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Department of History

Donna Harsch, Department Head
Department Office: Baker Hall 240
(412)268-2880
Fax: (412)268-1019
http://www.hss.cmu.edu/departments/history

Undergraduate Degree Options in the Department of History

  • The B.A./B.S. in Social & Political History
  • The B.A. in Global Studies
  • The B.A./B.S. in Ethics, History, and Public Policy

The Department of History offers undergraduates a choice of three majors: Social & Political History, Global Studies, and Ethics, History, and Public Policy (administered by the Philosophy Department). Specific requirements and courses for each major are detailed below.

All three History majors are grounded firmly in the liberal arts.  Each has a strong interdisciplinary bent and an equally strong commitment to using knowledge of the past to illuminate present-day social, cultural, and political affairs.

In different ways, all three majors emphasize empirical research methods and conceptual analysis, and cultivate reading, research, and writing abilities central to a variety of professions. Our students develop strong analytic and writing skills; choose among diverse U.S., global, and thematic courses; learn experientially through internships and/or study abroad; and benefit from small class sizes and easy access to faculty who are internationally known for innovative historical, anthropological, and other social science approaches to investigating the past. The study of history necessarily includes diverse societies and controversial public policy issues, usefully blending liberal education with professional development.

History is also excellent preparation for leadership positions in law, business, journalism, politics, education, and government service (e.g., U.S. Foreign Service, Health & Human Services, Federal Trade Commission).  The resumes of innumerable CEOS and government statesmen show how effectively the study of history serves as a foundation for preparing leaders both at home and abroad.

Having been trained to analyze subtle and complex issues, to develop breadth of understanding, to dig out information and make sense of it, and to present their findings effectively, graduates of the History Department do extremely well in many types of for-profit, non-profit, governmental, and non-governmental organizations. Because history training combines research and writing skills with analysis of social and policy trends, it also prepares graduates for journalism and other writing careers in the modern media age.

All three History degree programs combine easily with majors in Business, Economics, English, Information Systems, Modern Languages, Philosophy, Professional Writing, Social and Decision Sciences, and Statistics.

Additional Majors

The majors in Social & Political History, Global Studies, and Ethics, History, and Public Policy may be declared as additional majors in consultation with the director of each program: Professor Steven Schlossman for Social & Political History (sls@cmu.edu), Professor John Soluri for Global Studies (jsoluri@andrew.cmu.edu), and Professor Alex London for Ethics, History, and Public Policy (Philosophy Department; ajlondon@andrew.cmu.edu.

Interdepartmental Majors

In addition to the Ethics, History, and Public Policy major, History faculty are also integral participants in three interdepartmental majors described elsewhere in this catalog: International Relations and Politics in the Institute for Politics and Strategy, Arabic Studies and Russian Studies in the Modern Languages Department. History courses are also central to the Environmental Policy major (additional major only).

Minors

Options for pursuing a minor in Social & Political History or Anthropology are discussed below, following the sub-section on Ethics, History, and Public Policy.

Several other minors with strong History content, detailed elsewhere in the Undergraduate Catalog, can be linked with any degree. Students should contact the relevant History faculty members listed below:

•African and African American Studies: Professor Edda Fields-Black (fieldsblack@cmu.edu)

•Environmental Studies: Professor John Soluri (jsoluri@andrew.cmu.edu)

•Gender Studies: Professor Lisa Tetrault (tetrault@andrew.cmu.edu)

•Religious Studies: Professor Allyson Creasman (allysonc@andrew.cmu.edu)

 •Russian Studies: Professor Wendy Goldman (goldman@andrew.cmu.edu)

 •Science, Technology, and Society: Professor Jay Aronson (aronson@andrew.cmu.edu).

Research And outreach Centers

The Department of History supports two research and outreach centers for faculty, students, and the larger Carnegie Mellon and Pittsburgh communities to advance new knowledge and help translate knowledge into public policies that further the pursuit of social, economic, and political justice.
 
