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Department of Social and Decision Sciences

Department Office: Porter Hall 208
http://www.cmu.edu/dietrich/sds/

The Department of Social and Decision Sciences is a multidisciplinary department that offers undergraduate programs that seamlessly combine frontier knowledge in the social sciences with the practical skills needed to excel in key decision making roles in the public and private sectors and in advanced studies. Our students learn how to combine intellectual ideals with the realities of human and organizational behavior and to apply these lessons across a wide variety of endeavors, ranging from government service to leadership positions in the information economy.

The department offers undergraduate majors in Decision Science, International Relations and Politics, and Policy and Management. The majors leverage off of our departmental core that includes courses in decision analysis, empirical research, organizations, and policy analysis. In addition to completing this core, students also specialize in their major area through a set of required and elective courses.

Our faculty is committed to the academic success and growth of our students and many of our undergraduates work with faculty on research projects and internships. The directors of the majors are easily accessible and encourage students to talk with them about their curriculum, progress, and available opportunities.

The Department of Social and Decision Sciences has a long history of creating innovative and prescient undergraduate programs that combine key ideas from across the social sciences into cohesive majors that allow our graduates to excel in their chosen professions or in the pursuit of advanced studies. Our emphasis on the theory and practice of individual and social decision making linked with our high-quality, multidisciplinary social science faculty, provides a solid foundation from which graduates can embrace a variety of future paths.

 

The Major in Decision Science

Baruch Fischhoff, Faculty Director
Office: Porter Hall 219E
Connie Angermeier, Academic Advisor
Office: Porter Hall 208A
Email: cla2@andrew.cmu.edu

The interdisciplinary field of Decision Science seeks to understand and improve the judgment and decision making of individuals, groups, and organizations. Qualified graduates can continue to PhD programs in Decision Science or related fields (e.g., psychology, business), pursue professional degrees (e.g., MBA, MD, JD, MPH), or take professional positions in business, government, consulting, or the non-profit sector. Students work with faculty and the Academic Advisor to tailor their education to their specific needs and interest.

Carnegie Mellon is one of the leading centers for the study of Decision Science - and offers the only undergraduate major that integrates analytical and behavioral approaches to decision making.  Our faculty are involved in applying Decision Science in a wide variety of areas, allowing them to share practical experiences with students. These applications include medical decision making (e.g., conveying the costs and benefits of treatment options), legal decision making (e.g., understanding the effects of anger on attributions of responsibility for accidents), risk management (e.g., assessing and communicating the risks of climate change), marketing (e.g., understanding the effects of inter-temporal choice on purchasing decisions), and business (e.g., identifying unrecognized conflicts of interest).

Decision Science is grounded in theories and methods drawn from psychology, economics, philosophy, statistics, and management science. Courses in the major cover the three aspects of decision science: (a) normative analysis, creating formal models of rational choice; (b) descriptive research, studying how cognitive, emotional, social, and institutional factors affect judgment and choice, and (c) prescriptive interventions, seeking to improve judgment and decision making. In addition to gaining a broad education in the principles of judgment and decision making, Decision Science majors gain broadly applicable skills in research design and analysis. They also have the chance to think about and discuss decision making in many different areas.

The core courses in Decision Science cluster into two categories. The theory cluster presents fundamental theories and results from the empirical study of decision making, as well as the application of decision-making research to real-world problems. The research methods cluster introduces students to methods for collecting and analyzing behavioral data. For example, students learn to conduct surveys (e.g., uncovering consumer or managerial preferences), design experiments evaluating psychological and economic theories, and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions.

The elective courses provide students with additional knowledge in areas of decision making that meet their personal, intellectual, and career goals. These courses are organized into six clusters: biological and behavioral aspects of decision making, managerial and organizational aspects, philosophical and ethical perspectives, economic and statistical methods, public policy, and research methods. Students can concentrate in one area or spread their studies across them. In addition to coursework, the department offers research opportunities for interested and qualified students. Participating in research helps students to extend their mastery of decision science, discover whether a research career is right for them, and get to know faculty and graduate students better.

Prerequisites

All Decision Science majors must complete mathematics, statistics, and analytic methods prerequisites (see below), by the end of the sophomore year.

Mathematics Prerequisite Units
21-111-21-112Calculus I-II10-20
or 21-120 Differential and Integral Calculus

Students who successfully pass the proctored Calculus Assessment on campus or who receive credit through accepted standardized exams (such as AP, IB, or Cambridge) at the 21-120 or 21-122 levels will be required to take a more advanced 21-xxx course for this prerequisite. 21-122, 21-240, or 21-256 are suggested.

Statistics Prerequisite Units
36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice9

 

Students must take one course from the following set (or an approved alternative).  Students may not count a course used to fulfill the Mathematics Prerequisite as also filling the Analytic Methods Prerequisite.

Analytic Methods Prerequisite Units
21-122Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation10
21-256Multivariate Analysis9
21-257Models and Methods for Optimization9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences9
36-401Modern Regression9
36-410Introduction to Probability Modeling9
80-211Logic and Mathematical Inquiry9
88-252Empirical Research for Social Science and Policy9

 

Curriculum

The core curriculum in Decision Science consists of two courses in empirical research methods and five courses providing the theoretical perspectives of Decision Science.

