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Department of Social and Decision Sciences

Department Office: Porter Hall 208
http://www.cmu.edu/dietrich/sds/

The Department of Social and Decision Sciences is a multidisciplinary department that offers undergraduate programs that seamlessly combine frontier knowledge in the social sciences with the practical skills needed to excel in key decision making roles in the public, private, and non-profit sectors and in advanced graduate studies. Our students learn how to combine intellectual ideals with the realities of human and organizational behavior and to apply these lessons across a wide variety of endeavors, ranging from government service to leadership positions in the information economy.

The department offers undergraduate majors in Decision Science and in Policy and Management. The core courses leverage our strength in decision analysis, empirical research, organizations, and policy analysis. In addition to completing this core, students also specialize in their major area through a set of required and elective courses.

Our faculty is committed to the academic success and growth of our students and many of our undergraduates work with faculty on research projects and internships. The directors of the majors are easily accessible and encourage students to talk with them about their curriculum, progress, and available opportunities.

The Department of Social and Decision Sciences has a long history of creating innovative and prescient undergraduate programs that combine key ideas from across the social sciences into cohesive majors that allow our graduates to excel in their chosen professions or in the pursuit of advanced studies. Our emphasis on the theory and practice of individual and social decision making linked with our high-quality, multidisciplinary social science faculty, provides a solid foundation from which graduates can embrace a variety of future paths.

The Major in Decision Science

Baruch Fischhoff, Faculty Director
Office: Porter Hall 219E
Connie Angermeier, Academic Advisor
Office: Porter Hall 208A
Email: cla2@andrew.cmu.edu

The interdisciplinary field of Decision Science seeks to understand and improve the judgment and decision making of individuals, groups, and organizations. Qualified graduates can continue to PhD programs in Decision Science or related fields (e.g., psychology, business), pursue professional degrees (e.g., MBA, MD, JD, MPH), or take professional positions in business, government, consulting, or the non-profit sector. Students work with faculty and the Academic Advisor to tailor their education to their personal needs and interest.

Carnegie Mellon is one of the leading centers for the study of Decision Science - and offers the only undergraduate major that integrates analytical and behavioral approaches to decision making.  Our faculty are involved in applying Decision Science in a wide variety of areas, allowing them to share practical experiences with students. These applications include medical decision making (e.g., conveying the costs and benefits of treatment options), legal decision making (e.g., reducing the effects of hindsight bias on attributions of responsibility for accidents), risk management (e.g., assessing and communicating the risks of climate change), marketing (e.g., understanding the effects of inter-temporal choice on purchasing decisions), and business (e.g., identifying unrecognized conflicts of interest).

Decision Science is grounded in theories and methods drawn from psychology, economics, philosophy, statistics, and management science. Courses in the major cover the three aspects of decision science: (a) normative analysis, creating formal models of choice; (b) descriptive research, studying how cognitive, emotional, social, and institutional factors affect judgment and choice, and (c) prescriptive interventions, seeking to improve judgment and decision making. In addition to gaining a broad education in the principles of judgment and decision making, Decision Science majors gain broadly applicable skills in research design and analysis. They also have the chance to think about and discuss decision making in many different areas.

The core courses present fundamental theories and results from the study of decision making, along with their application to real-world problems. They introduce students to methods for collecting and analyzing behavioral data. For example, students learn to conduct surveys (e.g., uncovering consumer or managerial preferences), design experiments (e.g., evaluating theories, comparing ways of presenting information), and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions.

The elective courses provide students with additional knowledge in areas of decision making that meet their personal, intellectual, and career goals. These courses are organized into six clusters: biological and behavioral aspects of decision making, managerial and organizational aspects, philosophical and ethical perspectives, economic and statistical methods, public policy, and research methods. Students can concentrate in one area or spread their studies across them. In addition to coursework, the department offers research opportunities for interested and qualified students. Participating in research helps students to extend their mastery of decision science, discover whether a research career is right for them, and get to know faculty and graduate students better.

Prerequisites

All Decision Science majors must complete mathematics, statistics, and analytic methods prerequisites (see below), by the end of the sophomore year.

Mathematics Prerequisite Units
21-111-21-112Calculus I-II10-20
or 21-120 Differential and Integral Calculus

Students who successfully pass the proctored Calculus Assessment on campus or who receive credit through accepted standardized exams (such as AP, IB, or Cambridge) at the 21-120 or 21-122 levels will be required to take a more advanced 21-xxx course for this prerequisite. 21-122, 21-240, or 21-256 are suggested.