1)   CAUSE (Center for African American Urban Studies and the Economy), Joe W. Trotter, Director;
2)   The Bajaj [India] Rural Development Lab, Nico Slate, Director.

The Major in Social & Political History (SPH)

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Professor Steven Schlossman; sls@cmu.edu, Baker Hall 236A, 412/268-2885
Academic Advisor: Dr. Naum Kats; kats@andrew.cmu.edu, Baker Hall 240, 412/268-2880
http://www.history.cmu.edu/undergraduate/history_major.html
 

Social & Political History (SPH) is a research- and writing-intensive major that emphasizes analysis of change over time and in-depth understanding of the societies, cultures, economies, political systems and conflicts that have shaped our world.

All majors take Introduction to Historical Research & Writing and the capstone Historical Research Seminar, where they conduct original, highly individualized historical projects using archival and other primary sources. Outstanding research papers are regularly presented at the Phi Alpha Theta regional and national history conferences, and at CMU’s year-end symposium, Meeting of the Minds. Several students have published the results of their research, and we are exploring new ways to facilitate future publication of students’ research in both undergraduate and professional history journals.

The History Department offers a wide array of survey courses covering seven major regions of the world: Asia, Europe, United States, African Diaspora, the Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Russia and the Former Soviet States. In addition, the Department offers numerous electives that focus on topics of specialized faculty expertise, such as environment, technology, gender, culture, labor, race, science, criminal justice, education, war, public health, politics, and diplomacy. Many of these topical courses closely link analysis of past and present, with a special interest in applying historical insight to the formulation of public policy (examples: “History of American Public Policy”; “American Environmental History”; “American Foreign Policy and the Middle East Since 1945”; Delinquency, Crime, and Juvenile Justice”).

The broad analytic, research, and writing skills cultivated by the SPH major prepare students for success in a wide variety of graduate and professional schools, and for exercising leadership in careers in business, law, government, education, journalism, public policy, social work, the armed services, Foreign Service,  media, museums and libraries. (For students interested in pursuing a professional career in History, options today include not only research and teaching -- our graduates have earned Ph.D. degrees at Harvard, Northwestern, and other major universities -- but also expert positions as historians in museums, archives, historic sites, the armed services, media outlets, and other public history venues.) Often, history graduates pursue post-undergraduate professional school, such as law, business administration, education, public policy, urban planning, librarianship, journalism, the ministry, or social work.

Curriculum

Students graduating with a primary major in Social & Political History may pursue a B.A. or B.S. degree. SPH may also be taken as an additional (i.e., second) major.

Requirements for both primary and additional SPH majors are Global Histories (79-104), which all Dietrich College and Tepper College students must take, plus an additional 93 units, for a total of 102 units.

All students in the Social & Political History major are required to complete two research-training courses: Introduction to Historical Research & Writing (79-200, 9 units), and Historical Research Seminar (79-420, 12 units), which is regularly offered in the Fall semester of the senior year. Students must earn a final grade of “C” or better in these two courses in order to fulfill the requirements for the SPH major.

In addition, students must take two historical survey courses from a wide range of attractive options that include most major regions of the world.

Otherwise, students enjoy great flexibility: they are free to take additional survey courses or to specialize in thematic topics or regions of the world that are of special interest to them.

If you are interested in pursuing a minor in Social & Political History, please view the Minor in Social and Political History.
 

Social & Political History Major (SPH)

