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Department of Modern Languages

Susan G. Polansky, Department Head
Bonnie L. Youngs, Director of Undergraduate Studies
Department Office: Baker Hall 160
http://www.cmu.edu/dietrich/modlang/

Studying foreign languages and their cultures is desirable and essential for understanding our complex global world. It is crucial to educate global citizens who will be sensitive to other cultures and capable of communicating in other languages. Proficiency in a foreign language by itself, or combined with other professional training, may lead to a variety of rewarding careers. Moreover, the personal experience of mastering another language is enriching and gratifying.

The Majors in Chinese Studies, French & Francophone Studies, German Studies, Hispanic Studies, Japanese Studies, and Russian Studies

These majors are designed to lead to acquisition of communicative language proficiency and substantive knowledge of other cultures.

Drawing on the unique interdisciplinary climate of the Carnegie Mellon campus, the undergraduate majors in Modern Languages encourage the acquisition of multiple skills by students with varied backgrounds, talents, and interests.  An important resource in support of these goals is the Modern Language Resource Center (MLRC), a state-of-the-art facility that provides students with access to authentic foreign language materials such as original television broadcasts, interactive video projects, Technology Enhanced Language Learning (TELL) courses, international audio and video resources, and computerized assessment tools.

Students majoring in a modern language are also encouraged to enroll, preferably during their junior year, in a study-abroad program or to spend a summer abroad at a language institute or in an internship. Semester or year-long programs are available in places such as China, France, Germany, Japan, Africa, Russia, Spain, and Latin America. The Department also sponsors summer courses in China, Germany, and Spain. Foreign film series, informal conversation tables, native-speaker conversation partners, speaking and writing assistants, and Student Advisory Committee cultural events are some of the activities organized by the Department of Modern Languages to increase students' ability in languages and knowledge of cultures.

The major in Modern Languages is designed to permit students to acquire communicative language proficiency in their language of specialization. Courses in culture and civilization offer students a solid introduction to the main currents in national literatures as well as artistic and social movements. These courses integrate study of cultures with skill development in reading, writing, and aural/oral communication. In addition, the student who majors in Modern Languages will develop a perspective on the learning and use of second languages, from both a social and cognitive point of view, within contemporary American society and in an increasingly global community. Working closely with their advisor, language majors are guided to develop personal interests by taking courses in other disciplines such as fine arts, history, psychology, philosophy, and other humanities and social sciences, which often include readings, discussions, and papers in the foreign language. The rich technological environment of the campus strongly enhances all fields of language study.

Second language proficiency is an asset which provides students with practical as well as theoretical bases for a variety of paths after graduation. Students of Modern Languages have taken paths to a wide variety of careers in government, entrepreneurship and business, law, technology and engineering firms, media, public health, health policy, and health professions, non-profit organizations, entertainment and creative arts, and education. They are also prepared to pursue graduate studies in second language-related fields (e.g. linguistics, second language acquisition, literary and cultural studies).

Curriculum

Six specializations are available in the Department of Modern Languages: Chinese Studies, French and Francophone Studies, German Studies, Hispanic Studies, Japanese Studies, and Russian Studies.

Language-specific faculty advisors for these majors are:

Chinese Studies- Dr. Elisabeth Kaske, Associate Professor of Chinese Studies and Dr. Yueming Yu, Teaching Professor of Chinese Studies
French & Francophone Studies-Dr. Bonnie Youngs, Teaching Professor of French & Francophone Studies
German Studies-Dr. Stephen Brockmann, Professor of German
Hispanic Studies-Dr. Therese Tardio, Associate Teaching Professor of Hispanic Studies
Japanese Studies-Dr. Yasufumi Iwasaki, Associate Teaching Professor of Japanese and Dr. Keiko Koda, Professor of Japanese and Second Language Acquisition
Russian Studies-Dr. Charlene Castellano, Teaching Professor of Russian

The Major in Chinese Studies96-99 units

Faculty Advisors

Dr. Elisabeth Kaske, Associate Professor of Chinese Studies (ekaske@andrew.cmu.edu)            Dr. Yueming Yu, Teaching Professor of Chinese Studies (yyu@andrew.cmu.edu)

Prerequisites

Intermediate-level proficiency in the Chinese language. This is equivalent to the completion of three courses (two at the 100-level and one at the 200-level), or placement or exemption based on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or CMU internal placement test scores. In all cases, progress will be accelerated by study abroad, which is highly recommended for all majors. (Study abroad advisor - Dr. Yueming Yu, yyu@andrew.cmu.edu)

Students with native or near-native proficiency in listening and speaking of the language prior to entering CMU should consult with the major advisor for a different curriculum that may accelerate their completion of the requirement.

Students may double count a maximum of one course taken for the Chinese Studies major that is also being used to fulfill the requirements of other majors, minors, and programs.

1. Core Courses in Chinese Studies39–42 units*

Complete all four courses

Units
82-232Intermediate Chinese II
(may be substituted by 82-235 Intermediate Chinese for Heritage Students) *
12
82-331Advanced Chinese I9
82-332Advanced Chinese II9
82-333Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture **Var.

*Students who place out of 82-232/82-235 must take a minimum of 9 additonal units chosen from List A Electives.

**Students must take this course for 12 units to fulfill the requirement. Students who take this course for 9 units prior to declaring their major must register for 3 units of independent study later in their studies.

2. Core Courses in Modern Languages12 units

Complete one 9 unit course* plus the Senior Seminar (3 units) in the spring of the senior year.

Units
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-281Tutoring for Community OutreachVar.
82-282Community Service LearningVar.
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
82-480Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism9
82-580Senior Seminar in Modern Languages3

* In consultation with the major advisor, students may substitute a Modern Languages course elective with one related to language analysis, language learning, or acquisition of language and culture from the listings in Chinese Studies or from another department. Examples: 80-180 Nature of Language, 85-421 Language and Thought.

3. Core Courses in History & Society9 units

Complete one course after consultation with the major advisor and the designated History or Modern Languages professor.

Units
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China: From the Birth of Mao ... to Now9
79-309The Chinese Revolution Through Film (1949-2000)9
82-230Topics in Cultural Comparison9
82-234Topics in Chinese History9
82-238Topics in Chinese Culture9
4. Chinese Studies and Interdisciplinary Electives36 units

Complete two courses (18 units) from List A and two courses (18 units) from List B, or two courses (18 units) from List A, one (9 units) from List B, and one (9 units) from List C.

List A. Core Chinese Studies Electives18 units
Units
82-432Popular Culture in China9
82-433Topics in Contemporary Culture of China *9
82-434Studies in Chinese Traditions *9
82-436Introduction to Classical Chinese9
82-439Modern China Through Literature *9
82-440Studies in Chinese Literature & Culture *9
82-531/532Special Topics in Chinese Studies *Var.

*Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

List B: Chinese Studies Electives(minimum) 9 units
Units
82-334Structure of Chinese9
82-335Chinese Culture Through Legends and Folktales9
82-337Mandarin Chinese for Oral Communication I9
82-338Mandarin Chinese for Oral Communication II9
82-339Business Language & Culture in China I9
82-340Business Language & Culture in China II9
82-432Popular Culture in China9
82-439Modern China Through LiteratureVar.
82-440Studies in Chinese Literature & Culture9
82-432Popular Culture in China9
82-433Topics in Contemporary Culture of China *9
82-434Studies in Chinese Traditions *9
82-436Introduction to Classical Chinese9
82-439Modern China Through Literature *Var.
82-440Studies in Chinese Literature & Culture *9
82-436Introduction to Classical Chinese9
82-505Undergraduate InternshipVar.
82-531/532Special Topics in Chinese Studies *Var.

* Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

List C. Interdisciplinary Electives

This list is compiled from possibilities such as but not limited to the following. Students should consult OLR and their major advisor for the most up to date interdisciplinary electives appropriate for the Chinese Studies curriculum. Courses may be suggested to the major advisor for approval as a substitute. Note that not all courses are offered each semester.

Architecture Units
48-351Human Factors in Architecture9
48-551Ethics and Decision Making in Architecture9
Art Units
60-373Aesthetics from a Global Viewpoint9
60-399Art History/Theory Independent Study9
Business Units
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
70-365International Trade and International Law9
70-430International Management9
English Units
76-318Communicating in the Global Marketplace9
76-339The Films of Spike Lee9
76-386Language & Culture9
76-387Narrative & Argument9
History Units
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China: From the Birth of Mao ... to Now9
79-309The Chinese Revolution Through Film (1949-2000)9
Modern Languages Units
82-230Topics in Cultural Comparison9
82-234Topics in Chinese History9
82-238Topics in Chinese Culture9
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-281Tutoring for Community OutreachVar.
82-282Community Service LearningVar.
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
82-480Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism9
Philosophy Units
80-180Nature of Language9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-276Philosophy of Religion9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
Psychology Units
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-421Language and Thought9
Social and Decision Science Units
88-384Conflict and Conflict Resolution in International Relations9
88-411Rise of the Asian Economies9
5. Oral Proficiency Interview

Complete an oral proficiency interview. At the latest, this exam should be scheduled by midterm of the senior spring semester. Students are permitted to retake the test.

