.

Students are strongly encouraged to be on the lookout for relevant new course offerings; every effort will be made to find equivalent courses that meet student interest when done in consultation with the faculty director.

Curriculum (54 units)
Foundation of Environmental Sciences (18 units)
One course in Biology
Units
03-121Modern Biology
or
9
03-125Evolution9
One course in Chemistry
09-103Atoms, Molecules and Chemical Change9
Perspectives on Environmental Problems (36 units disributed across the three categories listed below)
Humanities
76-319Environmental Rhetoric9
79-289Animal Planet: An Environmental History of People and Animals9
79-354Energy & Climate: History, Science, Technology, and Policy in the US 1776-20769
79-372Perspectives on the Urban Environment9
79-374American Environmental History: Critical Issues9
79-384Garbage Gone Global: Managing Surplus, Waste, and Desire9
80-348Health Development and Human Rights9
Economics and Policy
73-148Environmental Economics9
88-412Energy, Climate Change, and Economic Growth in the 21st Century9
90-798Environmental Policy & Planning
(only open to seniors)
12
90-808Energy Policy
(only open to seniors)
6
Environmental Art, Sciences, and Technology
09-510Introduction to Green Chemistry9
19-101Introduction to Engineering and Public Policy12
19-424Energy and the Environment9
60-203Concept Studio: EcoArt10

The Minor in Film and Media Studies

Faculty Advisor: David Shumway
Office to declare the minor: Baker Hall 259

Film and the electronic media have become a crucial part of contemporary culture and society; they constitute an important tool for under-standing social arrangements, historical changes, and play an increasingly important role in the development of aesthetic and cultural theory. The H&SS minor in Film and Media Studies takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of film and other electronic media. Courses provide techniques for analyzing and criticizing film and other media, for assessing their value as historical, anthropological and social scientific data, and for understanding the aesthetic and philosophical premises of various media texts. In addition, students may take courses in the processes of film-making, offered through special arrangement with the Pittsburgh Filmmakers (a non-profit media arts center, operating since 1971, that provides workshops, seminars, screenings, exhibitions, and training programs in the media and photographic arts).

Courses taken to fulfill requirements for other major or minor programs may not be applied to the Film and Media Studies Minor requirements.

54 UnitsCurriculum

The courses listed below are offered with at least general regularity. Participating departments may subsequently develop and offer other courses that, while not listed here, are deemed appropriate for this minor. The minor faculty advisor should be consulted (especially when the schedule of courses to be offered for a given semester becomes available) to identify such additional courses.

9 UnitsIntroductory Course
76-239Introduction to Film Studies
(prerequisite for 76-439)
9

 

9 UnitsRequired Intermediate Course
76-339Advanced Studies in Film and Media
(May be taken up to three times and counted for additional credit toward Intermediate Courses if topics differ)
9

 

27 UnitsIntermediate Courses

Complete a minimum of 27 units of course work, chosen in any combination from the following three course groups. (All courses are 9 units unless otherwise indicated).

1. Film and the Study of Society
76-238Media and Film Studies9
82-296A Century of Russian Film9
2. Film and Anthropology
79-278Rights to Representation: Indigenous People and their Media9
3. Filmmaking
76-269Survey of Forms: Screenwriting9
FM 200 Intermediate Filmmaking (please go to CFA 100 to register for this course)

Other 200 or 300 level courses in English, History, and Modern Languages can be counted in this category when their primary topic is film and media. Please consult the minor faculty advisor.

9 UnitsAdvanced Courses

Complete one advanced course that concentrates on film directly or that uses it as a tool of social or cultural analysis. One additional advanced course may be taken in place of an intermediate course.

FM 301 Advanced Filmmaking (please go to CFA 100 to register for this course)
76-438Advanced Seminar in American Literary and Cultural Studies9
76-439Advanced Seminar in Film and Media Studies: Hollywood Film Genres9
76-469Advanced Screenwriting Workshop9
82-491Literature, Politics and Film in Russia & East Europe TodayVar.

The Minor in Gender Studies

Faculty Advisor: Kristina Straub
Office to declare minor: English, Baker Hall 259

Gender studies is an interdisciplinary field that investigates how gender is embedded in social, cultural, and political relationships. It understands gender as a category of power that intersects with other power relations, including race, class, and sexuality. Courses allow students to develop a deeper understanding of how gender operates, and to transfer the analytical skills they acquire to other courses as well as to their personal and professional lives. The minor combines coursework in English, history, anthropology, psychology, philosophy, economics, and modern languages.