I. Required History Courses (30 units)
79-104Global Histories9
79-200Introduction to Historical Research & Writing9
79-420Historical Research Seminar12
II. Required Survey Courses (choose two -- 18 units)
79-202Flesh and Spirit: Early Modern Europe, 1400-17509
79-203Social and Political Change in 20th Century Central and Eastern Europe9
79-20520th/21st Century Europe9
79-207Development of European Culture9
79-221Development and Democracy in Latin America9
79-222Between Revolutions: The Development of Modern Latin America9
79-223Mexico: From the Aztec Empire to the Drug War9
79-225West African History in Film9
79-226African History: Earliest Times to 17809
79-227African History: Height of Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade to the End of Apartheid9
79-229Origins of the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1880-19489
79-230Arab-Israeli Conflict and Peace Process since 19489
79-233The United States and the Middle East since 19459
79-240Development of American Culture9
79-241African American History: Africa to the Civil War9
79-242African American History: Reconstruction to the Present9
79-245Capitalism and Individualism in American Culture9
79-24920th/21st Century U.S. History9
79-251India/America: Democracy, Diversity, Development9
79-252Exploring the American Century: United States History After 19459
79-25620th Century Germany9
79-258French History: From the Revolution to De Gaulle9
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China9
79-265Russian History: From the First to the Last Tsar9
79-266Russian History: From Communism to Capitalism9
79-269London and the Birth of Modern Britain, 1800 to the Present9
III. Social & Political History Elective Courses (54 units)

Students must complete 54 elective History units (typically 6 courses) for the Social & Political History major. Any history courses not fulfilling another major requirement may be chosen as an elective.

Social & Political History majors have considerable flexibility in choosing their elective courses, but should consult with the Academic Advisor, Dr. Naum Kats (BH 240), or the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Dr. Steven Schlossman, in making their selections.

Social & Political History Major — Sample Curriculum

Required Dietrich College General Education Course: 79-104 Global Histories
(need not be completed before beginning the major).

JuniorSenior
FallSpringFallSpring
79-200 Introduction to Historical Research & WritingRequired History Survey Course79-420 Historical Research SeminarHistory Elective
Required History Survey Course History ElectiveHistory ElectiveHistory Elective
History ElectiveHistory ElectiveThird Course (open)Third Course (open)
Fourth Course (open)Fourth Course (open)Fourth Course (open)Fourth Course (open)
Fifth Course (open)Fifth Course (open)Fifth Course (open)Fifth Course (open)

The table above represents a two-year (junior-senior) plan for completing all requirements for the Social & Political History Major.  The purpose of this table is merely to show that the Social & Political History Major can be completed in as few as two years, not that it must be. Students may declare the major and begin course requirements as early as the start of the sophomore year and in some instances in the freshman year. Students should meet with the department’s Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Steven Schlossman, sls@cmu.edu, for both short- and long-term course planning.

Additional Major in Social & Political History (SPH)

The Social & Political History Major may be scheduled as an additional major in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Steven Schlossman, sls@cmu.edu.

Bachelor of Science Option

Students may elect to earn a Bachelor of Science rather than a Bachelor of Arts degree by completing two courses from the list below, or by petitioning the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Steven Schlossman, sls@cmu.edu, to accept equivalent courses as substitutions.

21-257Models and Methods for Optimization9
36-202Statistical Methods
or
9
36-208Regression Analysis9
36-207Probability and Statistics for Business Applications9
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences9
80-305Rational Choice9
84-265Political Science Research Methods9
88-251Empirical Research Methods9

The Major in Global Studies

Director: Professor John Soluri; jsoluri@andrew.cmu.edu, Baker Hall 363, 412-268-7122
Academic Program Manager: Emily Half; ehalf@andrew.cmu.edu, Baker Hall A60C, 412-268-7082
http://www.cmu.edu/hss/globalstudies

The Department of History offers the major in Global Studies, an interdisciplinary major designed for students interested in humanistic approaches to understanding past and present processes of globalization. Participating faculty in the departments of History, Modern Languages, and English conduct research in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and the Pacific. The rigorous yet flexible Global Studies curriculum combines anthropology, history, literary and cultural studies, and advanced language training in order to help students make sense of complex interactions among global processes, regional and local cultures, and societal structures. Global Studies majors develop a broad understanding of their prospects and responsibilities as citizens of the world confronting challenging contemporary problems.