Study Abroad

A semester or year of study abroad is strongly recommended. Consult with your advisor and the Office of International Education (OIE) about possible options.

Senior Honors Thesis

Modern Languages majors are encouraged to undertake a Senior Honors Thesis (Modern Languages Honors Thesis, 82-591/82-592 or Dietrich College Senior Honors Thesis I, II, 66-501/66-502). The Honors Thesis program provides qualified seniors with a valuable opportunity to combine their academic and personal experiences and interests into a unique research project. (Prerequisites: a 3.5 QPA in Chinese and a 3.25 QPA overall)

Chinese Studies (B.A.) Sample Curriculum

This sample curriculum assumes that all prerequisites for 82-331 are fulfilled prior to the Junior year.

Junior YearSenior Year
FallSpringFallSpring
82-331 Advanced Chinese I82-332 Advanced Chinese IICore Chinese Studies Elective From List ACore Chinese Studies Elective From List A
82-333 Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture (12 units)Core History and Society ElectiveChinese Studies Elective From List B82-580 Senior Seminar in Modern Languages
Modern Languages core course or equivalent approved by advisorChinese Studies Elective From List B or Interdisciplinary Elective From List CChinese Studies Elective From List B or Interdisciplinary Elective From List CElective
ElectiveElectiveElectiveElective
ElectiveElectiveElectiveElective

This is presented as a two-year (junior-senior) plan for completing the major requirements. It is intended to show that this program can be completed in as few as two years, not that it must be. Students may enter their major and begin major course requirements as early as the start of the sophomore year, and in some instances in the first year. Students should consult their advisor when planning their program.

This plan is also an example of the suggested sequence of study for students who have had little or no prior exposure to the language. Such students would need to satisfy the prerequisites (elementary and intermediate language study) during their freshman and sophomore years.

The Major in French and Francophone Studies93 units

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Bonnie Youngs, Teaching Professor of French and Francophone Studies (byoungs@cmu.edu)

Prerequisites

Intermediate-level proficiency in French. This is equivalent to the completion of four courses (two at the 100-level and two at the 200-level) or exemption based on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or Carnegie Mellon internal placement test scores. In all cases, progress will be accelerated by study abroad, which is highly recommended for all majors. (Study abroad advisor: Dr. Michael West, mjwest@andrew.cmu.edu)

Students may double count a maximum of one course taken for the French & Francophone Studies major that is also being used to fulfill the requirements of other majors, minors, and programs.

1. Core Courses in French and Francophone Studies27 units

Complete all three courses.

Units
82-303Introduction to French Culture9
82-304The Francophone World9
82-305French in its Social Contexts9
2. Core Courses in Modern Languages12 units

Complete one 9 unit course* plus the Senior Seminar (3 units) in the spring of the senior year.

Units
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-281Tutoring for Community OutreachVar.
82-282Community Service LearningVar.
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
82-480Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism9
82-580Senior Seminar in Modern Languages3

* In consultation with the major advisor, students may substitute a Modern Languages course elective with one related to language analysis, language learning, or acquisition of language and culture from the listings in French & Francophone Studies or from another department. Examples:80-180 Nature of Language, 85-421 Language and Thought.

3. French and Francophone Studies Interdisciplinary Electives54 units

Complete six courses (54 units) from List A or five courses (45 units) from List A and one (9 units) from List B.

List A. French and Francophone Electives
Units
82-415/416Topics in French and Francophone Studies *9
82-501/502Special Topics: French and Francophone Studies *Var.
82-505Undergraduate InternshipVar.

* Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

List B. Interdisciplinary Electives

This list is compiled from possibilities such as but not limited to the following. Students should consult OLR and their major advisor for the most up to date interdisciplinary electives appropriate for the French & Francophone Studies curriculum. Courses may be suggested to the major advisor for approval as a substitute. Note that not all courses are offered each semester.

Architecture Units
48-338European Cities in the XIX Century: Planning, Architecture, Preservation9
48-340Modern Architecture and Theory 1900-19459
48-341Expression in Architecture9
48-448History of Sustainable Architecture9
English Units
76-239Introduction to Film Studies9
76-318Communicating in the Global Marketplace9
76-385Introduction to Discourse Analysis9
76-386Language & Culture9
76-387Narrative & Argument9
History Units
79-202Flesh and Spirit: Early Modern Europe, 1400-17509
79-20520th/21st Century Europe9
79-207Development of European Culture9
79-227African History: Height of Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade to the End of Apartheid9
79-258French History: From the Revolution to De Gaulle9
79-275Introduction to Global Studies9
79-350Early Christianity9
79-353Religious Identities and Religious Conflicts in 19th Century Europe9
79-385The Making of the African Diaspora9
79-386Entrepreneurs in Africa, Past, Present and Future9
79-396Music and Society in 19th and 20th Century Europe and the U.S.9
Modern Languages Units
82-227Germany & the European Union9
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-281Tutoring for Community OutreachVar.
82-282Community Service LearningVar.
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
82-480Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism9
Music Units
57-173Survey of Western Music History9
57-306World Music9
57-441Analysis of 19th Century Music9
Philosophy Units
80-180Nature of Language9
80-247Ethics and Global Economics9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-281Language and Thought9
80-282Phonetics and Phonology I9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
80-381Meaning in Language9
Psychology Units
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-421Language and Thought9
Social and Decision Sciences Units
88-384Conflict and Conflict Resolution in International Relations9
88-419Negotiation - International Focus9
4. Oral Proficiency Interview

Complete an oral proficiency interview. At the latest, this exam should be scheduled by midterm of the senior spring semester.  Students are permitted to retake the test.

Study Abroad

A semester or year of study abroad or internship is strongly recommended.  Consult with your advisor and the Office of International Education (OIE) about possible options.

Senior Honors Thesis

Modern Languages majors are encouraged to undertake a Senior Honors Thesis (Modern Languages Honors Thesis, 82-591/82-592 or Dietrich College Senior Honors Thesis I, II, 66-501/66-502). The Honors Thesis program provides qualified seniors with a valuable opportunity to combine their academic and personal experiences and interests into a unique research project. (Prerequisites: a 3.5 QPA in French and a 3.25 QPA overall)

French and Francophone Studies (B.A.)
Sample Curriculum
Junior YearSenior Year
FallSpringFallSpring
82-303 Introduction to French Culture82-305 French in its Social ContextsFrench & Francophone Studies (FFS) Elective From List AFFS Elective From List A
82-304 The Francophone WorldInterdisciplinary Elective From List BFFS Elective From List AFFS Elective From List A
Modern Languages core course or equivalent approved by advisorElectiveFFS Elective From List A82-580 Senior Seminar in Modern Languages
ElectiveElectiveElectiveElective
ElectiveElectiveElective

This is presented as a two-year (junior-senior) plan for completing the major requirements. It is intended to show that this program can be completed in as few as two years, not that it must be. Students may enter their major and begin major course requirements as early as the start of the sophomore year, and in some instances in the first year. Students should consult their advisor when planning their program.


This plan is also an example of the suggested sequence of study for students who have had little or no prior exposure to the language. Such students would need to satisfy the prerequisites (elementary and intermediate language study) during their freshman and sophomore years.

The Major in German Studies93 units

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Stephen Brockmann, Professor of German Studies (smb@andrew.cmu.edu)

Prerequisites

Intermediate-level proficiency in German. This is equivalent to the completion of four courses (two at the 100-level and two at the 200-level) or exemption based on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or Carnegie Mellon internal placement test scores. In all cases, progress will be accelerated by study abroad, which is highly recommended for all majors. (Study abroad advisor: Dr. Gabriele Eichmanns Maier, eichgabi@andrew.cmu.edu)

Students may double count a maximum of one course taken for the German Studies major that is also being used to fulfill the requirements of other majors, minors, and programs.

1. Corse Courses in German Studies27 units

Complete all three courses.*

Units
82-320Contemporary Society in Germany, Austria and Switzerland9
82-323Germany, Austria and Switzerland in the 20th Century9
82-327The Emergence of the German Speaking World9

* A 400-level course may be substituted with the major advisor's approval.

2. Core Courses in Modern Languages12 units

Complete one 9-unit course* in Modern Languages, plus the senior seminar (3 units) in spring of the senior year.

Units
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-281Tutoring for Community OutreachVar.
82-282Community Service LearningVar.
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
82-480Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism9
82-580Senior Seminar in Modern Languages3

* In consultation with the major advisor, students may substitute a Modern Languages course elective with one related to language analysis, language learning, or acquisition of language and culture from the listings in German Studies or from another department. Examples: 80-180 Nature of Language, 85-421 Language and Thought.

3. German Studies and Interdisciplinary Electives54 units

Complete five courses (45 units) from List A and one (9 units) from List B, or a minimum of three courses (27 units) from List A and one or two courses (9-18 units) from List B. The student may complete an additional 3 units of coursework in German to allow a List B elective to count as a List A elective, with permission of the major advisor and the course instructor.