Theoretical Perspectives Units
88-120Reason, Passion and Cognition **9
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
88-220Policy Analysis I9
88-223Decision Analysis and Decision Support Systems9
88-302Behavioral Decision Making9
 45

** 88-120 should be taken in the freshman or sophomore year.

 

Research Methods Units
36-202Statistical Methods9
88-251Empirical Research Methods9
 18
45 unitsElectives

Complete at least 45 units of courses from the following categories. The selected courses may be from one category or from any combination.  Note that not all elective courses are offered every year.

At least three of these courses (27 units) must be Department of Social and Decision Sciences courses (88-xxx).

1. Biological and Behavioral Aspects of Decision Making Units
85-352Evolutionary Psychology9
85-377Attitudes and Persuasion9
85-442Health Psychology9
88-360Behavioral Economics9
88-365Behavioral Economics and Public Policy9
88-388Psychological Models of Decision Making9
88-421Emotion: Physiology, Neurobiology, Expression, and Decision Making9
88-442Decision Science in Intergroup Conflict9

2. Managerial and Organization Aspects of Decision Making
70-311Organizational Behavior *9
70-381Marketing I9
70-460Mathematical Models for Consulting9
88-221Policy Analysis II9
88-260Organizations *9
88-419Negotiation9
88-444Public Policy and Regulation9
88-451Policy Analysis Senior Project12
or 88-452 Policy Analysis Senior Project

* Only one course (either 70-311 or 88-260) may count toward an elective requirement in the Decision Science major.

3. Philosophical and Ethical Perspectives on Decision Making Units
19-426Environmental Decision Making9
80-208Critical Thinking9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-241Ethical Judgments in Professional Life9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-305Rational Choice9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9


4. Economic and Statistical Methods for Decision Science Units
70-460Mathematical Models for Consulting9
73-347Game Theory for Economists9
80-337Philosophy Politics & Economics9
80-405Game Theory *9
88-316Game Theory *9
88-360Behavioral Economics9
88-367Behavior Economics in the Wild9
88-387Social Norms and Economics9

*  80-405 and 88-316 are different courses and are not cross-listed.

5. Decision Science and Public Policy
88-221Policy Analysis II9
88-365Behavioral Economics and Public Policy9
88-405Risk Perception and Communication9
88-408Attitudes the Media and Conflict in International Relations9
88-412Economics of Global Warming9
88-444Public Policy and Regulation9
88-451Policy Analysis Senior Project12
or 88-452 Policy Analysis Senior Project

6. Research Methods for Decision Science Units
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
70-460Mathematical Models for Consulting9
88-252Empirical Research for Social Science and Policy9
88-388Psychological Models of Decision Making9
88-402Modeling Complex Social Systems9
88-435Analysis of Uncertain Social Systems9

Note: Some courses have additional prerequisites.

Decision Science, B.S. Sample Curriculum
Freshman or Sophmore YearJunior Year
SpringFallSpring
88-120 Reason, Passion and Cognition **88-220 Policy Analysis I85-211 Cognitive Psychology
36-202 Statistical Methods88-251 Empirical Research Methods88-223 Decision Analysis and Decision Support Systems
Open Prerequisite88-302 Behavioral Decision MakingDecision Science Elective
ElectiveElectiveElective
ElectiveElectiveElective

Senior Year
FallSpring
Decision Science ElectiveDecision Science Elective
Decision Science ElectiveDecision Science Elective
Elective or Honors ThesisElective or Honors Thesis
ElectiveElective
ElectiveElective

This is presented as a two-year (junior-senior) plan for completing major requirements, with the exception of and 36-202. Its purpose is to show that this program can be completed in as few as two years, not that it must be. Students may enter their major, and begin major course requirements, as early as the start of the sophomore year, and in some instances in the freshman year. Students should consult their advisor when planning their program. Students who are planning to study abroad or to apply for the Heinz Accelerated Masters Program will have a very different curriculum map and should consult early – and often – with the Academic Advisor.

Students are encouraged to consider the Washington Semester Program as part of their education.  Suitable courses will be considered as fulfilling requirements of electives in the major.  Please send the course syllabus, along with a note explaining how the course addresses fundamental aspects of decision science in one of the six elective categories.

 

** This course should be taken as the first course in the Decision Science sequence. It is intended for students in their first or second year; it is offered in Spring semesters. It may be taken as late as the junior year.

Additional Major in Decision Science

Students who elect Decision Science as an additional major must fulfill all of the requirements of the Decision Science major.

Students pursuing International Relations and Politics with an additional major in Decision Science may only count 36-202, 88-220, and 88-251 toward the completion of both majors.

Students pursuing Policy and Management with an additional major in Decision Science and may only count 36-202, 88-220, 88-223, and toward the completion of both majors.

Additional majors cannot count menu electives toward simultaneously fulfilling more than one major or minor. Students who are interested in an additional major in Decision Science should see the Academic Advisor of the Decision Science program.

 

The Major in International Relations and Politics

Kiron K. Skinner, Faculty Director; kskinner@andrew.cmu.edu
Emily Half, Academic Program Manager; ehalf@andrew.cmu.edu, Baker Hall A60C, 412-268-7082
http://www.cmu.edu/ir

The International Relations and Politics (IRP) major analyzes the role of politics at the national, regional, international, and transnational levels; examines political and institutional arrangements within and among these levels; and investigates the grand strategy of nation-states.