There are three required courses for the major: the general education course Global Histories (79-104), Introduction to Global Studies (79-275), and Advanced Seminar in Global Studies (79-400). Majors also choose among several courses focused on theory, research methods, transnational histories, and regional/national histories and cultures. Demonstrating intermediate to advanced level proficiency in a language other than English is a crucial component of the major in Global Studies.

Global Studies majors are encouraged to incorporate a semester of study abroad into their course of study in order to immerse themselves in a society different from their own with unfamiliar cultural practices, language, and history. Global Studies majors may also enroll in 79-506 Global Studies Internship, a course that enables them to earn credit while gaining first-hand experience working with Pittsburgh-based organizations that work across borders.

Majors should consult frequently with the program's academic program manager, the faculty director, and participating faculty who will help students to craft a coherent course of study on specific topics and/or regions that may lead to the capstone research project (79-400 Advanced Seminar in Global Studies) or a Dietrich College senior honors thesis. The faculty director and  academic program manager will also work with students to connect their academic interests and their participation in student organizations and/or organizations based in Pittsburgh with transnational reach.
 

Curriculum

Students graduating with a primary major in Global Studies receive a Bachelor of Arts degree.  Global Studies may also be taken as an additional (e.g., second) major.  Required courses include 79-104 plus 93 additional units (including 79-275 and 79-400) and proficiency in a modern language other than English. Students may double count a maximum of two courses taken for the Global Studies major that are also being used to fulfill the requirements of other majors and programs. Students should consult with the Global Studies academic program manager (see above) about new courses and study abroad courses that may be approved for students pursuing the major in Global Studies.

I. Required General Education Course (9 units) 
79-104Global Histories9
II. Global Studies Introductory Course (9 units)

Students must earn a final grade of "C" or better for the course to count toward the major.

79-275Introduction to Global Studies9
III. Language Requirement

Demonstrating intermediate to advanced level proficiency in a language other than English is a crucial component of the major in Global Studies. Normally this requirement can be satisfied by successfully completing a course conducted in the second language at the 300 level or above for French, German, Italian, or Spanish, or the fourth semester (Intermediate II) level or above for Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, or Russian. Comparable proficiency for other languages can be considered. Additional advanced cultural, historical, and literary study in the second language is strongly recommended. Courses in a language other than English may also be counted as Global Studies transnational, global, or regional courses or Global Studies electives as appropriate.

IV. Theoretical and Topical Core Courses (18 units)

To gain a solid foundation in the theories, methods, and analytical topics underpinning the major in Global Studies, students select 18 units (typically two classes) from the core courses listed below.  Students must earn a final grade of "C" or better in these courses to fulfill the theoretical and topical core course requirement. 

76-453Literature of Empire9
76-497Culture: Interdisciplinary Approaches9
79-200Introduction to Historical Research & Writing9
79-297Dilemmas and Controversies in Anthropology9
79-314The Politics and Culture of Memory9
79-317Art, Anthropology, and Empire9
79-318Sustainable Social Change: History and Practice9
79-332Medical Anthropology9
79-376Doing Transnational History9
79-377Food, Culture, and Power: A History of Eating9
79-380Ethnographic Methods9
79-381Energy and Empire: How Fossil Fuels Changed the World9
V. Transnational, Global, and Regional Courses (27 units)

To gain insight into how complex transnational and global processes shape and are affected by local, national, and regional dynamics, students will select 27 units (typically three courses) from any subcategories below. 

