Search | Print Options

Search | Print Options

Department of Psychology

Michael Tarr, Department Head
Department Office: Baker Hall 346-C
http://www.cmu.edu/dietrich/psychology/index.html

Can newborn infants perceive the world as we do, or is it just "a blooming buzzing confusion"? Do personality, beliefs and social factors influence health? How do scientists and young children make discoveries, and what abilities make these insights possible? How does brain activity reveal differences in thinking? Can computers think the way people do?

These are some of the questions that psychologists at Carnegie Mellon are trying to answer.

For the student who is majoring in Psychology, Cognitive Science or Neuroscience, studying with faculty who are on the leading edge of research on questions like the above can be a very exciting experience.

The Psychology Department at Carnegie Mellon has long been noted as one of the pioneering Psychology Departments in the world, particularly in such areas as cognitive psychology, cognitive science, social psychology, developmental psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and health psychology. The Psychology Department offers 5 majors: B.A. and B.S. degrees in Psychology, as well as a B.S. degree in Cognitive Science and together with the Department of Biological Sciences, a unified B.S. double major in Psychology and Biological Sciences, and an Intercollege major in Neuroscience.

The Major in Psychology

Psychology is a discipline that embraces both biological and social sciences. It is a science concerned with establishing principles and laws regarding the ways in which people think and behave through the scientific study of human behavior.

The orientation of the Carnegie Mellon Psychology curriculum is toward developing highly skilled and knowledgeable graduates. About half of our graduates go on to graduate or professional school. The remainder seek to expand their problem-oriented analytic skills to qualify themselves for job opportunities beyond those typically open to liberal arts students.

Majors in the department are expected not only to learn about findings already established by psychologists, but also to become proficient in the investigation and analysis of behavior. This includes observing behavior, formulating hypotheses, designing experiments to test these hypotheses, running experiments, performing statistical analysis, and writing reports. The department has many resources for students to use in acquiring these skills. For instance, students interested in child development may be involved in the child development laboratory and observational facilities which are a part of the Carnegie Mellon Children's School which operates under the department's aegis. Students interested in health or clinical psychology might have opportunities to do internships in applied settings, and all Psychology majors have access to extensive computer facilities for data analysis and simulation work. The department also has a state of the art set of undergraduate research laboratories and computer clusters, and through the Scientific Imaging & Brain Research Center, a magnet  is in use for conducting brain imaging studies using fMRI.

In addition to formal class work, students are encouraged to participate in elective research projects where they may register and receive credit for freshmen research experience course, 85-506 Readings in Psychology, Fall research experience in 85-507 Research in Psychology or Spring research experience in 85-508 Research in Psychology.  In the research in psychology course, the student may work on an ongoing research projects or develop and carry out a new research project with a faculty member. There is university and departmental funding available to help support student-initiated research projects and student travel to present research results at scientific meetings and conferences. In the Readings courses, the student reads extensively on a particular topic. The faculty member and student meet to discuss the readings, and the student writes a paper on the topic selected. The Psychology Department Website, provides descriptions of faculty research interests that the student can use in determining who should be approached to supervise a particular research or reading project.  

Students interested in gaining field work experience via a number of internship opportunities available to them can recieve credit through 85-482 Internship in Psychology,  85-480 Internship in Clinical Psychology or 85-484 Practicum in Child Development.  Clinical internships are available with a variety of clinical settings including the prestigious Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic (the teaching hospital of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh Medical School). During the internship, students get first-hand experience with different clinical populations. Developmental Practicum experience is available in the department-run CMU Children's School.  

Psychology Curriculum

Mathematics19-20 units
21-111-21-112Calculus I-II20
or 
21-120-21-122Differential and Integral Calculus - Integration and Approximation *20
or
21-120-21-256Differential and Integral Calculus - Multivariate Analysis19

*Students who place out of 21-120 with AP credit are only required to successfully complete 21-122 or 21-256 instead of the full two semester sequence.  

*21-124 may be substituted for 21-122 for those interested in Neuroscience or Biology.  

Statistics Sequence18 units
36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences *9

*In certain circumstances, 36-202 can be a substitute for 36-309 with prior approval. 

