Interim Faculty Director: Joseph Mertz

Office: Hamburg Hall 3028
http://www.cmu.edu/information-systems/

Information Systems (IS), found within the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences, is an internationally recognized undergraduate major for students who want to design and implement effective solutions to meet organizational, societal and management needs for information and decision support.

In today's complex, interconnected world, the effective creation, distribution, and use of information via technology is central to daily life. Computer based information systems facilitate, enable and often define the relationships between corporations and consumers, buyers and suppliers, businesses of all sizes, social networks, and citizens and their governments. Understanding these relationships and effectively addressing the collection, flow, and distribution of information is vital to running a modern organization, enterprise or government agency.

Information Systems involves the effective design, delivery, use and impact of information and communications technologies in organizations and society. The importance of information technology and information systems to organizations and the need for well-educated professionals in the field is the basis for the Information Systems curriculum at Carnegie Mellon. Whether implementing applications, providing management or decision support, managing complex systems projects, or helping organizations design business processes or cope with rapid change, IS professionals fill an essential need across all sectors of society.

Information systems students at Carnegie Mellon learn to use, manage and deploy information technologies to address real problems or opportunities. They develop a solid foundation in computing, communications, as well as software development principles, languages, and methods. Since Information Systems generally operate within organizations, IS students study social sciences and organizational theory. IS students learn how to right-size information technology solutions to meet real-world economic and organizational constraints. Information Systems students also learn, through hands-on experience, the importance of professional communications, problem analysis, critical thinking and teamwork. Building on the multi-disciplinary strengths of the university and the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences, graduates in Information Systems are ideally suited to take a leading role in shaping our information-based future.

The flexible nature of the program encourages students to explore their own interests through program electives, study in a contemporary content area or through optional second majors and minors. 

IS students are well prepared to pursue graduate work in a wide range of fields. For students interested in master's degree-level graduate work at Carnegie Mellon, there are many possibilities, including accelerated Masters degree programs in Information Systems Management, Human Computer Interaction, Information Security Policy and Management, Engineering Technology and Innovation Management, and Business Administration.

IS graduates continue to be in high demand in the information-age workplace. There has been a strong job market for IS students in recent years, and national trends indicate that this is likely to continue. IS majors often take jobs in consulting companies, major software firms, large corporations, and start-up companies. Internship opportunities closely parallel the job market.

In addition to the Dietrich College General Education Requirements and basic prerequisites in Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, IS students must complete the Professional Core, the Disciplinary Core and a focused Content Area. In the Professional Core (consisting of six courses), students learn the basic skills necessary to analyze, design, implement and test high-quality, cost effective information systems. Two of the Professional Core courses are project-based experiences in which small teams of students develop and deliver solutions to real information problems.

In the Disciplinary Core (consisting of three courses), students study key areas fundamental to understanding and solving problems in information systems: professional communications; quantitative analysis and research methods; and organizations, policy, and social science.

IS students also complete three courses within one Content Area. The content areas are designed to provide students an opportunity to gain additional depth in a focused area. Currently, twelve content areas are available: (1) Business / Enterprise Systems, (2) Computing and Information Systems & Technology, (3) Social and Global Systems, (4) Quantitative Analysis, (5) Game Design, (6) Animation and Special Effects, (7) Media Design, (8) Design for Learning, (9) Sound Design, (10) Innovation and Entrepreneurship, (11) Intelligent Environments, (12) Physical Computing. Content areas (5) through (12) are offered through CMU's Integrative Design, Arts, and Technology (IDeATe) initiative combining arts and technology.

Study Abroad Options in Information Systems

Given the importance of globalization, we encourage students to consider expanding their international experience by spending a semester studying abroad. The IS program is very flexible in allowing students to pursue these opportunities. With careful planning, study abroad is possible during most semesters. Students interested in study abroad should talk with the IS Academic Advisor to help plan an appropriate course of study. With prior approval, study abroad courses may be applied to major requirements.
 

Information Systems as Additional Major or Minor

Information Systems is not available as either an additional major or minor.
 

Curriculum

The Information Systems major is offered only as a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. In addition to major requirements outlined below, all Information Systems students must fulfill the General Education requirements for the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences. A total of 360 units is required for the degree.

Requirements are subject to revision.  Advisor approval is required for each student's major curriculum plan.  Any proposed course substitutions to courses required for the IS major must be approved in advance by the IS Academic Advisor. 

Prerequisites

Information Systems requires completion of prerequisite courses in Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science.  All prerequisites must be successfully completed prior to the start of Fall semester, junior year.

Mathematics and Statistics

Complete one of the following calculus sequences:

Units
21-111Differential Calculus10
21-112Integral Calculus10

OR

Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-256Multivariate Analysis
(Required for advanced business courses)
9

OR

Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration and Approximation
(Required for advanced computer science courses)
10

AND also complete:

Units
36-200Reasoning with Data9
Computer Science

Three Computer Science courses are required. To maintain normal progress toward the Information Systems degree, students must complete 15-121 Introduction to Data Structures prior to the start of Spring Semester, sophomore year.