Transnational and Global Courses 

76-322Global Masala: South Asians in the Diaspora9
76-353Transnational Feminisms: Fiction and Film9
76-384Race, Nation, and the Enemy9
76-440Postcolonial Theory: Diaspora and Transnationalism9
76-448The Global Renaissance9
79-224Mayan America9
79-233The United States and the Middle East since 19459
79-237Comparative Slavery9
79-251India/America: Democracy, Diversity, Development9
79-273Jews and Muslims in History: From the Time of Muhammad to the Present9
79-276Beyond the Border9
79-280Brewing Revolution? Coffee and Social Change from Adam Smith to Starbucks6
79-282Europe and the World since 18009
79-288Bananas, Baseball, and Borders: Latin America and the United States9
79-289Animal Planet: An Environmental History of People and Animals6
79-290The Slave Passage: From West Africa to the Americas6
79-295Race Relations in the Atlantic World9
79-315The Politics of Water: Global Controversies, Past and Present9
79-333Sex, Gender & Anthropology9
79-342Introduction to Science and Technology Studies9
79-385The Making of the African Diaspora9
80-348Health Development and Human Rights9
80-447Global Justice9
82-283Language Diversity & Cultural Identity9
82-304The Francophone World9
82-345Introduction to Hispanic Literary and Cultural Studies9
84-326Theories of International Relations9
84-389Terrorism and Insurgency9

Regional Courses  

Africa:
79-225West African History in Film9
79-226African History: Earliest Times to 17809
79-227African History: Height of Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade to the End of Apartheid9
79-291Globalization in East African History6
79-386Entrepreneurs in Africa, Past, Present and Future9
Eastern and Southern Asia and the Pacific:
76-354South Asian Literature9
79-264Tibet in History and Imagination9
82-431China and the West9
88-411Rise of the Asian Economies9
Europe:
79-202Flesh and Spirit: Early Modern Europe, 1400-17509
79-203Social and Political Change in 20th Century Central and Eastern Europe9
79-20520th/21st Century Europe9
79-207Development of European Culture9
79-268World War I: The Twentieth Century's First Catastrophe9
79-323Family, Gender, and Sexuality in European History, 500-18009
79-353Religious Identities and Religious Conflicts in 19th Century Europe9
82-320Contemporary Society in Germany, Austria and Switzerland9
82-323Germany, Austria and Switzerland in the 20th Century9
82-415Topics in French and Francophone Studies9
82-416Topics in French and Francophone Studies9
82-441Studies in Peninsular Literature and Culture9
The Middle East:
79-229Origins of the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1880-19489
79-230Arab-Israeli Conflict and Peace Process since 19489
79-307Religion and Politics in the Middle East9
79-336Oil & Water: Middle East Perspectives9
79-398Documenting the 1967 Arab-Israeli War9
82-300Topics in Cross-Cultural Studies9
The Americas:
79-219Modern Cuba: A Travel Guide for Millennials, 1898 to the Present6
79-220Screening Mexico: Mexican Cinema, 1898 to Present6
79-221Development and Democracy in Latin America9
79-222Between Revolutions: The Development of Modern Latin America9
79-223Mexico: From the Aztec Empire to the Drug War9
79-235Caribbean Cultures9
82-343Latin America: Language and Culture9
82-451Studies in Latin American Literature and Culture9
82-455Topics in Hispanic Studies9
82-456Topics in Hispanic Studies9
(27 units)VI. Elective Courses

Students are required to take an additional 27 units (typically 3 courses) of electives, selected from one or both of the subcategories below. Category IV and V courses listed above that are not used to fulfill those requirements may be counted as electives in addition to the courses listed below. 

Global Studies offers students the opportunity to gain credit for a 9 unit elective while gaining first-hand experience interning with Pittsburgh-based organizations that work across borders.  79-506 Global Studies Internship is offered every semester and students should register for the course after consulting with the academic advisor and faculty director. The faculty director will assist students with matching their interests to local organizations and identifying an on-site supervisor available to collaborate in the ongoing and final evaluation of the student's work.