Breadth Requirement36 units
85-102Introduction to Psychology *9
Survey Courses - Complete Three
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-213 Human Information Processing and Artifical Intelligence
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-221Principles of Child Development9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-251Personality9

* A fourth survey course can be taken in place of Introduction to Psychology 

Research Methods*18 units
Complete two courses.
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
85-314Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods9
85-320Research Methods in Developmental Psychology9
85-330Analytic Research Methods9
85-340Research Methods in Social Psychology9

* Prerequisites for all Research Methods courses:  36-309 or equivalent, and corresponding survey course.

Advanced Courses18 units

Advanced psychology courses exist within four areas (cognitive, cognitive neuroscience, developmental, social and health psychology.) Any advanced content course or seminar in psychology or any psychology course higher than 85-350. Exceptions for the advanced course requirement are: 85-480, 85-482, 85-484, 85-484, 85-506, 85-507, 85-508, 85-601, 85-602, 66-501, 66-502.

Computer Science Requirement10 units
15-110Principles of Computing10
Natural Science Requirement (B.A. 18 units, B.S. 36 units, both of which include 9 units of GenEd Science)

The Psychology major requires (for B.S. candidates) three additional natural science courses (with two in the same science) beyond the College's General Education natural science requirement. For the B.A. the requirement is one course beyond the General Education requirement in natural science. 

These courses can be selected from the following areas: 

03-XXX           Biology*

09-XXX           Chemistry

33-XXX           Physics

*Given the growing relevance of biology to psychology, it is strongly recommended that for the B.S. a minimum of two courses in biology be included as part of the natural science requirement.

Additional Major in Psychology

In order to complete an additional major in Psychology, a student must fulfill all of the Psychology major requirements within the department -- in other words, the breadth requirement, computing requirement, three survey courses at the 200-level, two research methods courses, and two advanced courses. These courses must include at least 81 units, plus calculus prerequisites and the 36-201 statistics course or equivalent and 36-309 . In addition, B.S. candidates must take the three-course science requirement and B.A. candidates complete one science course beyond the GenEd requirement.

Concentrations within the Psychology Major

Students who wish to focus their Psychology program on a specific area can do so either by the careful selection of Psychology elective courses focusing on their area of interest or by pursuing one of the following concentrations.  Students must obtain a concentration form from the Undergraduate Program Coordinator, Emilie O'Leary, receive approval from their psychology faculty advisor, then returning the signed copy to Emilie in Baker Hall 339.  The completion of a concentration will be recognized in the Psychology Graduation Brochure.

Health-Psychology Concentration

For Psychology majors who wish to have a focus of their study on Health Psychology, the following courses should be selected as part of their Psychology Major in conjunction with their Psychology advisor's approval.

As part of the B.S. science requirement:

 03-121 Modern Biology

  + one additional Biology course

As part of the psychology breadth requirement:

85-219 Biological Foundations of Behavior

85-241 Social Psychology

 As part of the psychology Research Methods requirement:

85-340 Research Methods in Social Psychology

As part of the advanced coursework in psychology requirement, at least two of the following:

85-353 Mindfulness: Science and Practice

85-442 Health Psychology

85-443 Social Factors and Well-Being


85-446 Psychology of Gender

85-501 Stress, Coping and Well-Being

Cognitive-Neuroscience Concentration

For Psychology majors who wish to have a focus of their study be on Cognitive Neuroscience, the following courses should be selected as part of their Psychology Major in conjunction with their Psychology advisor's approval.

As part of the B.S. Science requirement:

03-121 Modern Biology

03-363 Systems Neuroscience

As part of the psychology Breadth requirement:

85-211 Cognitive Psychology

85-219 Biological Foundations of Behavior

As part of the Research Methods requirement:

85-310 Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology

85-314 Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods

As part of the advanced coursework in psychology requirement, at least two of the following:

85-356 Music and Mind: The Cognitive Neuroscience of Sound

85-370 Perception

85-406 Autism: Psychological and Neuroscience Perspectives

85-414 Cognitive Neuropsychology

85-419 Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing

85-429 Cognitive Brain Imaging

Developmental Psychology Concentration

For Psychology majors who wish to have a focus of their study be on Developmental Psychology, the following courses should be selected as part of their Psychology Major in conjunction with their Psychology advisor's approval.