Courses taken to fulfill requirements in other major or minor programs may not be applied to the Gender Studies minor requirements (and vice versa).

54 unitsCurriculum

The courses listed below are offered with at least general regularity. Participating departments may develop and offer other courses that, while not listed here, are appropriate for the study of gender. Consult the minor advisor to confirm the relevance of unlisted, gender-focused courses.

18 unitsRequired Introductory Courses
Complete one of the following (9 units)
76-241Introduction to Gender Studies9
79-331Body Politics: Women and Health in America9

and one of the following (9 units):
79-244Women in American History9
79-320Women, Politics, and Protest9

 

27 unitsElective Intermediate Courses
Choose three of the following courses:
76-241Introduction to Gender Studies *9
76-245Shakespeare: Tragedies and Histories9
76-341Advanced Gender Studies9
79-243African American Women's History9
79-244Women in American History *9
79-320Women, Politics, and Protest *9
79-322Family and Gender in Russian History9
79-331Body Politics: Women and Health in America9
85-221Principles of Child Development9
85-352Evolutionary Psychology9
* If not taken as required introductory course

 

9 unitsElective Advanced Courses
Choose one of the following courses (9 units):
76-41218th Century Literary and Cultural Studies9
76-422Theories of Sexuality and Gender9
79-379Extreme Ethnography9
82-407The Arts in SocietyVar.

 

As an alternative, in extenuating circumstances, students may substitute another 9-unit course from the “Intermediate Course” list above with the approval of the minor faculty advisor. Students may also take more than 9 units from the “Advanced Course” list to count for the 54 unit total. For information about additional course offerings, contact Kristina Straub, ks3t@andrew.cmu.edu, 412-268-6458.

The Minor in Global Systems and Management

Faculty Advisor: Carol S. Young
Office: PH 222F

Graduates across all disciplines are increasingly likely to find themselves working as part of a global development team on a wide variety of business, consumer, and intellectual products and services.

The Global Systems and Management minor (GSM) is intended for students wishing to develop skills essential for participating in emerging opportunities in global business systems, systems development, product development and global project management. GSM exposes students to contemporary issues and practices facing organizations, managers and individuals working on a global scale across political, cultural and temporal boundaries.  GSM presents an opportunity for students to learn about being part of an organization that works globally with its employees, business partners, customers and supply chains. 

Students will learn about global project management, outsourcing and cross-cultural communications from theoretical and practical viewpoints. An organized elective structure enables students to tailor the minor reflect their specific interests.

54 unitsCurriculum

GSM is offered jointly across the departments and programs of the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences with participation from the Tepper School of Business. The minor is administered by the Dietrich College Information Systems program. The minor requires students to complete:

  • one Information Systems course: 
    67-329 Contemporary Themes in Global Systems (offered only in the Spring semester)
  • two courses in Communications
  • a combination of 27 units with at least 9 units in each of the categories of:
    • Humanities, Heritage and Culture
    • International Management

for a total of 54 units to complete the GSM minor. 
        

Study Abroad Options

Students are encouraged to complete a semester of study abroad.  With prior approval from the GSM Advisor, study abroad courses may be applied to GSM minor requirements except for 67-329 Contemporary Themes in Global Systems.  Please consult with the GSM Advisor  before embarking on the semester of study abroad.

NOTE: Participating departments may develop and offer other courses that, while not listed here, are deemed appropriate for GSM. Students may develop and submit to the GSM Advisor customized plans that substantially meet the requirements of this minor while allowing the student a personally-crafted learning experience. Proposals should generally be developed no later than the sophomore year, and the minor program started no later than junior year. Proposals will be evaluated for clarity of focus, coherence and depth in areas related to global project development and viability within the context of the Dietrich College and University. Prior approval must be obtained to begin a customized course of study.
 

Double Counting of Courses

Students may apply one course taken to fulfill a requirement in another major or minor program toward the GSM minor.

