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Department of Philosophy

David Danks, Department Head
Office: Baker Hall 161
http://www.hss.cmu.edu/philosophy/index.php

The Department of Philosophy was founded in 1985 and reflects the tradition of philosophy as a central discipline in the humanities. The department has achieved an international reputation through the acclaimed research of its members and its innovative educational programs, not only in traditional topics such as ethics, philosophy of mind, logic, and theory of knowledge, but in such contemporary and applied areas as automated theorem proving, machine learning, the foundations of statistics, causal discovery, forward learning theory, game and decision theory, conflict resolution, and business ethics.

Philosophy thrives through contact with other disciplines. Interdisciplinary work, a traditional strength of the Carnegie Mellon community, is vital to the department and is reflected in the courses we offer, many of which incorporate substantive material from a range of other disciplines. Some courses are actually team-taught with professors from other departments and schools around the university.

Our programs are designed to develop our students' analytical sophistication and their practical and theoretical skills in specializations outside the department (see the sample curricula below). The department welcomes and, indeed, encourages minors and additional majors from other disciplines who are interested in reflecting on the foundation of their own subjects. The department offers two different undergraduate major programs, and jointly sponsors two interdepartmental majors: Ethics, History, and Public Policy (with the Department of History), and Linguistics (with English, Modern Languages, and Psychology):

  • the B.A. or B.S. in Ethics, History, and Public Policy (interdisciplinary major with Department of History)
  • the B.S. in Logic and Computation
  • the B.A. in Philosophy
  • the B.A. in Linguistics (interdisciplinary major with Departments of English, Modern Languages, and Psychology)

The major in Logic and Computation is perhaps the most non-traditional of the department's majors. It offers students a firm background in computer science, together with a solid grounding in logic, philosophy, and mathematics. This reflects the department's commitment to the use of formal, analytic methods in addressing philosophical issues. A flexible system of electives allows students to focus their efforts in any of a wide range of disciplines, from engineering to the fine arts. As a capstone to the program, students engage in original research in their senior year, and write a thesis under the direction of an advisor.

The department also sponsors four minor programs:

  • the minor in Ethics
  • the minor in Linguistics
  • the minor in Logic and Computation
  • the minor in Philosophy

Finally, the department offers two master's programs directly extending the departmental majors. Both programs are coordinated with and build on the undergraduate programs, so that majors can complete the requirements for the master's degree in one additional year:

  • the M.S. in Logic and Computation
  • the M.A. in Philosophy

Students who choose the appropriate specialized track in the Logic and Computation major (namely, sample 2 of the Curricula listed below) can be admitted to the M.S. program in Language and Information Technology offered by the School of Computer Science. To complete the discussion of departmental programs, it should be mentioned that the department sponsors as part of the Program in Pure and Applied Logic (offered jointly with the Departments of Computer Science and Mathematics) a Ph.D. in Logic, Computation, and Methodology.

The Major in Ethics, History, and Public Policy

Alex John London, Director
Office: Baker Hall 150A
Email: ajlondon@andrew.cmu.edu

http://www.cmu.edu/hss/ehpp/

The B.A./B.S. in Ethics, History, and Public Policy is an interdepartmental major offered jointly by the Departments of History and Philosophy. It prepares students for leadership positions by providing them with a rigorous, interdisciplinary humanistic and social-scientific education. It also serves as an excellent springboard for graduate study in a wide variety of disciplines such as law, public policy, ethics, and advocacy.  The program focuses equally on the historical understanding of how modern-day problems have evolved, and the importance of developing clear criteria for ethical decision-making. The capstone project course provides students with the opportunity to engage with real-world public policy challenges using the methods, theories, and knowledge that they have gained through the major. Offered jointly by the departments of History and Philosophy, the B.A./B.S. in EHPP encourages specialization, internship experiences, and research in a wide range of policy areas.

Curriculum

Students graduating with a primary major in Ethics, History, and Public Policy may elect to receive either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science Degree (additional requirements apply; see below). Basic requirements include 120 units encompassing 9 units in Economics, 36 units in History, 36 units in Philosophy, 27 units of elective courses, and a 12-unit senior capstone course. This program may also be taken as an additional (e.g., second) major.  All courses toward the major must be taken for a letter grade, and 79-200 and 79-300must be passed with a grade of "C" or better.

