Michael Tarr, Department Head

Erik Thiessen, Director of Undergraduate Education in Psychology
Baker Hall 342D

Emilie O'Leary, Undergraduate Coordinator
Baker Hall 339, emilier@andrew.cmu.edu
http://www.cmu.edu/dietrich/psychology/index.html

Can newborn infants perceive the world as we do, or is it just "a blooming buzzing confusion"? Do personality, beliefs and social factors influence health? How do scientists and young children make discoveries, and what abilities make these insights possible? How does brain activity reveal differences in thinking? Can computers think the way people do?

These are some of the questions that psychologists at Carnegie Mellon are trying to answer.

For the student who is majoring in Psychology, Cognitive Science or Neuroscience, studying with faculty who are on the leading edge of research on questions like the above can be a very exciting experience.

The Psychology Department at Carnegie Mellon has long been noted as one of the pioneering Psychology Departments in the world, particularly in such areas as cognitive psychology, cognitive science, social psychology, developmental psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and health psychology. The Psychology Department offers 5 majors: B.A. and B.S. degrees in Psychology, as well as a B.S. degree in Cognitive Science and together with the Department of Biological Sciences, a unified B.S. double major in Psychology and Biological Sciences, and an Intercollege major in Neuroscience.

The Major in Psychology

Psychology is a discipline that embraces both biological and social sciences. It is a science concerned with establishing principles and laws regarding the ways in which people think and behave through the scientific study of human behavior.

The orientation of the Carnegie Mellon Psychology curriculum is toward developing highly skilled and knowledgeable graduates. About half of our graduates go on to graduate or professional school. The remainder seek to expand their problem-oriented analytic skills to qualify themselves for job opportunities beyond those typically open to liberal arts students.

Majors in the department are expected not only to learn about findings already established by psychologists, but also to become proficient in the investigation and analysis of behavior. This includes observing behavior, formulating hypotheses, designing experiments to test these hypotheses, running experiments, performing statistical analysis, and writing reports. The department has many resources for students to use in acquiring these skills. For instance, students interested in child development may be involved in the child development laboratory and observational facilities which are a part of the Carnegie Mellon Children's School which operates under the department's aegis. Students interested in health or clinical psychology might have opportunities to do internships in applied settings, and all Psychology majors have access to extensive computer facilities for data analysis and simulation work. The department also has a state of the art set of undergraduate research laboratories and computer clusters, and through the Scientific Imaging & Brain Research Center, a magnet  is in use for conducting brain imaging studies using fMRI.

In addition to formal class work, students are encouraged to participate in elective research projects where they may register and receive credit for freshmen research experience course, 85-506 Readings in Psychology, Fall research experience in 85-507 Research in Psychology or Spring research experience in 85-508 Research in Psychology.  In the research in psychology course, the student may work on an ongoing research projects or develop and carry out a new research project with a faculty member. There is university and departmental funding available to help support student-initiated research projects and student travel to present research results at scientific meetings and conferences. In the Readings courses, the student reads extensively on a particular topic. The faculty member and student meet to discuss the readings, and the student writes a paper on the topic selected. The Psychology Department Website, provides descriptions of faculty research interests that the student can use in determining who should be approached to supervise a particular research or reading project.  

Students interested in gaining field work experience via a number of internship opportunities available to them can recieve credit through 85-482 Internship in Psychology,  85-480 Internship in Clinical Psychology or 85-484 Practicum in Child Development.  Clinical internships are available with a variety of clinical settings including the prestigious Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic (the teaching hospital of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh Medical School). During the internship, students get first-hand experience with different clinical populations. Developmental Practicum experience is available in the department-run CMU Children's School.  

Psychology Curriculum

Mathematics19-20 units
21-111-21-112Differential Calculus - Integral Calculus20
or 
21-120-21-122Differential and Integral Calculus - Integration and Approximation *20
or
21-120-21-256Differential and Integral Calculus - Multivariate Analysis19

*Students who place out of 21-120 with AP credit are only required to successfully complete 21-122 or 21-256 instead of the full two semester sequence.  

*21-124 may be substituted for 21-122 for those interested in Neuroscience or Biology.  

Statistics Sequence18 units
36-200Reasoning with Data9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral & Social Sciences *9

*In certain circumstances, 36-202 can be a substitute for 36-309 with prior approval. 

Breadth Requirement36 units
85-102Introduction to Psychology *9
Survey Courses - Complete Three
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-213 Human Information Processing and Artifical Intelligence
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-221Principles of Child Development9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-251Personality9

* A fourth survey course can be taken in place of Introduction to Psychology 

Research Methods*18 units
Complete two courses.
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
85-314Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods9
85-320Research Methods in Developmental Psychology9
85-330Analytic Research Methods9
85-340Research Methods in Social Psychology9

* Prerequisites for all Research Methods courses:  36-309 or equivalent, and corresponding survey course.

Advanced Courses18 units

Advanced psychology courses exist within four areas (cognitive, cognitive neuroscience, developmental, social and health psychology.) Any advanced content course or seminar in psychology or any psychology course higher than 85-350. Exceptions for the advanced course requirement are: 85-480, 85-482, 85-484, 85-506, 85-507, 85-508, 85-601, 85-602, 66-501, 66-502.

Computer Science Requirement10 units
15-110Principles of Computing10
Natural Science Requirement (B.A. 18 units, B.S. 36 units, both of which include 9 units of GenEd Science)

The Psychology major requires (for B.S. candidates) three additional natural science courses (with two in the same science) beyond the College's General Education natural science requirement. For the B.A. the requirement is one course beyond the General Education requirement in natural science. 

These courses can be selected from the following areas: 

  • 03-XXX Biology*
  • 09-XXX Chemistry
  • 33-XXX Physics

* Given the growing relevance of biology to psychology, it is strongly recommended that, for the B.S., a minimum of two courses in biology be included as part of the natural science requirement.

Additional Major in Psychology

In order to complete an additional major in Psychology, a student must fulfill all of the Psychology major requirements within the department -- in other words, the breadth requirement, computing requirement, three survey courses at the 200-level, two research methods courses, and two advanced courses. These courses must include at least 81 units, plus calculus prerequisites and the 36-200 statistics course or equivalent and 36-309 . In addition, B.S. candidates must take the three-course science requirement and B.A. candidates complete one science course beyond the GenEd requirement.

Concentrations within the Psychology Major

Students who wish to focus their Psychology program on a specific area can do so either by the careful selection of Psychology elective courses focusing on their area of interest or by pursuing one of the following concentrations.  Students must obtain a concentration form from the Undergraduate Program Coordinator, Emilie O'Leary, receive approval from their psychology faculty advisor, then returning the signed copy to Emilie in Baker Hall 339.  The completion of a concentration will be recognized in the Psychology Graduation Brochure.

Health-Psychology Concentration

For Psychology majors who wish to have a focus of their study on Health Psychology, the following courses should be selected as part of their Psychology Major in conjunction with their Psychology advisor's approval.

As part of the B.S. science requirement: Units
03-121Modern Biology9
plus one additional Biology course
As part of the psychology breadth requirement:
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-241Social Psychology9
As part of the psychology Research Methods requirements:
85-340Research Methods in Social Psychology9
As part of the advanced coursework in psychology requirement, at least two of the following:
85-442Health Psychology9
85-443Social Factors and Well-Being9
85-446Psychology of Gender9
85-501Stress, Coping and Well-Being9

Cognitive-Neuroscience Concentration

For Psychology majors who wish to have a focus of their study be on Cognitive Neuroscience, the following courses should be selected as part of their Psychology Major in conjunction with their Psychology advisor's approval.

As part of the B.S. Science requirement: Units
03-121Modern Biology9
03-363Systems Neuroscience9
As part of the psychology Breadth requirement:
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
As part of the Research Methods requirement:
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
85-314Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods9
As part of the advanced coursework in psychology requirement, at least two of the following:
85-356Music and Mind: The Cognitive Neuroscience of Sound9
85-370Perception9
85-406Autism: Psychological and Neuroscience Perspectives9
85-407Neuroscience of Concepts9
85-414Cognitive Neuropsychology9
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing9
85-429Cognitive Brain Imaging9
85-435Neural and Cognitive Models of Adaptive Decisions9

Developmental Psychology Concentration

For Psychology majors who wish to have a focus of their study be on Developmental Psychology, the following courses should be selected as part of their Psychology Major in conjunction with their Psychology advisor's approval.

As part of the B.S. science requirement: Units
03-121Modern Biology9
As part of the psychology Breadth requirement:
85-221Principles of Child Development9
As part of the psychology Research Methods Requirement:
85-320Research Methods in Developmental Psychology9
As part of the advanced coursework in psychology requirement, at least two of the following:
85-354Infant Language Development9
85-363Attention, Its Development and Disorders9
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-406Autism: Psychological and Neuroscience Perspectives9
85-423Cognitive Development9
Additional course requirement, one of the following:
85-484Practicum in Child DevelopmentVar.
03-364Developmental Neuroscience9

Cognitive Psychology Concentration

For Psychology majors who wish to have a focus of their study be on Cognitive Psychology and/or Cognitive Modeling, the following courses should be selected as part of their Psychology Major in conjunction with their Psychology advisor's approval.