List A. German Electives
Units
82-420The Crucible of Modernity:Vienna 19009
82-425/426Topics in German Literature and Culture *9
82-427Nazi and Resistance Culture9
82-428History of German Film9
82-505Undergraduate InternshipVar.
82-521/522Special Topics: German Studies *Var.

* Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

List B. Interdisciplinary Electives

From possibilities such as but not limited to the following. Students should consult OLR and their major advisor for the most up to date interdisciplinary electives appropriate for the German Studies curriculum. Courses may be suggested to the major advisor for approval as a substitute. Note that not all courses are offered each semester.

Architecture Units
48-338European Cities in the XIX Century: Planning, Architecture, Preservation9
48-340Modern Architecture and Theory 1900-19459
48-350Postwar Modern Architecture and Theory9
English Units
76-239Introduction to Film Studies9
76-386Language & Culture9
76-387Narrative & Argument9
76-483Corpus Analysis in Rhetoric9
History Units
79-20520th/21st Century Europe9
79-25620th Century Germany9
79-257Germany and the Second World War9
79-349The Holocaust in Historical Perspective9
Modern Languages Units
82-227Germany & the European Union9
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-281Tutoring for Community OutreachVar.
82-282Community Service LearningVar.
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
82-427Nazi and Resistance Culture
(when taken entirely in English)
9
82-428History of German Film
(when taken entirely in English)
9
82-480Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism9
Music Units
57-306World Music9
Philosophy Units
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-180Nature of Language9
80-251Modern Philosophy9
80-253Continental Philosophy9
80-256Modern Moral Philosophy9
80-275Metaphysics9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
Psychology Units
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-421Language and Thought9
4. Oral Proficiency Interview

Complete an oral proficiency interview. At the latest, this exam should be scheduled by midterm of the senior spring semester. Students are permitted to retake the test.

Study Abroad

A semester or year of study abroad is strongly recommended. Consult with your advisor and the Office of International Education (OIE) about possible options.

Senior Honors Thesis

Modern Languages majors are encouraged to undertake a Senior Honors Thesis (Modern Languages Honors Thesis, 82-591/82-592 or Dietrich College Senior Honors Thesis I, II, 66-501/66-502). The Honors Thesis program provides qualified seniors with a valuable opportunity to combine their academic and personal experiences and interests into a unique research project. (Prerequisites: a 3.5 QPA in German and a 3.25 QPA overall)

German Studies (B.A.) Sample Curriculum
Junior YearSenior Year
FallSpringFallSpring
82-320 Contemporary Society in Germany, Austria and Switzerland82-323 Germany, Austria and Switzerland in the 20th CenturyGerman Studies Elective From List AGerman Studies Elective From List A
82-327 The Emergence of the German Speaking WorldInterdisciplinary Elective From List BGerman Studies Elective From List AGerman Studies Elective From List A or Interdesciplinary Elective From List B
Modern Languages core course or equivalent approved by advisorElectiveGerman Studies Elective From List A or Interdisciplinary Elective From List B82-580 Senior Seminar in Modern Languages
ElectiveElectiveElectiveElective
ElectiveElectiveElectiveElective

This is presented as a two-year (junior-senior) plan for completing the major requirements. It is intended to show that this program can be completed in as few as two years, not that it must be. Students may enter their major and begin major course requirements as early as the start of the sophomore year, and in some instances in the first year. Students should consult their advisor when planning their program.

This plan is also an example of the suggested sequence of study for students who have had little or no prior exposure to the language. Such students would need to satisfy the prerequisites (elementary and intermediate language study) during their freshman and sophomore years.

The Major in Hispanic Studies93 units

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Therese Tardio, Associate Teaching Professor of Hispanic Studies (tardio@andrew.cmu.edu)

Prerequisites

Intermediate-level proficiency in Spanish. This is equivalent to the completion of four courses (two at the 100-level and two at the 200-level) or exemption based on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or Carnegie Mellon internal placement test scores. In all cases, progress will be accelerated by study abroad, which is highly recommended for all majors. (Study abroad advisor: Dr. Therese Tardio, tardio@andrew.cmu.edu)

Students may double count a maximum of one course taken for the Hispanic Studies major that is also being used to fulfill the requirements of other majors, minors, and programs.

1. Core Courses in Hispanic Studies27 units

Complete two courses.

Units
82-342Spain: Language and Culture9
82-343Latin America: Language and Culture9
82-344U.S. Latinos: Language and Culture9

Complete required course.

Units
82-345Introduction to Hispanic Literary and Cultural Studies9
2. Core Courses in Modern Languages12 units

Complete one 9-unit course* in Modern Languages, plus the senior seminar (3 units) in spring of the senior year.

Units
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-281Tutoring for Community OutreachVar.
82-282Community Service LearningVar.
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
82-480Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism9
82-580Senior Seminar in Modern Languages3

* In consultation with the major advisor, students may substitute a Modern Languages course elective with one related to language analysis, language learning, or the acquisition of language and culture from the listings in Hispanic Studies or from another department. Examples: 80-180 Nature of Language, 85-421 Language and Thought.

3. Hispanic Studies and Interdisciplinary Electives54 units

Complete six courses (54 units) from or five courses (45 units) from List A and one (9 units) from List B.

List A. Hispanic Studies Electives
Units
82-441Studies in Peninsular Literature and Culture *9
82-443Spanish Reading and Translation Workshop9
82-444The Structure of Spanish9
82-451Studies in Latin American Literature and Culture *9
82-455/456Topics in Hispanic Studies *9
82-506Hispanic Studies InternshipVar.
82-541/542Special Topics: Hispanic Studies *Var.

* Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

List B. Interdisciplinary Electives

From possibilities such as but not limited to the following. Students should consult OLR and their major advisor for the most up to date interdisciplinary electives appropriate for the Hispanic Studies curriculum. Courses may be suggested to the major advisor for approval as a substitute. Note that not all courses are offered each semester.

Architecture Units
48-348Architectural History of Mexico & Guatemala9
English Units
76-385Introduction to Discourse Analysis9
76-386Language & Culture9
76-387Narrative & Argument9
76-484Discourse Analysis9
History Units
79-221Development and Democracy in Latin America9
79-222Between Revolutions: The Development of Modern Latin America9
79-223Mexico: From the Aztec Empire to the Drug War9
79-224Mayan America9
79-235Caribbean Cultures9
79-237Comparative Slavery9
79-276Beyond the Border9
79-288Bananas, Baseball, and Borders: Latin America and the United States9
79-295Race Relations in the Atlantic World9
Modern Languages Units
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-281Tutoring for Community OutreachVar.
82-282Community Service LearningVar.
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
82-480Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism9
Music Units
57-306World Music9
Philosophy Units
80-180Nature of Language9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-285Natural Language Syntax9
80-286Words and Word Formation: Introduction to Morphology9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
80-381Meaning in Language9
Psychology Units
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-421Language and Thought9
4. Oral Proficiency Interview

Complete an oral proficiency interview. At the latest, this exam should be scheduled by midterm of the senior spring semester. Students are permitted to retake the test.

Study Abroad

A semester or year of study abroad is strongly recommended. Consult with your advisor and the Office of International Education (OIE) about possible options.

Senior Honors Thesis

Modern Languages majors are encouraged to undertake a Senior Honors Thesis (Modern Languages Honors Thesis, 82-591/82-592 or Dietrich College Senior Honors Thesis I, II, 66-501/66-502). The Honors Thesis program provides qualified seniors with a valuable opportunity to combine their academic and personal experiences and interests into a unique research project. (Prerequisites: a 3.5 QPA in Hispanic Studies and a 3.25 QPA overall)

Hispanic Studies (B.A.)

Sample Curriculum

Junior YearSenior Year
FallSpringFallSpring
82-342 Spain: Language and Culture82-345 Introduction to Hispanic Literary and Cultural StudiesHispanic Studies Elective From List AHispanic Studies Elective From List A
82-343 Latin America: Language and CultureInterdisciplinary ElectiveFrom List BHispanic Studies Elective From List AHispanic Studies Elective From List A
Modern Languages core course or equivalent approved by advisorElectiveHispanic Studies Elective From List A or Interdisciplinary Elective from List A or List B82-580 Senior Seminar in Modern Languages
ElectiveElectiveElectiveElective
ElectiveElectiveElectiveElective

This is presented as a two-year (junior-senior) plan for completing the major requirements. It is intended to show that this program can be completed in as few as two years, not that it must be. Students may enter their major and begin major course requirements as early as the start of the sophomore year, and in some instances in the first year. Students should consult their advisor when planning their program.