I. Economics Requirement9 units
Choose one of the following:
73-100Principles of Economics9
88-220Policy Analysis I9

3

II. History Core36 units

Choose one 9-unit course from each category below:

Policy History (9 units)

79-300History of American Public Policy9

U.S. History (9 units)

79-240Development of American Culture9
79-24920th/21st Century U.S. History9

Non-U.S. History (9 units)

79-202Flesh and Spirit: Early Modern Europe, 1400-17509
79-203Social and Political Change in 20th Century Central and Eastern Europe9
79-20520th/21st Century Europe9
79-207Development of European Culture9
79-222Between Revolutions: The Development of Modern Latin America9
79-223Mexico: From the Aztec Empire to the Drug War9
79-226African History: Earliest Times to 17809
79-227African History: Height of Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade to the End of Apartheid9
79-229Origins of the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1880-19489
79-230Arab-Israeli Conflict and Peace Process since 19489
79-237Comparative Slavery9
79-251India/America: Democracy, Diversity, Development9
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China: From the Birth of Mao ... to Now9
79-264Tibet and China: History and Propaganda9
79-265Russian History: From the First to the Last Tsar9
79-266Russian History: From Communism to Capitalism9
79-307Religion and Politics in the Middle East9

Historical Methods and Approaches (9 units)

79-200Introduction to Historical Research & Writing9
III. Philosophy Core36 units

Choose one 9-unit course from each category below. No more than 9 units at the 100 level may be counted toward this requirement.

Ethics (9 units)

80-130Introduction to Ethics9
80-230Ethical Theory9

Political Philosophy (9 units)

80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-334Social and Political Philosophy9

Foundations of Social Science (9 units)

80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
80-324Philosophy of Economics9
80-337Philosophy, Politics & Economics9

Applied Philosophy (9 units)

80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-247Ethics and Global Economics9
80-335Deliberative Democracy: Theory and Practice9
80-348Health Development and Human Rights9
80-447Global Justice9
IV. Senior Capstone Project Course12 units
79-449EHPP Project Course
[cross-listed]
12
80-449EHPP Project Course12

The Ethics, History and Public Policy Project Course is required for the Ethics, History and Public Policy major and is taken in the fall semester of the senior year. In this capstone course, Ethics, History and Public Policy majors carry out a collaborative research project that examines a compelling current policy issue that can be illuminated with historical research and philosophical and policy analysis. The students develop an original research report based on both archival and contemporary policy analysis and they present their results to a client organization in the community.

V. Elective Courses27 units

Choose any three courses from any category or categories shown below.  Substitution of elective courses that cohere with a student's interest or concentration may be allowed after consultation with and approval from the Director.

Engineering and Public Policy (some courses have prerequisites; see EPP catalog listing)
19-424Energy and the Environment9
Business
70-311Organizational Behavior9
70-321Negotiation and Conflict Resolution9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-364Business Law9
70-365International Trade and International Law9
70-430International Management9
Economics (some courses have prerequisities; see Economics catalog listing)
73-148Environmental Economics9
73-310Evolution of Economic Ideas and Analysis9
73-352Public Economics9
73-358Economics of the Environment and Natural Resources9
73-359Benefit-Cost Analysis9
73-365Firms, Market Structures, and Strategy9
73-372International Money and Finance9
73-375History of Money and Monetary Policy9
73-408Law and Economics9
73-476American Economic History9
English
76-492Rhetoric of Public Policy9

History

Courses from the EHPP History Core (above) may be taken as electives only if they are not being used to fulfill the core requirement. Double counting is not permitted.

79-217The War in Vietnam9
79-221Development and Democracy in Latin America9
79-231American Foreign Policy: 1945-Present9
79-233The United States and the Middle East since 19459
79-242African American History: Reconstruction to the Present9
79-250Running for President: Campaigns & Elections in History of American Presidency9
79-253American Massacres in History and Memory6
79-267The Soviet Union in World War II: Military, Political, and Social History9
79-288Bananas, Baseball, and Borders: Latin America and the United States9
79-298Mobile Phones & Social Media in Development & Human Rights: A Critical Appraisal6
79-299From Newton to the Nuclear Bomb: History of Science, 1750-19509
79-301History of Surveillance: From the Plantation to Edward Snowden6
79-302Drone Warfare and Killer Robots: Ethics, Law, Politics, and Strategy6
79-303Pittsburgh and the Transformation of Modern Urban America6
79-305Moneyball Nation: Data in American Life9
79-310Modern U. S. Business History: 1870 to the Present9
79-315The Politics of Water: Global Controversies, Past and Present9
79-320Women, Politics, and Protest9
79-325U.S. Gay and Lesbian History6
79-331Body Politics: Women and Health in America9
79-336Oil & Water: Middle East Perspectives6
79-338History of Education in America9
79-339Juvenile Delinquency and Film (1920 to "The Wire")9
79-340Juvenile Delinquency and Juvenile Justice9
79-342Introduction to Science and Technology Studies9
79-349The Holocaust in Historical Perspective9
79-358Nazi Ghettos: From Spatial Segregation to Killing Zones6
79-370Disasters in American History (2):Epidemics & Fires6
79-371African American Urban History9
79-374American Environmental History: Critical Issues9
79-381Energy and Empire: How Fossil Fuels Changed the World9
79-389Stalin and Stalinism9

Philosophy

Courses from the EHPP Philosophy Core (above) may be taken as electives only if they are not being used to fulfill the core requirement. Double counting is not permitted.