Statesmen, scholars, and policy makers often define grand strategy as the combination of diplomatic, economic, military, and political factors used by leaders to defend their respective nation-states. The IRP major investigates the way in which leaders and citizens construct grand strategy and national security policy more generally; the impact of domestic and international forces on states’ security and economic policies; and the significance of alliances, coalitions, and international institutions for world politics.

Although the study of grand strategy and political institutions is the flagship initiative of the major, students are also able to study the effects of culture, economics, and society on the international system through a rich set of elective courses.

Thinking systematically about international and domestic politics is the core objective of the IRP major. To this end, the major has prerequisites in analytical methods, mathematics, and statistics that help to sharpen students’ ability to undertake scientific analysis in the required substantive and historical courses. The major is rooted in the discipline of political science but also utilizes the interdisciplinary strengths of the Department of Social and Decision Sciences (SDS), which include behavioral decision science, complex social systems, economics, the department’s program in strategy, entrepreneurship and technological change, and political history. Thus, students pursuing this major will use the analytic tools of game theory, economic and statistical analysis, qualitative analysis, rational choice theory, and theories of behavioral decision making as they study alliances, coalitions, institutions, and political strategy.

Recognizing the influence of language and culture on politics, students are required to complete the intermediate (200) level, or its equivalent, in a modern language other than English. Advanced-level study is strongly encouraged.

Open to all Carnegie Mellon undergraduates, Carnegie Mellon University’s Washington Semester Program (CMUWSP) allows students to study public policy and intern in Washington for one semester. Courses taken through CMUWSP will count toward the elective sequence in public policy for IRP majors.

Students’ understanding of politics is further informed by courses and colloquia offered by CMU’s top-ranked departments, divisions, and schools in business, computer science, engineering, and the humanities.

IRP majors interested in developing their research skills are encouraged to apply for a research position with the Center for International Relations and Politics. They are also encouraged to join student organizations focused on domestic or international politics. Becoming involved in the Social and Decision Sciences Department and the Student Advising Council, as well as attending lectures and events sponsored by the Center for International Relations and Politics and SDS, will provide additional opportunities for students.

The International Relations and Politics major is offered through the Department of Social and Decision Sciences. It is available as a primary major and an additional major in the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences.
 

Prerequisites

All International Relations and Politics majors must complete mathematics, statistics, and analytic methods prerequisites (see below) by the end of the sophomore year.

Mathematics Prerequisite Units
21-111-21-112Calculus I-II10-20
or 21-120 Differential and Integral Calculus

Students who successfully pass the proctored Calculus Assessment on campus at the 21-120 level will be required to take a more advanced 21-xxx course for this prerequisite. 21-122, 21-240, or 21-256 are suggested.
 

Statistics Prerequisite
36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice9

Students must take one course (9-10 units) from the following set (or an approved alternative) of Analytic Methods courses. Students may not double count a course used to fulfill the Mathematics Prerequisite for the Analytic Methods Prerequisite.

Analytic Methods Prerequisite
21-122Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation10
21-256Multivariate Analysis9
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
36-315Statistical Graphics and Visualization9
80-210Logic and Proofs9
80-305Rational Choice9
80-405Game Theory9
88-252Empirical Research for Social Science and Policy9
88-316Game Theory9
88-402Modeling Complex Social Systems9
88-424Decision Theory and Rational Choice9
88-435Analysis of Uncertain Social Systems9

 

Curriculum
Core Courses Units
36-202Statistical Methods9
88-104Decision Processes in American Political Institutions9
88-205Comparative Politics9
88-220Policy Analysis I9
88-251Empirical Research Methods9
88-326Theories of International Relations9
88-450IRP Capstone Policy Forum3
 57
 
 
Language Requirement

Students are required to complete the intermediate (200) level or the equivalent in a modern language other than English.  Advanced level study is strongly encouraged. Students who successfully pass a language placement exam on campus at the intermediate II level or higher will be required to take an advanced language course to satisfy the language requirement.

 
45 unitsElectives

International Relations and Politics students will either:

Option 1) take 45 units (five courses) from the elective lists below. Students must take three courses (27 units) from the Grand Strategy and Political Institutions category. The remaining two courses (18 units) must come from the Economics and Society and/or International Cultures categories. At least two courses (18 units) must be from the Department of Social and Decision Sciences (88-xxx). Most courses listed below are 9-unit courses, but some are fewer. When courses offered for fewer than 9 units are chosen, students should note that a minimum of 45 units is required, and should plan to take one or more additional courses as appropriate.

OR

Option 2) complete all (or the majority of) their electives via the Washington Semester Program (CMUWSP) Public Policy elective sequence (45 units). Any elective units not fulfilled during CMUWSP may be completed through coursework from the Grand Strategy and Political Institutions elective list.