Statistics Prerequisite Units
36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice9

Students must take one course from the following set (or an approved alternative).  Students may not count a course used to fulfill the Mathematics Prerequisite as also filling the Analytic Methods Prerequisite.

Analytic Methods Prerequisite Units
21-122Integration and Approximation10
21-256Multivariate Analysis9
21-257Models and Methods for Optimization9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences9
36-401Modern Regression9
36-410Introduction to Probability Modeling9
80-211Logic and Mathematical Inquiry9
80-212Arguments and Logical Analysis9
88-252Causal Inference in the Field: Using Data to Study Crime, Love, Sports & More9
Curriculum

The core curriculum in Decision Science consists of two courses in empirical research methods and five courses providing the theoretical perspectives of Decision Science.

Theoretical Perspectives Units
88-120Reason, Passion and Cognition **9
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
88-220Policy Analysis I9
88-223Decision Analysis and Decision Support Systems9
88-302Behavioral Decision Making9
 45

** 88-120 should be taken in the freshman or sophomore year.

Research Methods Units
36-202Statistical Methods9
88-251Empirical Research Methods9
 18
Electives
45 units

Complete at least 45 units of courses from the following categories. The selected courses may be from one category or from any combination.  Note that not all elective courses are offered every year.

At least three of these courses (27 units) must be Department of Social and Decision Sciences courses (88-xxx).

1. Biological and Behavioral Aspects of Decision Making Units
85-352Evolutionary Psychology9
85-377Attitudes and Persuasion9
85-442Health Psychology9
88-342The Neuroscience of Decision Making9
88-360Behavioral Economics9
88-365Behavioral Economics and Public Policy9
88-388Psychological Models of Decision Making9
2. Managerial and Organization Aspects of Decision Making
70-311Organizational Behavior *9
70-381Marketing I9
70-460Mathematical Models for Consulting9
88-221Policy Analysis II9
88-260Organizations *9
88-419Negotiation9
88-444Public Policy and Regulation9
88-451Policy Analysis Senior Project12
or 88-452 Policy Analysis Senior Project

* Only one course (either 70-311 or 88-260) may count toward an elective requirement in the Decision Science major.

3. Philosophical and Ethical Perspectives on Decision Making Units
19-426Environmental Decision Making9
80-208Critical Thinking9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-305Rational Choice9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
4. Economic and Statistical Methods for Decision Science Units
70-460Mathematical Models for Consulting9
73-347Game Theory for Economists9
80-337Philosophy, Politics & Economics9
80-405Game Theory *9
88-316Game Theory *9
88-360Behavioral Economics9
88-367Behavioral Economics in the Wild9

80-405 and 88-316 are different courses and are not cross-listed.

5. Decision Science and Public Policy
84-393Legislative Decision Making: U.S. Congress9
88-221Policy Analysis II9
88-365Behavioral Economics and Public Policy9
88-405Risk Perception and Communication9
88-412Energy, Climate Change, and Economic Growth in the 21st Century9
88-444Public Policy and Regulation9
88-451Policy Analysis Senior Project12
or 88-452 Policy Analysis Senior Project
6. Research Methods for Decision Science Units
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
70-460Mathematical Models for Consulting9
88-252Causal Inference in the Field: Using Data to Study Crime, Love, Sports & More9
88-388Psychological Models of Decision Making9
88-402Modeling Complex Social Systems9
88-435Decision Science and Policy9

Note: Some courses have additional prerequisites.

Decision Science, B.S. Sample Curriculum
Freshman or Sophomore YearJunior
FallSpringFallSpring
88-120 Reason, Passion and Cognition36-202 Statistical Methods88-220 Policy Analysis I88-223 Decision Analysis and Decision Support Systems
General Education course85-211 Cognitive Psychology88-251 Empirical Research MethodsDecision Science Elective
General Education coursePrerequisite88-302 Behavioral Decision MakingElective
General Education courseGeneral Education courseElectiveElective
General Education courseGeneral Education courseElective

Senior
FallSpring
Decision Science ElectiveDecision Science Elective
Decision Science ElectiveDecision Science Elective
Elective or Honors ThesisElective or Honors Thesis
ElectiveElective
ElectiveElective

This is presented as a recommended plan for completing major requirements. The major can be completed in as few as two years (not that it must be), but students may not have time for other opportunities such as additional majors or study abroad. Students may declare their major as early as after spring break in the freshman year. Students who are planning to study abroad or to apply for the Heinz Accelerated Masters Program may have a very different curriculum map and should consult early – and often – with the Decision Science Academic Advisor.