Students entering the program as freshmen will have the option to complete a Computer Science Placement Test. Depending on appropriate Advanced Placement credit and/or results of the Computer Science Placement Test, entering students may place directly into 15-112 or 15-121.   15-110 is taken as the first Computer Science prerequisite unless a student places directly into 15-112 or 15-121. Most students entering the program will begin the sequence with 15-110.

Units
15-110Principles of Computing10
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
15-121Introduction to Data Structures10

Note: Students cannot receive credit for both 15-104 Introduction to Computing for Creative Practice and 15-110 Principles of Computing.

Professional Core

The Professional Core consists of six courses (five core courses and one core elective).

Complete all five of these courses:

Units
67-250The Information Systems Milieux
(Spring Semester Only)
9
67-262Database Design and Development
(Fall Semester Only)
9
67-272Application Design and Development
(Spring Semester Only)
9
67-373Information Systems Consulting Project
(Spring Semester Only)
12
67-475Innovation in Information Systems
(Fall Semester Only)
12
Professional Core Elective

Plus, complete 6 to 12 units chosen from the following options:

Units
19-402Telecommunications Technology and Policy for the Internet Age12
19-403Policies of Wireless Systems12
67-240Mobile Web Design & Development9
67-261Information Design Fundamentals9
67-279Introduction to Geographical Information Systems6
67-306Special Topics: Management of Computer and Information Systems6
67-308Innovation Studio: Health Care Information Systems9
67-309Special Topics: Information Assurance and Security6
67-319-67-331Global Technology Consulting Groundwork - Technology Consulting in the Global Community
(these two courses are taken sequentially)
6
67-324Accelerating Innovation and Entrepreneurship9
67-327Web Application Security6
67-328Mobile to Cloud: Building Distributed Applications9
67-329Contemporary Themes in Global Systems9
67-344Organizational Intelligence in the Information Age9
67-353IT & Environmental Sustainability6
67-364Practical Data Science9
67-442Mobile Application Development in iOS9
88-223Decision Analysis12
88-275Bubbles: Data Science for Human Minds9

OR Any Computer Science course above 15-121 with prerequisite of 15-112 or higher.

OR Any Human-Computer Interaction course (05-xxx).

OR other pre-approved 67-3xx or 67-4xx which may be offered from time to time. Students wishing to apply such courses to their Professional Core requirement must complete a course substitution application through the IS Academic Advisor. 

OR other pre-approved courses offered by the Engineering & Public Policy Department (19-xxx). 

NOTE: 67-1xx and 67-2xx courses may not be applied to this requirement.

Disciplinary Core

Complete one course (9 units) from each of the three Disciplinary Core categories.

Professional Communications

Information systems professionals communicate with a wide range of people in most organizations and often facilitate communications between diverse groups of stakeholders. Consequently, the most successful professionals typically are those with strong communication skills. These courses help students see that the structure and presentation of information affects how well (and how easily) it can be understood and used.

Complete one course (9 units).  It is recommended that this requirement be completed by the end of junior year: 

Units
05-341Organizational Communication9
36-315Statistical Graphics and Visualization9
51-261Design Center: Communication Design Fundmntls: IxD for Communications9
or 51-262 Communication Design Fundamentals: Design for Interactions for Communications
70-321Negotiation and Conflict Resolution9
70-340Business Communications9
70-341Team Dynamics and Leadership9
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
76-270Writing for the Professions9
76-272Language in Design9
88/70/85-341Team Dynamics and Leadership9
Quantitative Analysis and Research Methods

This area focuses on decision making and data analysis — essential to development of useful information systems. this area exposes students to analytic methods in the social sciences and quantitative methods for approaching complex methods.

Complete one course (9 units).  It is recommended that this requirement be completed in the sophomore year: 

Units
21-257Models and Methods for Optimization9
21-325Probability9
36-202Statistics & Data Science Methods9
36/70-208Regression Analysis9
36-217Probability Theory and Random Processes9
36-225Introduction to Probability Theory9
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral & Social Sciences9
67-364Practical Data Science9
80-305Choices, Decisions, and Games9
80-405Game Theory9
88-223Decision Analysis12
88-251Empirical Research Methods9
88-275Bubbles: Data Science for Human Minds9
Organizations, Policy, and Social Science

The focus of this area is on how organizations function in modern social and economic environments. Students will develop a greater understanding of how social policy and technology influence organizations and how they operate.