This plan is also an example of the suggested sequence of study for students who have had little or no prior exposure to the language. Such students would need to satisfy the prerequisites (elementary and intermediate language study) during their freshman and sophomore years

The Major in Japanese Studies102-105 units

Faculty Advisors

Dr. Yasufumi Iwasaki, Associate Teaching Professor of Japanese Studies (yiwasaki@andrew.cmu.edu)
Dr. Keiko Koda, Professor of Japanese Studies and Second Language Acquisition (kkoda@andrew.cmu.edu)

Prerequisites

Intermediate-level proficiency in the Japanese language. This is equivalent to the completion of three courses (two at the 100-level and one at the 200-level), or placement or exemption based on Advanced Placement, Cambridge GCE Advanced level, International Baccalaureate or CMU internal placement test scores. In all cases, progress will be accelerated by study abroad, which is highly recommended for all majors. (Study abroad advisor - Dr. Yasufumi Iwasaki, yiwasaki@andrew.cmu.edu)

Students may double count a maximum of one course taken for the Japanese Studies major that is also being used to fulfill the requirements of other majors, minors, and programs.

1. Core Courses in Japanese Studies36–39 units

Complete all four courses.

Units
82-272Intermediate Japanese II *12
82-273Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture9
82-371Advanced Japanese I9
82-372Advanced Japanese II9

*Students who place out of 82-272 Intermediate Japanese II must take 9 units chosen from List A electives.

1

2. Core Courses in Modern Languages12 units

Complete one 9-unit course* in Modern Languages, plus the senior seminar (3 units) in spring of the senior year.

Units
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-281Tutoring for Community OutreachVar.
82-282Community Service LearningVar.
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
82-480Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism9
82-580Senior Seminar in Modern Languages3

* In consultation with the major advisor, students may substitute a Modern Languages course elective with one related to language analysis, language learning, or the acquisition of language and culture from the listings in Japanese Studies or from another department. Examples: 80-180 Nature of Language, 85-421 Language and Thought.

3. Japanese Studies and Interdisciplinary Electives54 units

Complete four courses (36 units) from List A and two (18 units) from List B. With permission of the major advisor, students are encouraged to complete at least one Japanese history course that qualifies for List A or List B at the University of Pittsburgh, one in Japan when they study abroad, or in a summer program at any other university.

List A. Japanese Electives
Units
82-373Structure of the Japanese Language9
82-374Technical Japanese9
82-473/474Topics in Japanese Studies *9
82-505Undergraduate InternshipVar.
82-571/572Special Topics: Japanese Studies *Var.

* Students may repeat these courses with new topics.


List B. Interdisciplinary Electives

This list is compiled from possibilities such as but not limited to the following. Students should consult OLR and their major advisor for the most up to date interdisciplinary electives appropriate for the Japanese Studies curriculum. Courses may be suggested to the major advisor for approval as a substitute. Note that not all courses are offered each semester.

English Units
76-239Introduction to Film Studies9
76-386Language & Culture9
76-387Narrative & Argument9
History Units
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China: From the Birth of Mao ... to Now9
79-275Introduction to Global Studies9
Modern Languages Units
82-234Topics in Chinese History9
82-278Japanese Film and Literature: The Art of Storytelling9
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-281Tutoring for Community OutreachVar.
82-282Community Service LearningVar.
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-373Structure of the Japanese Language9
82-374Technical Japanese9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
82-480Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism9
Music Units
57-306World Music9
Philosophy Units
80-180Nature of Language9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
Psychology Units
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-421Language and Thought9
Social and Decision Sciences Units
88-384Conflict and Conflict Resolution in International Relations9
4. Oral Proficiency Interview

Complete an oral proficiency interview. At the latest, this exam should be scheduled by midterm of the senior spring semester. Students are permitted to retake the test.

Study Abroad

A semester or year of study abroad is strongly recommended. Consult with your advisor and the Office of International Education (OIE) about possible options.

Senior Honors Thesis

Modern Languages majors are encouraged to undertake a Senior Honors Thesis (Modern Languages Honors Thesis, 82-591/82-592 or Dietrich College Senior Honors Thesis I, II, 66-501/66-502). The Honors Thesis program provides qualified seniors with a valuable opportunity to combine their academic and personal experiences and interests into a unique research project. (Prerequisites: a 3.5 QPA in Japanese Studies and a 3.25 QPA overall)


Japanese Studies (B.A.) Sample Curriculum

This sample curriculum assumes that all prerequisites for 82-371 are fulfilled prior to the junior year.

Junior YearSenior Year
FallSpringFallSpring
82-273 Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture82-372 Advanced Japanese IIJapanese Studies Elective from List AJapanese Studies Elective From List A
82-371 Advanced Japanese IModern Languages core course of equivalent approved by advisorJapanese Studies Elective from List AInterdisciplinary Elective From List B
Modern Languages core course of equivalentInterdisciplinary Elective from List BElective82-580 Senior Seminar in Modern Languages
ElectiveInterdisciplinary Elective from List BElectiveElective
ElectiveElectiveElectiveElective
Elective

This is presented as a two-year (junior-senior) plan for completing the major requirements. It is intended to show that this program can be completed in as few as two years, not that it must be. Students may enter their major and begin major course requirements as early as the start of the sophomore year, and in some instances in the first year. Students should consult their advisor when planning their program.

This plan is also an example of the suggested sequence of study for students who have had little or no prior exposure to the language. Such students would need to satisfy the prerequisites (elementary and intermediate language study) during their freshman and sophomore years.

The Major in Russian Studies75–78 units

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Tatyana Gershkovich, Assistant Professor of Russian
 

The major in Russian Studies is jointly administered by the Departments of History and Modern Languages. Students are required to fulfill requirements in history and in language and culture.

Prerequisites

Elementary-level proficiency in the Russian language. This is equivalent to the completion of two courses at the 100-level, or placement or exemption based on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or CMU internal placement test scores. Carnegie Mellon students who arrive with previous language study and/or who have high AP or CEEB scores will be able to begin taking courses toward the major earlier in their undergraduate program and will also be able, should they so desire, to complete an additional major. In all cases, progress will be accelerated by study abroad, which is highly recommended for all majors.

Students may double count a maximum of one course taken for the Russian Studies major that is also being used to fulfill the requirements of other majors, minors, and programs.
 

1. Core Course in History9 units
Complete one course.*
79-265Russian History: From the First to the Last Tsar9
79-266Russian History: From Communism to Capitalism9

* Both courses are recommended.

1

2. Required Electives in History18 units
Complete two courses. In consultation with the major advisor, students may substitute a different course. Units
79-267The Soviet Union in World War II: Military, Political, and Social History9
79-341The Cold War in Documents and Film9
3. Core Courses in Modern Languages27 units

Complete three courses.                                                                                             
 

Units
82-291Intermediate Russian I9
82-292Intermediate Russian II9
82-399Special Topics: Russian in Context
(Students can repeat 82-399 with different topics.) *
Var.

Should a student enter the Russian Studies program with demonstrated language proficiency at the intermediate or advanced level, higher level courses will be used to complete the required total of 27 units from the list of core courses in Modern Languages. Advanced language options include Special Topics: Russian, a repeatable course, as well as subject-oriented language supplements to existing courses taught in English in a variety of fields. The student can add a language supplement (3 units) to selected 9-unit electives, earning a total of 12 units for the language-supplemented course.

4. Required Electives18 units

Complete two courses. This list is compiled from possibilities such as but not limited to the following. Students should consult OLR and their major advisor for the most up to date interdisciplinary electives appropriate for the Russian Studies curriculum. Courses may be suggested to the major advisor for approval as a substitute. Note that not all courses are offered each semester.

History
Units
79-20520th/21st Century Europe9
79-231American Foreign Policy: 1945-Present9
79-265Russian History: From the First to the Last Tsar9
79-266Russian History: From Communism to Capitalism9
79-267The Soviet Union in World War II: Military, Political, and Social History9
79-341The Cold War in Documents and Film9
Modern Languages
Units
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-294Topics in Russian Language and Culture *Var.
82-296A Century of Russian Film9
82-396The Faust Legend at Home and Abroad
(or 82-193 which is a Freshman Seminar.)
Var.
82-397Russia's DemonsVar.
82-399Special Topics: Russian in Context *Var.
82-400Russian Studies Topics (section A and/or B)6
82-492The Historical Imagination in Nineteenth-Century Russian LiteratureVar.
82-505Undergraduate InternshipVar.
82-580Senior Seminar in Modern Languages **3

*Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

**If their schedule permits and after consultation with the major advisor, students may elect to take the 3-unit Modern Languages Senior Seminar in addition to two 9-unit electives.

5. Required Independent Research3–6 units
Complete one course. Units
82-599Russian Studies ThesisVar.

In the senior year, majors are required to undertake an independent research or translation project in which their language skills are applied to Russian-language materials. This project, which earns 3 to 6 units, is conducted in connection with an existing course in Russian history, language, literature or politics. The student works closely with the professor to select a topic requiring the use of Russian sources suitable to the student's proficiency level. For example, students may choose to prepare a translation of a little-known piece of Russian literature or a debate from a nineteenth-century journal, to compare Soviet and Western newspaper coverage of the Cuban missile crisis, to research Russian opinion of American race relations, or to read and evaluate the reviews of a popular Russian novel.

Study Abroad

Students in both the major and minor programs are encouraged to spend a semester or summer in Russia via an approved exchange program. Many exchange programs offer instruction in Russian language, history, literature, and culture, in internationally recognized universities. They also offer travel to ancient sites and cities, visits to museums, palaces, exhibitions, and monuments, and the opportunity to live with a Russian host family. Scholarship monies are available.