Core Course
Required course:
67-329Contemporary Themes in Global Systems
(Spring Semester Only)
9
18 unitsCommunications
Complete two courses:
70-321Negotiation and Conflict Resolution9
70-340Business Communications9
70/85/88-341Organizational Communication9
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
76-270Writing for the Professions9
76-318Communicating in the Global Marketplace9
76-386Language & Culture9
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
88-419Negotiation9
27 unitsHumanities, Heritage and Culture (HHC) & International Management (IM)
(Complete 9 units of HHC and 18 units of IM   ---OR---   18 units of HHC and 9 units of IM)
Humanities, Heritage and Culture

Humanities Heritage and Culture consists of:

  • History Department courses:  79-200 level or above covering international/regional studies that are outside of U.S. history
  • Modern Languages Department courses:  82-200 level or above, covering international or regional studies but not including elementary or intermediate language courses
79-203Social and Political Change in 20th Century Central and Eastern Europe9
79-20520th Century Europe9
79-212China and Its Neighbors: Minorities, Conquerors, and Tribute Bearers9
79-221Development and Democracy in Latin America9
79-225West African History in Film9
79-226Introduction to African History: Earliest Times to 17809
79-227Introduction to African History: 1780-19949
79-229Origins of the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1880-19489
79-230Arab-Israeli Conflict and Peace Process since 19489
79-235Caribbean Cultures9
79-236Introduction to African Studies9
79-251India/America: Democracy, Diversity, Development9
79-254The Jewish Diaspora in Latin America9
79-255Irish History9
79-25620th Century Germany9
79-257Germany and the Second World War9
79-258French History: From the Revolution to De Gaulle9
79-259France During World War II9
79-261Chinese Culture and Society9
79-262Modern China9
79-263China's Cultural Revolution6
79-264China in the Age of Reform, 1978-Present9
79-265Russian History: From the First to the Last Tsar9
79-266Russian History: From Communism to Capitalism9
79-267The Soviet Union in World War II: Military, Political, and Social History9
79-272Iberian Encounters: Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Spain9
79-27419th and 20th Century Russia: Society, Art, Music and Theater9
79-275Introduction to Global Studies9
79-278Rights to Representation: Indigenous People and their Media9
79-291Globalization in East African History6
79-292China Inside Out: Going Global, 19th to 21st Centuries9
79-295Race Relations in the Atlantic World9
79-297Dilemmas and Controversies in Anthropology9
79-307Religion and Politics in the Middle East9
79-30818th Century China Through Literature9
79-30920th Century China Through Film9
79-310Religions of China9
79-312International Human Rights Institutions in Theory and Practice6
79-322Family and Gender in Russian History9
79-323Family, Gender, and Sexuality in European History, 500-18009
79-326History of Modern Germany through its Cinema9
79-341The Cold War in Documents and Film9
79-349The Holocaust in Historical Perspective9
79-355World Citizenship9
79-358The Pacific Encounters the West: An Anthropology of Globalization9
79-375China's Environmental Crisis9
79-381Petrocultures: How Oil Changed the World9
79-385The Making of the African Diaspora9
79-386Entrepreneurs in Africa, Past, Present and Future9
82-215Introduction to Modern Arabic Literature and CultureVar.
82-253Korean Culture Through Film9
82-273Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture9
82-276Intensive Japanese Language and Culture: Intermediate LevelVar.
82-303French Culture9
82-304The Francophone World9
82-305French in its Social Contexts9
82-306Intensive French Language and Culture: Advanced LevelVar.
82-311Arabic Language and Culture I9
82-312Arabic Language and Culture II9
82-320Contemporary Society in German, Austria and Switzerland9
82-323Germany, Austria and Switzerland in the 20th Century9
82-326Intensive German Language and Culture: Advanced LevelVar.
82-333Introduction to Chinese Language and CultureVar.
82-342Spain: Language and Culture9
82-343Latin America: Language and Culture9
82-345Introduction to Hispanic Literary and Cultural Studies9
82-346Intensive Spanish Language and Culture: Advanced LevelVar.
82-361Introduction to Italian Culture9
82-362Italian Language and Culture II9
82-396The Faust Legend at Home and AbroadVar.
82-399Special Topics: Russian in ContextVar.
82-415Topics in French and Francophone Studies9
or 82-416 Topics in French and Francophone Studies
82-425Topics in German Literature and Culture9
82-431China and the West9
82-433Topics in Contemporary Culture of China9
82-441Studies in Peninsular Literature and Culture9
82-450Advanced Research in Hispanic Language & Culture9
82-456Topics in Hispanic Studies9
82-473Topics in Japanese Studies9
or 82-474 Topics of Japanese Studies
 International Management
19-411Global Competitiveness: Firms, Nations and Technological Change9
67-319-67-331Global Technology Consulting Groundwork - Technology Consulting in the Global Community
(these two courses are taken sequentially)
6
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
70-365International Trade and International Law9
70-430International Management9
70-480International Marketing9
73-372International Money and Finance9
79-384Garbage Gone Global: Managing Surplus, Waste, and Desire9
88-326Theories of International Relations9
88-378International Economics9
88-384Conflict and Conflict Resolution in International Relations9
88-410The Global Economy: A User's Guide9
88-411The Rise of the Asian Economies9
88-412Energy, Climate Change, and Economic Growth in the 21st Century9
88-415Global Competitiveness: Firms Nations, and Technological Change9
MINIMUM NUMBER OF UNITS REQUIRED FOR MINOR
54