The Washington Semester Program (CMUWSP) Public Policy Elective Sequence includes:

  • Core Seminar (12 units)
  • Elective Seminar (12 units)
  • Internship and Internship Seminar (15 units)
  • Policy Forum (6 units)

 

Grand Strategy and Political Institutions Units
19-609Public Policy and Regulation9
19-662Special Topics: Technology and Development in China & India12
24-484Decision Tools for Engineering Design and Entrepreneurship12
79-231American Foreign Policy: 1945-Present9
79-389Stalin and Stalinism9
80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-235Political Philosophy9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
80-335Deliberative Democracy: Theory and Practice9
88-181Topics in Law: 1st Amendment *9
88-184Topics of Law: The Bill of Rights * 9
88-210Comparative Political Systems9
88-223Decision Analysis and Decision Support Systems9
88-302Behavioral Decision Making9
88-309Judicial Politics & Behavior9
88-336Autocrats and Democrats9
88-349War and Peace9
88-362Diplomacy and Statecraft9
88-380Grand Strategy in the United States9
88-384Conflict and Conflict Resolution in International Relations9
88-388Psychological Models of Decision Making9
88-389Terrorism and Insurgency9
88-405Risk Perception and Communication9
88-408Attitudes the Media and Conflict in International Relations9
88-414International and Subnational Security9
88-415Global Competitiveness: Firms Nations, and Technological Change9
88-416Democracies and War9
88-442Decision Science in Intergroup Conflict9

*Only one course (either 88-181 or 88-184) may count toward an elective requirement for the IRP major.

 

Economics and Society Units
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
70-365International Trade and International Law9
70-430International Management9
73-328Health Economics12
73-331Political Economy of Inequality and Redistribution9
73-372International Money and Finance9
73-375History of Money and Monetary Policy9
73-394Development Economics9
79-206The European Union at the Crossroads9
79-321The Rise of the Modern Nation State9
79-386Entrepreneurs in Africa, Past, Present and Future9
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-247Ethics and Global Economics9
80-344Management, Environment, and Ethics9
80-348Health Development and Human Rights9
80-447Global Justice9
88-352Environmental Economics and Policy9
88-357Comparative Foreign Policy: China, Russia, and the US9
88-359Globalization9
88-378International Economics9
88-391Technology and Economic Growth9
88-410The Global Economy: A User's Guide9
88-411The Rise of the Asian Economies9
88-412Economics of Global Warming9
88-413Energy and Climate: History, Science, Technology, & Policy in the US 1776-20769
88-419Negotiation9
88-423Institutions, Entrepreneurship, and Innovation9


International Cultures Units
76-318Communicating in the Global Marketplace9
76-322Global Masala: South Asians in the Diaspora9
76-327Special Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies9
76-386Language & Culture9
79-20520th Century Europe9
79-212China and Its Neighbors: Minorities, Conquerors and Tribute Bearers9
79-213Nationalities and the New States of the Former USSR9
79-220Caribbean: Cultures and Histories9
79-221Development and Democracy in Latin America9
79-222Between Revolutions: The Development of Modern Latin America9
79-224Mayan America9
79-227Introduction to African History: 1780-19949
79-229Origins of the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1880-19489
79-230Arab-Israeli Conflict and Peace Process since 19489
79-233The United States and the Middle East since 19459
79-235Caribbean Cultures9
79-236Introduction to African Studies9
79-251India/America: Democracy, Diversity, Development9
79-255Irish History9
79-25620th Century Germany9
79-257Germany and the Second World War9
79-259France During World War II9
79-261Chinese Culture and Society9
79-262Modern China9
79-263China's Cultural Revolution6
79-264China in the Age of Reform, 1978-Present6
79-265Russian History: From the First to the Last Tsar9
79-266Russian History: From Communism to Capitalism9
79-267The Soviet Union in World War II: Military, Political and Social History9
79-275Introduction to Global Studies9
79-288Bananas, Baseball, and Borders: A History of Latin America - US Relations9
79-290States/Stateless Societies and Nationalism in West Africa6
79-291Globalization in East African History6
79-292China Inside Out: Going Global, 19th to 21st Centuries9
79-299Trafficking Persons: Children in a Global Context9
79-307Religion and Politics in the Middle East9
79-30920th Century China Through Film9
79-312International Human Rights Institutions in Theory and Practice6
79-314The Politics and Culture of Memory9
79-334Law, Ethics, and the Life Sciences9
79-342Introduction to Science and Technology Studies9
79-368Poverty, Charity, and Welfare9
79-375China's Environmental Crisis9
79-377Food, Culture, and Power: A History of Eating9
79-381Petrocultures: How Oil Changed the World9
79-383Epidemic Disease and Public Health9
79-385The Making of the African Diaspora9
79-398Documenting the 1967 Arab-Israeli War9
79-399US-Arab Encounters9
82-304The Francophone World9
82-320Contemporary Society in German, Austria and Switzerland9
82-323Germany, Austria and Switzerland in the 20th Century9
82-333Introduction to Chinese Language and CultureVar.
82-342Spain: Language and Culture9
82-343Latin America: Language and Culture9
82-344U.S. Latinos: Language and Culture9
82-345Introduction to Hispanic Literary and Cultural Studies9
82-361Introduction to Italian Culture9
82-362Italian Language and Culture9
82-404Francophone Realities: Africa9
82-426Topics in German Literature and Culture9
82-441Studies in Peninsular Literature and Culture9
82-451Studies in Latin American Literature and Culture9
82-455Topics in Hispanic Studies9
82-474Topics of Japanese Studies9
82-491Literature, Politics and Film in Russia & East Europe TodayVar.
82-541Special Topics: Hispanic StudiesVar.
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
88-314Politics through Film9
88-368Conflict, Human Rights and Development9
300 or 400- level language course (at most one for this category)

NOTE: Some courses have additional prerequisites.