80-256Modern Moral Philosophy9
80-305Choices, Decisions, and Games9
80-405Game Theory9
Institute for Politics and Strategy
84-310International Political Economy and Organizations9
84-380Grand Strategy in the United States9
84-393Legislative Decision Making: US Congress9
84-402Judicial Politics and Behavior9
Social and Decision Sciences
88-223Decision Analysis9
88-281Topics in Law: 1st Amendment9
88-345Perspectives on Industrial Research and Development9
88-371Entrepreneurship, Regulation and Technological Change9
88-387Social Norms and Economics9
88-444Public Policy and Regulation9
VI. Bachelor of Science Option

Students may elect to earn a Bachelor of Science rather than a Bachelor of Arts degree by completing two courses from the list below, or by petitioning the Director of EHPP to accept equivalent courses as substitutions.

21-257Models and Methods for Optimization9
36-202Statistical Methods9
or 36-208 Regression Analysis
36-207Probability and Statistics for Business Applications9
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences9
80-305Choices, Decisions, and Games9
84-265Political Science Research Methods9
88-251Empirical Research Methods9
Additional Major

The B.A./B.S. in Ethics, History, and Public Policy may be scheduled as an additional major in consultation with the Director of Ethics, History, and Public Policy, Professor Alex John London, ajlondon@andrew.cmu.edu.

Ethics, History, and Public Policy Sample Curriculum
Junior YearSenior Year
FallSpringFallSpring
Core requirement in Economics Core requirement in History or PhilosophyCapstone CourseEHPP Elective Course
Core requirement in History or PhilosophyCore requirement in History or PhilosophyEHPP Elective CourseSecond Course (open)
Core requirement in History or PhilosophyCore requirement in History or PhilosophyEHPP Elective CourseThird Course (open)
Core requirement in History or PhilosophyCore requirement in History or PhilosophyFourth Course (open)Fourth Course (open)
Core requirement in History or PhilosophyFifth Course (open)Fifth Course (open)Fifth Course (open)

The above sample program is presented as a two-year (junior-senior year) plan for completing EHPP major requirements. Its purpose is to show that this program can be completed in as few as two years; not that it must be. Students may enter the EHPP major, and begin major course requirements, as early as the start of the sophomore year, or even in the first year. Students should consult their advisor when planning their program.

The Major in Linguistics

Tom Werner, Director
Office: Baker Hall 155F
Email: twerner@andrew.cmu.edu

Linguistics is the study of human language, and it encompasses a broad spectrum of research questions, approaches and methodologies. Some linguists are concerned with the cognitive aspects of language learning, production and comprehension; some are concerned with language as a social and cultural phenomenon; others engage in the analysis of linguistic form and meaning, some from a functional and others from a formal perspective. There are also computational approaches to linguistics with both applied and theoretical goals.

The major in Linguistics reflects the multidisciplinary character of the field and of the Linguistics faculty here at Carnegie Mellon, offering a program which provides students with the fundamental tools of linguistic analysis while maintaining a focus on the human context in which language is learned and used. The major is available as either a primary major or an additional major. It is an ideal choice for students with a general interest in their own or other languages, and combines well thematically with studies in any of the departments represented in the major.

Curriculum

The Linguistics major requires a total of 12 courses, which includes 2 semesters of language study. In addition, primary majors in Linguistics are required to write a Senior Thesis in their final year. At least three courses (not including specific language courses) must be at the 300-level or higher. All courses counted towards the major must be taken for a letter grade and passed with a grade of "C" or above. For Dietrich College students, up to 2 of these courses may be counted also as satisfying the college's general education requirements (as long as the double-counting maximum established by the college is not exceeded), with permission of the major director. Students from other colleges may fulfill their Humanities requirements using courses taken towards the Linguistics Major. However, no courses may be counted simultaneously towards the Linguistics Major and any other major or minor.