Complete one course (9 units): 

Units
08-200/19-211Ethics and Policy Issues in Computing9
15-390/70-421Entrepreneurship for Computer Science9
19-402Telecommunications Technology and Policy for the Internet Age12
19-403Policies of Wireless Systems12
19-411Global Competitiveness: Firms, Nations and Technological Change9
67-308Innovation Studio: Health Care Information Systems9
67-344Organizational Intelligence in the Information Age9
67-353IT & Environmental Sustainability6
70-311Organizational Behavior9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70/85/88-341Team Dynamics and Leadership9
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
70-414Entrepreneurship for Engineers9
70-415Introduction to Entrepreneurship9
70-416New Venture Creation9
70-420Entrepreneurship for Scientists9
70-437Organizational Learning and Strategic Management9
80-341Computers, Society and Ethics9
88-223Decision Analysis12
88-275Bubbles: Data Science for Human Minds9

Content Area

Complete a minimum of 27 units from one of the Content Areas below. No Content Area course may also be used to fulfill a Disciplinary Core or Professional Core requirement.
 

Business/Enterprise Systems

This content area broadens a student's knowledge in the business, economics and policy aspects of large scale information systems. 

Units
19-402Telecommunications Technology and Policy for the Internet Age12
19-403Policies of Wireless Systems12
19-411Global Competitiveness: Firms, Nations and Technological Change9
67-240Mobile Web Design & Development9
67-261Information Design Fundamentals9
67-306Special Topics: Management of Computer and Information Systems6
67-308Innovation Studio: Health Care Information Systems9
67-309Special Topics: Information Assurance and Security6
67-319-67-331Global Technology Consulting Groundwork - Technology Consulting in the Global Community
(these two courses are taken sequentially)
6
67-324Accelerating Innovation and Entrepreneurship9
67-328Mobile to Cloud: Building Distributed Applications9
67-330Technology Consulting in the Community9
67-344Organizational Intelligence in the Information Age9
67-353IT & Environmental Sustainability6
67-442Mobile Application Development in iOS9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-366Intellectual Property and E-Commerce6
70-371Operations Management9
70-414Entrepreneurship for Engineers9
or 70-415 Introduction to Entrepreneurship
or 70-420 Entrepreneurship for Scientists
or 70-421 Entrepreneurship for Computer Scientists
70-437Organizational Learning and Strategic Management9
70-438Commercialization and Innovation9
70-443Digital Marketing and Social Media Strategy9
70-449Social, Economic and Information Networks9
70-455Modern Data Management9
70-460Mathematical Models for Consulting9
70/73-465Technology Strategy9
70-471Supply Chain Management9
73-359Benefit-Cost Analysis9
73-469Global Electronic Markets: Economics and the Internet9
76-391Document & Information Design12
76-487Web Design12

Computing and Information Systems & Technology

This content area allows students to focus on current and emerging technologies. 

Units
05-391Designing Human Centered Software12
05-410User-Centered Research and Evaluation12
05-430Programming Usable Interfaces15
05-431Software Structures for User Interfaces15
05-432Personalized Online Learning12
05-433Programming Usable Interfaces OR Software Structures for Usable Interfaces6
05-499Special Topics in HCIVar.
16-311Introduction to Robotics12
16-362Mobile Robot Algorithms Laboratory12
19-411Global Competitiveness: Firms, Nations and Technological Change9
60-415Advanced ETB: Animation Studio10
67-240Mobile Web Design & Development9
67-327Web Application Security6
67-328Mobile to Cloud: Building Distributed Applications9
67-364Practical Data Science9
67-442Mobile Application Development in iOS9
Any 15-xxx course above 15-121 with prerequisite of 15-112 or higher

Social and Global Systems

This content area exposes students to key themes in globalization and global systems . management, policy, international business, and technology.

Units
19-402Telecommunications Technology and Policy for the Internet Age12
19-403Policies of Wireless Systems12
19-411Global Competitiveness: Firms, Nations and Technological Change9
67-319-67-331Global Technology Consulting Groundwork - Technology Consulting in the Global Community
(these two courses are taken sequentially)
6
67-329Contemporary Themes in Global Systems9
67-330Technology Consulting in the Community9
67-353IT & Environmental Sustainability6
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
70-365International Trade and International Law9
70-430International Management9
70-480International Marketing9
73-372International Money and Finance9
76-318Communicating in the Global Marketplace9
76-386Language & Culture9
79-318Sustainable Social Change: History and Practice9
79-381Energy and Empire: How Fossil Fuels Changed the World9
88-384Conflict and Conflict Resolution in International Relations9
88-411Rise of the Asian Economies9

 Additionally, other pre-approved courses offered by the Engineering & Public Policy Department (19-xxx) may be used to fulfill the Social and Global Systems Content Area. 
 

Quantitative Analysis

Students will learn to apply analytic and quantitative methods for approaching complex, ambiguous problems. 