International Relations and Politics, B.S.

These sample curricula represent a plan for completing the requirements for the B.S. in International Relations and Politics. International Relations and Politics students are encouraged to spend a semester studying and interning in Washington, DC, through the CMUWSP, and/or study abroad. The plan below demonstrates that a semester off-campus fits well into the curriculum. As with most majors in the Dietrich College, the International Relations and Politics major can be completed in as few as two years of undergraduate study, not that it must be. Students may declare the B.S. in International Relations and Politics and take appropriate courses as early as the second semester of the freshman year and as late as the junior year, and should consult frequently with the academic program manager (see above) about their course of study.

 

FreshmanSophomore
FallSpringFallSpring
36-201 Statistical Reasoning and Practice76-101 Interpretation and Argument88-220 Policy Analysis I88-205 Comparative Politics
79-104 Global HistoriesFreshman Seminar88-326 Theories of International RelationsAnalytic Methods Prerequisite
21-120 Differential and Integral Calculus*36-202 Statistical MethodsLanguage Course or Gen EdIRP Elective
88-104 Decision Processes in American Political Institutions**Language Course or Gen EdIRP ElectiveLanguage Course or Gen Ed
Language Course or Gen EdGen Ed or ElectiveGen Ed or ElectiveElective
99-101 Computing @ Carnegie Mellon

*If required to start with 21-111 in fall of freshman year, complete 21-112 in spring of freshman year.

**This course should be taken as the first course in the International Relations and Politics major sequence. It is intended for students in their first or second years.

 

JuniorSenior
FallSpringFallSpring
88-251 Empirical Research MethodsCMUWSP or STUDY ABROAD*66-501 H&SS Senior Honors Thesis I**66-502 H&SS Senior Honors Thesis II**
IRP ElectiveIRP Elective88-450 IRP Capstone Policy ForumElective
Language Course or ElectiveElectiveIRP ElectiveElective
ElectiveElectiveElectiveElective
ElectiveElectiveElectiveElective
ElectiveElective


*All students are strongly encouraged to participate in the CMUWSP  and/or in a study abroad program.  Spring semester of the junior year is a popular semester to study off-campus. However, International Relations and Politics majors may instead choose to participate in the CMUWSP or study abroad in spring of sophomore year, fall of junior year, or fall of senior year. Students should consult the academic advisor when planning their curricular program.

**Students are not required to complete a college honors thesis. However, many International Relations and Politics majors choose to apply for the senior honors thesis program. Students who do not pursue a senior honors thesis should select an elective in its place.

 

Additional Major

Students who elect International Relations and Politics as an additional major must fulfill all of the requirements of the International Relations and Politics major.

Students pursuing Decision Science or Policy and Management with an additional major in International Relations and Politics may only count 36-202, , and 88-251 toward the completion of both majors. Additional majors cannot count menu electives toward simultaneously fulfilling more than one major or minor.

 

The Major in Policy and Management

Paul Fischbeck, Director
Office: Porter Hall 208F
Connie Angermeier, Academic Advisor
Office: Porter Hall 208A
Email: cla2@andrew.cmu.edu

The Policy and Management major prepares students for key decision-making and management roles in government, non-profit organizations, and business. The major emphasizes analytic approaches to decision making and practical management skills necessary for graduates to excel in both the public and private sectors. The multidisciplinary curriculum merges frontier knowledge on both the ideals of decision making, policy, and organization, as well as the realities of individual and organizational behavior that must be confronted if high-quality outcomes are going to be attained.

The major is comprised of four clusters of courses. The Analytic Methods requirement consists of four courses that provide theoretical training and practical experience in problem solving and decision making. These courses provide systematic methods for dealing with the complexities that make decisions difficult, ranging from incorporating issues of risk and uncertainty in decision making to dealing with choices that have mutually conflicting objectives. For example, a business or government agency may need to decide on a policy for mitigating the uncertain impacts of air pollution while simultaneously trying to minimize the costs of such a policy on manufacturing. A firm might want to consider the uncertain reductions in security dangers from alternative policies to protect against terrorism. In this requirement, students will gain an appreciation of the economic analysis of complex decisions, as well as the trade-off between economic and political-based decision making.

The Organizational Context requirement is a course that emphasizes the analysis of how people organize and coordinate their behavior to perform complex tasks that are beyond the capability of any single individual. The course uses a multidisciplinary approach to analyze the potential shortcomings of large organizations, such as inertia, group-think, coordination failure, and bureaucratic infighting.

The Research Methods requirement is comprised of two courses focused on key methods for collecting and analyzing data that are needed to make informed decisions. Students learn to use interviews, surveys, experiments, and econometric methods to enhance their ability to test existing, and design new, policies.

Finally, the Electives requirement consists of five courses chosen by the student, in coordination with the Academic Advisor, to add depth and breadth to the major. These courses are chosen from five categories that emphasize different aspects of decision making and management: (1) policy making, (2) management, (3) technology and information, (4) international policy, and (5) political science and law. The selected courses may be from one category or from any combination of categories.

The Policy and Management major provides an excellent combination of theoretical and practical skills for students who intend to seek managerial positions. Because of its strong analytic orientation, it is also an excellent major for those who intend to go on to professional school programs in law, business, or public policy. It is also an appropriate choice for students pursuing graduate degrees in economics, political science, or decision science. One such graduate option is the accelerated masters program offered by the H. J. Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management, in which a student earns both a B.S. in Policy and Management and a M.S. in Public Policy and Management in five years.