Introductory course
80-180Nature of Language9
Fundamental Skills

Take one course from each of the following core subject areas:

Sounds
80-282Phonetics and Phonology I9
Structure
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-285Natural Language Syntax9
Meaning
80-381Meaning in Language9
80-383Language in Use9
76-385Introduction to Discourse Analysis9
Breadth

Take one course from each of the following breadth subject areas:

Area 1: Language Learning and Language Cognition
76-420The Cognition of Reading and Writing: Introduction to a Social/Cognitive Process9
80-281Language and Thought9
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
82-585Topics in Second Language Acquisition9
85-354Infant Language Development9
85-421Language and Thought9
Area 2: Discourse, Society and Culture
76-385Introduction to Discourse Analysis9
76-386Language & Culture9
80-283Syntax and Discourse9
82-273Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture9
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-333Introduction to Chinese Language and CultureVar.
80-383Language in Use9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
Electives

Take four additional electives. These can be additional courses from the Fundamental Skills courses or Breadth courses listed above, or any other course which is approved by the Director as a linguistics elective. Listed below are the additional electives taught on a regular basis. Additional appropriate courses are offered irregularly or on a one-off basis. The Director will provide students with a list of possible electives each semester, and will assist students in selecting electives which are consistent with their goals and interests.

76-378Literacy: Educational Theory and Community Practice9
76-451Language and Globalization9
80-284Invented Languages9
80-286Words and Word Formation: Introduction to Morphology9
80-287Historical and Comparative Linguistics9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
80-382Phonetics and Phonology II9
80-384Linguistics of Turkic Languages9
80-385Linguistics of Germanic Languages9
82-373Structure of the Japanese Language9
11-411Natural Language Processing12
11-492Speech Processing12
11-716Graduate Seminar on Dialog Processing6
11-721Grammars and Lexicons12
11-722Grammar Formalisms12
11-761Language and Statistics12
Language Requirement

Students must successfully complete two semesters of consecutive language courses. (Note that students may not 'test out' of this requirement. However, language courses taken at other institutions or as part of a study abroad program will typically substitute for a semester of language study.)

Senior Thesis [primary majors only]

Primary majors must complete a senior thesis (a workload equivalent to a 12-unit course) during their senior year. Topics must be approved by an advisor, who will work with the student and guide the thesis project.

Note

  • All 11-xxx courses have significant Computer Science prerequisites. Interested students should check with the course instructor before registering.

The Major in Logic and Computation

Joel Smith, Director
Office: Baker Hall 161C
Email: joelms@cmu.edu

The Logic and Computation curriculum takes advantage of the preparation provided by the H&SS General Education Program in mathematics, philosophy, psychology, and statistics. It is flexible in that it permits students to focus on any of a number of areas including (but not limited to):

  • computer science;
  • language and information technology;
  • artificial intelligence and cognitive science;
  • logic and the foundations of mathematics;
  • methodology and philosophy of science.

Students in the program take a common core of courses in logic, methodology, and computer science, together with an associated seminar in their senior year. The individual focus is achieved by selecting a sequence of four advanced and closely related courses. It is in this area of focus (or specialization) that students write their senior thesis under the supervision of a faculty member. A number of sample curricula are presented below.

The resulting education in logic, analytic philosophy, mathematics, statistics, and computer science enables students to pursue professional careers or graduate study. The analytic and communication skills developed in the major support a wide range of career choices, including those among the fields of technology, business, and law. Fields of graduate study for which students are well prepared include, for example, computer science, cognitive science, philosophy, logic, and linguistics.

Students who are interested in pursuing this major, or who are pursuing it already, should take note of the Cognitive Science major in the Department of Psychology. That major is so closely related that it is not difficult to pursue it as an additional major, and it provides an intellectually exciting complement.

Curriculum

Logic and Computation is a B.S. degree. In their freshman and sophomore years, students are expected to take three courses that provide preparation in computer science, mathematics, and statistics: 15-112 Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science, 21-127 Concepts of Mathematics, 36-201 Statistical Reasoning and Practice. 80-211 Logic and Mathematical Inquiry is part of the major's Core Requirements, but should be taken no later than the spring of the sophomore year. This also applies to the computer science sequence 15-122 and 15-150.

NOTE: Students should complete the prerequisites before their junior year. It is strongly recommended that students take 80-211 Logic and Mathematical Inquiry no later than the spring of their sophomore year and, if possible, also 15-122 and 15-150. However, with suitable planning and advice from the program director, it is possible to complete the program in two years, beginning in the junior year.

The course requirements for the major consist of seven core courses (including one seminar) and four electives. The core courses provide comprehensive background in logic, computability, and analytic philosophy. 80-310 Formal Logic and 80-150 Nature of Reason must be taken no later than the fall of the junior year. Four advanced electives are chosen in the area of focus, and should support independent research towards fulfilling the senior thesis requirement. In their senior year, students present and discuss their research in 80-511 Thesis Seminar.  All courses, if taken at CMU, must be taken for a letter grade and passed with a grade of "C" or above.