Students are encouraged to consider the Washington Semester Program as part of their education. Suitable courses will be considered as fulfilling requirements of electives in the major. Please send the course syllabus, along with a note explaining how the course addresses fundamental aspects of decision science in one of the six elective categories.

88-120 should be taken as the first course in the Decision Science sequence. It is intended for students in their first or second year; it is offered in Fall semesters. It may be taken as late as the junior year.

Additional Major in Decision Science

Students who elect Decision Science as an additional major must fulfill all of the requirements of the Decision Science major.

Students pursuing Policy and Management with an additional major in Decision Science and may only count 36-202, 88-220, 88-223, and 88-251 toward the completion of both majors.

Additional majors cannot count menu electives toward simultaneously fulfilling more than one major or minor. Students who are interested in an additional major in Decision Science should see the Academic Advisor of the Decision Science program.

The Major in Policy and Management

Paul Fischbeck, Director
Office: Porter Hall 208F
Connie Angermeier, Academic Advisor
Office: Porter Hall 208A
Email: cla2@andrew.cmu.edu

The Policy and Management major prepares students for key decision-making and management roles in government, non-profit organizations, and business. The major emphasizes analytic approaches to decision making and practical management skills necessary for graduates to excel in both the public and private sectors. The multidisciplinary curriculum merges frontier knowledge on both the ideals of decision making, policy, and organization, as well as the realities of individual and organizational behavior that must be confronted if high-quality outcomes are going to be attained.

The major is comprised of four clusters of courses. The Analytic Methods requirement consists of four courses that provide theoretical training and practical experience in problem solving and decision making. These courses provide systematic methods for dealing with the complexities that make decisions difficult, ranging from incorporating issues of risk and uncertainty in decision making to dealing with choices that have mutually conflicting objectives. For example, a business or government agency may need to decide on a policy for mitigating the uncertain impacts of air pollution while simultaneously trying to minimize the costs of such a policy on manufacturing. A firm might want to consider the uncertain reductions in security dangers from alternative policies to protect against terrorism. In this requirement, students will gain an appreciation of the economic analysis of complex decisions, as well as the trade-off between economic and political-based decision making.

The Organizational Context requirement is a course that emphasizes the analysis of how people organize and coordinate their behavior to perform complex tasks that are beyond the capability of any single individual. The course uses a multidisciplinary approach to analyze the potential shortcomings of large organizations, such as inertia, group-think, coordination failure, and bureaucratic infighting.

The Research Methods requirement is comprised of two courses focused on key methods for collecting and analyzing data that are needed to make informed decisions. Students learn to use interviews, surveys, experiments, and econometric methods to enhance their ability to test existing, and design new, policies.

Finally, the Electives requirement consists of five courses chosen by the student, in coordination with the Academic Advisor, to add depth and breadth to the major. These courses are chosen from five categories that emphasize different aspects of decision making and management: (1) policy making, (2) management, (3) technology and information, (4) international policy, and (5) political science and law. The selected courses may be from one category or from any combination of categories.

The Policy and Management major provides an excellent combination of theoretical and practical skills for students who intend to seek managerial positions. Because of its strong analytic orientation, it is also an excellent major for those who intend to go on to professional school programs in law, business, or public policy. It is also an appropriate choice for students pursuing graduate degrees in economics, political science, or decision science. One such graduate option is the accelerated masters program offered by the H. J. Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management, in which a student earns both a B.S. in Policy and Management and a M.S. in Public Policy and Management in five years.

Prerequisites

All Policy and Management majors must complete mathematics and statistics prerequisites (see below), by the end of the sophomore year.

Mathematics Prerequisites Units
21-111-21-112Calculus I-II10-20
or 21-120 Differential and Integral Calculus
21-122Integration and Approximation10
or 21-256 Multivariate Analysis

 Students who successfully pass the proctored Calculus Assessment on campus or who receive credit through accepted standardized exams (such as AP, IB, or Cambridge) at the 21-122 level will be required to take a more advanced 21-xxx course for this prerequisite. 21-240 or 21-256 are suggested.