As part of the B.S. science requirement:

03-121 Modern Biology

As part of the psychology Breadth requirement:

85-221 Principles of Child Development

As part of the psychology Research Methods Requirement:

85-320 Research Methods in Developmental Psychology

As part of the advanced coursework in psychology requirement, at least two of the following:

85-354 Infant Language Development

85-363 Attention, Its Development and Disorders

85-406 Autism: Psychological and Neuroscience Perspectives

85-423 Cognitive Development

85-425 Child Psychopathology and Treatment

Additional course requirement, one of the following:

85-484 Practicum in Child Development

03-350 Developmental Biology

Cognitive Psychology Concentration

For Psychology majors who wish to have a focus of their study be on Cognitive Psychology and/or Cognitive Modeling, the following courses should be selected as part of their Psychology Major in conjunction with their Psychology advisor's approval.

As part of the B.S. science requirement:

03-121 Modern Biology

As part of the psychology Breadth requirement:

85-211 Cognitive Psychology

As part of the psychology Research Methods requirement:

85-310 Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology

As part of the advanced coursework in psychology requirement, at least two of the following:

85-356 Music and Mind: The Cognitive Neuroscience of Sound

85-370 Perception

85-380 In Search of Mind: The History of Psychology

85-390 Human Memory

85-392 Human Expertise

85-395 Applications of Cognitive Science

85-406 Autism: Psychological and Neuroscience Perspectives

85-412 Cognitive Modeling

85-414 Cognitive Neuropsychology

85-419 Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing

85-421 Language and Thought

85-426 Learning in Humans and Machines

85-429 Cognitive Brain Imaging

Social-Personality Psychology Concentration

For Psychology majors who wish to have a focus of their study be on Social and/or Personality Psychology, the following courses should be selected as part of their Psychology Major in conjunction with their Psychology advisor's approval.

As part of the Psychology Breadth requirement:

85-241 Social Psychology

85-251 Personality

As part of the Psychology Research Methods requirement:

85-340 Research Methods in Social Psychology

As part of the advanced coursework in psychology requirement, at least two of the following:

85-352 Evolutionary Psychology

85-358 Pro-Social Behavior

85-375 Crosscultural Psychology

85-377 Attitudes and Persuasion

85-443 Social Factors and Well-Being

85-444 Relationships

85-446 Psychology of Gender

85-501 Stress, Coping and Well-Being

Clinical/Counseling Psychology Concentration

For Psychology majors who wish to have a focus of their study be on Clinical/Counseling Psychology, the following courses should be selected as part of their Psychology Major in conjunction with their Psychology advisor's approval.

As part of the Psychology Breadth requirement at least one of the following:

85-241 Social Psychology

85-251 Personality

Required additional coursework:

85-261 Abnormal Psychology

85-281 Introduction to Clinical Psychology

85-480 Internship in Clinical Psychology

As part of the Psychology Research Methods requirements:

85-340 Research Methods in Social Psychology

As part of the advanced coursework in psychology requirement, at least two of the following:

85-375 Crosscultural Psychology

85-377 Attitudes and Persuasion

85-406 Autism: Psychological and Neuroscience Perspectives

85-414 Cognitive Neuropsychology

85-425 Child Psychopathology and Treatment

85-442 Health Psychology

85-443 Social Factors and Well-Being

85-444 Relationships

85-446 Psychology of Gender

85-481 Seminar in Intervention

85-501 Stress, Coping and Well-Being

Neuroscience Major

The Psychology Department at Carnegie Mellon University has a major focus on the role of the brain and nervous system in cognition and behavior, including biological approaches involving the health impact that arises from the interaction of behavior with the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems.  These interests are manifested in faculty research, departmental and university centers that operate from or heavily involve the department (e.g., the Center for Cognitive Brain Imaging, and the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition) as well as undergraduate coursework and graduate coursework.  For undergraduates, there are a number of ways in which students with an interest in these approaches can pursue that interest in an organized fashion.  Major requirements can be found on the Neuroscience website.