Units
21-257Models and Methods for Optimization9
21-292Operations Research I9
36/70-208Regression Analysis9
36-217Probability Theory and Random Processes9
or 36-225 Introduction to Probability Theory
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral & Social Sciences9
36-350Statistical Computing9
36-401Modern Regression9
36-410Introduction to Probability Modeling9
or 36-46x Topics in Statistics
67-364Practical Data Science9
70-460Mathematical Models for Consulting9
70-462Stochastic Modeling and Simulations9
73-274Econometrics I9
73-374Econometrics II9
88-223Decision Analysis12
88-251Empirical Research Methods9

Integrative Design, Arts, and Technology (IDeATe) Content Areas:

An IDeATe content area consists of a minimum of 27 units which may include one Portal Course (other than 15-104 Introduction to Computing for Creative Practice) plus 2 courses from one of the areas below. Course information can be found on the IDeATe website.

Game Design (IDeATe)

In this content area, students will learn both theory and skill in the key areas of games: dramatic narrative and character development, visual and sound synthesis, special effects and performance capture, programming and engine development, interface and interaction architecture development, game assessment and redesign.  

Animation and Special Effects (IDeATe)

The interconnected components of performance capture, rendering, 3D and 2D animation, and special effects will be covered in this content area.  

Media Design (IDeATe)

The digital mediation of experiences content area explores the interconnected development of technology and content in new media systems and the meaning that arises from the resulting forms. Students learn to design mediated experiences across different platforms, from mobile to large-scale installations. 

Design FOR LEARNING  (IDeATe)

Students in this content area will combine their diverse skills for the design of effective new media systems for learning; from games for learning to tangible learning tool kits and remote learning systems. They will leverage new technologies, media arts knowledge, and learning science principles to create engaging experiences with measurable real world impact.  

Sound Design (IDeATe)

This content area will explore the processes and products of digital sound and music. Students will receive basic training in key areas: principles of computer music, hybrid instrument building, concepts in sound design.  62-150 IDeATe Portal: Introduction to Media Synthesis and Analysis (10 units) is the required portal course for this content area and will serve as one of the courses for this content area. 

innovation and Entrepreneurship (IDeATe)

Students in this content area will develop the knowledge and skills to lead and innovate in creative industries. Their interdisciplinary, hands-on coursework will emphasize the conceptualization of innovative products and the structuring of innovation processes. 

Intelligent Environments  (IDeATe)

The focus of this content area is on spaces that support efficiency and high quality of experience, addressing both the integrated development of such environments and the resulting experience.
The required portal course for this content area is 62-150 IDeATe Portal: Introduction to Media Synthesis and Analysis (10 units) or 16-223/60-223 IDeATe: Introduction to Physical Computing (10 units) and will serve as one of the courses for this content area. 

The barriers between computing devices and their users have slowly dissolved. The physical world is becoming a key interface for computing and the internet of things is becoming the next generation of connectivity. Students in this content area will explore the technical, experiential, and semantic issues of this evolution. 

Sample Curriculum 

FreshmanSophomore
FallSpringFallSpring
67-100 Information Systems Freshman Workshop67-250 The Information Systems Milieux67-262 Database Design and Development67-272 Application Design and Development
15-110 Principles of Computing15-112 Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science15-121 Introduction to Data StructuresDisciplinary Core Course
21-111 Differential Calculus21-112 Integral CalculusDisciplinary Core CourseElective Course
Freshman Seminar76-101 Interpretation and ArgumentElective CourseElective Course
36-200 Reasoning with Data79-104 Global Histories Elective CourseElective Course
99-101 Computing @ Carnegie Mellon
Elective Course
JuniorSenior
FallSpringFallSpring
Professional Core Elective Course 67-373 Information Systems Consulting Project67-475 Innovation in Information SystemsContent Area Course
Disciplinary Core CourseContent Area CourseContent Area CourseElective Course
Elective CourseElective CourseElective CourseElective Course
Elective CourseElective CourseElective CourseElective Course
Elective CourseElective CourseElective CourseElective Course

Academic Policies

Transfer into Information Systems

Most IS students are admitted directly into Information Systems as incoming freshmen. Only Information Systems major students are permitted to enroll in the Professional Core courses (67-250 and above), and IS students have enrollment priority in IS electives.

Students in high academic standing may apply to be admitted to the Information Systems major as transfer students.  Transfers into Information Systems will always be subject to availability of space in the major. Applications will be considered based on the following criteria:

  • Strong record of academic performance at Carnegie Mellon (minimum QPA of 3.4)
  • Relevance and clarity of personal statement
  • Interview with IS Academic Advisor. Current Dietrich students must also interview with their Academic Advisory Center (AAC) advisor while non-Dietrich students will only be required to meet with the IS Academic Advisor.
  • Relevance of courses completed to date
  • Completion of 15-112 Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science with final grade of 'A' or 'B'

Application materials must be submitted no later than the last day of classes of the fall or spring semester. Current Dietrich students will submit materials to the Academic Advisory Center while non-Dietrich students will submit all materials directly to Information Systems in Hamburg Hall 3031.

Students accepted as transfers to the IS program would normally be expected to complete the usual prerequisites and begin the Professional Core courses during the next available semester. 