Thematic Elective Courses 

70-365International Trade and International Law9
76-241Introduction to Gender Studies9
76-318Communicating in the Global Marketplace9
76-386Language & Culture9
76-450Literary and Cultural Theory: Law, Culture, and the Humanities9
79-201Introduction to Anthropology9
79-206Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Europe6
79-286Archaeology: Understanding the Ancient World6
79-287The Mummy's Curse: Uses and Abuses of Archaeology6
79-298Mobile Phones & Social Media in Development & Human Rights: A Critical Appraisal6
79-301History of Surveillance: From the Plantation to Edward Snowden6
79-330Medicine and Society9
79-349The Holocaust in Historical Perspective9
79-506Global Studies Internship9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-247Ethics and Global Economics9
80-335Deliberative Democracy: Theory and Practice9
80-344Management, Environment, and Ethics9
82-215Introduction to Modern Arabic Literature and CultureVar.
82-311Advanced Arabic I9
82-312Advanced Arabic II9
82-541Special Topics: Hispanic StudiesVar.
84-275Comparative Politics9
84-310International Political Economy and Organizations9
84-362Diplomacy and Statecraft9
88-412Energy, Climate Change, and Economic Growth in the 21st Century9

Nation–based Elective Courses 

76-337Intro to Ethnic American Studies9
79-231American Foreign Policy: 1945-Present9
79-320Women, Politics, and Protest9
79-331Body Politics: Women and Health in America9
82-344U.S. Latinos: Language and Culture9
82-420The Crucible of Modernity:Vienna 19009
79-269London and the Birth of Modern Britain, 1800 to the Present9
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China9
79-309The Chinese Revolution through Film (1949-2000)9
82-333Introduction to Chinese Language and CultureVar.
82-433Topics in Contemporary Culture of China9
82-434Studies in Chinese Traditions9
82-440Studies in Chinese Literature & Culture9
79-258French History: From the Revolution to De Gaulle9
79-259France During World War II9
82-303Introduction to French Culture9
82-305French in its Social Contexts9
79-25620th Century Germany9
79-257Germany and the Second World War9
79-326German History through Film9
79-358Nazi Ghettos: From Spatial Segregation to Killing Zones6
82-327The Emergence of the German Speaking World9
82-425Topics in German Literature and Culture9
82-427Nazi and Resistance Culture9
82-428History of German FilmVar.
79-319India through Film6
79-255Irish History6
82-361Italian Language and Culture I9
82-362Italian Language and Culture II9
82-273Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture9
82-278Japanese Film and Literature: The Art of Storytelling9
82-473Topics in Japanese Studies9
82-474Topics in Japanese Studies9
82-253Korean Culture Through Film9
82-254World of Korea, Then and Now9
79-265Russian History: From the First to the Last Tsar9
79-266Russian History: From Communism to Capitalism9
79-267The Soviet Union in World War II: Military, Political, and Social History9
79-322Stalin and the Great Terror6
79-389Stalin and Stalinism9
82-293Introduction to Russian Culture9
82-294Topics in Russian Language and Culture9
82-342Spain: Language and Culture9
 VII. Senior Capstone Course (12 units)

The research seminar is the capstone course for Global Studies majors and is designed to give students the chance to define and carry out a research project of personal interest. Students are strongly encouraged to incorporate their prior coursework (including foreign language training), study abroad or internships into their research. Students must earn a final grade of "C" or better for the course to count toward the major.

79-400Advanced Seminar in Global Studies12
Global Studies Major — Sample Curriculum

This sample curriculum represents a plan for completing the requirements for the Global Studies major.  Global Studies students are encouraged to spend a semester abroad and the plan below demonstrates that study abroad fits well into the curriculum.  Students may declare the Global Studies major and take appropriate courses as early as the second semester of the freshman year and as late as the junior year, and should consult frequently with the Global Studies academic program manager (see above) about their course of study in Pittsburgh and possibly abroad.