As part of the B.S. science requirement: Units
03-121Modern Biology9
As part of the psychology Breadth requirement:
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
As part of the psychology Research Methods requirement:
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
As part of the advanced coursework in psychology requirement, at least two of the following:
85-356Music and Mind: The Cognitive Neuroscience of Sound9
85-370Perception9
85-385Auditory Perception: Sense of Sound9
85-390Human Memory9
85-395Applications of Cognitive Science9
85-406Autism: Psychological and Neuroscience Perspectives9
85-412Cognitive Modeling9
85-414Cognitive Neuropsychology9
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing9
85-421Language and Thought9
85-429Cognitive Brain Imaging9
85-407Neuroscience of Concepts9
85-435Neural and Cognitive Models of Adaptive Decisions9

Social-Personality Psychology Concentration

For Psychology majors who wish to have a focus of their study be on Social and/or Personality Psychology, the following courses should be selected as part of their Psychology Major in conjunction with their Psychology advisor's approval.

As part of the Psychology Breadth requirement: Units
85-241Social Psychology9
85-251Personality9
As part of the Psychology Research Methods requirement:
85-340Research Methods in Social Psychology9
As part of the advanced coursework in psychology requirement, at least two of the following:
85-350Psychology of Prejudice9
85-352Evolutionary Psychology9
85-358Pro-Social Behavior9
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-377Attitudes and Persuasion9
85-443Social Factors and Well-Being9
85-444Relationships9
85-446Psychology of Gender9
85-501Stress, Coping and Well-Being9
85-357Navigating Race and Identity in America: The Role of Psychology in Racial Intera9

Clinical/Counseling Psychology Concentration

For Psychology majors who wish to have a focus of their study be on Clinical/Counseling Psychology, the following courses should be selected as part of their Psychology Major in conjunction with their Psychology advisor's approval.

As part of the Psychology Breadth requirement at least one of the following: Units
85-241Social Psychology9
85-251Personality9
Required additional coursework:
85-261Abnormal Psychology9
85-281Introduction to Clinical Psychology9
85-480Internship in Clinical PsychologyVar.
As part of the Psychology Research Methods requirements:
85-340Research Methods in Social Psychology9
As part of the advanced coursework in psychology requirement, at least two of the following:
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-377Attitudes and Persuasion9
85-406Autism: Psychological and Neuroscience Perspectives9
85-414Cognitive Neuropsychology9
85-442Health Psychology9
85-443Social Factors and Well-Being9
85-444Relationships9
85-446Psychology of Gender9
85-501Stress, Coping and Well-Being9

Neuroscience Major

The Psychology Department at Carnegie Mellon University has a major focus on the role of the brain and nervous system in cognition and behavior, including biological approaches involving the health impact that arises from the interaction of behavior with the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems.  These interests are manifested in faculty research, departmental and university centers that operate from or heavily involve the department (e.g., the Center for Cognitive Brain Imaging, and the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition) as well as undergraduate coursework and graduate coursework. 

For undergraduates, there are a number of ways in which students with an interest in these approaches can pursue that interest in an organized fashion.  Major requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Neuroscience can be found under Intercollege Programs.

Carnegie Mellon University recently launched BrainHub – an initiative designed to leverage its core strengths in cognitive science, engineering, and computer science, and our emerging excellence in biological sciences, to harness the technology that helps the world explore brain and behavior.  Students will be able to take advantage of exciting opportunities such as lectures hosted on various topics, newly funded CMU campus research projects trying to answer pressing questions in brain science and the many global partnerships with other institutions all with the same motivating goal to enhance and increase research in brain sciences.

Finally, for any interested student, there is a Minor in Cognitive Neuroscience available through the Psychology department.

The Major in Cognitive Science

The Psychology Department offers a B.S. degree in Cognitive Science. The field of cognitive science has grown out of increasingly active interaction among psychology, linguistics, artificial intelligence, philosophy, and neuroscience. All of these fields share the goal of understanding intelligence. By combining these diverse perspectives, students of cognitive science are able to understand cognition at a deep level. Because this major is administered by the Psychology Department, it focuses on human cognition and the experimental study of the human mind as illuminated by the techniques of the above disciplines.
 

Cognitive Science Curriculum

The Cognitive Science major is only offered as a B.S. degree. Candidates should complete before the junior year the two-semester calculus sequence 21-120 /21-256 (or alternatively 21-120/21-122)* and a statistics sequence (36-200 or equivalent and if possible, 36-309 ). In addition, candidates complete 15-112 Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science, as their departmental computing course.

Because of the number and sequential nature of required courses, prospective Cognitive Science majors are encouraged to begin course work for the major prior to junior year. In particular, completion of calculus, 36-200, and 85-211 or 85-213 before the junior year will enable students to complete 85-310 and 36-309 and by the Fall semester of their sophomore or junior year and, if interested, to then take advantage of research opportunities in the department.

*The 3-Semester sequence 21-111 /21-112/21-256 may be substituted by students who have already taken 21-111 before deciding on the major.                                                                                                                                                                          

Computing Prerequisite10 units
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
Mathematics29-30 units
21-120-21-122Differential and Integral Calculus - Integration and Approximation *20
or
21-120-21-256Differential and Integral Calculus - Multivariate Analysis *19
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10

*Students who place out of 21-120 are only required to successfully complete 21-122 or 21-256 instead of the full two-semester sequence.

Statistics Sequence18 units
36-200Reasoning with Data9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral & Social Sciences9
Computational/Cognitive Modeling Core29–31 units
Two of the following: Units
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
15-150Principles of Functional Programming10
15-251Great Ideas in Theoretical Computer Science12
Plus one of the following: Units
85-412Cognitive Modeling9
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing9
85-435Neural and Cognitive Models of Adaptive Decisions9
Cognitive Psychology Core27 units
Units
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-213 Human Information Processing and Artifical Intelligence
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-314 Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods
Plus two of the following (one of which must be 85-3xx or 85-4xx): Units
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-370Perception9
85-390Human Memory9
85-395Applications of Cognitive Science9
85-408Visual Cognition9
85-414Cognitive Neuropsychology9
85-421Language and Thought9
80-381Meaning in Language9
80-310Formal Logic9
80-314Logic and Artificial Intelligence9
80-315Modal Logic9
80-383Language in Use9

Cognitive Science Concentration

(3 courses, concentration approval required)

These three courses are chosen in conjunction with your advisor to form a coherent area of concentration from the course list under "Cognitive Science Concentration" in the current Undergraduate Catalog.  Before proceeding with the choice of courses, students must fill out the concentration form, obtained from Emilie O'Leary in Baker Hall 339, with a description of the concentration area and the planned set of three courses.  Courses not represented on the list may, with pre-approval of advisor and department, be used to satisfy part of this requirement.  The three courses are not required to be within any single category below but be coherent within the major and the focus may vary across disciplinary boundaries.  Courses taken for the major requirements can not be double counted in the concentration.

Computer Science36 units
16-385Computer Vision9
15-453Formal Languages, Automata, and Computability9
10-601Introduction to Machine Learning (Masters)12
05-410User-Centered Research and Evaluation12
05-432Personalized Online Learning12
Psychology
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-352Evolutionary Psychology9
85-354Infant Language Development9
85-370Perception9
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-380In Search of Mind: The History of Psychology9
85-390Human Memory9
85-392Human Expertise9
85-395Applications of Cognitive Science9
85-406Autism: Psychological and Neuroscience Perspectives9
85-412Cognitive Modeling9
85-414Cognitive Neuropsychology9
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing9
85-421Language and Thought9
85-423Cognitive Development9
85-426Learning in Humans and Machines9
85-429Cognitive Brain Imaging9
Philosophy
80-210Logic and Proofs9
80-211Logic and Mathematical Inquiry9
80-220Philosophy of Science9
80-254Analytic Philosophy9
80-255Pragmatism9
80-270Philosophy of Mind9
80-310Formal Logic9
80-311Undecidability and Incompleteness9
80-314Logic and Artificial Intelligence9
Linguistics
76-385Introduction to Discourse Analysis9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
Decision Sciences
88-302Behavioral Decision Making9
Neurosciences
03-362Cellular Neuroscience9
03-363Systems Neuroscience9
42-202Physiology9
15-386Neural Computation9
15-883Computational Models of Neural Systems12
Science Requirement

The Cognitive Science program requires two additional science courses (in the same science) beyond the college's two-course Science General Education requirement.

These can be selected from any one of the following areas.
03-xxxBiology *
09-xxxChemistry
33-xxxPhysics

* Those interested in a cognitive neuroscience focus are recommended to take biology courses, including if possible, 03-362, or 03-363.