Prerequisites

All Policy and Management majors must complete mathematics and statistics prerequisites (see below), by the end of the sophomore year.

Mathematics Prerequisites Units
21-111-21-112Calculus I-II10-20
or 21-120 Differential and Integral Calculus
21-122Integration, Differential Equations and Approximation10
or 21-256 Multivariate Analysis

 Students who successfully pass the proctored Calculus Assessment on campus or who receive credit through accepted standardized exams (such as AP, IB, or Cambridge) at the 21-122 level will be required to take a more advanced 21-xxx course for this prerequisite. 21-240 or 21-256 are suggested.

Statistics Prerequisite Units
36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice9
Curriculum
Analytical Methods Units
88-220Policy Analysis I9
88-221Policy Analysis II9
88-223Decision Analysis and Decision Support Systems9
88-451Policy Analysis Senior Project12
or 88-452 Policy Analysis Senior Project
 39


Organizational Context Units
88-260Organizations9
 9


Research Methods Units
36-202Statistical Methods9
88-251Empirical Research Methods9
 18
 
45 unitsElectives

Complete at least 45 units (a minimum of five courses) from the following categories of courses. Most courses listed below are 9-unit courses, but some are less. When courses offered for less than 9 units are chosen, students should note that a minimum of 45 units is required, and should plan to take one or more additional courses as appropriate. The categories were created only to help in your selection process.  You may select courses from one category or from any combination of categories.

At least 27 units (a minimum of three courses) must be Social and Decision Sciences courses (88-xxx).

1. Policy Making Units
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
73-328Health Economics12
73-331Political Economy of Inequality and Redistribution9
73-340Labor Economics9
73-352Public Economics9
73-357Regulation: Theory and Policy9
79-305Juvenile Delinquency: Images, Realities, Public Policy, 1825-19679
79-306Delinquency, Crime, and Juvenile Justice: 1970's to the Present9
79-335Drug Use and Drug Policy9
79-338Education and Social Reform9
79-374American Environmental History: Critical Issues9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
88-352Environmental Economics and Policy9
88-365Behavioral Economics and Public Policy9
88-412Economics of Global Warming9
88-423Institutions, Entrepreneurship, and Innovation9
88-435Analysis of Uncertain Social Systems9


2. Management Units
70-321Negotiation and Conflict Resolution9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
70-430International Management9
80-241Ethical Judgments in Professional Life9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-344Management, Environment, and Ethics9
88-252Empirical Research for Social Science and Policy9
88-341Organizational Communication9
88-360Behavioral Economics9
88-363Behavioral Economics Theory9
88-367Behavior Economics in the Wild9
88-387Social Norms and Economics9
88-402Modeling Complex Social Systems9
88-403Network and Social Systems9
88-419Negotiation9


3. Technology and Information Units
19-402Telecommunications, Technology Policy & Management12
19-448Science, Technology & Ethics9
73-474The Economics of Ideas: Growth, Innovation and Intellectual Property9
79-342Introduction to Science and Technology Studies9
80-341Computers, Society and Ethics9
88-345Perspectives on Industrial Research and Development9
88-347Complex Technological Systems: Past, Present, and Future9
88-371Entrepreneurship, Regulation and Technological Change9
88-391Technology and Economic Growth9
88-413Energy and Climate: History, Science, Technology, & Policy in the US 1776-20769
88-415Global Competitiveness: Firms Nations, and Technological Change9


4. International Policy Units
79-278Rights to Representation: Indigenous People and their Media9
80-247Ethics and Global Economics9
80-447Global Justice9
88-362Diplomacy and Statecraft9
88-368Conflict, Human Rights and Development9
88-384Conflict and Conflict Resolution in International Relations9
88-408Attitudes the Media and Conflict in International Relations9
88-410The Global Economy: A User's Guide9
88-411The Rise of the Asian Economies9
88-412Economics of Global Warming9
88-414International and Subnational Security9


5. Political Science and Law Units
70-364Business Law9
70-365International Trade and International Law9
73-408Law and Economics9
79-334Law, Ethics, and the Life Sciences9
80-235Political Philosophy9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
88-181Topics in Law: 1st Amendment *9
or 88-184 Topics of Law: The Bill of Rights
88-309Judicial Politics & Behavior9
88-389Terrorism and Insurgency9
88-444Public Policy and Regulation9

* only one course (either 88-181 or 88-184 ) may count toward an elective requirement in the Policy and Management major.

NOTE: Some courses have additional prerequisites.

Policy and Management, B.S. Sample Curriculum

Freshman or Sophomore YearJunior Year
SpringFallSpring
36-202 Statistical Methods88-220 Policy Analysis I88-221 Policy Analysis II
Open Prerequisite88-251 Empirical Research Methods88-223 Decision Analysis and Decision Support Systems
Open PrerequisiteElective88-260 Organizations
ElectiveElectiveElective
ElectiveElectiveElective

 

Senior Year
FallSpring
88-452 Policy Analysis Senior Project or P&M elective88-451 Policy Analysis Senior Project or P&M elective
Policy and Management ElectivePolicy and Management Elective
Policy and Management ElectivePolicy and Management Elective
ElectiveElective
ElectiveElective

This is presented as a two-year (junior-senior) plan for completing major requirements. Its purpose is to show that this program can be completed in as few as two years; not that it must be. Students may enter their major, and begin major course requirements, as early as the start of the sophomore year, and in some instances in the first year. Students should consult their advisor when planning their program. Students who are planning to study abroad or to apply for the Heinz Accelerated Masters Program will have a very different curriculum map and should consult early - and often - with the Academic Advisor.