Minor in Health Care Policy and Management

Sponsored by:
H. John Heinz III College
Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Mellon College of Science

Faculty Advisors:
Jason D'Antonio, Mellon College of Science
James F. Jordan, H. John Heinz III College

The face of health care is changing. The practice of medicine is being fundamentally altered by the forces of change in public policy, health care organizations and in the industry as a whole. The role of individual professionals in this industry is changing as rapidly as the industry itself. Traditional career paths have disappeared overnight to be replaced by new opportunities that require new skills. New organizations are placing new demands on their professional and medical staffs. The criteria of efficiency and financial stability are entering the domains of diagnosis and treatment.

This minor is designed to provide students considering a career in the health professions with an understanding of how these changes are likely to affect their careers. Students will become familiar with the critical policy and management issues and will begin to learn to operate effectively in the emerging health care environment. The curriculum combines economic, organizational, managerial, historical and psychological perspectives on these issues to provide a foundation for a deepened understanding of the changing structure of health care organizations and policy.

60 units minimumCurriculum

Seven courses (a minimum of 60 units) are required to complete this minor. Entry into the minor requires completion of 73-100 Principles of Economics or 88-220 Policy Analysis I or the equivalent by approval.

39 unitsRequired Courses 
Students are required to take the following courses.
79-330Medicine and Society9
90-836Health Systems6
90-861Health Policy6
94-705Health Economics12

27 units

Elective Courses

Complete a minimum of 27 units.

Heinz College Courses
90-708Healthcare Ethics6
90-721Healthcare Management6
90-818Health Care Quality & Performance Improvement6
90-830Introduction to Financial Management of Health Care6
90-831Advanced Financial Management of Health Care6
90-832Health Law12
90-863Health Policy II6
94-706Healthcare Information Systems12
Humanities and Social Sciences Courses (9 units each)
76-494Healthcare Communications9
79-335Drug Use and Drug Policy9
79-383Epidemic, Disease, and Public Health9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-247Ethics and Global Economics9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-442Health Psychology9
85-446Psychology of Gender9

Please note that some of these courses have prerequisites that will not count toward the completion of the requirements for this minor.

The Minor in Linguistics

Tom Werner, Director
Office: Baker Hall 155F
Email: twerner@andrew.cmu.edu

Linguistics is the study of human language, and it encompasses a broad spectrum of research questions, approaches and methodologies. Some linguists are concerned with the cognitive aspects of language learning, production and comprehension; some are concerned with language as a social and cultural phenomenon; others engage in the analysis of linguistic form and meaning, some from a functional and others from a formal perspective. There are also computational approaches to linguistics with both applied and theoretical goals.

The interdepartmental Minor in Linguistics is sponsored by the departments of English, Modern Languages, Philosophy and Psychology and the Language Technologies Institute. It synthesizes the linguistics related offerings in these departments and provides students with an academic experience that reflects both the interdisciplinary character of the subject and its cross-departmental representation at Carnegie Mellon.

Curriculum

The Linguistics Minor requires a total of 6 courses. All courses counted towards the Minor must be taken for a letter grade and passed with a grade of "C" or above. For Dietrich College students, up to 2 of these courses may be counted also as satisfying the college's general education requirements (as long as the double-counting maximum established by the college is not exceeded), with permission of the director. Students from other colleges may fulfill their Humanities requirements using courses taken towards the Linguistics Minor. However, no courses may be counted simultaneously towards the Linguistics Minor and any other major or minor.