2

Prerequisites29 units
15-110Principles of Computing10
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
36-201Statistical Reasoning and Practice9
Logic and Computation Core69–71 units
80-150Nature of Reason9
80-211Logic and Mathematical Inquiry9
80-310Formal Logic9
80-311Undecidability and Incompleteness9
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
15-150Principles of Functional Programming10
80-511Thesis Seminar6

 

Logic and Computation Electives36 units

Bearing in mind prerequisites, Logic and Computation majors must complete four advanced courses in areas that use logical and computational tools, such as philosophy, computer science, linguistics, mathematical logic, psychology, or statistics. The sequence of courses, mostly at the 300-level, must be selected in consultation with the program director.

Sample Curricula

Here are five samples of Logic and Computation curricula (beyond the core courses), each reflecting a different emphasis.

Sample 1.
A student interested in Computer Science might take the following courses:

80-315Modal Logic9
80-413Category Theory9
15-312Foundations of Programming Languages12
15-317Constructive Logic9

Sample 2.
A student interested in Language and Information Technology might take the following courses:

80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-281Language and Thought9
80-381Meaning in Language9
80-383Language in Use9
80-580Seminar on the Philosophy of Language9

Sample 3.
A student interested in Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Science might take the following courses:

80-314Logic and Artificial Intelligence9
80-315Modal Logic9
80-411Proof Theory9
85-412Cognitive Modeling9

Sample 4.
A student interested in Logic and the Foundations of Mathematics might consider the following courses:

80-254Analytic Philosophy9
80-312Philosophy of Mathematics9
80-365Ramsey9
80-411Proof Theory9
80-413Category Theory9

Sample 5.
A student interested in Methodology might consider the following courses:

80-220Philosophy of Science9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences9
Logic and Computation Degree Requirements (minimum)360 units

Logic and Computation as a Second Major

The Logic and Computation major is also suitable as a second major for students in H&SS or for students in other colleges within the university. Non-H&SS students interested in an additional major in Logic and Computation need to take only those courses in the H&SS General Education Program that are prerequisites to courses required in the major; all other H&SS General Education requirements are waived for these students. Depending on the student's back-ground, the requirements of the second major in Logic and Computation can be fulfilled with as few as five additional courses. However, the department limits the courses that may be ‘double counted'; the core courses in the Philosophy department may not be double counted.

The M.S. Program in Logic and Computation

The Department of Philosophy also offers a graduate M.S. degree in Logic and Computation, which culminates with the writing of a master's thesis. It is ordinarily a two-year program, but students in the Logic and Computation major are able to complete the additional requirements in one year. Interested students are invited to contact the department for further information and apply to the program in their senior year. Details can be found on the department's homepage: http://hss.cmu.edu/philosophy/

The Major in Philosophy

Joel Smith, Director
Office: Baker Hall 161C
Email: joelms@cmu.edu

The Major in Philosophy is intended to be flexible and to facilitate additional majors in other fields (including majors with a strong professional focus). It provides students with a broad humanities education and sharpens their analytical skills. We encourage, but do not require, students to choose a thematic concentration through their electives. Sample curricula emphasizing Pre-Law, Metaphysics and Epistemology, Ethics and Social Philosophy, and Philosophy of Mind are suggested below. However, alternative emphases can be proposed and approved by the Director. The Major in Philosophy is a B.A. degree.

Curriculum

In addition to the general education requirements for the student's college, Philosophy primary majors and additional majors must complete 80-100 Introduction to Philosophy and nine Philosophy courses in the Areas listed below. The 80-100 requirement must be fulfilled before the first semester of the junior year. Only two of the remaining nine courses may be at the 100-level, and two of the nine courses must be at the 300-level or higher. All ten courses, if taken at CMU, must be taken for a letter grade and passed with a grade of "C" or above. Courses from other universities, as well as an 80-100 skills test, may be substituted with permission of the Director. Students are to choose one course out of each of the Areas 1-4, two courses out of Area 5, and may freely select three courses in Area 6. As per the requirement of the College of H&SS, a student's Freshman Seminar course may not count toward the fulfillment of the major requirements.