Students are encouraged to consider the Washington Semester Program as part of their education.  Suitable courses will be considered as fulfilling requirements of electives in the major.  Please send the course syllabus, along with a note explaining how the course addresses fundamental aspects of policy in one of the five elective categories.

 

Additional Major

Students who elect Policy and Management as an additional major must fulfill all of the requirements of the Policy and Management major.

Students pursuing Decision Science with an additional major in Policy and Management may only count 36-202 , 88-220 , 88-223 , and 88-251 toward the completion of both majors.

Students pursuing International Relations and Politics with an additional major in Policy and Management may only count 36-202, 88-220, and 88-251 toward the completion of both majors.

Additional majors cannot count menu electives toward simultaneously fulfilling more than one major or minor. Students who are interested in an additional major in Policy and Management should see the Academic Advisor of the Policy and Management program.

The Minor in Policy and Management

Paul Fischbeck, Faculty Director
Office: Porter Hall 208F
Connie Angermeier, Academic Advisor
Office: Porter Hall 208A
Email: cla2@andrew.cmu.edu

Regardless of major, many Carnegie Mellon graduates will face managerial challenges and responsibilities in their professional lives. Whether these are in their area of expertise or in more general settings, these roles will to some degree require assumption of the responsibility for directing the work of others. The Policy and Management minor is intended for students who expect to need these management concepts and skills.  At most, one course may be double-counted with another major or minor.

54 unitsCurriculum
36 unitsRequired Courses
88-220Policy Analysis I9
88-221Policy Analysis II9
88-223Decision Analysis and Decision Support Systems9
88-260Organizations9
 
18 unitsElectives

Complete two courses from the following categories. At least one of the courses (9 units) must be a Social and Decision Sciences course (88-xxx).

1. Policy Making Units
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
73-328Health Economics12
73-331Political Economy of Inequality and Redistribution9
73-340Labor Economics9
73-352Public Economics9
73-357Regulation: Theory and Policy9
79-305Juvenile Delinquency: Images, Realities, Public Policy, 1825-19679
79-306Delinquency, Crime, and Juvenile Justice: 1970's to the Present9
79-338Education and Social Reform9
79-335Drug Use and Drug Policy9
79-374American Environmental History: Critical Issues9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
88-352Environmental Economics and Policy9
88-365Behavioral Economics and Public Policy9
88-412Economics of Global Warming9
88-423Institutions, Entrepreneurship, and Innovation9
88-435Analysis of Uncertain Social Systems9


2. Management Units
70-321Negotiation and Conflict Resolution9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
70-430International Management9
80-241Ethical Judgments in Professional Life9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-344Management, Environment, and Ethics9
88-252Empirical Research for Social Science and Policy9
88-341Organizational Communication9
88-360Behavioral Economics9
88-363Behavioral Economics Theory9
88-367Behavior Economics in the Wild9
88-387Social Norms and Economics9
88-402Modeling Complex Social Systems9
88-403Network and Social Systems9
88-419Negotiation9


3. Technology and Information Units
19-402Telecommunications, Technology Policy & Management12
19-448Science, Technology & Ethics9
73-474The Economics of Ideas: Growth, Innovation and Intellectual Property9
79-230Arab-Israeli Conflict and Peace Process since 19489
79-342Introduction to Science and Technology Studies9
80-341Computers, Society and Ethics9
88-345Perspectives on Industrial Research and Development9
88-347Complex Technological Systems: Past, Present, and Future9
88-371Entrepreneurship, Regulation and Technological Change9
88-391Technology and Economic Growth9
88-413Energy and Climate: History, Science, Technology, & Policy in the US 1776-20769
88-415Global Competitiveness: Firms Nations, and Technological Change9


4. International Policy Units
79-278Rights to Representation: Indigenous People and their Media9
80-247Ethics and Global Economics9
80-447Global Justice9
88-362Diplomacy and Statecraft9
88-368Conflict, Human Rights and Development9
88-384Conflict and Conflict Resolution in International Relations9
88-408Attitudes the Media and Conflict in International Relations9
88-410The Global Economy: A User's Guide9
88-411The Rise of the Asian Economies9
88-412Economics of Global Warming9
88-414International and Subnational Security9


5. Political Science and Law Units
70-364Business Law9
70-365International Trade and International Law9
73-408Law and Economics9
79-334Law, Ethics, and the Life Sciences9
80-235Political Philosophy9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
88-181Topics in Law: 1st Amendment *9
or 88-184 Topics of Law: The Bill of Rights
88-309Judicial Politics & Behavior9
88-389Terrorism and Insurgency9
88-444Public Policy and Regulation9

* only one course (either 88-181 or 88-184 ) may count toward an elective requirement in the Policy and Management minor.

NOTE: Some courses have additional prerequisites.