Faculty Exchange Program

In 1993, the College of Humanities and Social Sciences initiated a faculty exchange program with the Russian State University of the Humanities (RGGU), one of the foremost universities in Russia, located in Moscow. Carnegie Mellon has hosted faculty members from RGGU specializing in history, language and philosophy. These professors have joined our College departments for a semester, offering unique courses and perspectives not generally available to our students. In the past, these Russian visitors have offered courses on the Russian Civil War as well as advanced language and literature courses. Several faculty members from Carnegie Mellon have visited Moscow, using the RGGU exchange to pursue archival research and collaborative projects. The exchange offers students an opportunity to study language from native speakers, gain exposure to different perspectives on history and politics, and gather firsthand knowledge about recent developments in Russia. In addition, the exchange can provide important contacts for students interested in pursuing careers abroad.

Sample Curriculum - Russian Studies, B.A.

This sample curriculum assumes that all prerequisites for 82-291 are fulfilled prior to the Junior year.

Junior YearSenior Year
FallSpringFallSpring
82-291 Intermediate Russian I82-292 Intermediate Russian II82-399 Special Topics: Russian in Context82-599 Russian Studies Thesis
Core Course in History 76-265/266Required Elective in History82-399 Special Topics: Russian in ContextRequired Elective
ElectiveRequired ElectiveRequired Elective82-580 Senior Seminar in Modern Languages
ElectiveElectiveElectiveElective
ElectiveElectiveElectiveElective

This is presented as a two-year (junior-senior) plan for completing the major requirements. Its purpose is to show that this program can be completed in as few as two years, not that it must be. Students may enter their major and begin major course requirements as early as the start of the sophomore year, and in some instances in the first year. Students should consult their advisor when planning their program.

This plan is also an example of the suggested sequence of study for students who have had little or no prior exposure to the language. Such students would need to satisfy the prerequisites (elementary and intermediate language study) during their freshman and sophomore years.

Modern Languages as an Additional Major

In addition to their primary major, a student may complete a major in Chinese Studies, French and Francophone Studies, German Studies, Hispanic Studies, Japanese Studies, and Russian Studies. Students outside of Dietrich College interested in an additional major in Modern Languages need to fulfill only the requirements for the Modern Languages major but not the Dietrich College General Education requirements.

Minors in the Department of Modern Languages

The Department of Modern Languages also offers minors in Arabic Studies, Chinese Studies, French and Francophone Studies, German Studies, Hispanic Studies, Japanese Studies, and Russian Studies. A minor in one of these language and culture areas requires core courses similar to the major and includes a variety of options for electives. Many students study abroad as part of their program. Students who minor in Modern Languages have found the program an enriching complement to their major areas of study and an asset to their work in government, entrepreneurship and business, law, technology and engineering firms, media, public health, health policy, and health professions, non-profit organizations, entertainment and creative arts, and education.

Curriculum

The minimum requirement for the minor in French and Francophone Studies, German Studies or Hispanic Studies is 54 units (not including any 100- or 200-level prerequisite work in the chosen language), as outlined below. The minimum requirement for the minor in Arabic Studies, Chinese Studies, Japanese Studies or Russian Studies is 54-60 units, depending on the student's language background.

Language-specific faculty advisors for these specializations are:

Arabic Studies-Dr. Khaled Al Masaeed, Assistant Professor of Arabic Studies (Pittsburgh) and Dr. Zeinab Ibrahim, Teaching Professor of Arabic Studies (Qatar)
Chinese Studies-Dr. Gang Liu, Assistant Teaching Professor of Chinese Studies, Dr. Sue-mei Wu, Teaching Professor of Chinese Studies, and Tianxue Yao, Lecturer of Chinese Studies
French & Francophone Studies- Dr. Bonnie Youngs, Teaching Professor of French & Francophone Studies
German Studies-Dr. Gabriele Eichmanns Maier, Associate Teaching Professor of German Studies
Hispanic Studies-Dr. Felipe Gómez, Associate Teaching Professor of Hispanic Studies and Dr. María del Mar Rosa Rodríguez, Assistant Professor of Hispanic Studies
Japanese Studies- Dr. Yasufumi Iwasaki, Associate Teaching Professor of Japanese and Dr. Yoshihiro Yasuhara, Assistant Teaching Professor of Japanese Studies
Russian Studies-Dr. Tatyana Gershkovich, Assistant Professor of Russian Studies
 

The Minor in Arabic Studies54-57 units

Faculty Advisors

Dr. Khaled Al Masaeed, Assistant Professor of Arabic Studies (Pittsburgh) (masaeed@andrew.cmu.edu)
Dr. Zeinab Ibrahim, Teaching Professor of Arabic Studies (Qatar) (zeinab@qatar.cmu.edu)

Prerequisites

Intermediate-level proficiency in the Arabic language. This is equivalent to the completion of three courses (two at the 100-level and one at the 200-level), or placement or exemption based on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or CMU internal placement test scores. In all cases, progress will be accelerated by study abroad, which is highly recommended for all minors. (Study abroad advisor - Dr. Khaled Al Masaeed, (masaeed@andrew.cmu.edu). 

Students may double count a maximum of one course taken for the Arabic Studies minor that is also being used to fulfill the requirements of other majors, minors, and programs.

Students with native or near-native proficiency in listening and speaking of the language prior to entering CMU should consult with the minor advisors for a different curriculum that may accelerate their completion of the requirement.

1. Core Courses in Arabic Studies27-30 units

Complete three courses.*

82-212Intermediate Arabic II12
82-311Advanced Arabic I9
82-312Advanced Arabic II9

*Students who place higer than 82-212 must take a total of 27 units in Core Courses
 

2. Arabic Studies and Interdisciplinary Electives27 units

Complete two courses (18 units) from List A and one course (9 units) from List B, or three courses (27 units) from List A.
 

List A. Electives
82-117Arabic Conversation & Dialect I6
82-118Arabic Conversation & Dialect II6
82-411Language and Society in the Arab World *Var.
82-412TOPICS IN ARABIC STUDIES *9
82-505Undergraduate InternshipVar.

*Students may repeat these courses with new topics
 

List B. Interdisciplinary Electives
Architecture
48-240Historical Survey of World Architecture and Urbanism I9
48-315Environment I: Climate & Energy9
Business Administration
70-321Negotiation and Conflict Resolution9
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
70-365International Trade and International Law9
Engineering and Public Policy
19-411Global Competitiveness: Firms, Nations and Technological Change9
19-424Energy and the Environment9
English
76-318Communicating in the Global Marketplace9
76-472Multimedia Storytelling in a Digital Age9
76-386Language & Culture9
76-484Discourse Analysis9
76-491Rhetorical Analysis9
Information Systems
67-329Contemporary Themes in Global Systems9
Institute for Politics and Strategy
84-275Comparative Politics9
84-310International Political Economy and Organizations9
84-322Nonviolent Conflict and Revolution9
84-323War and Peace9
84-326Theories of International Relations9
84-362Diplomacy and Statecraft9
84-389Terrorism and Insurgency9
Linguistics
80-180Nature of Language9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-282Phonetics and Phonology I9
80-381Meaning in Language9
80-383Language in Use9
Modern Languages
82-114Arabic for Global Exchange Online6
82-214Topics in Modern Arabic Language, Literature, & Culture
(CMU-Q)
9
82-215Introduction to Modern Arabic Literature and CultureVar.
82-216Literature of the Arabic-speaking World
(CMU-Q)
9
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-282Community Service LearningVar.
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-300Topics in Cross-Cultural Studies9
82-313Readings in Islamic History
(CMU-Q)
9
82-314Arabic for the Professions
(CMU-Q)
9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-480Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism9
Philosophy
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-247Ethics and Global Economics9
80-281Language and Thought9
80-324Philosophy of Economics9
80-381Meaning in Language9
80-383Language in Use9
Psychology
85-219Biological Foundations of Behavior9
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-421Language and Thought9
Social and Decision Sciences
88-384Conflict and Conflict Resolution in International Relations9
88-412Energy, Climate Change, and Economic Growth in the 21st Century9


 

The Minor in Chinese Studies57-60 units

Faculty Advisors

Dr. Gang Liu, Assistant Teaching Professor of Chinese Studies (gangliu@andrew.cmu.edu)
Dr. Sue-mei Wu, Teaching Professor of Chinese Studies (suemei@andrew.cmu.edu)
Tianxue Yao, Lecturer of Chinese Studies (tyao@andrew.cmu.edu)

Prerequisites

Intermediate-level proficiency in the Chinese language. This is equivalent to the completion of three courses (two at the 100-level and one at the 200-level), or placement or exemption based on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or CMU internal placement test scores. In all cases, progress will be accelerated by study abroad, which is highly recommended for all minors. (Study abroad advisor - Dr. Yueming Yu, yyu@andrew.cmu.edu). 

Students may double count a maximum of one course taken for the Chinese Studies minor that is also being used to fulfill the requirements of other majors, minors, and programs.