Additional Major in Cognitive Science

In order to complete a double major in Cognitive Science, a student must fulfill the major requirements as listed under the Cognitive Science major. These include the programming requirement (15-112), the Mathematics and Statistics prerequisites, Computational/Cognitive Modeling Core, The Cognitive Psychology Core, the Cognitive Science Concentration Requirement, and the Supplementary Science Requirement. Students will be assigned a department advisor to help plan their program of studies in Cognitive Science.

Unified Double Major in Psychology & Biological Sciences

This major is intended to reflect the interdisciplinary nature of current research in the fields of biology and psychology, as well as the national trend in some professions to seek individuals broadly trained in both the social and natural sciences.

Note: Students entering from the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences will earn a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and Biological Sciences. Students in the Mellon College of Science will earn a Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences and Psychology. Students in the joint Science and Humanities Scholars (SHS) program can complete the SHS educational core and choose either departmental order for their diploma.

Depending on a student's home college (DC or MCS), General Education (GenEd) requirements will be different. GenEd requirements for DC and MCS are found on their respective Catalog pages.

Degree Requirements:

Biological Sciences Units
03-151Honors Modern Biology10
or 03-121 Modern Biology
03-220Genetics9
or 03-221 Genomes, Evolution, and Disease: Introduction to Quantitative Genetic Analysis
03-231Honors Biochemistry9
03-320Cell Biology9
03-343Experimental Techniques in Molecular Biology12
03-411Topics in Research1
03-412Topics in Research1
03-xxxGeneral Biology Elective 19
03-3xxAdvanced Biology Elective 118
Total Biology units78

1 Please see description and requirements for electives under the B.S. in Biological Sciences section of this Catalog.

Mathematics, Statistics, Physics and Computer Science Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-124Calculus II for Biologists and Chemists10
or 21-122 Integration and Approximation
36-247Statistics for Lab Sciences9
or 36-200 Reasoning with Data
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral & Social Sciences9
33-121Physics I for Science Students 212
or 33-141 Physics I for Engineering Students
15-110Principles of Computing10-12
or 15-112 Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science
or 02-201 Programming for Scientists
99-10xComputing at Carnegie Mellon3
Total Science units63-65

2 MCS students must also complete 33-122 Physics II for Biological Sciences and Chemistry Students.

Chemistry Units
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
09-217Organic Chemistry I9
or 09-219 Modern Organic Chemistry
09-218Organic Chemistry II9
or 09-220 Modern Organic Chemistry II
09-207Techniques in Quantitative Analysis9-12
or 09-221 Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis
09-208Techniques for Organic Synthesis and Analysis9-12
or 09-222 Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis
Total Chemistry units56-62
Psychology Courses Units
85-102Introduction to Psychology9
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-2xxSurvey Psychology Courses *18
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-340 Research Methods in Social Psychology
or 85-320 Research Methods in Developmental Psychology
or 85-314 Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods
or 85-330 Analytic Research Methods
85-3xxAdvanced Psychology Electives18
Total Psychology units63

 * Excluding 85-261 Abnormal Psychology

 
Additional Advanced Elective9 units
(Choose one of the following courses)
85-3xxAdvanced Psychology Elective9
or
03-3xxAdvanced Biology Elective9
Additional Laboratory or Research Methods9-12 units
(Choose one of the following courses)
03-344Experimental Biochemistry12
03-345Experimental Cell and Developmental Biology12
03-346Experimental Neuroscience12
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
85-314Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods9
85-320Research Methods in Developmental Psychology9
85-340Research Methods in Social Psychology9
Elective Units Units
Free Electives33-36
MCS Nontechnical Breadth or DC General Education requirements36-48
Total Elective units69-84

Minimum number of units required for degree:360

Minors in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience

Minor in Psychology72 units

I. Introductory course
85-102Introduction to Psychology *9

*A survey course can be taken in place of 85-102.

II. Area Survey courses
Complete two courses.
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-213 Human Information Processing and Artifical Intelligence
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-221Principles of Child Development9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-251Personality9
III. Statistics
36-200Reasoning with Data9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral & Social Sciences9
27 unitsUpper Level Courses

Complete three courses from categories IV and V, with at least one course from each.

IV. Research Methods Courses * (minimum 9 units)
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
85-314Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods9
85-320Research Methods in Developmental Psychology9
85-330Analytic Research Methods9
85-340Research Methods in Social Psychology9

* Prerequisites for all Research Methods courses: 36-309 and the appropriate survey course.

V. Advanced courses (minimum 9 units)

Advanced psychology courses exist within four areas (cognitive, cognitive neuroscience, developmental, social and health psychology.) Any advanced content course or seminar in psychology or any psychology course higher than 85-350. Exceptions for the advanced course requirement are: 85-48085-48285-48485-48485-50685-50785-50885-60185-60266-50166-502.

Minor in Cognitive Neuroscience63 units

The minor in Cognitive Neuroscience offered by the Department of Psychology is similar to the Neuroscience Minor offered by the Department of Biological Sciences.  The differences between the two forms of the minor are determined by one required course, and additionally, by the students' choice of distribution electives.  The requirements for the Cognitive Neuroscience Minor include 7 courses: four required courses, and three distribution and elective courses.  

Because of the curriculum within this minor may overlap with some degree requirements, no more than 2 courses fulfilling Neuroscience or Cognitive Neuroscience Minor requirements may count towards a student's major or other minor requirements.

Cognitive Neuroscience Curriculum 

Required Coursework                                                                                                                 
03-121Modern Biology9
03-363Systems Neuroscience9
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-213 Human Information Processing and Artifical Intelligence
Distribution Requirements
Three courses, including at least 1 from each of the following categories
Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience
85-314Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods9
85-412Cognitive Modeling9
85-414Cognitive Neuropsychology9
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing9
85-429Cognitive Brain Imaging9
15-386Neural Computation9
15-883Computational Models of Neural Systems12
36-746Statistical Methods for Neuroscience and Psychology12
Cognitive Neuroscience Electives
03-133Neurobiology of Disease9
03-362Cellular Neuroscience9
03-364Developmental Neuroscience9
03-365Neural Correlates of Learning and Memory9
85-356Music and Mind: The Cognitive Neuroscience of Sound9
85-370Perception9
85-385Auditory Perception: Sense of Sound9
85-390Human Memory9
85-406Autism: Psychological and Neuroscience Perspectives9

The Honors Program

The Honors Program provides recognition of outstanding performance by students in the Psychology department. Participation enables students to pursue their own research ideas through completion of an honors thesis. The honors thesis is completed during the senior year. By completing a thesis, the student earns 18 units of credit and qualifies for graduation with “College Honors.” To qualify for the Honors Program, the student must maintain a quality point average of at least 3.50 in the major and 3.25 overall.  More information on the Honor program can be found here.

A year long departmental senior thesis course exists (66-501 and 66-502) for students interested in pursuing a sizable research project who do not qualify for the honors program.  More information can be obtained by contacting Emilie O'Leary at emilier@andrew.cmu.edu.

Course Descriptions

Note on Course Numbers

Each Carnegie Mellon course number begins with a two-digit prefix which designates the department offering the course (76-xxx courses are offered by the Department of English, etc.). Although each department maintains its own course numbering practices, typically the first digit after the prefix indicates the class level: xx-1xx courses are freshmen-level, xx-2xx courses are sophomore level, etc. xx-6xx courses may be either undergraduate senior-level or graduate-level, depending on the department. xx-7xx courses and higher are graduate-level. Please consult the Schedule of Classes each semester for course offerings and for any necessary pre-requisites or co-requisites.

85-102 Introduction to Psychology
Fall and Summer: 9 units
This course examines major areas of scientific psychology in some depth, the attempt being to develop basic models of our behavior and thought that explain wide areas of our functioning. The primary focus is on the areas of neural and motivational control of behavior, memory and thought, social interaction, and psychological development. Specific topics within these areas include brain function, motivational control systems, learning, cognitive and perceptual information processing, problem solving, obedience and conformity, social interaction, emotion, attitude consistency and change, how our social, cognitive and language functions develop, the importance of childhood to adult functioning, and psychopathology. In addition to the lecture, the course includes a weekly recitation section meeting and weekly short WEB-based laboratory experiences in which students get to perform actual experiments, interpret real data, and experience many psychological phenomena.
85-198 Research Training: Psychology
Fall and Spring: 9 units
See www.hss.cmu.edu/aac and click on (forms and guides informational handout page) then click on current freshman-sophmore research training courses for listing of research training course descriptions.