                                      

Introduction to Philosophy9 units
80-100Introduction to Philosophy9
Area 1: Values and Normative Theory9 units
One of the following:
80-130Introduction to Ethics9
80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-230Ethical Theory9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-247Ethics and Global Economics9
80-248Engineering Ethics9
80-334Social and Political Philosophy9
80-335Deliberative Democracy: Theory and Practice9
80-337Philosophy, Politics & Economics9
80-348Health Development and Human Rights9
80-430Ethics and Medical Research9
80-447Global Justice9
Area 2: Philosophy of Mind/Language/Metaphysics9 units
One of the following:
80-180Nature of Language9
80-270Philosophy of Mind9
80-271Philosophy and Psychology9
80-276Philosophy of Religion9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-281Language and Thought9
80-282Phonetics and Phonology I9
80-283Syntax and Discourse9
80-284Invented Languages9
80-371Philosophy of Perception9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
80-381Meaning in Language9
80-382Phonetics and Phonology II9
80-383Language in Use9
80-384Linguistics of Turkic Languages9
80-580Seminar on the Philosophy of Language9
Area 3: Logic/Philosophy of Mathematics9 units
One of the following:
80-110Nature of Mathematical Reasoning9
80-210Logic and Proofs9
80-211Logic and Mathematical Inquiry9
80-212Arguments and Logical Analysis9
80-310Formal Logic9
80-311Undecidability and Incompleteness9
80-312Philosophy of Mathematics9
80-315Modal Logic9
80-411Proof Theory9
80-413Category Theory9
80-513Seminar on Philosophy of Mathematics9
80-514Categorical Logic9
Area 4: Epistemology/Metaphysics9 units
One of the following:
80-150Nature of Reason9
80-201Epistemology9
80-208Critical Thinking9
80-220Philosophy of Science9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-222Measurement and Methodology9
80-226Revolutions in Science9
80-305Choices, Decisions, and Games9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
80-322Philosophy of Physics9
80-323Philosophy of Biology9
80-324Philosophy of Economics9
80-405Game Theory9
80-515Seminar on the Foundations of Statistics9
80-516Causality and LearningVar.
80-520Seminar on Philosophy Science9
80-521Seminar on Formal Epistemology9
Area 5: History of Philosophy18 units
Two of the following:
80-150Nature of Reason9
80-226Revolutions in Science9
80-250Ancient Philosophy9
80-251Modern Philosophy9
80-252Kant9
80-253Continental Philosophy9
80-254Analytic Philosophy9
80-255Pragmatism9
80-256Modern Moral Philosophy9
80-257Nietzsche9
80-258Hume9
80-261Empiricism and Rationalism9
80-262Introduction to the Philosophy of Bertrand Russell9
80-36319th Century Foundations of Science9
Area 6: Elective27 units

Three other philosophy courses, or appropriate courses from other departments, with the permission of the Director.

Sample Curricula

Here are four sample curricula, reflecting different emphases.

1. For an emphasis on Law & Social Policy, a student might take:

Area 1
80-334Social and Political Philosophy9
Area 2
80-180Nature of Language9
Area 3
80-211Logic and Mathematical Inquiry9
Area 4
80-208Critical Thinking9
Area 5
80-150Nature of Reason9
80-250Ancient Philosophy9
Area 6
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
80-348Health Development and Human Rights9
80-447Global Justice9

2. For an emphasis on Philosophy of Science, a student might take:

Area 1
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
Area 2
80-371Philosophy of Perception9
Area 3
80-211Logic and Mathematical Inquiry9
Area 4
80-220Philosophy of Science9
or 80-221 Philosophy of Social Science
Area 5
80-250Ancient Philosophy9
80-226Revolutions in Science9
Area 6
80-150Nature of Reason9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-322Philosophy of Physics9
80-323Philosophy of Biology9

3. For an emphasis on Ethics and Social Philosophy, a student might take:

Area 1
80-230Ethical Theory9
Area 2
80-276Philosophy of Religion9
Area 3
80-110Nature of Mathematical Reasoning9
Area 4
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
or 80-321 Causation, Law, and Social Policy
Area 5
80-250Ancient Philosophy9
Area 6
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9

4. For an emphasis on Philosophy of Mind, a student might take:

Area 1
80-130Introduction to Ethics9
Area 2
80-270Philosophy of Mind9
Area 3
80-211Logic and Mathematical Inquiry9
Area 4
80-201Epistemology9
Area 5
80-251Modern Philosophy9
Area 6
80-257Nietzsche9
80-371Philosophy of Perception9
80-521Seminar on Formal EpistemologyVar.

Additional Major

Students who want an additional major in Philosophy must fulfill the same departmental requirements as primary majors in Philosophy.

The M.A. Program in Philosophy

The Department of Philosophy also offers a graduate M.A. degree in Philosophy, which culminates with the writing of a master's thesis. It is ordinarily a two-year program, but students in the Philosophy major are able to complete the additional requirements in one year. Interested students are invited to visit the department's homepage for further information: www.cmu.edu/dietrich/philosophy/.

Philosophy Department Minors

All majors in the Department allow for minors; in addition, there is a Minor in Ethics and an interdepartmental minor in Linguistics. The requirements are again designed to be flexible and to allow students to tailor courses to their special interests, while providing some breadth.
 