Students with native or near-native proficiency in listening and speaking of the language prior to entering CMU should consult with the minor advisors for a different curriculum that may accelerate their completion of the requirement.

1. Core Courses in Chinese Studies36–39 units

Complete four courses.

82-232Intermediate Chinese II
(may be substituded by 82-235 Intermediate Chinese for Heritage Students) *
12
82-235Intermediate Chinese for Heritage Students *9
82-331Advanced Chinese I9
82-332Advanced Chinese II9
82-333Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture **Var.

*Students who place out of 82-232/82-235 must take a minimum of 9 additional units chosen from List A Electives.

**Students must take this course for 12 units with the additional work in Chinese to fulfill the requirement.  Students who take this course for 9 units prior to declaring their minor must register for 3 units of independent study later in their studies.

2. Chinese Studies and Interdisciplinary Electives18 units
List A. Chinese Studies Electives

Complete two courses (18 units) from List A or one course (9 units) from List A and one (9 units) from List B.

82-334Structure of Chinese9
82-335Chinese Culture Through Legends and Folktales9
82-337Mandarin Chinese for Oral Communication I9
82-338Mandarin Chinese for Oral Communication II9
82-339Business Language & Culture in China I9
82-340Business Language & Culture in China II9
82-432Popular Culture in China9
82-433Topics in Contemporary Culture of China *9
82-440Studies in Chinese Literature & Culture *9
82-432Popular Culture in China9
82-433Topics in Contemporary Culture of China *9
82-434Studies in Chinese Traditions *9
82-436Introduction to Classical Chinese *9
82-439Modern China Through Literature *Var.
82-440Studies in Chinese Literature & Culture *9
82-505Undergraduate InternshipVar.
82-531/532Special Topics in Chinese Studies *Var.

*Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

List B. Interdisciplinary Electives

This list is compiled from possibilities such as but not limited to the following. Students should consult OLR and their minor advisor for the most up to date interdisciplinary electives appropriate for the Chinese Studies curriculum. Courses may be suggested to the minor advisor for approval as a substitute. Note that not all courses are offered each semester.

Architecture Units
48-351Human Factors in Architecture9
48-551Ethics and Decision Making in Architecture9
Art Units
60-373Aesthetics from a Global Viewpoint9
60-399Art History/Theory Independent Study9
Business Administration Units
70-342Managing Across Cultures9
70-365International Trade and International Law9
70-430International Management9
English Units
76-318Communicating in the Global Marketplace9
76-339The Films of Spike Lee9
76-386Language & Culture9
76-387Narrative & Argument9
History Units
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China: From the Birth of Mao ... to Now9
79-309The Chinese Revolution Through Film (1949-2000)9
Modern Languages Units
82-230Topics in Cultural Comparison9
82-234Topics in Chinese History9
82-238Topics in Chinese Culture9
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-281Tutoring for Community OutreachVar.
82-282Community Service LearningVar.
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
82-480Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism9
Philosophy Units
80-180Nature of Language9
80-276Philosophy of Religion9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
Psychology Units
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-421Language and Thought9
Social and Decision Sciences Units
88-384Conflict and Conflict Resolution in International Relations9
88-411Rise of the Asian Economies9

The Minor in French and Francophone Studies54 units

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Bonnie Youngs, Teaching Professor of French and Francophone Studies (byoungs@cmu.edu)

Prerequisites

Intermediate-level proficiency in French. This is equivalent to the completion of four courses (two at the 100-level and two at the 200-level) or exemption based on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or Carnegie Mellon internal placement test scores. In all cases, progress will be accelerated by study abroad, which is highly recommended for all minors. (Study abroad advisor - Dr. Michael West, mjwest@andrew.cmu.edu)

Students may double count a maximum of one course taken for the French & Francophone Studies minor that is also being used to fulfill the requirements of other majors, minors, and programs.

1. Core Courses in French and Francophone Studies27 units

Complete three courses.

82-303Introduction to French Culture9
82-304The Francophone World9
82-305French in its Social Contexts9
2. French and Francophone Studies and Interdisciplinary Electives27 units

Complete three courses (27 units) from List A, or two courses (18 units) from List A and one
(9 units) from List B.

List A. French Electives
Units
82-415/416Topics in French and Francophone Studies *9
82-501/502Special Topics: French and Francophone Studies *Var.
82-505Undergraduate InternshipVar.

* Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

List B. Interdisciplinary Electives

This list is compiled from possibilities such as but not limited to the following. Students should consult OLR and their minor advisor for the most up to date interdisciplinary electives appropriate for the French & Francophone Studies curriculum. Courses may be suggested to the minor advisor for approval as a substitute. Note that not all courses are offered each semester.

Architecture Units
48-338European Cities in the XIX Century: Planning, Architecture, Preservation9
48-340Modern Architecture and Theory 1900-19459
48-341Expression in Architecture9
48-448History of Sustainable Architecture9
English Units
76-239Introduction to Film Studies9
76-318Communicating in the Global Marketplace9
76-385Introduction to Discourse Analysis9
76-386Language & Culture9
76-387Narrative & Argument9
History Units
79-202Flesh and Spirit: Early Modern Europe, 1400-17509
79-20520th/21st Century Europe9
79-207Development of European Culture9
79-227African History: Height of Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade to the End of Apartheid9
79-353Religious Identities and Religious Conflicts in 19th Century Europe9
79-385The Making of the African Diaspora9
79-258French History: From the Revolution to De Gaulle9
79-275Introduction to Global Studies9
79-350Early Christianity9
79-386Entrepreneurs in Africa, Past, Present and Future9
79-396Music and Society in 19th and 20th Century Europe and the U.S.9
Modern Languages Units
82-227Germany & the European Union9
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-281Tutoring for Community OutreachVar.
82-282Community Service LearningVar.
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
82-480Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism9
Music Units
57-173Survey of Western Music History9
57-306World Music9
Philosophy Units
80-180Nature of Language9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-281Language and Thought9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
Psychology Units
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-421Language and Thought9
Social and Decision Sciences Units
88-384Conflict and Conflict Resolution in International Relations9
88-419Negotiation - International Focus9

The Minor in German Studies54 units

Faculty Advisor
Dr. Gabriele Eichmanns Maier, Associate Teaching Professor of German Studies
(eichgabi@andrew.cmu.edu)

Prerequisites

Intermediate-level proficiency in German. This is equivalent to the completion of four courses (two at the 100-level and two at the 200-level) or exemption based on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or Carnegie Mellon internal placement test scores. In all cases, progress will be accelerated by study abroad, which is highly recommended for all minors. (Study abroad advisor - Dr. Gabriele Eichmanns Maier, eichgabi@andrew.cmu.edu)

Students may double count a maximum of one course taken for the German Studies minor that is also being used to fulfill the requirements of other majors, minors, and programs.

1. Core Courses in German Studies27 units

Complete three courses.*

Units
82-320Contemporary Society in Germany, Austria and Switzerland9
82-323Germany, Austria and Switzerland in the 20th Century9
82-327The Emergence of the German Speaking World9

* A 400-level course may be substituted with the minor advisor's approval.

2. German Studies & Interdisciplinary Electives27 units

Complete three courses (27 units) from List A or two courses (18 units) from List A and one (9 units) from List B.

List A. German Studies Electives
Units
82-420The Crucible of Modernity:Vienna 19009
82-425/426Topics in German Literature and Culture *9
82-427Nazi and Resistance Culture9
82-428History of German Film9
82-521/522Special Topics: German Studies *Var.

*Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

List B. Interdisciplinary Electives

This list is compiled from possibilities such as but not limited to the following. Students should consult OLR and their minor advisor for the most up to date interdisciplinary electives appropriate for the German Studies curriculum. Courses may be suggested to the minor advisor for approval as a substitute. Note that not all courses are offered each semester.

Architecture Units
48-338European Cities in the XIX Century: Planning, Architecture, Preservation9
48-340Modern Architecture and Theory 1900-19459
48-350Postwar Modern Architecture and Theory9
English Units
76-239Introduction to Film Studies9
76-386Language & Culture9
76-387Narrative & Argument9
76-483Corpus Analysis in Rhetoric9
History Units
79-20520th/21st Century Europe9
79-257Germany and the Second World War9
79-349The Holocaust in Historical Perspective9
Modern Languages Units
82-227Germany & the European Union9
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-281Tutoring for Community OutreachVar.
82-282Community Service LearningVar.
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
82-427Nazi and Resistance Culture (when taken entirely in English)9
82-428History of German Film (when taken entirely in English)Var.
82-480Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism9
Music Units
57-306World Music9
Philosophy Units
80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-180Nature of Language9
80-251Modern Philosophy9
80-253Continental Philosophy9
80-256Modern Moral Philosophy9
80-275Metaphysics9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
Psychology Units
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-421Language and Thought9

54 units The Minor in Hispanic Studies

The Minor in Hispanic Studies54 units

Faculty Advisors

Dr. Felipe Gómez, Associate Teaching Professor of Hispanic Studies
(fgomez@andrew.cmu.edu)
Dr. María del Mar Rosa Rodríguez, Assistant Professor of Hispanic Studies
(mrosarod@andrew.cmu.edu)

Prerequisites

Intermediate-level proficiency in Spanish. This is equivalent to the completion of four courses (two at the 100-level and two at the 200-level) or exemption based on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or Carnegie Mellon internal placement test scores. In all cases, progress will be accelerated by study abroad, which is highly recommended for all minors. (Study abroad advisor – Dr. Therese Tardio, tardio@andrew.cmu.edu)

Students may double count a maximum of one course taken for the Hispanic Studies minor that is also being used to fulfill the requirements of other majors, minors, and programs.