Carnegie Mellon University recently launched BrainHub – an initiative designed to leverage its core strengths in cognitive science, engineering, and computer science, and our emerging excellence in biological sciences, to harness the technology that helps the world explore brain and behavior.  Students will be able to take advantage of exciting opportunities such as lectures hosted on various topics, newly funded CMU campus research projects trying to answer pressing questions in brain science and the many global partnerships with other institutions all with the same motivating goal to enhance and increase research in brain sciences.

Finally, for any interested student, there is a minor in Cognitive Neuroscience available through the Psychology department (see below).  

 

Unified Double Major in Psychology & Biological Sciences

This major is intended to reflect the interdisciplinary nature of current research in the fields of biology and psychology, as well as the national trend in some professions to seek individuals broadly trained in both the social and natural sciences.

Note: Students entering from the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences will earn a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and Biological Sciences. Students in the Mellon College of Science will earn a Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences and Psychology. Students in the joint Science and Humanities Scholars (SHS) program can complete the SHS educational core and choose either departmental order for their diploma.

Depending on a student's home college (DC or MCS), General Education (GenEd) requirements will be different. GenEd requirements for DC and MCS are found on their respective Catalog pages.

Degree Requirements:
Biological Sciences Units
03-121Modern Biology9
or 03-151 Honors Modern Biology
03-220Genetics9
03-231/232Biochemistry I9
03-320Cell Biology9
03-343Experimental Techniques in Molecular Biology12
03-411Topics in Research1
03-412Topics in Research1
03-xxxGeneral Biology Elective 19
03-3xxAdvanced Biology Elective 118
Total Biology units77

1 Please see description and requirements for electives under the B.S. in Biological Sciences section of this Catalog.

Mathematics, Statistics, Physics and Computer Science Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration and Approximation10
or 21-124 Calculus II for Biologists and Chemists
36-247Statistics for Lab Sciences9
or 36-201 Statistical Reasoning and Practice
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences9
33-121Physics I for Science Students MCS students must complete Physics II also (33-122)12
15-110Principles of Computing10-12
or 15-112 Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science
or 02-201 Programming for Scientists
99-10xComputing at Carnegie Mellon3
Total Science units63-65
Chemistry Units
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
09-217Organic Chemistry I9
or 09-219 Modern Organic Chemistry
09-218Organic Chemistry II9
or 09-220 Modern Organic Chemistry II
09-207Techniques in Quantitative Analysis9-12
or 09-221 Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis
09-208Techniques for Organic Synthesis and Analysis9-12
or 09-222 Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis
Total Chemistry units56-62
Psychology Courses Units
85-102Introduction to Psychology9
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-2xxSurvey Psychology Courses *18
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-340 Research Methods in Social Psychology
or 85-320 Research Methods in Developmental Psychology
or 85-314 Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods
or 85-330 Analytic Research Methods
85-3xxAdvanced Psychology Electives18
Total Psychology units63

 * Excluding 85-261 Abnormal Psychology

Additional Advanced Elective

9 units(Choose one of the following courses)

85-3xxAdvanced Psychology Elective9
or
03-3xxAdvanced Biology Elective9

Additional Laboratory or Research Methods

9-12 units(Choose one of the following courses)

03-344Experimental Biochemistry12
03-345Experimental Cell and Developmental Biology12
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
85-314Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods9
85-320Research Methods in Developmental Psychology9
85-340Research Methods in Social Psychology9
Elective Units Units
Free Electives33-36
MCS Nontechnical Breadth or DC General Education requirements36-48
Total Elective units69-84

360

Minimum number of units required for degree:

The Major in Cognitive Science

The Psychology Department offers a B.S. degree in Cognitive Science. The field of cognitive science has grown out of increasingly active interaction among psychology, linguistics, artificial intelligence, philosophy, and neuroscience. All of these fields share the goal of understanding intelligence. By combining these diverse perspectives, students of cognitive science are able to understand cognition at a deep level. Because this major is administered by the Psychology Department, it focuses on human cognition and the experimental study of the human mind as illuminated by the techniques of the above disciplines.
 