Students interested in applying for transfer to the Information Systems major should contact the IS Academic Advisor for information regarding availability, application procedures and deadlines. Potential applicants to the IS major should be working toward a sensible alternative major, so that their success at Carnegie Mellon is not predicated on admission to the IS program.

Double Counting of Courses

"Double Counting" refers to instances when a course taken to fulfill one requirement counts simultaneously toward a requirement in another major or minor program.  Double Counting is permitted in the Dietrich College on a very limited basis.  Information Systems students may double count no more than two courses used to fulfill any Information Systems major requirement (beyond the Dietrich College General Education requirements and Prerequisite courses) with any combination of dual degrees, additional majors, minors or graduate degree programs.  Only one course may double count with any minor.  No course can count for more than one requirement within the major. Students must also adhere to any policy restrictions on double counting enforced by the academic department of the student's additional major or minor.

Course Repeats

Per university policy, when a course is repeated, all grades will be recorded on the official academic transcript and will be calculated in the student's QPA. This is the case regardless if the first grade for the course is a passing or failing grade.

Undergraduate students who wish to repeat a course already passed must obtain approval from the student's Dean or Department Head. When a student takes a course s/he has already passed, only one set of units will count towards graduation requirements.

Course Descriptions

Note on Course Numbers

Each Carnegie Mellon course number begins with a two-digit prefix which designates the department offering the course (76-xxx courses are offered by the Department of English, etc.). Although each department maintains its own course numbering practices, typically the first digit after the prefix indicates the class level: xx-1xx courses are freshmen-level, xx-2xx courses are sophomore level, etc. xx-6xx courses may be either undergraduate senior-level or graduate-level, depending on the department. xx-7xx courses and higher are graduate-level. Please consult the Schedule of Classes each semester for course offerings and for any necessary pre-requisites or co-requisites.