Introductory course
80-180Nature of Language9
Fundamental Skills

Take one course from two of the following core subject areas:

Sounds
80-282Phonetics and Phonology I9

Structure
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
76-389Rhetorical Grammar9
80-283Syntax and Discourse9

Meaning
80-381Meaning in Language9
80-383Language in Use9
76-385Introduction to Discourse Analysis9
Electives

Take three additional courses. These can be additional courses from the Fundamental Skills category above, or any other course which is approved by the director as a linguistics elective. Listed below are the additional electives taught on a regular basis. Other appropriate courses are offered irregularly or on a one-off basis. The director will provide students with a list of possible electives each semester.

Electives are listed below with an indication of the broad areas into which they fall. Students are free to select any configuration of courses from any areas. The director will assist students in selecting electives which are consistent with their goals and interests.

Language Learning and Cognition
76-378Literacy: Educational Theory and Community Practice9
76-420Process of Reading and Writing9
80-281Language and Thought9
82-480Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism9
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
82-488Lanuage Learing in a Study Abroad Context9
85-354Infant Language Development9
85-421Language and Thought9

Discourse, Society and Culture
76-318Communicating in the Global Marketplace9
76-325Topics in Rhetoric: Intertextuality9
76-373Topics in Rhetoric: Argument9
76-385Introduction to Discourse Analysis9
76-386Language & Culture9
76-457Topics in Rhetoric9
82-273Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture9
82-305French in its Social Contexts9
82-311Arabic Language and Culture I9
82-312Arabic Language and Culture II9
82-333Introduction to Chinese Language and CultureVar.
82-345Introduction to Hispanic Literary and Cultural Studies9
82-378Japanese Conversation Analysis9
82-476Japanese Discourse Analysis9

Linguistic Analysis Conceptual Foundations
80-380Philosophy of Language9
82-373Structure of the Japanese Language9
82-442Analysis of Spoken Spanish9
82-444The Structure of Spanish9
80-382Phonetics and Phonology II9
11-721Grammars and Lexicons12
11-722Grammar Formalisms12

Language Technologies
11-411Natural Language Processing12
11-716Graduate Seminar on Dialog Processing6
11-761Language and Statistics12
11-762Language and Statistics II12
15-492Special Topic: Speech Processing12

Notes

Course numbers 82-305, 82-311, 82-312, 82-378, 82-476, 82-373, 82-442, 82-444 are taught in the language of analysis.

All 11-xxx and 15-xxx courses have significant Computer Science prerequisites. Interested students should check with the course instructor before registering.

The Minor in Neural Computation

Director: Dr. Tai Sing Lee
Administrative Coordinator: Melissa Stupka
Website: http://www.cnbc.cmu.edu/upnc/nc_minor/

The minor in Neural Computation is an inter college minor jointly sponsored by the School of Computer Science, the Mellon College of Science, and the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and is coordinated by the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC).

The Neural Computation minor is open to students in any major of any college at Carnegie Mellon. It seeks to attract undergraduate students from computer science, psychology, engineering, biology, statistics, physics, and mathematics from SCS, CIT, Dietrich College and MCS. The primary objective of the minor is to encourage students in biology and psychology to take computer science, engineering and mathematics courses, to encourage students in computer science, engineering, statistics and physics to take courses in neuroscience and psychology, and to bring students from different disciplines together to form a community. The curriculum and course requirements are designed to maximize the participation of students from diverse academic disciplines. The program seeks to produce students with both basic computational skills and knowledge in cognitive science and neuroscience that are central to computational neuroscience.

Curriculum

The minor in Neural Computation will require a total of five courses: four courses drawn from the four core areas (A: Neural Computation, B: Neuroscience, C: Cognitive Psychology, D: Intelligent System Analysis), one from each area, and one additional depth elective chosen from one of the core areas that is outside the student's major. The depth elective can be replaced by a one-year research project in computational neuroscience. No more than two courses can be double counted toward the student's major or other minors. However, courses taken for general education requirements of the student's degree are not considered to be double counted. A course taken to satisfy one core area cannot be used to satisfy the course requirement for another core area. The following listing presents a set of current possible courses in each area. Substitution is possible but requires approval by the director of the minor program.