Cognitive Science Curriculum

The Cognitive Science major is only offered as a B.S. degree. Candidates should complete before the junior year the two-semester calculus sequence 21-120 /21-256 (or alternatively 21-120/21-122)* and a statistics sequence (36-201 or equivalent and if possible, 36-309 ). In addition, candidates complete 15-112 Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science, as their departmental computing course.

Because of the number and sequential nature of required courses, prospective Cognitive Science majors are encouraged to begin course work for the major prior to junior year. In particular, completion of calculus, 36-201, and 85-211 or 85-213 before the junior year will enable students to complete 85-310 and 36-309 and by the Fall semester of their sophomore or junior year and, if interested, to then take advantage of research opportunities in the department.

*The 3-Semester sequence 21-111 /21-112/21-256 may be substituted by students who have already taken 21-111 before deciding on the major.                                                                                                                                                                          

Computing Prerequisite10 units
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
Mathematics29-30 units
21-120-21-122Differential and Integral Calculus - Integration and Approximation *20
or
21-120-21-256Differential and Integral Calculus - Multivariate Analysis *19
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10

*Students who place out of 21-120 are only required to successfully complete 21-122 or 21-256 instead of the full two-semester sequence.

Statistics Sequence18 units
36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences9
Computational/Cognitive Modeling Core29–31 units
Two of the following: Units
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
15-150Principles of Functional Programming10
15-251Great Theoretical Ideas in Computer Science12
Plus one of the following: Units
85-412Cognitive Modeling9
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing9
85-426Learning in Humans and Machines9
Cognitive Psychology Core27 units
Units
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-213 Human Information Processing and Artifical Intelligence
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
Plus two of the following (one of which must be 85-3xx or 85-4xx): Units
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-370Perception9
85-390Human Memory9
85-395Applications of Cognitive Science9
85-408Visual Cognition9
85-414Cognitive Neuropsychology9
80-381Meaning in Language9
80-310Formal Logic9
80-314Logic and Artificial Intelligence9
80-315Modal Logic9
80-316Causation Probability & Al9
80-383Language in Use9

Cognitive Science Concentration

(3 courses, concentration approval required)

These three courses are chosen in conjunction with your advisor to form a coherent area of concentration from the course list under "Cognitive Science Concentration" in the current Undergraduate Catalog.  Before proceeding with the choice of courses, students must fill out the concentration form, obtained from Emilie O'Leary in Baker Hall 339, with a description of the concentration area and the planned set of three courses.  Courses not represented on the list may, with pre-approval of advisor and department, be used to satisfy part of this requirement.  The three courses are not required to be within any single category below but be coherent within the major and the focus may vary across disciplinary boundaries.  Courses taken for the major requirements can not be double counted in the concentration.

Computer Science36 units
15-385Introduction to Computer Vision6
15-453Formal Languages, Automata, and Computability9
10-601Introduction to Machine Learning (Masters)12
05-410User-Centered Research and Evaluation12
05-432Personalized Online Learning12
Psychology
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-352Evolutionary Psychology9
85-354Infant Language Development9
85-370Perception9
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-380In Search of Mind: The History of Psychology9
85-390Human Memory9
85-392Human Expertise9
85-395Applications of Cognitive Science9
85-406Autism: Psychological and Neuroscience Perspectives9
85-412Cognitive Modeling9
85-414Cognitive Neuropsychology9
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing9
85-421Language and Thought9
85-423Cognitive Development9
85-426Learning in Humans and Machines9
85-429Cognitive Brain Imaging9
Philosophy
80-210Logic and Proofs9
80-211Logic and Mathematical Inquiry9
80-220Philosophy of Science9
80-254Analytic Philosophy9
80-255Pragmatism9
80-270Philosophy of Mind9
80-310Formal Logic9
80-311Undecidability and Incompleteness9
80-314Logic and Artificial Intelligence9
Linguistics
76-385Introduction to Discourse Analysis9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
Decision Sciences
88-302Behavioral Decision Making9
Neurosciences
03-362Cellular Neuroscience9
03-363Systems Neuroscience9
42-202Physiology9
15-386Neural Computation9
15-883Computational Models of Neural Systems12
Science Requirement18 units (minimum)

The Cognitive Science program requires two additional science courses (in the same science) beyond the college's two-course Science General Education requirement.