67-100 Information Systems Freshman Workshop
Fall: 1 unit
This class provides an overview of the Information Systems Program for freshman students. The Program's academic advisor facilitates discussion of the field of IS, the curriculum, and careers, as well as co-curricular experiences such as internships and study abroad. Guest lecturers include the IS faculty, IS alumni, the IS career consultant, and various campus representatives. Discussions will include students' progress in their first semester, as well as guidance in course planning, for creating their Spring semester schedule of classes, and their overall four-year plan.
67-202 The Softer Side of Software
Intermittent: 6 units
Even the best technologist has to rely on soft skills in their lives and jobs-whether they want a team member to take their constructive feedback or an angel investor to understand why their product is better than the competition. Classes will cover delivering engaging presentations, writing emails co-workers want to read, conducting meetings and workshops, delivering criticism and more. This mini course requires students to participate in a combination of short readings, in-class simulations, theater exercises, individual and group projects to practice soft skills. This course has some space available to students outside of the Information Systems program.
67-211 Introduction to Business Systems Programming
Fall and Spring: 6 units
This course examines the fundamentals of business systems, particularly transaction processing systems. Topics include records processing, data representations, file structures, and basic algorithms common to business systems. The relationship of transaction processing and Big Data tools is covered. The course is a mix of lectures,which examine the history and current practices of business systems technology, and programming exercises that illustrate the core concepts. The programming exercises use the CoBOL programming language as an example of a language designed to be used to program business systems. Some minimal programming experience is necessary. Good listening skills and class interaction are required.
67-240 Mobile Web Design & Development
Fall and Spring: 9 units
The Mobile Web Design and Development course provides a solid web design and development foundation focusing on responsive and user-centered design, and client-side components. Students explore the current standards and best practices of web design. Throughout the course, students work with HTML5, CSS3, Twitter Bootstrap, and Javascript, and learn how the various web components function together. The course utilizes a hands-on approach to guide students through learning and understanding the design and development process. This course is primarily designed for students with minimal technical experience. By the end of the course, students will be able to plan, design, and implement a basic functioning mobile web site/ app.
Prerequisites: 15-112 Min. grade C or 15-104 Min. grade C
67-250 The Information Systems Milieux
Spring: 9 units
Information systems (IS) are changing work practices, reshaping organizations, transforming cultures, and giving new meaning to the ways we see the world. This course is designed to help students understand the role of IS in modern society and the means by which these systems are created. It provides not only a framework for understanding information and information systems, but also a language to identify their dynamic complexities and inter-dependencies. Topics include: current trends in IS, structured approaches to the creation of IS, corporate IS competitive advantage, business process improvements/re-engineering, eCommerce and the digital economy, knowledge management, decisions support systems, and the implications of IS for people, organizations and society. Classes will use a combination of lectures, class discussions, reading assignments, case studies, group projects, and "hands-on" work in database design. This course is a required professional core course for IS freshmen only.
67-261 Information Design Fundamentals
Fall and Spring: 9 units
Information Design Fundamentals builds from a foundation in visual composition and typographic layout, to visual/verbal communication through the interplay of images, text, and typeface. Students apply this core understanding to information design problems that consider both qualitative and quantitative data developed for descriptive and strategic purposes that take the form of timelines, maps, hierarchies, and networks. While exercises concentrate on mastery of the tools and usability testing, projects importantly incorporate user studies methods as the first design step in order to help users perform tasks that meet their goals in ways that minimize barriers
67-262 Database Design and Development
Fall: 9 units
Data driven decision making is a core process of organizations. In this class students will study the principles of database management systems, their design, and development. Recent alternatives to the classical relational model will also be examined. This course is a required professional core course and is open only to sophomores in the IS major who have completed 67-250 or equivalent.
Prerequisites: (15-112 or 15-121 or 15-122) and 67-250
67-272 Application Design and Development
Spring: 9 units
This course provides students with the concepts and techniques to design and develop software applications, and to understand the design process. Students will learn the importance of user-centered design and will develop a prototype of a web application as a course project. In the process of developing the application, students will learn how to design and create relational databases, how to acquire competency in new programming languages quickly, how to use the Model-View-Controller pattern to develop software applications, how to ensure technical quality in software development, and how to apply principles of user-centered design. This course is a required professional core course and is open only to sophomores and juniors in the IS major who have completed 67-250 or equivalent.
Prerequisites: (15-122 or 15-121) and 67-262
67-276 Building Better Web Applications
Fall: 3 units
This class introduces students to new technologies that will help improve web application performance and responsiveness. Classes will begin with a time of instruction followed by hands-on activities to reinforce learning principles.
Prerequisite: 67-272
67-279 Introduction to Geographical Information Systems
Intermittent: 6 units
Geographical Information Systems (GIS) allow us to visualize information that uses location. Through displaying layers of information in computer generated maps, we can see, analyze, understand and explore spatial patterns and relationships in new and novel ways. People in many different fields use Geographical Information Systems in their work: for visualizing the environment, human development, demographics, traffic and transportation, public health and many more. In this course, students will learn the basics of GIS through hands-on experience with popular mapping tools. Sources of data, principles of coordinate and projection systems and elementary geo-analysis techniques will be included. Upon completion of the course, students will have the background to begin using GIS techniques in their own areas of interest and will be prepared for further study in advanced GIs courses.
67-306 Special Topics: Management of Computer and Information Systems
Intermittent: 6 units
The course will provide a thorough understanding of the many responsibilities for managing technology by the organization IT resource, executives, managers, and functional end users. Concentration on IT plan and budget development with associated management, IT roles and responsibilities, system development and operations best practices, security management, IT procurement with emphasis on service and product agreements, vendor relationships, project management, and business continuity/disaster recovery. Junior or senior class standing is required. Coursework in information systems, software design, project management, or related job experience is strongly preferred, but not required due to the managerial, rather than technical, nature of the course.