 

A. Neural Computation
Units
15-386Neural Computation9
15-387Computational Perception9
15-883Computational Models of Neural Systems12
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing9
86-375Computational Perception9
Pitt-Mathematics-1800 Introduction to Mathematical Neuroscience9

 

B. Neuroscience
03-362Cellular Neuroscience9
03-363Systems Neuroscience9
03-761Neural Plasticity9
85-765Cognitive NeuroscienceVar.
Pitt-Neuroscience 1000 Introduction to Neuroscience9
Pitt-Neuroscience 1012 Neurophysiology9

 

C. Cognitive Psychology
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
85-213Human Information Processing and Artifical Intelligence9
85-412Cognitive Modeling9
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing9
85-426Learning in Humans and Machines9
85-765Cognitive NeuroscienceVar.

 

D. Intelligent System Analysis
10-601Introduction to Machine Learning12
15-381Artificial Intelligence: Representation and Problem Solving9
15-386Neural Computation9
15-387Computational Perception9
15-486Artificial Neural Networks12
15-494Special Topic: Cognitive Robotics12
16-299Introduction to Feedback Control Systems12
16-311Introduction to Robotics12
16-385Computer Vision9
18-290Signals and Systems12
24-352Dynamic Systems and Controls12
36-225Introduction to Probability Theory9
36-247Statistics for Lab Sciences9
36-401Modern Regression9
36-410Introduction to Probability Modeling9
42-631Neural Data Analysis9
42-632Neural Signal Processing12
86-375Computational Perception9
86-631Neural Data Analysis9

 

Prerequisites

The required courses in the above four core areas require a number of basic prerequisites: basic programming skills at the level of 15-110 Principles of Computing and basic mathematical skills at the level of 21-122 Integration and Approximation or their equivalents. Some courses in Area D require additional prerequisites. Area B Biology courses require, at minimum, 03-121 Modern Biology. Students might skip the prerequisites if they have the permission of the instructor to take the required courses. Prerequisite courses are typically taken to satisfy the students' major or other requirements. In the event that these basic skill courses are not part of the prerequisite or required courses of a student's major, one of them can potentially count toward the five required courses (e.g. the depth elective), conditional on approval by the director of the minor program.

 

Research Requirements (Optional)

The minor itself does not require a research project. The student however may replace the depth elective with a year-long research project. In special circumstances, a research project can also be used to replace one of the five courses, as long as (1) the project is not required by the student's major or other minor, (2) the student has taken a course in each of the four core areas (not necessarily for the purpose of satisfying this minor's requirements), and (3) has taken at least three courses in this curriculum not counted toward the student's major or other minors. Students interested in participating in the research project should contact any faculty engaged in computational neuroscience or neural computation research at Carnegie Mellon or in the University of Pittsburgh. A useful webpage that provides listing of faculty in neural computation is http://www.cnbc.cmu.edu/computational-neuroscience. The director of the minor program will be happy to discuss with students about their research interest and direct them to the appropriate faculty.

 

Fellowship Opportunities

The Program in Neural Computation (PNC) administered by the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition currently provides 3-4 competitive full-year fellowships ($11,000) to Carnegie Mellon undergraduate students to carry out mentored research in neural computation. The fellowship has course requirements similar to the requirements of the minor. Students do not apply to the fellowship program directly. They have to be nominated by the faculty members who are willing to mentor them. Therefore, students interested in the full-year fellowship program should contact and discuss research opportunities with any CNBC faculty at Carnegie Mellon or University of Pittsburgh working in the area of neural computation or computational neuroscience and ask for their nomination by sending email to Dr. Tai Sing Lee, who also administers the undergraduate fellowship program at Carnegie Mellon. See http://www.cnbc.cmu.edu/fellowcompneuro for details.

The Program in Neural Computation also offers a summer training program for undergraduate students from any U.S. undergraduate college. The students will engage in a 10-week intense mentored research and attend a series of lectures in neural computation. See the http://www.cnbc.cmu.edu/summercompneuro for application information.

The Minor in Religious Studies

Faculty Director: Allyson Creasman
Undergraduate Advisor: Naum Kats
Office: Baker Hall 240

The Religious Studies minor provides the student with a range of intellectual tools with which to think about religious ideas, behaviors and institutions. A further objective is to enable the student to build a base of knowledge which extends beyond any one particular religious tradition. The minor consists of six courses, totaling at least 54 units.