These can be selected from any one of the following areas.
03-xxxBiology *
09-xxxChemistry
33-xxxPhysics

* Those interested in a cognitive neuroscience focus are recommended to take biology courses, including if possible, 03-362, or 03-363.

Additional Major in Cognitive Science

In order to complete a double major in Cognitive Science, a student must fulfill the major requirements as listed under the Cognitive Science major. These include the programming requirement (15-112), the Mathematics and Statistics prerequisites, Computational/Cognitive Modeling Core, The Cognitive Psychology Core, the Cognitive Science Concentration Requirement, and the Supplementary Science Requirement. Students will be assigned a department advisor to help plan their program of studies in Cognitive Science.

Minors in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience

72 unitsMinor in Psychology

I. Introductory course
85-102Introduction to Psychology *9

*A survey course can be taken in place of 85-102.

II. Area Survey courses
Complete two courses.
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-213 Human Information Processing and Artifical Intelligence
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-221Principles of Child Development9
85-241Social Psychology9
85-251Personality9
III. Statistics
36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences9
27 unitsUpper Level Courses

Complete three courses from categories IV and V, with at least one course from each.

IV. Research Methods Courses * (minimum 9 units)
85-310Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology9
85-314Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods9
85-320Research Methods in Developmental Psychology9
85-330Analytic Research Methods9
85-340Research Methods in Social Psychology9

* Prerequisites for all Research Methods courses: 36-309 and the appropriate survey course.

V. Advanced courses (minimum 9 units)

Advanced psychology courses exist within four areas (cognitive, cognitive neuroscience, developmental, social and health psychology.) Any advanced content course or seminar in psychology or any psychology course higher than 85-350. Exceptions for the advanced course requirement are: 85-48085-48285-48485-48485-50685-50785-50885-60185-60266-50166-502.

Minor in Cognitive Neuroscience63 units

The minor in Cognitive Neuroscience offered by the Department of Psychology is similar to the Neuroscience Minor offered by the Department of Biological Sciences.  The differences between the two forms of the minor are determined by one required course, and additionally, by the students' choice of distribution electives.  The requirements for the Cognitive Neuroscience Minor include 7 courses: four required courses, and three distribution and elective courses.  

Because of the curriculum within this minor may overlap with some degree requirements, no more than 2 courses fulfilling Neuroscience or Cognitive Neuroscience Minor requirements may count towards a student's major or other minor requirements.

Cognitive Neuroscience Curriculum 

Required Coursework                                                                                                                 
03-121Modern Biology9
03-363Systems Neuroscience9
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-211Cognitive Psychology9
or 85-213 Human Information Processing and Artifical Intelligence
Distribution Requirements
Three courses, including at least 1 from each of the following categories
Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience
85-314Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods9
85-412Cognitive Modeling9
85-414Cognitive Neuropsychology9
85-419Introduction to Parallel Distributed Processing9
85-429Cognitive Brain Imaging9
15-386Neural Computation9
15-883Computational Models of Neural Systems12
36-746Statistical Methods for Neuroscience and Psychology12
Cognitive Neuroscience Electives
03-260Neurobiology of Disease9
03-362Cellular Neuroscience9
03-364Developmental Neuroscience9
03-365Neural Correlates of Learning and Memory9
85-356Music and Mind: The Cognitive Neuroscience of Sound9
85-370Perception9
85-385Auditory Perception: Sense of Sound9
85-390Human Memory9
85-406Autism: Psychological and Neuroscience Perspectives9

The Honors Program

The Honors Program provides recognition of outstanding performance by students in the Psychology department. Participation enables students to pursue their own research ideas through completion of an honors thesis. The honors thesis is completed during the senior year. By completing a thesis, the student earns 18 units of credit and qualifies for graduation with “College Honors.” To qualify for the Honors Program, the student must maintain a quality point average of at least 3.50 in the major and 3.25 overall.  More information on the Honor program can be found here.