67-308 Innovation Studio: Health Care Information Systems
Intermittent: 9 units
Healthcare information systems are intended to improve patient outcomes while reducing the cost of clinical care. However, with the highest per person healthcare expenditures, the United States ranks low in healthcare quality compared to other countries. Although healthcare information systems are improving, challenges persist because information workflow, human interface design, and interoperability are not emphasized. In this course, students will learn to solve real-world healthcare information systems challenges in a team-based format. Juniors and Seniors
67-309 Special Topics: Information Assurance and Security
Intermittent: 6 units
Special Topics: Information Assurance and Security [Power to the Edge: Challenges to systems survivability in a net-centric world] This course is an overview of increasingly important aspects of systems development, operation and sustainment, namely information assurance, software assurance, survivability and security. As more and more functionality and dynamic decision-making are pushed down and out into the organization (power to the edge), assurance and security concerns, with their organizational and human dimensions, impact the fidelity of the data and the very survival of the organization. Topics include overview and definitions, defense in depth, legal and policy issues, principles of survivability and information assurance, risk management, insider threat, vendor and outsourcing issues, incident management and forensics. This class is a combination of lectures, readings, and discussion groups. Students will leave the course with an understanding of the various concepts and their impacts on systems and the organization itself.
Prerequisites: (15-112 or 15-110) and 67-250
67-317 Mobile Web Development and Usability Testing
Intermittent: 9 units
Designing for mobile web applications enables businesses to harness the explosive growth and new opportunities on the mobile internet, besides enabling innovation in many ways. This course emphasizes a 'mobile first' approach to responsive web design, development, and user experience. Students gain a deep understanding of the mobile web development process, the grammar of building mobile web sites, emerging web standards, and state-of-the-art mobile usability testing methods. They gain first-hand exposure to developing with HTML5 and CSS3 and applying heuristic methods and testing tools such as Morae and Tobii eye tracker, to achieve an enhanced mobile user experience. Recent reports state that 80 percent of mobile websites in the US get traffic from other regions of the world. The course will address the need for facilitating a 'global' user experience, through independent student projects that target a 'global or social' theme and deliver a complete solution involving design, development, and usability testing of a localized and responsive web site.
Prerequisites: (15-122 or 15-121) and 67-272
67-319 Global Technology Consulting Groundwork
Spring: 3 units
This course is by invitation only for participants in the Technology Consulting in the Global Community program. For information on the program and how to apply, see http://cmu.edu/tcingc.
67-324 Accelerating Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Fall: 9 units
Mastering innovation processes and incorporating entrepreneurial methods into one?s career is a cornerstone of success. Whether one endeavors into a startup or large company, successfully incorporating innovation and entrepreneurship will propel a career in software development, consulting, financial services, and many others. Innovation and entrepreneurship is a discipline with established tools and methods that must be properly harnessed. This course will expose and educate students to the discipline of innovation and entrepreneurship that will be portable to most any career and industry focus. This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
67-327 Web Application Security
Fall: 6 units
This is a technical course designed to help students learn how to exploit web applications and to be better able as developers to defend against such exploits. The course covers the process of hacking a web application, starting with initial mapping and analysis, followed by identifying common logic flaws in web apps, database and network exploits, command and SQL injections, and the like. This hands-on course requires students to be familiar with a popular web application framework or language (such as Ruby on Rails, PHP, Django/Python, ASP.NET or the like). Prerequisite: 67-272 or permission of instructor.
Prerequisite: 67-272
67-328 Mobile to Cloud: Building Distributed Applications
Fall: 9 units
Web 2.0, Mashups, Mobile Apps, and Cloud Computing are just a few of the new terms people are using to describe emerging technologies for building complex, distributed applications. Protocol standards, web services, open-APIs, increasingly more powerful mobile devices, and the Internet have enabled new possibilities for weaving complex applications using globally-distributed data and computing resources. Application development has largely left any single computer, and is distributed across a wide range of hardware and software platforms. This class will explore these developing technologies and models for structuring their complexity, while building projects that go from mobile to the cloud. Prerequisite: 67-272 (with "C" or higher) or permission of instructor.
Prerequisite: 67-272 Min. grade C
67-329 Contemporary Themes in Global Systems
Intermittent: 9 units
Globalization and outsourcing of information systems (IS) is a mainstay of the business environment. The decision to outsource software services to providers in distant places has many risks and thus careful management of critical success factors is essential. Likewise, products and services are being developed and delivered by teams of people in diverse locations working together. Management of these sourcing models and human capital relationships will be an increasingly important skill for students expecting to fully participate in the emerging IS marketplace of the 21st century. This course introduces the effective fundamentals of global project management and the mechanics of sourcing arrangements including offshore outsourcing. Students will also examine the effects of human diversity and cross-cultural considerations in the creation, use and management of information systems. A combination of readings, participation in class discussions, and non-technical collaborative projects will be expected of class participants. Students must have sophomore standing or higher.
67-330 Technology Consulting in the Community
Spring: 9 units
In this course, the student develops technical consulting and management skills while collaborating on-site with a community leader of a non-profit community organization or school. This service-learning course has students analyze a complex organization, then design and implement a work plan that will expand the organization's capacity to use information technology. Student consultants do not merely provide IT support, nor do they focus on system development. Rather they focus on solving organizational problems using IT solutions. In doing so, they may develop a system, or adapt open source or commercial tools as appropriate to the situation. Throughout the semester, students develop a consulting report. They learn how to use this working document to collaborate with others and to think through and communicate a strategic technology plan. Students also experience how urban community organizations function, seeing the valuable benefits these organizations provide to society. Prerequisites: 76101 and (15121 or 70451) At least sophomore standing.
Prerequisites: 15-121 or 70-451 or 15-122
67-331 Technology Consulting in the Global Community
Fall: 3 units
This course is by invitation only for participants in the Technology Consulting in the Global Community program. Admitted ONLY BY Permission of Instructor