The Minor in Ethics

With the explosive growth of science and technology have come both new possibilities and new problems. Developments in medicine, in biology, in chemistry, in nuclear engineering or in computer science all have costs as well as benefits, and they present us with many hard choices. Some of the hardest of these new problems are moral problems.

The Philosophy Department's Minor in Ethics introduces students to central ethical concepts and theories proposed and defended by the great philosophers of the past; it provides an understanding of how these theories and concepts can be applied to practical problems. This background in ethical theory and its applications should help students to respond more sensitively and appropriately to the new and unavoidable ethical problems that technologies, businesses, unions, and branches of government must face.

Curriculum

Ethics minors must complete five philosophy courses in the areas listed below.  All five required courses, if taken at CMU, must be taken for a letter grade and passed with a grade of a "C" or above, except 80-294 Ethics Internship / Practicum, which may be taken pass/fail.

Ethics Core Courses27 units

Complete three courses from any of the following areas with at least two courses at the 200-level or higher.

80-130Introduction to Ethics9
80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-230Ethical Theory
(AY 17-18 is the last year this will be offered)
9
80-241Ethical Judgments in Professional Life9
80-242Conflict and Dispute Resolution *9
80-243Ethics of Leadership *9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-246Moral Psychology9
80-247Ethics and Global Economics9
80-248Engineering Ethics9
80-330Research Ethics9
80-334Social and Political Philosophy9
80-335Deliberative Democracy: Theory and Practice9
80-336Philosophy of Law9
80-348Health Development and Human Rights9
80-430Ethics and Medical Research9
80-431Meta-ethics9
80-447Global Justice9
Ethics Electives18 units

Complete two courses at the 200-level or higher.  These courses may be additional courses from Ethics Core list above.  Other applicable philosophy courses include the following: 80-294 or 80-495

Appropriate courses in ethics from other departments may count with the permission of the faculty advisors for this minor.

*Courses typically only offered on the CMU-Q campus.

The Minor in Linguistics

The Interdepartmental Minor in Linguistics is jointly sponsored with the departments of English, Modern Languages, and Psychology. It synthesizes the linguistics related offerings in these departments and provides students with an academic experience that reflects both the interdisciplinary character of the subject and its cross-departmental representation in Dietrich College. Students who wish to receive a minor in Linguistics must complete six courses. For a detailed discussion of the curriculum and the flexible electives, consult the Dietrich College Interdisciplinary Minors section of the catalog.
 

The Minor in Logic and Computation

The Minor in Logic and Computation provides students with general course work in logic, the theory of computation, and philosophy. Students must complete six courses, among them the following three core courses.

Logic and Computation Core Courses27 units
80-150Nature of Reason9
80-211Logic and Mathematical Inquiry9
or 80-210 Logic and Proofs
80-310Formal Logic9
or 80-311 Undecidability and Incompleteness
Logic and Computation Electives27 unts

Students must take two courses in the Philosophy Department at the 300-level or higher, in subjects related to logic and computation, and an additional course at the 300-level or higher in an area that uses logical and computational tools, such as philosophy, computer science, linguistics, mathematics, psychology, or statistics. The choice of electives must be approved by the program director.

The Minor in Philosophy

The Minor in Philosophy allows students to complement their primary majors with a broad philosophical grounding.

Logic/Methodology Requirements9 units
Complete one course: Units
80-110Nature of Mathematical Reasoning9
80-210Logic and Proofs9
80-211Logic and Mathematical Inquiry9
80-212Arguments and Logical Analysis9
80-220Philosophy of Science9
80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-222Measurement and Methodology9
80-226Revolutions in Science9
80-310Formal Logic9
80-311Undecidability and Incompleteness9
80-312Philosophy of Mathematics9
80-314Logic and Artificial Intelligence9
80-315Modal Logic9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
80-322Philosophy of Physics9
80-323Philosophy of Biology9
80-324Philosophy of Economics9
80-411Proof Theory9
80-413Category Theory9
80-513Seminar on Philosophy of Mathematics9
80-514Categorical Logic9
80-515Seminar on the Foundations of Statistics9
80-516Causality and LearningVar.
80-520Seminar on Philosophy Science9
80-521Seminar on Formal EpistemologyVar.
History of Philosophy Requirements18 units
Complete two courses: Units
80-150Nature of Reason9
80-226Revolutions in Science9
80-250Ancient Philosophy9
80-251Modern Philosophy9
80-252Kant9
80-253Continental Philosophy9
80-254Analytic Philosophy9
80-255Pragmatism9
80-256Modern Moral Philosophy9
80-257Nietzsche9
80-258Hume9
80-261Empiricism and Rationalism9
80-262Introduction to the Philosophy of Bertrand Russell9
80-264William James and Philosophical Psychology9
80-36319th Century Foundations of Science9
Philosophy Electives18 units

Complete 18 units in the Philosophy department at the 200-level or higher.