 

Washington Semester Program

Kiron Skinner, Faculty Director; kskinner@andrew.cmu.edu
Emily Half, Academic Program Manager; ehalf@andrew.cmu.edu; 412-268-7082, Baker Hall A60C

http://www.cmu.edu/ir/washington-semester-program/index.html

 

From embassy headquarters to nongovernmental organizations, think tanks to advocacy organizations, and consulting firms to media outlets, Washington, DC, is a focal point for many international and public policy activities.

Undergraduates from any course of study who would value firsthand policy experience are invited to apply to Carnegie Mellon University's Washington Semester Program, sponsored by the university's Center for International Relations and Politics. In this semester-long program, students live, work, and study in Washington, DC, coming into direct contact with political, business, and community leaders and learning about the most pressing policy issues of the day.

Students earn 45 units for the Washington Semester Program, interning three days per week in any sector or field of interest within Washington, DC, while taking classes two days per week and in the evenings. The Center for International Relations and Politics sponsors events and a policy forum in Washington for students participating in the program to further enrich their experience and enhance their understanding of how Washington functions as a hub of international and public policy decision making.

Students should contact the academic program manager for more information or to discuss how the CMUWSP may fit into their curriculum.


Faculty

LINDA BABCOCK, James Mellon Walton Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.SAURABH BHARGAVA, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.SERGUEY BRAGUINSKY, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Keio University, Japan; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.LEE BRANSTETTER, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.STEPHEN BROOMELL, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.MINA CIKARA, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.JULIE DOWNS, Associate Research Professor – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.PAUL S. FISCHBECK, Professor of Social and Decision Sciences and Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.BARUCH FISCHHOFF, Howard Heinz University Professor of Social and Decision Sciences and of Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.CHRISTINA FONG, Senior Research Scientist – Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.RUSSELL GOLMAN, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., The University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.CLEOTILDE GONZALEZ, Associate Research Professor of Information and Decision Sciences – Ph.D., Texas Tech University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.DAVID A. HOUNSHELL, David M. Roderick Professor of Technology and Social Change – Ph.D., University of Delaware; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.KARIM KASSAM, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.GEORGE F. LOEWENSTEIN, Herbert A. Simon University Professor of Economics and Psychology – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.JOHN H. MILLER, Professor of Economics and Social Science and Department Head – Ph.D., The University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.KIRON K. SKINNER, Associate Professor of International Relations and Political Science – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.ERTE XIAO, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., George Mason University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.

Faculty by Courtesy Appointment

LINDA ARGOTE, David and Barbara Kirr Professor of Organizational Behavior – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.KATHLEEN M. CARLEY, Professor of Sociology – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.DENNIS N. EPPLE, Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.JOSEPH B. KADANE, Leonard J. Savage University Professor of Statistics and Social Science – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.MARK S. KAMLET, Provost and Professor of Economics and Public Policy – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.SARAH B. KIESLER, Professor – Ph.D., The Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.DAVID M. KRACKHARDT, Professor of Organizations and Public Policy – Ph.D., University of California, Irvine; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.ROBERT E. KRAUT, Hebert A. Simon Professor of Human Computer Interaction – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.CAREY MOREWEDGE, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.JOEL TARR, Richard S. Caliguiri University Professor of History and Policy – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.

Emeritus Faculty

WILLIAM R. KEECH, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.

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Faculty

LINDA BABCOCK, James Mellon Walton Professor of Economics – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.SAURABH BHARGAVA, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.SERGUEY BRAGUINSKY, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Keio University, Japan; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.LEE BRANSTETTER, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.STEPHEN BROOMELL, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.MINA CIKARA, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.JULIE DOWNS, Associate Research Professor – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.PAUL S. FISCHBECK, Professor of Social and Decision Sciences and Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.BARUCH FISCHHOFF, Howard Heinz University Professor of Social and Decision Sciences and of Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.CHRISTINA FONG, Senior Research Scientist – Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.RUSSELL GOLMAN, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., The University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.CLEOTILDE GONZALEZ, Associate Research Professor of Information and Decision Sciences – Ph.D., Texas Tech University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.DAVID A. HOUNSHELL, David M. Roderick Professor of Technology and Social Change – Ph.D., University of Delaware; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.KARIM KASSAM, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.GEORGE F. LOEWENSTEIN, Herbert A. Simon University Professor of Economics and Psychology – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.JOHN H. MILLER, Professor of Economics and Social Science and Department Head – Ph.D., The University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.KIRON K. SKINNER, Associate Professor of International Relations and Political Science – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.ERTE XIAO, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., George Mason University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.

Faculty by Courtesy Appointment

LINDA ARGOTE, David and Barbara Kirr Professor of Organizational Behavior – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.KATHLEEN M. CARLEY, Professor of Sociology – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.DENNIS N. EPPLE, Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.JOSEPH B. KADANE, Leonard J. Savage University Professor of Statistics and Social Science – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.MARK S. KAMLET, Provost and Professor of Economics and Public Policy – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.SARAH B. KIESLER, Professor – Ph.D., The Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.DAVID M. KRACKHARDT, Professor of Organizations and Public Policy – Ph.D., University of California, Irvine; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.ROBERT E. KRAUT, Hebert A. Simon Professor of Human Computer Interaction – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.CAREY MOREWEDGE, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.JOEL TARR, Richard S. Caliguiri University Professor of History and Policy – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.

Emeritus Faculty

WILLIAM R. KEECH, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.