Course Website: http://www.hss.cmu.edu/aac
85-211 Cognitive Psychology
Fall and Spring: 9 units
How do people perceive, learn, remember, and think? This course will consider perception, language, attention, learning, memory, reasoning, and decision making. Experimental findings and formal models will be discussed in each part of the course.
85-213 Human Information Processing and Artifical Intelligence
Fall: 9 units
This class will review various results in cognitive psychology (attention, perception, memory, problem solving, language) and use of artificial intelligence techniques to simulate cognitive processes.
Prerequisites: 15-122 or 15-150
85-219 Biological Foundations of Behavior
Fall: 9 units
This course will provide students with a general introduction to the underlying biological principles and mechanisms which give rise to complex human cognitive, perceptual and emotional behavior. Topics to be covered include: the anatomical structure of nerve cells and how they communicate, properties of brain organization and function, processing in sensory and motor systems, biological characteristics of human cognition, and neural and hormonal influences on health and emotion. This course will focus on how emerging methods and approaches are beginning to make it possible for psychologists, computer scientists, and biologists to gain an integrated understanding of complex behavior.
85-221 Principles of Child Development
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course is about normal development from conception through adolescence. Topics include physical, perceptual, cognitive, emotional and social development. Students will learn facts about children at various points in development, theories about how development works, and research methods for studying development in infants and children. Students will be encouraged to relate the facts, theories and methods of developmental psychology to everyday problems, social issues and real world concerns.
85-241 Social Psychology
Fall and Spring: 9 units
The focus of this course will be on how peoples behavior, feelings and thoughts are influenced or determined by their social environment. The course will begin with lectures and readings on how social psychologists go about studying social behavior. Next, various topics on which social psychologists have done research will be covered. These topics will include: person perception, prejudice and discrimination, the nature of attitudes and how attitudes are formed and changed, interpersonal attraction, conformity, compliance, altruism, aggression, group behavior, and applications of psychology to problems in health care, law, politics, and the environment. Through readings and lectures on these topics, students will also be exposed to social psychological theories.
85-251 Personality
Intermittent: 9 units
The primary purpose of personality psychology is to understand human uniqueness—how and why it is that one person differs from others, in terms of the ways he or she thinks, feels, and acts. Students in the course will be exposed to several broad theoretical perspectives, each of which attempts to capture and understand the origins and consequences of individual distinctiveness from a slightly different vantage point. Included among these approaches are the dispositional or trait, psychoanalytic, learning, humanistic, and cognitive self regulation perspectives. This is a survey course and is intended to provide students with a broad background of theory and research in the area. Class meetings consist primarily of lecture, but there is some discussion too. Students will be given the opportunity to assess their own personalities during the course. A consistent theme throughout the course is the relationships between aspects of one's personality and physical health.
85-261 Abnormal Psychology
Fall and Spring: 9 units
The study of psychopathology is not an exact science; nor are there many clear-cut parameters with which to differentiate "normal" and "abnormal" behavior.  This course will focus on learning about and understanding the range of behaviors which fall within the province of "abnormal" psychology. Its approach will be descriptive, empirical, theoretical and conceptual. Students will examine definitions of ?abnormality? in an historical and contemporary context, explore issues relevant to diagnosis and patient care, be introduced to various psychological diagnostic categories, and develop an appreciation of the range of treatments for these disorders.
85-281 Introduction to Clinical Psychology
Spring: 9 units
This course is designed to introduce students to a wide variety of concepts in the area of clinical psychology. We will explore clinical psychology in an historical perceptive, ethics related to the practice of psychology, and various theories of psychotherapy (Incluing psychoanalytic, psychodynamic, existential, and cognitive behavioral). Also, we will look at group theories underlying group therapy and family/systems therapy.
Prerequisites: 85-261 or 85-251
85-310 Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This is a course in which students develop the research skills associated with cognitive psychology and cognitive science. Students learn how to design and conduct experiments, and analyze and interpret the data they collect. The course covers a variety of experimental designs, e.g., factorial, Latin Squares. Analyses of response times, qualitative data, and signal detection are also covered. Cognitive modeling will also be discussed. Topics include mental imagery, memory, and perception. The class format consists of lectures, discussions and student presentations.
Prerequisites: (36-309 and 85-211) or (36-309 and 85-213)
85-314 Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods
Intermittent: 9 units
This is a hands-on laboratory course designed to foster basic skills in the empirical approaches used in cognitive neuroscience research. Students will learn how to evaluate which cognitive neuroscience method is best suited to a research question, basic experimental design and analysis, and how to formally present empirical results. The course will focus on functional MRI, but will also cover structural MRI (diffusion imaging) and EEG, and survey various other methods. Students will work with actual datasets using the current software used by cognitive neuroscience researchers. You must have taken 36-309 previously, as well as one of the following: 85-310, 85-320, 85-330, 85-340, 09-207, or 03-124. A background in basic neurobiology, such as 85-219, and comfort with using research software such as SPSS as well as basic programming are encouraged but not required.
Prerequisites: 85-330 or 85-310 or 03-124 or 09-207 or 85-320 or 85-340
85-320 Research Methods in Developmental Psychology
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This is a laboratory course, in which the student will have direct experience working with children, as well as writing research reports and designing and critiquing research in child development. The purpose of the course is to develop research expertise that will assist the student both in carrying out research and in evaluating the research of others. Special emphasis will be given to the unique methodological problems associated with the study of development. Students must be sure they are also available to attend the Children's School during specific blocks in addition to the class meeting times. Either MW 8:30-10:30am, TR 8:30-10:30am, MW 12:30-2:15pm or MW 12:30-2:15pm.
Prerequisites: 36-309 and 85-221
85-330 Analytic Research Methods
Intermittent: 9 units
This class will teach students how to apply six major non-experimental research methods used in analytic behavioral analysis. Protocol Analysis. This method is used to study patterns and changes in problem-solving and their matches to theoretical models, including computational models. Corpus Analysis. This method is used to isolate patterns of behavioral and communication usage and change, as revealed through the study of the world-wide web and large computerized databases such as CHILDES, TalkBank, or the British National Corpus. Tools here include text searches and data-mining. Conversation Analysis. This is a microanalytic method used to examine sequencing, repair, and orientation in closely transcribed recordings of spoken interactions, as made available through systems such as the CABank database, as well as recorded programs on YouTube and elsewhere. Coding Systems. This approach seeks to capture interactional and behavioral structures in writing, teaching, interview, and other interactions. Here, there will be a special emphasis on the coding of instructional interactions. Gesture Analysis. This microanalytic method seeks to track patterns in gestural and nonverbal communication, often in association with spoken messages. Profile Analysis. This approach studies differences across learners at various ages and ability levels and group differences involving aphasia, autism, stuttering, dementia, and other individual differences. Students will work with data already available from previous studies, and will also learn to collect their own new datasets. Although the data being examined have been generated through naturalistic processes, they can be analyzed quantitatively using time-series analyses, non-parametric statistics, error matrices, and neural network simulations. In these various analyses, we will also consider how behavioral patterns are shape
Prerequisites: 85-320 or 85-310 or 85-340
85-340 Research Methods in Social Psychology
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course is designed to provide students with the necessary knowledge to evaluate research, make transitions between theory and the operations that test the theory, and to design and carry out original research. Topics will include the nature of proof and causal inference, manipulation of indepen-dent variables, measurement of dependent variables, questionnaire design, experimental ,and quasi-experimental, design and ethical issues involved in doing research. Survey, observational and experimental techniques as applied in both field and laboratory settings will be covered. Students will be expected to criticize completed research. They are also expected to design measures and complete their own original studies. During the course of the semester students will also be expected to design and carry out an original research project as well.
Prerequisites: (85-251 and 36-309) or (85-241 and 36-309) or (85-251 and 36-202) or (36-202 and 85-241)
85-341 Team Dynamics and Leadership
Spring: 9 units
Much of the work in groups and organizations consists of communication. You communicate to get information that will be the basis of decisions, to provide a vision for the people who work for and with you, to coordinate activity, and to sell yourself and your work. The goal of this course is to identify sources of communication problems within an organization and ways to overcome them. To do this requires that we know how communication normally works, what parts are difficult, and how to fix it when it goes wrong. The focus of this course is on providing you with a broad understanding of the way communication operates within dyads, work groups, and organizations. This course is not a practicum in public speaking or writing, although you will get some experience writing, speaking, and managing impressions. Rather the intent is to give you theoretical and empirical underpinnings for the communication you will undoubtedly do when you return to work. Readings come from both the research and the managerial literatures. Among the topics considered are managerial communication, persuasion and conformity, self presentation and person perception, social networks. Cases and group projects give you an opportunity to apply what you've learned.
Prerequisites: 70-207 or 36-247 or 36-225 or 36-207 or 36-217 or 36-220 or 36-201
85-345 Meaning in Mind and Brain
Intermittent: 9 units
What does it mean to say that an object, word, event or sentence means something? What is the nature of semantic representations that are activated in the brain during comprehension, and how are they related to perceptual, linguistic, mnemonic and motor representations? How do these representations emerge over the course of development, and how can they be selectively impaired by brain damage? This course examines these and related questions by drawing on findings from a broad range of methodologies, including developmental studies of young children, behavioral studies of adults, neuropsychological studies of brain-damaged patients, neurophysiology and functional brain imaging, and computational modeling. The course will take a seminar format in which students read, present and discuss the current literature.
Prerequisites: 85-219 or 85-213 or 85-211
85-350 Psychology of Prejudice
Spring: 9 units
This course is devoted to the study of both traditional and more modern forms of prejudice and discrimination and the psychological processes that can arise from categorizations and stereotyping. The class provides an overview of the cognitive and emotional underpinnings of prejudice and discrimination as it pertains to many forms of inequality. The psychological theories underlying these behaviors will be examined as well as their impact on the lives of stigmatized individuals. Its goal is to examine a number of social differences and understand how prejudice can impact many areas of society. In addition to the traditional forms of prejudice based on such things as race, gender and age; other inequalities that result from less traditional groupings such as social class, appearance, and disability and will be explored. Research on issues of social identity, intergroup relations and the reduction of prejudice will be examined through readings and class activities.
Prerequisite: 85-241
85-352 Evolutionary Psychology
Intermittent: 9 units
This course will cover both the fundamentals of evolutionary psychology, including the theories of natural and sexual selection, with the overarching aim of providing an overview of the field at an advanced level. We will examine the relevance of evolutionary thinking to a range of psychological phenomena including problems of survival, long-term mating strategies, short-term sexual strategies, parenting, kinship, cooperative alliances, aggression and warfare, conflict between the sexes, and prestige, status, and social dominance. We will also examine evolutionary approaches to sensation and perception, development, consciousness, cognition, language, and abnormal behavior. Juniors and Seniors only or permission of instructor. Pre req: 85-102, 85-211, 85-221, 85-241 or 85-251
Prerequisites: 85-211 or 85-102 or 85-221 or 85-251 or 85-241
85-353 Mindfulness: Science and Practice