The Honors Program

The Dietrich College Senior Honors Program provides recognition of outstanding performance by students majoring in Philosophy, Logic and Computation or Ethics, History, and Public Policy. Students have the opportunity to develop their skills and to apply their knowledge through completion of an honors thesis in their senior year. By completing the thesis, students earn 18 units of credit and qualify for graduation with College Honors. To qualify for the honors program, students must maintain a quality point average of at least 3.50 in the major and 3.25 overall, and be invited by the department to become a participant.

Undergraduate Research Fellows

Qualified upper level undergraduates, preferably majors in one of the Philosophy Department's programs, may apply to serve in their junior or senior years as fellows in the Laboratory for Symbolic and Educational Computing (LSEC). Applications are reviewed in the fall. Visit LSEC from the Department's website, http://www.hss.cmu.edu/philosophy/labs-lsec.php, or contact Professors Joseph Ramsey or Wilfried Seig for additional information.

Faculty

JEREMY AVIGAD, Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.
STEVEN AWODEY, Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.
ADAM BJORNDAHL, Assistant Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.
ROBERT CAVALIER, Teaching Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., Duquesne University; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.
DAVID DANKS, Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
BENJAMIN R. GEORGE, Assistant Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.
CLARK GLYMOUR, Alumni University Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., Indiana University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.
MARALEE HARRELL, Associate Teaching Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
KEVIN T. KELLY, Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.
ALEX LONDON, Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of Virginia; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
RICHARD SCHEINES, Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.
TEDDY I. SEIDENFELD, Herbert A. Simon Professor of Philosophy and Statistics – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.
WILFRIED SIEG, Patrick Suppes Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.
MANDY SIMONS, Associate Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.
JOEL SMITH, Distinguished Career Teaching Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
PETER L. SPIRTES, Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.
DANIELLE WENNER, Assistant Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., Rice University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.
THOMAS WERNER, Assistant Teaching Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., Rutgers University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
KUN ZHANG, Assistant Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., The Chinese University of Hong Kong; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.
KEVIN ZOLLMAN, Associate Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of California, Irvine; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.

Special Faculty

CHRISTINA BJORNDAHL, Teaching Instructor – Ph.D. Candidate, Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.
DAVID GRAY, Assistant Teaching Professor of Philosophy, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.
DERRICK GRAY, Teaching Instructor – Ph.D., Rice University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.
ANDY NORMAN, Teaching Instructor – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.
JOSEPH RAMSEY, Director of Research Computing – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.

Affiliated Faculty

WAYNE WU, Associate Professor and Associate Director of CNBC – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.

Emeritus Faculty

DANA S. SCOTT, Hillman University Professor of Mathematical Logic, Computer Science and Philosophy (Emeritus) – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.

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Faculty

JEREMY AVIGAD, Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.
STEVEN AWODEY, Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.
ADAM BJORNDAHL, Assistant Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.
ROBERT CAVALIER, Teaching Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., Duquesne University; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.
DAVID DANKS, Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
BENJAMIN R. GEORGE, Assistant Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.
CLARK GLYMOUR, Alumni University Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., Indiana University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.
MARALEE HARRELL, Associate Teaching Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
KEVIN T. KELLY, Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.
ALEX LONDON, Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of Virginia; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
RICHARD SCHEINES, Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.
TEDDY I. SEIDENFELD, Herbert A. Simon Professor of Philosophy and Statistics – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.
WILFRIED SIEG, Patrick Suppes Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.
MANDY SIMONS, Associate Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.
JOEL SMITH, Distinguished Career Teaching Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
PETER L. SPIRTES, Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.
DANIELLE WENNER, Assistant Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., Rice University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.
THOMAS WERNER, Assistant Teaching Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., Rutgers University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
KUN ZHANG, Assistant Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., The Chinese University of Hong Kong; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.
KEVIN ZOLLMAN, Associate Professor of Philosophy – Ph.D., University of California, Irvine; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.

Special Faculty

CHRISTINA BJORNDAHL, Teaching Instructor – Ph.D. Candidate, Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.
DAVID GRAY, Assistant Teaching Professor of Philosophy, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.
DERRICK GRAY, Teaching Instructor – Ph.D., Rice University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.
ANDY NORMAN, Teaching Instructor – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.
JOSEPH RAMSEY, Director of Research Computing – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.

Affiliated Faculty

WAYNE WU, Associate Professor and Associate Director of CNBC – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.

Emeritus Faculty

DANA S. SCOTT, Hillman University Professor of Mathematical Logic, Computer Science and Philosophy (Emeritus) – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.