Statistics Prerequisite Units
36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice9
Curriculum
Analytical Methods Units
88-220Policy Analysis I9
88-221Policy Analysis II9
88-223Decision Analysis and Decision Support Systems9
88-451Policy Analysis Senior Project12
or 88-452 Policy Analysis Senior Project
 39
Organizational Context Units
88-260Organizations9
 9
Research Methods Units
36-202Statistical Methods9
88-251Empirical Research Methods9
 18

Electives

45 units

Complete at least 45 units (a minimum of five courses) from the following categories of courses. Most courses listed below are 9-unit courses, but some are less. When courses offered for less than 9 units are chosen, students should note that a minimum of 45 units is required, and should plan to take one or more additional courses as appropriate. The categories were created only to help in your selection process.  You may select courses from one category or from any combination of categories.

At least 27 units (a minimum of three courses) must be Social and Decision Sciences courses (88-xxx).

1. Policy Making Units
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
73-328Health Economics12
73-331Political Economy of Inequality and Redistribution9
73-352Public Economics9
79-374American Environmental History: Critical Issues9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
88-352Environmental Economics and Policy9
88-365Behavioral Economics and Public Policy9
88-412Energy, Climate Change, and Economic Growth in the 21st Century9
88-423Institutions, Entrepreneurship, and Innovation9
88-432International Policy Decision Modeling Workshop9
88-435Decision Science and Policy9
2. Management Units
70-321Negotiation and Conflict Resolution9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
70-430International Management9
80-241Ethical Judgments in Professional Life9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-344Management, Environment, and Ethics9
88-252Causal Inference in the Field: Using Data to Study Crime, Love, Sports & More9
88-341Organizational Communication9
88-360Behavioral Economics9
88-363Behavioral Economics Theory9
88-367Behavioral Economics in the Wild9
88-387Social Norms and Economics9
88-402Modeling Complex Social Systems9
88-403Network and Social Systems9
88-419Negotiation9
3. Technology and Information Units
19-402Telecommunications Technology, Policy & Management12
19-448Science, Technology & Ethics9
73-474The Economics of Ideas: Growth, Innovation and Intellectual Property9
79-342Introduction to Science and Technology Studies9
80-341Computers, Society and Ethics9
88-345Perspectives on Industrial Research and Development9
88-347Complex Technological Systems: Past, Present, and Future9
88-371Entrepreneurship, Regulation and Technological Change9
88-391Technology and Economic Growth9
88-413Energy and Climate: History, Science, Technology, & Policy in the US 1776-20769
88-415Global Competitiveness: Firms Nations, and Technological Change9
4. International Policy Units
79-278Rights to Representation: Indigenous People and their Media9
80-247Ethics and Global Economics9
80-447Global Justice9
84-362Diplomacy and Statecraft9
84-389Terrorism and Insurgency9
84-414International and Subnational Security9
88-384Conflict and Conflict Resolution in International Relations9
88-410The Global Economy: A User's Guide9
88-411Rise of the Asian Economies9
88-412Energy, Climate Change, and Economic Growth in the 21st Century9
88-432International Policy Decision Modeling Workshop9
5. Political Science and Law Units
70-364Business Law9
70-365International Trade and International Law9
73-408Law and Economics9
80-235Political Philosophy9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
84-393Legislative Decision Making: U.S. Congress9
84-402Judicial Politics and Behavior9
88-281Topics in Law: 1st Amendment *9
or 88-284 Topics of Law: The Bill of Rights
88-444Public Policy and Regulation9

* only one course (either 88-281 or 88-284) may count toward an elective requirement in the Policy and Management major.

NOTE: Some courses have additional prerequisites.

Policy and Management, B.S. Sample Curriculum
Freshman or Sophomore YearJunior Year
SpringFallSpring
36-202 Statistical Methods88-220 Policy Analysis I88-221 Policy Analysis II
Open Prerequisite88-251 Empirical Research Methods88-223 Decision Analysis and Decision Support Systems
Open PrerequisiteElective88-260 Organizations
ElectiveElectiveElective
ElectiveElectiveElective
Senior Year
FallSpring
88-452 Policy Analysis Senior Project or P&M elective88-451 Policy Analysis Senior Project or P&M elective
Policy and Management ElectivePolicy and Management Elective
Policy and Management ElectivePolicy and Management Elective
ElectiveElective
ElectiveElective

This is presented as a two-year (junior-senior) plan for completing major requirements. Its purpose is to show that this program can be completed in as few as two years; not that it must be. Students may declare their major as early as after spring break of the first year. Students who are planning to study abroad or to apply for the Heinz Accelerated Masters Program may have a very different curriculum map and should consult early - and often - with the Academic Advisor.