Intermittent: 9 units
This course will focus on blending first-person experience with mindfulness practices (including mindfulness meditation) and learning about the scientific research on mindfulness. Students will engage in guided mindfulness exercises, develop a daily mindfulness practice, and try out different mindfulness training traditions. In addition, much of this course will be focused on applying a critical eye to the theory, measures, mechanisms, and effects of mindfulness (and mindfulness training interventions) across multiple domains cognition, social processes, behavior, biological mechanisms, and health. As such, this will be a small seminar course focused developing first-person experiences of mindfulness and on discussing the debates and opportunities related to the emerging science of mindfulness.
Prerequisites: 85-340 or 85-320 or 85-310 or 85-314
85-354 Infant Language Development
Intermittent: 9 units
While adults struggle to learn languages, almost all infants acquire language with seemingly little effort. This course examines infants' learning abilities and language milestones with a focus on several different theoretical accounts of language development, and the way empirical data can be used to assess those theories. The course is reading intensive, and evaluation will be based on both written assignments and oral participation.
Prerequisite: 85-221
85-356 Music and Mind: The Cognitive Neuroscience of Sound
Intermittent: 9 units
This course will take a multidisciplinary approach to understand the neural systems that contribute to auditory perception and cognition, using music and speech as domains of inquiry. Students will master topics in acoustics, psychophysics, cognitive psychology, cognitive development, neurophysiology, and neuropsychology. The early part of the course will provide students with a common foundation in acoustics, signal processing, and auditory neuroscience. Later in the semester, the focus will turn to developing analytical skills through critical evaluation of primary-source experimental literature. Hands-on laboratories and homework sets in sound manipulation and experimentation also will constitute a means of learning about auditory cognitive neuroscience. Throughout, the focus will be upon understanding general cognitive and perceptual challenges in perceiving and producing complex sounds like speech and music. Topics may include biological vs. cultural influences, development in infancy, perception versus production, time perception, effects of experience on perceptual processing, comparative studies of animals, attention, development of expertise, effects of brain damage, and emotional expression. Topics will be addressed from the perspective of cognitive neuroscience, in that we will attempt to understand the neural processes that give rise to auditory perception and cognition.
Prerequisites: (85-370 or 85-219 or 85-211) and (85-310 or 85-320 or 85-340)
85-357 Navigating Race and Identity in America: The Role of Psychology in Racial Intera
Intermittent: 9 units
How have social institutions and historical factors led to the belief systems and stereotypes that shape how race is experienced in American society, and how do these belief systems affect the way individuals within racial groups come to view and define themselves? This course will serve as an introduction to how people's psychologyhow they think, feel, and actshapes their experience of race and identity in America. After a brief discussion about the structural and systemic origins of the racial status quo, we will examine the way that individuals navigate the social and racial landscape of modern-day America. Complementing courses that take sociological approaches to race in America, this course will focus on how individuals' perceptions and thoughts about the world affect how they interpret and respond to social situations. For example, the course will address: how stereotypes about one's race or identity can cause individuals to feel threatened, and can undermine health, feelings of belonging, and academic performance how an individual's concerns about the thoughts and beliefs of others can radically affect identity formation, particularly during adolescence how individuals have to navigate multiple cultural identities, especially as minority group members contending with mainstream ideas that differ from their own how majority group members (e.g., Whites) view their role in racial systems, and how they deal with concerns about being or appearing prejudiced how interventions can use social psychological concepts to mitigate negative outcomes of racial inequality We will then use our understanding of these concepts to examine and consider different racial situations thoughout American society and to understand how individuals navigate and experience race and identity. Throughout the course, we will watch films, read literature, and analyze music and art that reflect the experience of race and identity.
85-358 Pro-Social Behavior
Fall: 9 units
This course is an advanced seminar that focuses on social psychological research involving the examination of pro-social behavior. A heavy emphasis will be placed on classic research on helping (which investigates how, when, and why we help strangers), as well as the wide body of literature on social support (which investigates how we help, and seek help from, those who are closer to us). Research on both help-seeking and help-provision will be covered, as well as the implications of this type of pro-social behavior for relationships and health. The course also will cover research on other types of pro-social behavior such as empathy, altruism, forgiveness, and cooperation. This is an advanced seminar in which you will be expected to read original research articles and chapters on assigned topics and come to class prepared to discuss the material. Readings will consist of theoretical and empirical articles from psychology journals and related sources. Additional course requirements will involve short, weekly writing assignments, student presentations of research articles, and a written research proposal. Over the course of the semester, students will design and carry out a small-scale, original investigation on a topic of interest.
85-362 Seminar on Addiction
Intermittent: 9 units
This seminar will explore various topics central to the study of drug addiction, with a primary emphasis on psychological and neurobiological theories of drug addiction. We will also discuss research and clinical techniques related to the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of substance use disorders and related problems. Emphasis will be on alcohol and tobacco, but other drugs will be discussed as well. The main course objective is to provide a unifying model for understanding the fundamental aspects of addiction.
Prerequisites: 85-310 or 85-320 or 85-340 or 85-314
85-363 Attention, Its Development and Disorders
Intermittent: 9 units
This seminar is on attention, its development, and disorders. The seminar will discuss a broad range of topics including: theoretical and practical implications of studying attention (for example, is it really dangerous to talk on the cell phone while driving? does listening to music help studying?); interrelationship of attention with other cognitive processes, such as perception and memory; challenges and opportunities for studying attention in infants and young children; biological and psychological foundations of attention disorders. Classes will consist of a combination of lecture and discussion. Students will be expected to read original research articles, participate in class discussions, make presentations based on readings, and complete a written assignment.
Prerequisites: 85-221 or 85-211
85-370 Perception
Fall: 9 units
Perception, broadly defined, is the construction of a representation of the external world for purposes of thinking and acting. Although we often think of perception as the processing of inputs to the sense organs, the world conveyed by the senses is ambiguous, and cognitive and sensory systems interact to interpret it. In this course, we will examine the sensory-level mechanisms involved in perception by various sensory modalities, including vision, audition, and touch. We will learn how sensory coding interacts with top-down processing based on context and prior knowledge and how perception changes with learning and development. We will look at methods of psychophysics, neuroscience, and cognitive psychology. The goals include not only imparting basic knowledge about perception but also providing new insights into everyday experiences.
85-375 Crosscultural Psychology
Intermittent: 9 units
Human beings share a common genetic inheritance, but our cultural institutions differ in a bewildering variety of ways. This course explores the many different cultural expressions of basic human cognitive and social abilities and needs, We will look at cultural variations in child rearing, mother-child attachment, language socialization, categorization, reasoning, problem-solving, architecture, music, politics, warfare, food-gathering, sex roles, mental disorders, and altered states of consciousness, all with the goal of understanding how the shape of social systems and symbolic expression reflects the economic and adaptive needs of the culture and its people. Among the approaches to these phenomena we will consider are symbolic interaction, cognitive anthropology, dialectic materialism, and modern ethnology.
Prerequisites: 85-219 or 85-221 or 85-241 or 85-251 or 85-198 or 85-261 or 85-102 or 85-100 or 85-211
85-377 Attitudes and Persuasion
Intermittent: 9 units
This advanced undergraduate course will focus on the topic of attitude change and how various persuasive techniques are used to shape human response. The dynamics of propaganda and what makes the techniques effective on social and consumer decisions will be addressed. The primary goals of the course are to 1) understand the dynamics of attitude change; 2) explore the mechanism by which attitude change techniques operate and 3) examine relevant theories and research in persuasion. Examples of topics covered include the origins of attitudes, how attitudes influence judgments, social power and attitude change, and how individual decisions are influenced by the mass media. Classic and contemporary research in the area of persuasion will be examined in the form of course readings and assignments.
Prerequisite: 85-241
85-380 In Search of Mind: The History of Psychology
Intermittent: 9 units
This course will focus on three aspects of the origin and growth of experimen-tal psychology. The first is the prehistory of psychology, where the connection of the discipline to the development of modern science, and in particular, its origins in philosophy and physiology, is examined. The second focus of the course is on the different approaches and attempts to define the field that have contested for dominance during much of the life of the discipline. The final major focus of the course is on the modern period (roughly the last forty years) where the influences that brought about the modern counter-revolution in psychology will be examined, and where some conjecture about likely future directions will occur. Two prior courses in psychology.
85-385 Auditory Perception: Sense of Sound
Intermittent: 9 units
This course explores how our sense of hearing allows us to interact with the world. Students will learn about basic principles of sound, spatial sound, sound quality, hearing impairment, auditory perception, interactions with other modalities, and auditory cognition. Topics may also include musical acoustics, basic auditory physiology, sound-semantic associations, acoustic analysis, and sound-making gestures. We will consider not only simple laboratory-generated signals, but also more complex sounds such as those in our everyday environment, as well music and speech. Students will gain some in-class experience with generating sounds and analytic listening. After students reach a sophisticated level of understanding of the auditory fundamentals, they will apply their knowledge to the study of several current issues in auditory research.
Prerequisites: 85-211 or 85-102
85-390 Human Memory
Intermittent: 9 units
Without memory, people would barely be able to function: we could not be able to communication because we would not be able to remember meanings or words, nor what anyone said to us; we could have no friends because everyone would be a stranger (no memory of meeting anyone); we could have no sense of self because we could not remember anything about ourselves either; we could not predict anything about the future because we would have no recollections of the past; we would not know how to get around, because we would have no knowledge of the environment. This course will discuss issues related to memory at all levels: the sensory registers, i.e., how we perceive things; working or short-term memory; long-term memory or our knowledge base. We will discuss the differences between procedural/skill knowledge, and declarative/fact knowledge. The topics of memory monitoring, feeling and knowing, spread of activation within memory (priming), implicit memory, and amnesia will also be covered.
Prerequisites: 85-340 or 85-213 or 85-211
85-391 Psychology of Sleep
Intermittent: 9 units
This course is ONLY offered at Carnegie Mellon in Qatar. This course is an advanced seminar that focuses on the biology, psychology, and social factors of sleep and dreaming. The course will go over the history behind the scientific study of sleep, as well as the cultural and psychological underpinnings of dreaming. Students will also delve into the neuroscience and abnormal psychology of sleep. Emphasis will be placed on reading, presenting and analyzing empirical research articles. Students will also be required to fill out sleep logs and a dream diary, culminating in a final research paper analyzing their semester long sleep patterns and dreams based on research discussed in class.
Prerequisites: 85-211 and 85-102
85-392 Human Expertise
Intermittent: 9 units
The process of becoming an expert involves many changes, some quantitative and some qualitative. This course will provide an up-to-date account of the theory and data concerning the development of expertise. Questions addressed include the following. What does it take to become an expert? Are experts born or made? Is the process of acquiring expertise common across different domains from music to sports to science? Research studied in the course will employ a variety of methodologies, from case studies to protocol analysis to computational modeling.
Prerequisites: 85-213 or 85-211
85-395 Applications of Cognitive Science
Spring: 9 units