1. Core Courses in Hispanic Studies27 units

Complete two courses.

Units
82-342Spain: Language and Culture9
82-343Latin America: Language and Culture9
82-344U.S. Latinos: Language and Culture9

Complete the following course.

Units
82-345Introduction to Hispanic Literary and Cultural Studies9
2. Hispanic Studies and Interdisciplinary Electives27 units

Complete three courses (27 units) from List A or two courses (18 units) from List A and one (9 units) from List B.

List A: Hispanic Studies Electives
Units
82-441Studies in Peninsular Literature and Culture *9
82-443Spanish Reading and Translation Workshop9
82-444The Structure of Spanish9
82-451Studies in Latin American Literature and Culture *9
82-455/456Topics in Hispanic Studies *9
82-505Undergraduate InternshipVar.
82-541/542Special Topics: Hispanic Studies *Var.

* Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

List B. Interdisciplinary Electives

This list is compiled from possibilities such as but not limited to the following. Students should consult OLR and their minor advisor for the most up to date interdisciplinary electives appropriate for the Hispanic Studies curriculum. Courses may be suggested to the minor advisor for approval as a substitute. Note that not all courses are offered each semester.

Architecture Units
48-348Architectural History of Mexico & Guatemala9
English Units
76-385Introduction to Discourse Analysis9
76-484Discourse Analysis9
76-386Language & Culture9
76-387Narrative & Argument9
History Units
79-221Development and Democracy in Latin America9
79-222Between Revolutions: The Development of Modern Latin America9
79-223Mexico: From the Aztec Empire to the Drug War9
79-224Mayan America9
79-235Caribbean Cultures9
79-237Comparative Slavery9
79-276Beyond the Border9
79-288Bananas, Baseball, and Borders: Latin America and the United States9
79-295Race Relations in the Atlantic World9
Modern Languages Units
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-281Tutoring for Community OutreachVar.
82-282Community Service LearningVar.
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
82-480Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism9
Music Units
57-306World Music9
Philosophy Units
80-180Nature of Language9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-285Natural Language Syntax9
80-286Words and Word Formation: Introduction to Morphology9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
80-381Meaning in Language9
Psychology Units
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-421Language and Thought9

The Minor in Japanese Studies54–57 units

Faculty Advisors
Dr. Yasufumi Iwasaki, Associate Teaching Professor of Japanese
(yiwasaki@andrew.cmu.edu)
Dr. Yoshihiro Yasuhara, Associate Teaching Professor of Japanese Studies
(yyashuar@andrew.cmu.edu)

Prerequisites

Intermediate-level of proficiency in the Japanese language. This is equivalent to the completion of three courses (two at the 100-level and one at the 200-level), or placement or exemption based on Advanced Placement, Cambridge GCE Advanced level, International Baccalaureate or CMU internal placement test scores. In all cases, progress will be accelerated by study abroad, which is highly recommended for all minors. (Study abroad advisor - Dr. Yasufumi Iwasaki, yiwasaki@andrew.cmu.edu)

Students may double count a maximum of one course taken for the Japanese Studies minor that is also being used to fulfill the requirements of other majors, minors, and programs.

1. Core Courses in Japanese Studies27–39 units*

Complete four courses.

82-272Intermediate Japanese II *12
82-273Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture9
82-371Advanced Japanese I9
82-372Advanced Japanese II9

*Students who place out of 82-272 must take 9 units chosen from the List A electives.

2. Japanese Studies and Interdisciplinary Electives18 units

Complete two courses (18 units) from List A, or one course (9 units) from List A and one (9 units) from List B.

List A. Japanese Studies Electives
82-373Structure of the Japanese Language9
82-374Technical Japanese9
82-473/474Topics in Japanese Studies *9
82-505Undergraduate InternshipVar.
82-571/572Special Topics: Japanese Studies *Var.

*Students may repeat these courses with new topics.

List B. Interdisciplinary Electives

This list is compiled from possibilities such as but not limited to the following. Students should consult OLR and their minor advisor for the most up to date interdisciplinary electives appropriate for the Japanese Studies curriculum. Courses may be suggested to the minor advisor for approval as a substitute. Note that not all courses are offered each semester.

English
76-239Introduction to Film Studies9
76-386Language & Culture9
76-387Narrative & Argument9
History
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China: From the Birth of Mao ... to Now9
79-275Introduction to Global Studies9
Modern Languages
82-234Topics in Chinese History9
82-278Japanese Film and Literature: The Art of Storytelling9
82-280Learning About Language Learning9
82-281Tutoring for Community OutreachVar.
82-282Community Service LearningVar.
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-373Structure of the Japanese Language9
82-374Technical Japanese9
82-383Second Language Acquisition: Theories and Research9
82-388Understanding Second Language Fluency9
82-480Social and Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism9
Music
57-306World Music9
Philosophy
80-180Nature of Language9
80-280Linguistic Analysis9
80-380Philosophy of Language9
Psychology
85-375Crosscultural Psychology9
85-421Language and Thought9
Social and Decision Sciences
88-384Conflict and Conflict Resolution in International Relations9

The Minor in Russian Studies54 units

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Tatyana Gershkovich, Assistant Professor of Russian Studies


The minor in Russian Studies is jointly administered by the Departments of History and Modern Languages. Students are required to fulfill requirements in history and in language and culture.

Prerequisites

Elementary-level proficiency in the Russian language. This is equivalent to the completion of two courses at the 100-level, or placement or exemption based on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or CMU internal placement test scores. Carnegie Mellon students who arrive with previous language study and/or who have high AP or CEEB scores will be able to begin taking courses toward the minor earlier in their undergraduate program. In all cases, progress will be accelerated by study abroad, which is highly recommended for all minors.

Students may double count a maximum of one course taken for the Russian Studies minor that is also being used to fulfill the requirements of other majors, minors, and programs.

1. Required Course in History9 units
Complete one course. * Units
79-265Russian History: From the First to the Last Tsar9
79-266Russian History: From Communism to Capitalism9

* Both courses are recommended.
 

2. Required Electives in History18 units
In consultation with the minor advisor, students may choose a substitute. Units
79-267The Soviet Union in World War II: Military, Political, and Social History9
79-341The Cold War in Documents and Film9
3. Core Courses in Modern Languages18 units
Complete both courses. Units
82-291Intermediate Russian I9
82-292Intermediate Russian II9

Should a student enter the Russian Studies program with demonstrated language proficiency at the intermediate or advanced level, higher level courses will be used to complete the required total of 18 units of core courses in Modern Languages. Advanced language options include Special Topics: Russian, a repeatable course, as well as subject-oriented language supplements to existing courses taught in English in a variety of fields. The student can add a language supplement (3 units) to selected 9-unit electives, earning a total of 12 units for the language-supplemented course.

4. Interdisciplinary Electives18 units

Complete two courses. This list is compiled from possibilities such as but not limited to the following. Students should consult their minor advisor for the most up to date interdisciplinary electives appropriate for the Russian Studies curriculum. Courses may be suggested to the minor advisor for approval as a substitute. Note that not all courses are offered each semester.

History Units
79-20520th/21st Century Europe9
79-231American Foreign Policy: 1945-Present9
79-265Russian History: From the First to the Last Tsar9
79-266Russian History: From Communism to Capitalism9
79-267The Soviet Union in World War II: Military, Political, and Social History9
79-341The Cold War in Documents and Film9
Modern Languages Units
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-294Topics in Russian Language and Culture *Var.
82-296A Century of Russian Film9
82-396The Faust Legend at Home and AbroadVar.
82-397Russia's DemonsVar.
82-399Special Topics: Russian in Context *Var.
82-400Russian Studies Topics (section A and/or B)6
82-492The Historical Imagination in Nineteenth-Century Russian LiteratureVar.

* Students may repeat these course with new topics.

Study Abroad

A semester or year of study abroad is strongly recommended. Consult with your advisor and the Office of International Education (OIE) about possible options. Students are encouraged to spend a semester or summer in Russia via an approved exchange program. Many exchange programs offer instruction in Russian language, history, literature, and culture, in internationally recognized universities. They also offer travel to ancient sites and cities, visits to museums, palaces, exhibitions, and monuments, and the opportunity to live with a Russian host family. Scholarship opportunities are available.