Students are encouraged to consider the Washington Semester Program as part of their education. Suitable courses will be considered as fulfilling requirements of electives in the major.  Please discuss course selections with the Academic Advisor after acceptance to the program. 

Additional Major

Students who elect Policy and Management as an additional major must fulfill all of the requirements of the Policy and Management major.

Students pursuing Decision Science with an additional major in Policy and Management may only count 36-202 , 88-220 , 88-223 , and 88-251 toward the completion of both majors.

Additional majors cannot count menu electives toward simultaneously fulfilling more than one major or minor. Students who are interested in an additional major in Policy and Management should see the Academic Advisor of the Policy and Management program.

The Minor in Policy and Management

Paul Fischbeck, Faculty Director
Office: Porter Hall 208F
Connie Angermeier, Academic Advisor
Office: Porter Hall 208A
Email: cla2@andrew.cmu.edu

Regardless of major, many Carnegie Mellon graduates will face managerial challenges and responsibilities in their professional lives. Whether these are in their area of expertise or in more general settings, these roles will to some degree require assumption of the responsibility for directing the work of others. The Policy and Management minor is intended for students who expect to need these management concepts and skills.  At most, one course may be double-counted with another major or minor.

Curriculum
54 units
36 unitsRequired Courses
88-220Policy Analysis I9
88-221Policy Analysis II9
88-223Decision Analysis and Decision Support Systems9
88-260Organizations9
18 unitsElectives

Complete two courses from the following categories. At least one of the courses (9 units) must be a Social and Decision Sciences course (88-xxx).

1. Policy Making Units
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
73-328Health Economics12
73-331Political Economy of Inequality and Redistribution9
73-352Public Economics9
79-374American Environmental History: Critical Issues9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
88-352Environmental Economics and Policy9
88-365Behavioral Economics and Public Policy9
88-412Energy, Climate Change, and Economic Growth in the 21st Century9
88-423Institutions, Entrepreneurship, and Innovation9
88-432International Policy Decision Modeling Workshop9
88-435Decision Science and Policy9
2. Management Units
70-321Negotiation and Conflict Resolution9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
70-430International Management9
80-241Ethical Judgments in Professional Life9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-344Management, Environment, and Ethics9
88-252Causal Inference in the Field: Using Data to Study Crime, Love, Sports & More9
88-341Organizational Communication9
88-360Behavioral Economics9
88-363Behavioral Economics Theory9
88-367Behavioral Economics in the Wild9
88-387Social Norms and Economics9
88-402Modeling Complex Social Systems9
88-403Network and Social Systems9
88-419Negotiation9
3. Technology and Information Units
19-402Telecommunications Technology, Policy & Management12
19-448Science, Technology & Ethics9
73-474The Economics of Ideas: Growth, Innovation and Intellectual Property9
79-230Arab-Israeli Conflict and Peace Process since 19489
79-342Introduction to Science and Technology Studies9
80-341Computers, Society and Ethics9
88-345Perspectives on Industrial Research and Development9
88-347Complex Technological Systems: Past, Present, and Future9
88-371Entrepreneurship, Regulation and Technological Change9
88-391Technology and Economic Growth9
88-413Energy and Climate: History, Science, Technology, & Policy in the US 1776-20769
88-415Global Competitiveness: Firms Nations, and Technological Change9
4. International Policy Units
79-278Rights to Representation: Indigenous People and their Media9
80-247Ethics and Global Economics9
80-447Global Justice9
84-389Terrorism and Insurgency9
84-414International and Subnational Security9
88-384Conflict and Conflict Resolution in International Relations9
88-410The Global Economy: A User's Guide9
88-411Rise of the Asian Economies9
88-412Energy, Climate Change, and Economic Growth in the 21st Century9
88-432International Policy Decision Modeling Workshop9
5. Political Science and Law Units
70-364Business Law9
70-365International Trade and International Law9
73-408Law and Economics9
80-235Political Philosophy9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
84-393Legislative Decision Making: U.S. Congress9
84-402Judicial Politics and Behavior9
88-281Topics in Law: 1st Amendment *9
or 88-284 Topics of Law: The Bill of Rights
88-444Public Policy and Regulation9

* only one course (either 88-281 or 88-284 ) may count toward an elective requirement in the Policy and Management minor.