Courses taken to fulfill requirements in other major or minor programs may not be applied to this minor.

54 unitsCurriculum

In addition to the general education requirements of the student's college and the requirements of the student's major, Religious Studies minors must satisfy the requirements as outlined below.

The “required” course listed below is offered regularly; the “distribution” and “elective” courses are offered with at least general regularity. Participating departments may subsequently develop and offer other courses that, while not listed here, are deemed appropriate for this minor. The minor faculty advisor should be consulted (especially when the schedule of courses to be offered for a given semester becomes available) to identify such additional courses.

9 unitsCore Course

This required course introduces a variety of methods of religious inquiry such as philosophy of religion, sociological and behavioral approaches to religion, historical analysis of religious subject matter, literary and critical analysis of religious texts, theological modes of thought, and anthropological treatments of religion.

79-281Introduction to Religion9
18 unitsDistribution Requirements

A distribution course is one that applies a particular discipline to more than one religion. Complete a course from each of two different disciplinary approaches. See the faculty advisor for other options.

Anthropological Approaches
79-310Religions of China9
Historical Approaches
79-272Iberian Encounters: Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Spain9
79-307Religion and Politics in the Middle East9
79-353Religious Identities and Religious Conflicts in 19th Century Europe9
Philosophical Approaches
80-276Philosophy of Religion9
Textual Approaches
76-346Angels and Diplomats -- Renaissance Poetry from Wyatt to Milton9
: Angels and Diplomats
27 unitsElective Courses

Complete courses totaling at least 27 units. In addition to the Carnegie Mellon courses listed below, electives may be chosen from among any of the courses listed above under “Distribution Requirements” that were not used to fulfill that requirement.

76-330Medieval Literature9
76-430Arthurian Legends in the 20th Century9
79-202Flesh and Spirit: Early Modern Europe, 1400-17509
79-254The Jewish Diaspora in Latin America9
79-349The Holocaust in Historical Perspective9
79-350Early Christianity9
79-352Christendom Divided: The Protestant and Catholic Reformation 1450-16509
82-313Readings in Islamic History9

Students may cross-register for relevant electives at other Pittsburgh institutions with the permission of the faculty advisor for the religious studies minor.

The Minor in Science, Technology and Society

Faculty Advisor: Jay Aronson,
Undergraduate Advisor: Naum Kats
Office: Baker Hall 240

This minor provides varied perspectives on the development and meaning of science and technology in modern society. The core courses provide for the exploration of the philosophical underpinnings, cultural and historical contexts, and economic and literary assessments of the interplay among science, technology, and society. Elective courses allow students to pursue more deeply subjects and approaches that build on both core courses and students' primary majors.

Courses taken to fulfill requirements in other major or minor programs may not be applied to this minor.

54 unitsCurriculum
27 unitsCore Courses

Complete one course from Area 1, two from Area 2, and 3 Electives.

Area 1. Language and Rhetoric in Science and Technology 9 units
51-326Photography & Family9
76-319Environmental Rhetoric9
76-395Science Writing9
76-425Science in the Public Sphere9
76-476Rhetoric of Science9
76-492Rhetoric of Public Policy9

 

Area 2. History, Philosophy and Social Studies of Science and Technology (18 units)
79-330Medicine and Society9
79-333Biology and Society: Evolution, Animal Experimentation, and Eugenics9
79-334Law, Ethics, and the Life Sciences9
79-342Introduction to Science and Technology Studies9
79-382History of Biomedical Research9
80-226Revolutions in Science9
80-323Philosophy of Biology9
 
 

 

27 unitsElectives

Complete three courses from the approved list of elective courses. Courses listed in Areas 1, 2 and 3 may also be taken as electives if not already completed for an Area requirement. For a listing of approved courses, consult the description of the minor in Science, Technology and Society on the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences' webpage (http://www.hss.cmu.edu/index.html), or contact the faculty advisor directly at aronson@andrew.cmu.edu.