67-344 Organizational Intelligence in the Information Age
Fall: 9 units
Across all organizations people find that the actions they take affect, and are affected by, the technology, norms, procedures, culture, and members of the organization. In order to navigate through this organizational world, agents need a better understanding of social and organizational intelligence. How do organizations (and the people who populate them) acquire and then process information? In what ways have new technologies affected the norms, procedures, and culture of organizations? How do leaders successfully guide their organizations through a world where new information and new technologies are constantly being produced? This course is about information assessment and analysis in organizations, and the way organizations are transformed by technology. This course is for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors.
67-353 IT & Environmental Sustainability
Intermittent: 6 units
Sustainable living and sustainable development are serious challenges facing individuals, communities, organizations and countries around the world. Addressing these challenges is a multidisciplinary effort. In particular, while Information and Communications Technologies have been among the most transformative developments in recent decades, they have the potential to address some of society's most urgent needs. For examples, intelligent use of IS/IT can help enable smarter cities, more efficient transportation systems, smarter energy systems, more efficient logistics and 'greener' product life cycle design. In this course, students will reflect on the challenges of sustainability and the potential role IS/IT may play in enabling adaptation and mitigation of these challenges.
67-364 Practical Data Science
Spring: 9 units
From empirical, to theoretical, to computational science, we are at the dawn of a new revolution—-a fourth paradigm of science driven by data. Like archaeological remnants, data, by its very nature, is a marker of what happened in the past. How can data be used to better understand this past and what is happening in the present? How can data be leveraged to forecast what will happen in the future? Better still, how can data be used to mold what should happen in the future? In this course we will study descriptive, predictive, and prescriptive methods by which data can be used to gain insight and inform actions of people and organizations. The real excitement of data science is in the doing. This is an application oriented course requiring skill in algorithmic problem solving. We will use Python based data science tools. While prior programming experience with Python will be helpful the course will strive to be self-contained. If you have not programmed in Python before, you need to be comfortable programming in some language (e.g., Ruby, R, Java, C++) and will need to come up to speed with the Pythonic way of problem solving.
Prerequisites: 36-201 Min. grade C and 15-112 Min. grade C
67-373 Information Systems Consulting Project
Spring: 12 units
In this course, students design and implement a usable information system for a client. The client may be affiliated with the university, government, business, or non-profit agency. Students will be assigned to teams to work on these projects, and will produce operational, fully documented and tested, computer-based information systems. The projects will be supervised by CMU faculty and, when possible, by project clients.
Prerequisite: 67-272
67-390 Independent Study in Information Systems
Fall and Spring
Independent studies are opportunities to engage in research with an IS faculty member to advance your learning in certain areas of interest. Information Systems students may enroll in independent study for 3, 6, 9, or 12 units of academic credit by obtaining an IS faculty sponsor who will oversee the academic component of the coursework, monitor progress, and assign a final grade.
67-391 Independent Study in Information Systems
Fall and Spring
Independent studies are opportunities to engage in research with an IS faculty member to advance your learning in certain areas of interest. Information Systems students may enroll in independent study for 3, 6, 9, 12 units of academic credit by obtaining an IS faculty sponsor who will oversee the academic component of the coursework, monitor progress, and assign a final grade.
67-440 IDeATe Mobile Application Design & Development
Spring: 9 units
TBD
67-442 Mobile Application Development in iOS
Fall: 9 units
This course provides students with the concepts and techniques to design and develop mobile applications with iOS and to understand the design and development process involved. Students will develop a series of smaller iOS applications in weekly lab sessions as well as larger application as part of a course project. In the process of developing these applications, students will develop a strong understanding of the Swift programming language, iOS application development, mobile-centered design, and how to ensure technical quality in software development. This course is open only to juniors and seniors in the IS major who have completed 67-272.
Prerequisite: 67-373
67-475 Innovation in Information Systems
Fall: 12 units
In this capstone team-based course, IS seniors design and implement an information systems solution to meet a real-world need or opportunity. Innovation, entrepreneurship, planning, project management, and risk taking will all be emphasized. Students will be challenged to produce "proof of concept" systems or prototypes that are fully documented, tested, and ready to present for external evaluation. This course is a required professional core course and is open only to seniors in the IS major who have completed 67-373.
Prerequisite: 67-373
67-490 Practicum in Information Systems
Intermittent
This course is offered only at Carnegie Mellon's campus in Qatar. The practicum in information systems allows students interested in applying skills acquired in the field of information systems in the context of a working environment. Students will complete a project and be accountable to a stakeholder that is external to their program of study. They may shadow and observe practices in the field of information systems, and also perform tasks as assigned. A hands-on experience is expected. By completing this course, students practice desirable skills for employability, such as time management, project management, team work, and professional development.

Faculty

CHADI AOUN, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Univeristy of New South Wales; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–

ANIS CHARFI, Associate Teaching Professor – Dr.Ing., Technische Universitat Darmstadt; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–

SUSAN HAGAN, Associate Teaching Professor – PhD., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–

C.F. LARRY HEIMANN, Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Washington University (St. Louis); Carnegie Mellon, 1998–

DIVAKARAN LIGINLAL, Teaching Professor – Ph.D., University of Arizona - Tucson; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–

SELMA LIMAM MANSAR, Teaching Professor – Ph.D., National Polytechnic Institute of Grenoble; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–

JOSEPH S. MERTZ, Teaching Professor (joint Appointment with Heinz College) – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–

SARA MOUSSAWI, Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D. , City University of New York; Carnegie Mellon, 2016-–

DANIEL PHELPS, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Florida State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–

JERIA QUESENBERRY, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–

RAJA SOORIAMURTHI, Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Indiana University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–

SAVANID (NUI) VATANASAKDAKUL, Associate Teaching Professor – PhD., University of New South Wales; Carnegie Mellon, 2018–

RANDY S. WEINBERG, Teaching Professor; Information Systems – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–