Faculty

MARIANA ACHUGAR, Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies & Second Language Acquisition – Ph.D., University of California at Davis; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
KHALED AL MASAEED, Assistant Professor of Arabic Studies – Ph.D., The University of Arizona; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.
STEPHEN BROCKMANN, Professor of German with courtesy appointments in English and History – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
CHARLENE CASTELLANO, Teaching Professor of Russian Emeritus – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.
SÉBASTIEN DUBREIL, Teaching Professor of French & Francophone Studies and Second Language Acquisition & Technology Enhanced Learning – Ph.D., Emory University; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.
KENYA C. DWORKIN Y MENDEZ, Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies with courtesy appointments in English and History – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
GABRIELE EICHMANNS-MAIER, Associate Teaching Professor of German – Ph.D., University of Washington; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.
BARBARA FREED, Professor Emeritus of French & Francophone Studies and Second Language Acquisition – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.
TATYANA GERSHKOVICH, Assistant Professor of Russian Studies – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.
FELIPE GOMEZ, Associate Teaching Professor of Hispanic Studies – Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.
CHRISTIAN HALLSTEIN, Teaching Professor of German – Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.
ERIK HELIN, Special Lecturer, Carnegie Mellon - Qatar – MA , Eastern Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.
PAUL HOPPER, Paul Mellon Distinguished Professor Emeritus of the Humanities, Rhetoric and Linguistics with a courtesy appointment in Modern Languages – Ph.D., University of Texas; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.
ZEINAB IBRAHIM, Associate Teaching Professor, Carnegie Mellon - Qatar – Ph.D., Georgetown University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.
YASUFUMI IWASAKI, Associate Teaching Professor of Japanese – Ph.D., University of Illinois; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.
BARBARA JOHNSTONE, Professor Emeritus of Rhetoric and Linguistics with a courtesy appointment in Modern Languages – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.
CHRISTOPHER M. JONES, Teaching Professor of French & Francophone Studies and Director of Modern Language Resource Center – Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
ELISABETH KASKE, Associate Professor of Chinese Studies – Ph.D., Heidelberg University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.
KEIKO KODA, Professor of Japanese and Second Language Acquisition and Director of Graduate Studies – Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.
GANG LIU, Assistant Teaching Professor of Chinese Studies – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.
BRIAN MACWHINNEY, Professor of Psychology with a courtesy appointment in Modern Languages – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.
MAME NIANG-MEUNIER, Assistant Professor of French & Francophone Studies – Ph.D., Louisiana State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.
SUSAN G. POLANSKY, Teaching Professor of Hispanic Studies and Head of Modern Languages – Ph.D., Boston College; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.
GIOVANNI PUPPO, Instructor of Italian – Ph.D., University of Rome; Carnegie Mellon, 1975–.
MARIA DEL MAR ROSA-RODRIGUEZ, Assistant Professor of Hispanic Studies – Ph.D., Emory University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.
JURIS SILENIEKS, Professor Emeritus of French – Ph.D., University of Nebraska; Carnegie Mellon, 1960–.
CANDACE SKIBBA, Assistant Teaching Professor of Hispanic Studies – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.
DONALD SUTTON, Professor Emeritus of History with a courtesy appointment in Modern Languages – Ph.D. , Cambridge University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.
NAOKO TAGUCHI, Associate Professor of Japanese and Second Language Acquisition – Ph.D., Northern Arizona University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.
THERESE TARDIO, Associate Teaching Professor of Hispanic Studies – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.
G. RICHARD TUCKER, Paul Mellon University Professor Emeritus of Applied Linguistics with a courtesy appointment in Psychology – Ph.D., McGill University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.
JAN VAIRO, Senior Lecturer – M.A., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.
REMI (ADAM) VAN COMPERNOLLE, Assistant Professor of French & Francophone Studies & Second Language Acquisition – Ph.D., Penn State; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.
MICHAEL J. WEST, Teaching Professor of French & Francophone Studies – PhD., University of California-Santa Barbara; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.
DANIELLE WETZEL, Teaching Professor and Director of First Year Writing with a courtesy appointment in Modern Languages – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.
SETH WIENER, Assistant Professor of Second Language Acquistion and Chinese – Ph.D., Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.
SUE-MEI WU, Teaching Professor of Chinese Studies – Ph.D., Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
TIANXUE YAO, Senior Lecturer – M.A., Carnegie Mellon University, M.A., JiLin University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.
YOSHIHIRO YASUHARA, AssociateTeaching Professor of Japanese Studies – Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.
BONNIE L. YOUNGS, Teaching Professor of French & Francophone Studies and Director of Undergraduate Studies – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
YUEMING YU, Teaching Professor of Chinese Studies – Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.

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Faculty

MARIANA ACHUGAR, Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies & Second Language Acquisition – Ph.D., University of California at Davis; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
KHALED AL MASAEED, Assistant Professor of Arabic Studies – Ph.D., The University of Arizona; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.
STEPHEN BROCKMANN, Professor of German with courtesy appointments in English and History – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
CHARLENE CASTELLANO, Teaching Professor of Russian Emeritus – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.
SÉBASTIEN DUBREIL, Teaching Professor of French & Francophone Studies and Second Language Acquisition & Technology Enhanced Learning – Ph.D., Emory University; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.
KENYA C. DWORKIN Y MENDEZ, Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies with courtesy appointments in English and History – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
GABRIELE EICHMANNS-MAIER, Associate Teaching Professor of German – Ph.D., University of Washington; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.
BARBARA FREED, Professor Emeritus of French & Francophone Studies and Second Language Acquisition – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.
TATYANA GERSHKOVICH, Assistant Professor of Russian Studies – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.
FELIPE GOMEZ, Associate Teaching Professor of Hispanic Studies – Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.
CHRISTIAN HALLSTEIN, Teaching Professor of German – Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.
ERIK HELIN, Special Lecturer, Carnegie Mellon - Qatar – MA , Eastern Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.
PAUL HOPPER, Paul Mellon Distinguished Professor Emeritus of the Humanities, Rhetoric and Linguistics with a courtesy appointment in Modern Languages – Ph.D., University of Texas; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.
ZEINAB IBRAHIM, Associate Teaching Professor, Carnegie Mellon - Qatar – Ph.D., Georgetown University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.
YASUFUMI IWASAKI, Associate Teaching Professor of Japanese – Ph.D., University of Illinois; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.
BARBARA JOHNSTONE, Professor Emeritus of Rhetoric and Linguistics with a courtesy appointment in Modern Languages – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.
CHRISTOPHER M. JONES, Teaching Professor of French & Francophone Studies and Director of Modern Language Resource Center – Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
ELISABETH KASKE, Associate Professor of Chinese Studies – Ph.D., Heidelberg University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.
KEIKO KODA, Professor of Japanese and Second Language Acquisition and Director of Graduate Studies – Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.
GANG LIU, Assistant Teaching Professor of Chinese Studies – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.
BRIAN MACWHINNEY, Professor of Psychology with a courtesy appointment in Modern Languages – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.
MAME NIANG-MEUNIER, Assistant Professor of French & Francophone Studies – Ph.D., Louisiana State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.
SUSAN G. POLANSKY, Teaching Professor of Hispanic Studies and Head of Modern Languages – Ph.D., Boston College; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.
GIOVANNI PUPPO, Instructor of Italian – Ph.D., University of Rome; Carnegie Mellon, 1975–.
MARIA DEL MAR ROSA-RODRIGUEZ, Assistant Professor of Hispanic Studies – Ph.D., Emory University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.
JURIS SILENIEKS, Professor Emeritus of French – Ph.D., University of Nebraska; Carnegie Mellon, 1960–.
CANDACE SKIBBA, Assistant Teaching Professor of Hispanic Studies – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.
DONALD SUTTON, Professor Emeritus of History with a courtesy appointment in Modern Languages – Ph.D. , Cambridge University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.
NAOKO TAGUCHI, Associate Professor of Japanese and Second Language Acquisition – Ph.D., Northern Arizona University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.
THERESE TARDIO, Associate Teaching Professor of Hispanic Studies – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.
G. RICHARD TUCKER, Paul Mellon University Professor Emeritus of Applied Linguistics with a courtesy appointment in Psychology – Ph.D., McGill University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.
JAN VAIRO, Senior Lecturer – M.A., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.
REMI (ADAM) VAN COMPERNOLLE, Assistant Professor of French & Francophone Studies & Second Language Acquisition – Ph.D., Penn State; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.
MICHAEL J. WEST, Teaching Professor of French & Francophone Studies – PhD., University of California-Santa Barbara; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.
DANIELLE WETZEL, Teaching Professor and Director of First Year Writing with a courtesy appointment in Modern Languages – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.
SETH WIENER, Assistant Professor of Second Language Acquistion and Chinese – Ph.D., Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.
SUE-MEI WU, Teaching Professor of Chinese Studies – Ph.D., Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
TIANXUE YAO, Senior Lecturer – M.A., Carnegie Mellon University, M.A., JiLin University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.
YOSHIHIRO YASUHARA, AssociateTeaching Professor of Japanese Studies – Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.
BONNIE L. YOUNGS, Teaching Professor of French & Francophone Studies and Director of Undergraduate Studies – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
YUEMING YU, Teaching Professor of Chinese Studies – Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.