The famous psychologist George Miller once said that Psychology should "give itself away." The goal of this course is to look at cases where we have done so — or at least tried. The course focuses on applications that are sufficiently advanced as to have made an impact outside of the research field per se. That impact can take the form of a product, a change in practice, or a legal statute. The application should have a theoretical base, as contrasted, say, with pure measurement research as in ergonomics. Examples of applications are virtual reality (in vision, hearing, and touch), cognitive tutors based on models of cognitive processing, phonologically based reading programs, latent semantic analysis applications to writing assessment, and measurses of consumers' implicit attitudes. The course will use a case-study approach that considers a set of applications in detail, while building a general understanding of what it means to move research into the applied setting. The questions to be considered include: What makes a body of theoretically based research applicable? What is the pathway from laboratory to practice? What are the barriers - economic, legal, entrenched belief or practice? The format will emphasize analysis and discussion by students.
85-406 Autism: Psychological and Neuroscience Perspectives
Fall: 9 units
Autism is a disorder that affects many cognitive and social processes, sparing some facets of thought while strongly impacting others. This seminar will examine the scientific research that has illuminated the nature of autism, focusing on its cognitive and biological aspects. For example, language, perception, and theory of mind are affected in autism. The readings will include a few short books and many primary journal articles. The readings will deal primarily with autism in people whose IQ's are in the normal range (high functioning autism). Seminar members will be expected to regularly enter to class discussions and make presentations based on the readings. The seminar will examine various domains of thinking and various biological underpinnings of brain function, to converge on the most recent scientific consensus on the biological and psychological characterization of autism. There will be a special focus on brain imaging studies of autism, including both structural (MRI) imaging of brain morphology and functional (fMRI and PET) imaging of brain activation during the performance of various tasks.
Prerequisites: 85-213 or 85-219 or 85-355 or 85-429 or 85-211
85-407 Neuroscience of Concepts
Intermittent: 9 units
Conceptual knowledge underpins all aspects of everyday experience, from language, to thinking, to recognizing familiar objects, people and places. This seminar will survey major theories and findings about how the brain represents 'meaning.' The course will emphasize research using neuropsychological methods in brain-damaged patients and functional neuroimaging in healthy participants. Students will read primary empirical and theoretical review articles to develop an understanding of both classic findings and recent discoveries about how the human brain represents meaning.
Prerequisites: (85-219 or 85-211) and (36-200 or 36-201)
85-408 Visual Cognition
Intermittent: 9 units
Recognizing an object, face or word is a complex process which is mastered with little effort by humans. This course adopts a three-pronged approach, drawing on psychological, neural and computational models to explore a range of topics including early vision, visual attention, face recognition, reading, object recognition, and visual imagery. The course will take a seminar format.
Prerequisites: 85-213 or 85-219 or 85-211
85-412 Cognitive Modeling
Spring: 9 units
This course will be concerned with modeling of agent behavior in a range of applications from laboratory experiments on human cognition, high-performance simulations such as flight simulators, and video game environments like Unreal Tournament. The first half of the course will teach a high-level modeling language for simulating human perception, cognition, and action. The second half of the course will be a project in which students develop a simulated agent or agents for the application of their choice.
Prerequisites: 15-150 or 15-210 or 15-251 or 15-122
85-414 Cognitive Neuropsychology
Spring: 9 units
This course will review what has been learned of the neural bases of cognition through studies of brain-damaged patients as well as newer techniques such as brain stimulation mapping, regional metabolic and blood flow imaging, and attempt to relate these clinical and physiological data to theories of the mind cast in information-processing terms. The course will be organized into units corresponding to the traditionally-defined subfields of cognitive psychology such as perception, memory and language. In each area, we will ask: To what extent do the neurological phenomena make contact with the available cognitive theories? When they do, what are their implications for these theories (i.e., Can we confirm or disconfirm particular cognitive theories using neurological data?)? When they do not, what does this tell us about the parses of the mind imposed by the theories and methodologies of cognitive psychology and neuropsychology?
Prerequisites: 85-211 or 85-219
85-418 Contributions of Psychological Research to Education
Intermittent: 9 units
The main goal of this course is for students to learn about what psychological research has to say regarding how to improve education. We will examine basic principles arising out of cognitive and developmental psychology that can inform educational practice; application of these principles to reading, writing, and mathematics; and policy issues, including ones involving universal preschool education, the Common Core State Standards, and whether college inculcates critical thinking skills.
85-419 Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing
Spring: 9 units
This course provides an overview of Parallel-Distributed-Processing/neural-network models of perception, memory, language, knowledge representation, and learning. The course consists of lectures describing the theory behind the models as well as their implementation, and their application to specific empirical domains. Students get hands-on experience developing and running simulation models.
Prerequisites: 21-111 or 21-124 or 21-115 or 21-120 or 21-112
85-421 Language and Thought
Intermittent: 9 units
This course allows the student to explore ways in which the mind shapes language and language shapes the mind. Why are humans the only species with a full linguistic system? Some of the questions to be explored are: What kinds of mental abilities allow the child to learn language? What are the cognitive abilities needed to support the production and comprehension of sentences in real time? How do these abilities differ between people? Are there universal limits on the ways in which languages differ? Where do these limitations come from cognition in general or the specific language facility? Why is it so hard to learn a second language? Are there important links between language change and cultural change that point to links between language and culture?
Prerequisites: 85-211 or 80-180 or 85-213 or 80-150
85-423 Cognitive Development
Intermittent: 9 units
The general goals of this course are that students become familiar with the basic phenomena and the leading theories of cognitive development, and that they learn to critically evaluate research in the area. Piagetian and information processing approaches will be discussed and contrasted. The focus will be upon the development of childrens information processing capacity and the effect that differences in capacities have upon the childs ability to interact with the environment in problem solving and learning situations.
Prerequisite: 85-221
85-424 Hemispheric Specialization: Why, How and What?
Intermittent: 9 units
The brain is divided into two hemispheres, raising a host of questions about brain organization, hemispheric specialization and laterality. Despite all the research devoted to these questions, our understanding of the behavioral significance and neural basis of laterality remains limited. This course will address the questions of "why", "how" and "what". We will review the latest data and empirical results but will also develop a coherent theoretical perspective, moving from molecular, genetic and evolutionary considerations to cognitive and clinical factors in the understanding of one of the most fascinating phenomena in neuroscience, neuropsychology, psychiatry, neurology, and cognitive sciences. In addition to tackling a major text in the field (The Two Halves of the Brain Edited by Hugdahl and Westerhausen), we will read the latest papers in the field. The class will be almost entirely discussion-based and students will be responsible for doing the readings ahead of time and being prepared for the discussion.
Prerequisites: 85-221 or 85-241 or 85-251
85-425 Child Psychopathology and Treatment
Intermittent: 9 units
The first half of this course will focus on understanding the etiology and epidemiology of child and adolescent psychopathology. Special emphasis will be placed on conditions that are first diagnosed during childhood (e.g., ADHD, Autism, Eating Disorders) as well as understanding how child and adult psychopathology differ. The second half of this course will focus on treatment interventions for youth with psychopathology. Students will learn about how interventions for adults with psychopathology are altered to be developmentally appropriate for children, and methods of intervention commonly used with children but less so with adults(e.g., family therapy, play therapy). For students who have completed abnormal psychology and the psychology breadth requirement but not the other course pre-requisite, 85102, please see Theresa Kurutz to register for this course in BH 343.
Prerequisites: 85-102 and 85-261
85-426 Learning in Humans and Machines
Spring: 9 units
This course explores how probabilistic methods can help to explain cognition and to develop intelligent machines. The applications discussed include perception, language, memory, categorization, reasoning, decision-making, and motor control.
Prerequisite: 15-112
85-429 Cognitive Brain Imaging
Spring: 9 units
This seminar will examine how the brain executes higher level cognitive processes, such as problem-solving, language comprehension, and visual thinking. The topic will be addressed by examining what recent brain imaging studies can tell us about these various kinds of thinking. This new scientific approach has the potential of providing important information about how the brain thinks, indicating not only what parts perform what function, but also how the activity of different parts of the brain are organized to perform some thinking task, and how various neurological diseases (e.g. aphasia, Alzheimer's) affect brain activity. A variety of different types of thinking will be examined, including short-term working memory storage and computation, problem solving, language comprehension, visual thinking. Several different technologies for measuring brain activity (e.g. PET and functional MRI and also some PET imaging) will be considered, attempting to relate brain physiology to cognitive functioning. The course will examine brain imaging in normal subjects and in people with various kinds of brain damage.
Prerequisites: 85-211 or 85-419 or 85-213 or 85-412 or 85-414
85-435 Neural and Cognitive Models of Adaptive Decisions
Intermittent: 9 units
Humans and other mammals exhibit a high degree of control when selecting actions in noisy contexts, quickly adapting to unexpected outcomes in order to better exploit opportunities arising in the future. This course will explore both the cognitive and neurobiological systems of adaptive decision-making, through a mixture of readings, lectures, and hands-on modeling projects (in Python and Matlab).
Prerequisites: (85-211 or 85-213) and (21-120 or 21-115 or 21-111)
85-442 Health Psychology
Intermittent: 9 units
This course is concerned with how behavior and psychological states influence the development of and recovery from disease. The class provides an overview of existing psychological and epidemiological data on the relationship between behavior and disease and addresses the issue of how behavior, emotion and cognition can influence the disease processes. Topics include: measures and concepts, stress and disease, stress and coping, personal control, helplessness and disease, social support and health, reactivity to stress, behavior and hypertension, coronary heart disease, infectious diseases and immune function, and the effectiveness of behavioral interventions in health. Only Juniors and Seniors will be admitted into the course and instructor permission is required.
85-443 Social Factors and Well-Being
Intermittent: 9 units
This course will focus on the role that our social environment plays in our feelings of well-being and in the maintenance of our mental and physical health. Topics to be discussed include marriage, widowhood, loneliness, social support, social participation, social aspects of personality (e.g., social anxiety, extraversion, agreeableness, and hostility), social stressors (betrayal and conflict), discrimination, and socioeconomic status. We will consider how each social factor develops, the extent to which we can alter it or its effects on our lives, and how it influences our overall well-being. Only Juniors and Seniors will be admitted into the course and instructor permission is required.
85-444 Relationships
Fall: 9 units
The primary goal of this course is to introduce you to social psychological theory and research on the topic of relationships. Although a variety of relationship phenomena will be discussed, a heavy emphasis will be placed on research that addresses fundamental processes in close relationships. The coverage of material will include a review of historical roots and classic approaches to the scientific study of relationships, as well as exciting new research and theory on particular subtopics. The majority of class time is spent discussing and evaluating recent research. Special emphasis also is given to learning and critically evaluating the methodological tools that are used to study close relationships. The goal is for students to leave this course with a broad overview of the field and an in-depth understanding of particular subtopics. This is an advanced seminar in which students will be expected to read original research articles and chapters on assigned topics and come to class prepared to discuss the material. Readings will consist of theoretical and empirical articles from psychology journals and related sources. Additional course requirements will involve short, weekly writing assignments, student presentations of research articles, and a written research proposal. Over the course of the semester, students will design and carry out a small-scale, original investigation on a relationships topic of interest.