NOTE: Some courses have additional prerequisites.

Faculty

LINDA BABCOCK, James Mellon Walton Professor of Economics and Department Head – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.SAURABH BHARGAVA, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.SERGUEY BRAGUINSKY, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Keio University, Japan; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.LEE BRANSTETTER, Professor – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.STEPHEN BROOMELL, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.JULIE DOWNS, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.PAUL S. FISCHBECK, Professor of Social and Decision Sciences and Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.BARUCH FISCHHOFF, Howard Heinz University Professor of Social and Decision Sciences and of Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.CHRISTINA FONG, Senior Research Scientist – Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.RUSSELL GOLMAN, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., The University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.CLEOTILDE GONZALEZ, Research Professor of Information and Decision Sciences – Ph.D., Texas Tech University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.DAVID A. HOUNSHELL, David M. Roderick Professor of Technology and Social Change – Ph.D., University of Delaware; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.ALEX IMAS, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.MARK S. KAMLET, University Professor of Economics and Public Policy and Provost Emeritus – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.GEORGE F. LOEWENSTEIN, Herbert A. Simon University Professor of Economics and Psychology – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.JOHN H. MILLER, Professor of Economics and Social Science – Ph.D., The University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.

Faculty by Courtesy Appointment

LINDA ARGOTE, David and Barbara Kirr Professor of Organizational Behavior – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.KATHLEEN M. CARLEY, Professor of Sociology – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.DENNIS N. EPPLE, Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.JEFFREY GALAK, Associate Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., New York University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.JOSEPH B. KADANE, Leonard J. Savage University Professor of Statistics and Social Science – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.SARAH B. KIESLER, Professor – Ph.D., The Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.DAVID M. KRACKHARDT, Professor of Organizations and Public Policy – Ph.D., University of California, Irvine; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.ROBERT E. KRAUT, Hebert A. Simon Professor of Human Computer Interaction – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.KIRON K. SKINNER, Associate Professor of International Relations and Political Science – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.JOEL TARR, Richard S. Caliguiri University Professor of History and Policy – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.

Emeritus Faculty

WILLIAM R. KEECH, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.

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Faculty

LINDA BABCOCK, James Mellon Walton Professor of Economics and Department Head – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.SAURABH BHARGAVA, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.SERGUEY BRAGUINSKY, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Keio University, Japan; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.LEE BRANSTETTER, Professor – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.STEPHEN BROOMELL, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.JULIE DOWNS, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.PAUL S. FISCHBECK, Professor of Social and Decision Sciences and Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.BARUCH FISCHHOFF, Howard Heinz University Professor of Social and Decision Sciences and of Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.CHRISTINA FONG, Senior Research Scientist – Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.RUSSELL GOLMAN, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., The University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.CLEOTILDE GONZALEZ, Research Professor of Information and Decision Sciences – Ph.D., Texas Tech University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.DAVID A. HOUNSHELL, David M. Roderick Professor of Technology and Social Change – Ph.D., University of Delaware; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.ALEX IMAS, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.MARK S. KAMLET, University Professor of Economics and Public Policy and Provost Emeritus – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.GEORGE F. LOEWENSTEIN, Herbert A. Simon University Professor of Economics and Psychology – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.JOHN H. MILLER, Professor of Economics and Social Science – Ph.D., The University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.

Faculty by Courtesy Appointment

LINDA ARGOTE, David and Barbara Kirr Professor of Organizational Behavior – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.KATHLEEN M. CARLEY, Professor of Sociology – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.DENNIS N. EPPLE, Professor of Economics – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.JEFFREY GALAK, Associate Professor of Marketing – Ph.D., New York University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.JOSEPH B. KADANE, Leonard J. Savage University Professor of Statistics and Social Science – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.SARAH B. KIESLER, Professor – Ph.D., The Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.DAVID M. KRACKHARDT, Professor of Organizations and Public Policy – Ph.D., University of California, Irvine; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.ROBERT E. KRAUT, Hebert A. Simon Professor of Human Computer Interaction – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.KIRON K. SKINNER, Associate Professor of International Relations and Political Science – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.JOEL TARR, Richard S. Caliguiri University Professor of History and Policy – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.

Emeritus Faculty

WILLIAM R. KEECH, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.