A year long departmental senior thesis course exists (66-501 and 66-502) for students interested in pursuing a sizable research project who do not qualify for the honors program.  More information can be obtained by contacting Emilie O'Leary at emilier@andrew.cmu.edu.

Faculty

JOHN R. ANDERSON, Richard King Mellon University Professor of Psychology and Computer Science – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.
MARLENE BEHRMANN, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., University of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
SHARON CARVER, Director of Children's School, Teaching Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
SHELDON COHEN, Robert E. Doherty Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., New York University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.
CHANTE COX-BOYD, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.
DAVID CRESWELL, Associate Professor – Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.
KASEY CRESWELL, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.
BROOKE C. FEENEY, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.
ANNA FISHER, Associate Professor – Ph.D., The Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.
JOHN R. HAYES, Emeritus Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1965–.
VICKI S. HELGESON, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., University of Denver; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.
LAURIE HELLER, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.
LORI L. HOLT, Associate Professor – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.
MARCEL A. JUST, D. O. Hebb Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1972–.
CHARLES KEMP, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.
DAVID KLAHR, Walter van Dyke Bingham Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.
ROBERTA KLATZKY, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
KENNETH R. KOEDINGER, Professor of HCII – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.
KENNETH KOTOVSKY, Professor of Psychology, Director, Undergraduate Studies in Psychology – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.
MARSHA C. LOVETT, Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
BRIAN MACWHINNEY, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.
DAVID PLAUT, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1994–.
DAVID RAKISON, Associate Professor – D.Phil., University of Sussex; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
LYNNE M. REDER, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.
MICHAEL F. SCHEIER, Professor of Psychology, Head, Psychology Department – Ph.D., University of Texas; Carnegie Mellon, 1975–.
ROBERT S. SIEGLER, Theresa Heinz Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., State University of New York, Stony Brook; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.
JAMES J. STASZEWSKI, Research Professor – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.
MICHAEL TARR, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.
ERIK D. THIESSEN, Associate Professor – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.
TIMOTHY VERSTYNEN, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley ; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.

Back To Top

Faculty

JOHN R. ANDERSON, Richard King Mellon University Professor of Psychology and Computer Science – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.
MARLENE BEHRMANN, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., University of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
SHARON CARVER, Director of Children's School, Teaching Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
SHELDON COHEN, Robert E. Doherty Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., New York University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.
CHANTE COX-BOYD, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.
DAVID CRESWELL, Associate Professor – Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.
KASEY CRESWELL, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.
BROOKE C. FEENEY, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.
ANNA FISHER, Associate Professor – Ph.D., The Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.
JOHN R. HAYES, Emeritus Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1965–.
VICKI S. HELGESON, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., University of Denver; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.
LAURIE HELLER, Associate Teaching Professor – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.
LORI L. HOLT, Associate Professor – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.
MARCEL A. JUST, D. O. Hebb Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1972–.
CHARLES KEMP, Associate Professor – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.
DAVID KLAHR, Walter van Dyke Bingham Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.
ROBERTA KLATZKY, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
KENNETH R. KOEDINGER, Professor of HCII – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.
KENNETH KOTOVSKY, Professor of Psychology, Director, Undergraduate Studies in Psychology – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.
MARSHA C. LOVETT, Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
BRIAN MACWHINNEY, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.
DAVID PLAUT, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1994–.
DAVID RAKISON, Associate Professor – D.Phil., University of Sussex; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
LYNNE M. REDER, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.
MICHAEL F. SCHEIER, Professor of Psychology, Head, Psychology Department – Ph.D., University of Texas; Carnegie Mellon, 1975–.
ROBERT S. SIEGLER, Theresa Heinz Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., State University of New York, Stony Brook; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.
JAMES J. STASZEWSKI, Research Professor – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.
MICHAEL TARR, Professor of Psychology – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.
ERIK D. THIESSEN, Associate Professor – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.
TIMOTHY VERSTYNEN, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley ; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.