Prerequisite: 85-340
85-446 Psychology of Gender
Spring: 9 units
This course is devoted to the investigation of psychological gender rather than biological sex. That is, sex differences will be explored from a social psychological (e.g., socialization) perspective. Implications of both male gender role and female gender role in the areas of relationships and health will be the course focus.
Prerequisites: 85-251 or 85-241
85-480 Internship in Clinical Psychology
All Semesters
This course introduces students to Clinical Psychology and related mental health fields. Students' learning is facilitated through classroom-based activities and by learning about clinical research and/or practice in designated field settings. Students spend 3 hours per week in class and 6 hours per week in an applied or research setting. Please contact Dr. Beth Zimick if you are interested in enrolling at bethc@andrew.cmu.edu.
Prerequisites: 85-261 or 85-251
85-481 Seminar in Intervention
Intermittent: 9 units
This course is an introduction to the therapeutic process. Students will be introduced to a variety of therapeutic approaches and techniques (e.g. Solution-Focused, Cognitive, Client Centered, etc.) and will have the opportunity to learn the basic skills associated with each (e.g. Cognitive Restructuring, Mirroring, Empathic Highlighting, etc.). Instruction will entail a mix of discussion and demonstration, and there will be a heavy emphasis on in-class practice of these skills.
Prerequisites: (85-261 and 85-251) or (85-261 and 85-281) or (85-251 and 85-281)
85-482 Internship in Psychology
Fall and Spring
The Internship in Psychology is designed to enable students to gain experience in professional settings related to their studies in Psychology and earn credit for the intellectual work involved. It is the students responsibility to locate an internship site and on-site supervisor, as well as to identify a CMU faculty sponsor. The student registers for the internship by submitting a completed internship form to Theresa Kurutz in Baker Hall 343.
85-484 Practicum in Child Development
Fall and Spring
This guided field experience is designed to help students deepen their understanding of developmental psychology by assisting in a preschool or kindergarten classroom and discussing the ways that their experiences relate to the theories they have learned previously and to new readings. Each student will individually schedule a consistent 6 hours per week helping in a Children's School classroom (preferably 2 or 3 chunks of time). Classroom duties will include working one-on-one and with small groups of students as they do puzzles, art projects, dramatic play, etc., as well as helping with snack, playground supervision, classroom cleanup, and storytime. Each student will be expected to keep a journal 1) relating general experiences to developmental theories and 2) documenting the development of a particular child during the semester. All students will meet for a 1 hour weekly discussion with the director. Discussion topics and related readings will be selected collaboratively, based on issues/questions raised by the group's observations and discussions. This course is typically 9 units, but may be negotiable between 3 and 9.
Prerequisite: 85-221
85-501 Stress, Coping and Well-Being
Intermittent: 9 units
This course will examine basic processes and theory about stress and coping from a psychological perspective. The first part of the course will explore topics related to the psychobiology of stress, stress measurement, and links between stress and health. The second part of the course will explore topics on mechanisms and theoretical perspectives on coping with stress. This will include a consideration of topics such as emotion regulation, self-regulation, coping with traumatic events, alternative medicine approaches, and resilience factors. This class is a small, upper level seminar that will consist of some lecture and extensive class discussion. Active class participation is required.
Prerequisites: 85-310 or 85-340 or 85-320
85-505 Readings In Psychology
All Semesters
As the name implies, the emphasis in the Reading course is on reading articles and books in some specified area. The students work in the course must lead to the production of a written paper which will be read by the instructor directing the readings. Often the reading is related to a research project which the student may wish to conduct. Readings courses have also been used to give students an opportunity to receive instruction in areas which are not included elsewhere in our course listing. The course may be taken for any number of units up to 9, depending upon the amount of work to be done.
85-506 Readings in Psychology
Fall and Spring
As the name implies, the emphasis in the reading course is on reading articles and books in some specified area. The students work in the course must lead to the production of a written paper which will be read by a psychology faculty instructor directing the readings. Often the reading is related to a research project which the student may wish to conduct. Reading courses have also been used to give students an opportunity to receive instruction in areas which are not included elsewhere in our course listing. The course may be taken for any number of units up to 9, depending upon the amount of work to be done. This course is special permission and can only be added in consultation with a psychology faculty member and registered by the Undergraduate administrator, Emilie O'Leary emilier@andrew.cmu.edu.
85-507 Research in Psychology
Fall
This course may include field study, applied work, or laboratory research. The student should have previous training in the basic research skills that will be used in his/her project, especially statistical methods and experimental design. Independent Research Projects will be supervised by a faculty member and must result in a written paper. It is the students responsibility to make arrangements for independent study courses with individual faculty members. This should be done the semester before a student wishes to register for one of these courses. The course may be taken for any number of units up to 12, depending upon the amount of work to be done. Please contact the CMU psychology faculty member you wish to work with to get approval to enroll then email Emilie Rendulic at emilier@andrew.cmu.edu in order to be registered for the course.
85-508 Research in Psychology
Spring
This course may include field study, applied work, or laboratory research. The student should have previous training in the basic research skills that will be used in his/her project, especially statistical methods and experimental design. Independent Research Projects will be supervised by a faculty member and must result in a written paper. It is the students responsibility to make arrangements for independent study courses with individual faculty members. This should be done the semester before a student wishes to register for one of these courses. The course may be taken for any number of units up to 12, depending upon the amount of work to be done.
85-601 Senior Thesis
Fall: 9 units
This course is intended for senior Psychology or Cognitive Science majors who wish to conduct a research project under the direction of a faculty advisor. The project topic is to be selected jointly by the student and the advisor. The project will culminate in a senior paper which will be presented to the Department Head at the end of Fall Semester. Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in a previous research course required to enter, grade of B or better in first semester of senior thesis course required to complete, and permission of instructor. A formal proposal is required in the first semester. This course differs from the Honors Thesis sequence (66-501,502) in that it does not require Honors standing in HSS (i.e., there are no QPA requirements). This course differs from Research in Psychology (85-507,508) in that the student's original contribution to the research is expected to be more substantial, and in that a final written report of the project is to be presented to the Department.
85-602 Senior Thesis
Spring: 9 units
This course is intended for senior Psychology or Cognitive Science majors who wish to conduct a research project under the direction of a faculty advisor. The project topic is to be selected jointly by the student and the advisor. The project will culminate in a senior paper which will be presented to the Department Head at the end of Fall Semester. Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in a previous research course required to enter, grade of B or better in first semester of senior thesis course required to complete, and permission of instructor. A formal proposal is required in the first semester. This course differs from the Honors Thesis sequence (66-501,602) in that it does not require Honors standing in HSS (i.e., there are no QPA requirements). This course differs from Research in Psychology (85-507,508) in that the student's original contribution to the research is expected to be more substantial, and in that a final written report of the project is to be presented to the Department.
85-730 Analytic Research Methods
Intermittent: 12 units
This class will teach students how to apply six major non-experimental research methods used in analytic behavioral analysis. Protocol Analysis. This method is used to study patterns and changes in problem-solving and their matches to theoretical models, including computational models. Corpus Analysis. This method is used to isolate patterns of behavioral and communication usage and change, as revealed through the study of the world-wide web and large computerized databases such as CHILDES, TalkBank, or the British National Corpus. Tools here include text searches and data-mining. Conversation Analysis. This is a microanalytic method used to examine sequencing, repair, and orientation in closely transcribed recordings of spoken interactions, as made available through systems such as the CABank database, as well as recorded programs on YouTube and elsewhere. Coding Systems. This approach seeks to capture interactional and behavioral structures in writing, teaching, interview, and other interactions. Here, there will be a special emphasis on the coding of instructional interactions. Gesture Analysis. This microanalytic method seeks to track patterns in gestural and nonverbal communication, often in association with spoken messages. Profile Analysis. This approach studies differences across learners at various ages and ability levels and group differences involving aphasia, autism, stuttering, dementia, and other individual differences. Students will work with data already available from previous studies, and will also learn to collect their own new datasets. Although the data being examined have been generated through naturalistic processes, they can be analyzed quantitatively using time-series analyses, non-parametric statistics, error matrices, and neural network simulations. In these various analyses, we will also consider how behavioral patterns are shape
85-753 Mindfulness: Science and Practice
Intermittent
This course will focus on blending first-person experience with mindfulness practices (including mindfulness meditation) and learning about the scientific research on mindfulness. Students will engage in guided mindfulness exercises, develop a daily mindfulness practice, and try out different mindfulness training traditions. In addition, much of this course will be focused on applying a critical eye to the theory, measures, mechanisms, and effects of mindfulness (and mindfulness training interventions) across multiple domains cognition, social processes, behavior, biological mechanisms, and health. As such, this will be a small seminar course focused developing first-person experiences of mindfulness and on discussing the debates and opportunities related to the emerging science of mindfulness.
85-762 Seminar on Addiction
Fall: 9 units
This seminar will explore various topics central to the study of drug addiction, with a primary emphasis on psychological and neurobiological theories of drug addiction. We will also discuss research and clinical techniques related to the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of substance use disorders and related problems. Emphasis will be on alcohol and tobacco, but other drugs will be discussed as well. The main course objective is to provide a unifying model for understanding the fundamental aspects of addiction.
85-765 Cognitive Neuroscience
Intermittent
This course will cover fundamental findings and approaches in cognitive neuroscience, with the goal of providing an overview of the field at an advanced level. Topics will include high-level vison, spatial cognition, working memory, long-term memory, learning, language, executive control, and emotion. Each topic will be approached from a variety of methodological directions, for example, computational modeling, cognitive assessment in brain-damaged humans, non-invasive brain monitoring in humans, and single-neuron recording in animals. Lectures will alternate with sessions in seminar format. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or two upper-level psychology courses from the areas of developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, computational modeling of intelligence, neuropsychology or neuroscience.
85-851 Personality and Health
Intermittent
The general purpose of this course is to examine possible connections between personality and physical well-being. Material will be presented at the outset of the semester that is designed to enable students to understand more fully how psychologists think about the concept of personality (what it is and what it does for us), how it is assessed, and how personality and health psychologists do research on the topic. As the semester progresses, we will explore and discuss research that links certain aspects of personality to health, illness, and mortality. The list of personality characteristics to be considered includes (but is not necessarily limited to) optimism/pessimism, conscientiousness, hostility, trait positive and negative affect, life purpose, and chronic goal adjustment strategies. As time permits, select person variables will also be considered, e.g., the impact of depressive mood on health. Class time will be largely taken by discussion of original research papers. Different sets of students will be responsible for leading these discussions. Grades will be based on a combination of class participation, quality of paper presentations, and performance on a final research paper.