15-xxxSpecial Topics9-12
17-400Electronic Voting12
18-482Telecommunications, Technology Policy & Management12
19-448Science, Technology & Ethics9
39-100Special Topics: WHAT IS ENGINEERING?9
48-448History of Sustainable Architecture9
79-331Body Politics: Women and Health in America9
79-332Medical Anthropology9
79-335Drug Use and Drug Policy9
79-381Petrocultures: How Oil Changed the World9
79-383Epidemic, Disease, and Public Health9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-247Ethics and Global Economics9
80-341Computers, Society and Ethics9
88-343Economics of Technological Change9
85-380In Search of Mind: The History of Psychology9

The Minor in Sociology

Faculty Director, Saurabh Bhargava
Program Advisor, Connie Angermeier
Office: Porter Hall 208A
Email: cla2@andrew.cmu.edu

The Sociology minor provides the student with a solid introduction to the central concepts in sociological theory and a grounding in the methods of empirical inquiry needed to understand societies, their histories, and how they change over time. Students choose among selected topics including social psychology, work and organizations, social networks, technology and society, medical sociology, and gender and family. Exposure to these topics will help students understand and appreciate the processes by which families, groups, and organizations form and evolve over time; by which individuals affect and are affected by the society in which they live; and by which technology and institutions shape and influence society. This background in empirical tools and social theory will strengthen students' ability to enter graduate studies in sociology, social history, social science, and organizational theory; to begin professional careers involving social analysis, network analysis, data analysis of teams, groups and organizations, social analysis within journalism, political institutions, the government; and to enter the corporate environment with a thorough understanding of organizational activity.

54 unitsCurriculum

In addition to the general education requirements of the student's college and the requirements of the student's major, Sociology minors must satisfy the following requirements. The Core courses comprise 18 units of the minor. One course is taken from the Organizations cluster, and one course is taken from the Methodology cluster. The Elective courses comprise 36 units of the minor. Sociology minors should consult with the program advisor to plan a course schedule prior to registration.

NOTE: The core courses are offered regularly; the elective courses are offered with at least general regularity. Participating departments may subsequently develop and offer other courses that, while not listed here, are deemed appropriate for this minor. The program advisor should be consulted (especially when the schedule of courses to be offered for a given semester becomes available) to identify such additional courses.

No more than 9 units in the Sociology minor may be counted to fulfill any other major or minor's requirements.

Core Courses 18 units
a. Organizations

Complete one course.
70-311Organizational Behavior9
88-260Organizations9

b. Methodology

Complete one course.
36-202Statistical Methods9
70-208Regression Analysis9
85-340Research Methods in Social Psychology9
88-251Empirical Research Methods9
88-252Causal Inference in the Field: Using Data to Study Crime, Love, Sports & More9
36 unitsElective Courses

Complete four courses (a minimum of 36 units) from the following list. Two courses (18 units) must be taken from one category to complete the depth requirement. One course (9 units) must be taken from the other category. The remaining course (9 units) may be taken from either category. Appropriate courses offered by the Department of Sociology at the University of Pittsburgh (available during the academic year through cross-registration) may also be included as part of this option. Contact the Sociology program advisor for more information.

1. Sociology of Gender, Family, and Culture
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
79-244Women in American History9
79-261Chinese Culture and Society9
79-30818th Century China Through Literature9
79-320Women, Politics, and Protest9
79-322Family and Gender in Russian History9
79-323Family, Gender, and Sexuality in European History, 500-18009
79-331Body Politics: Women and Health in America9
79-332Medical Anthropology9
79-339Juvenile Delinquency and Film (1920-1950)6
79-343History of American Urban Life9
79-368Poverty, Charity, and Welfare9
79-377Food, Culture, and Power: A History of Eating9
79-379Extreme Ethnography9
80-230Ethical Theory9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-305Rational Choice9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-446Psychology of Gender9
2. Sociology of Work, Organizations, and Technology
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-414Entrepreneurship for Engineers9
73-432Economics of Education9
79-342Introduction to Science and Technology Studies9
80-341Computers, Society and Ethics9
88-341Organizational Communication9
88-345Perspectives on Industrial Research and Development9
88-347Complex Technological Systems: Past, Present, and Future9
88-371Entrepreneurship, Regulation and Technological Change9
88-391Technology and Economic Growth9
88-402Modeling Complex Social Systems9
88-413Energy and Climate: History, Science, Technology, & Policy in the US 1776-20769
88-415Global Competitiveness: Firms Nations, and Technological Change9
88-419Negotiation9
88-423Institutions, Entrepreneurship, and Innovation9
88-435Analysis of Uncertain Social Systems9
88-451Policy Analysis Senior Project12
or 88-452 Policy Analysis Senior Project

Note: Some courses have additional prerequisites.

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