Faculty

JOHN R. ANDERSON, Richard King Mellon University Professor of Psychology and Computer Science – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–

MARLENE BEHRMANN, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., University of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–

SHARON CARVER, Director of Children's School, Teaching Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–

SHELDON COHEN, Robert E. Doherty University Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., New York University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–

CHANTE COX-BOYD, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–

DAVID CRESWELL, Associate Professor – Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–

KASEY CRESWELL, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–

BROOKE C. FEENEY, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–

ANNA FISHER, Associate Professor – Ph.D., The Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–

JOHN R. HAYES, Emeritus Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1965–

VICKI S. HELGESON, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., University of Denver; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–

LAURIE HELLER, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–

LORI L. HOLT, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–

MARCEL A. JUST, D. O. Hebb University Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1972–

CHARLES KEMP, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–

DAVID KLAHR, Walter van Dyke Bingham Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–

ROBERTA KLATZKY, Charles J. Queenan Jr., Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–

KENNETH R. KOEDINGER, Professor of HCII – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–

KENNETH KOTOVSKY, Emeritus Professor of Psychology, Director, Undergraduate Studies in Psychology – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–

MARSHA C. LOVETT, Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–

BRIAN MACWHINNEY, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–

KODY MANKE, Visiting Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D, Standford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–

DAVID PLAUT, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1994–

DAVID RAKISON, Associate Professor – D.Phil., University of Sussex; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–

LYNNE M. REDER, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–

MICHAEL F. SCHEIER, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., University of Texas; Carnegie Mellon, 1975–

ROBERT S. SIEGLER, Theresa Heinz Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., State University of New York, Stony Brook; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–

MICHAEL TARR, Professor of Psychology, Head, Department of Psychology – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–

ERIK D. THIESSEN, Associate Professor – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–

TIMOTHY VERSTYNEN, Associate Professor – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley ; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–