FreshmanSophomore
FallSpringFallSpring
79-104 Global Histories79-275 Introduction to Global StudiesGS Theoretical & Topical Core CourseGS Theoretical & Topical Core Course
76-101 Interpretation and Argument36-201 Statistical Reasoning and PracticeGS Transnational, Global, Regional CourseGS Transnational, Global, Regional Course
Freshman SeminarLanguage Course or Gen EdLanguage Course or ElectiveLanguage Course or Elective
Language Course or Gen EdFourth Course (open)Fourth Course (open)Fourth Course (open)
Fifth Course (open)Fifth Course (open)Fifth Course (open)Fifth Course (open)
99-101 Computing @ Carnegie Mellon
JuniorSenior
FallSpringFallSpring
GS Transnational, Global, Regional CourseSTUDY ABROAD*66-501 H&SS Senior Honors Thesis I**66-502 H&SS Senior Honors Thesis II**
GS ElectiveGS ElectiveLanguage Course or Elective79-400 Advanced Seminar in Global Studies
Language Course or ElectiveGS ElectiveThird Course (open)Language Course or Elective
Fourth Course (open)Language Course or ElectiveFourth Course (open)Third Course (open)
Fifth Course (open)Fourth Course (open)Fifth Course (open)Fourth Course (open)
Fifth Course (open)

 *Spring semester of the junior year is a popular semester for study abroad.  However, Global Studies majors may instead choose to study abroad in spring of sophomore year, fall of junior year, or fall of senior year.  Students should discuss study abroad and curricular planning with the academic program manager.

 **Students are not required to complete a college honors thesis. However, many Global Studies majors choose to apply for the senior honors thesis program.  Students who do not pursue a senior honors thesis should select an elective in its place.

Additional Major

Global Studies may be elected as a primary or an additional major; the requirements for each are the same.  Contact the academic program manager (see contact information above) to elect the additional major.

The Major in Ethics, History, and Public Policy

Alex John London, Director
Office: Baker Hall 150A
Email: ajlondon@andrew.cmu.edu

http://www.cmu.edu/hss/ehpp/

The B.A./B.S. in Ethics, History, and Public Policy is an interdepartmental major offered jointly by the Departments of History and Philosophy. It prepares students for leadership positions by providing them with a rigorous, interdisciplinary humanistic and social-scientific education. It also serves as an excellent springboard for graduate study in a wide variety of disciplines such as law, public policy, ethics, and advocacy.  The program focuses equally on the historical understanding of how modern-day problems have evolved, and the importance of developing clear criteria for ethical decision-making. The capstone project course provides students with the opportunity to engage with real-world public policy challenges using the methods, theories, and knowledge that they have gained through the major. Offered jointly by the departments of History and Philosophy, the B.A./B.S. in EHPP encourages specialization, internship experiences, and research in a wide range of policy areas.

Curriculum

Students graduating with a primary major in Ethics, History, and Public Policy may elect to receive either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science Degree (additional requirements apply; see below). Basic requirements include 120 units encompassing 9 units in Economics, 36 units in History, 36 units in Philosophy, 27 units of elective courses, and a 12-unit senior capstone course. This program may also be taken as an additional (e.g., second) major.  All courses toward the major must be taken for a letter grade, and 79-200 and 79-300must be passed with a grade of "C" or better.

I. Economics Requirement9 units
Choose one of the following:
73-100Principles of Economics9
88-220Policy Analysis I9

3

II. History Core36 units

Choose one 9-unit course from each category below:

Policy History (9 units)

79-300History of American Public Policy9

U.S. History (9 units)

79-240Development of American Culture9
79-24920th/21st Century U.S. History9

Non-U.S. History (9 units)

79-202Flesh and Spirit: Early Modern Europe, 1400-17509
79-203Social and Political Change in 20th Century Central and Eastern Europe9
79-20520th/21st Century Europe9
79-207Development of European Culture9
79-222Between Revolutions: The Development of Modern Latin America9
79-223Mexico: From the Aztec Empire to the Drug War9
79-226African History: Earliest Times to 17809
79-227African History: Height of Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade to the End of Apartheid9
79-229Origins of the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1880-19489
79-230Arab-Israeli Conflict and Peace Process since 19489
79-237Comparative Slavery9
79-251India/America: Democracy, Diversity, Development9
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China9
79-264Tibet in History and Imagination9
79-265Russian History: From the First to the Last Tsar9
79-266Russian History: From Communism to Capitalism9
79-307Religion and Politics in the Middle East9

Historical Methods and Approaches (9 units)

79-200Introduction to Historical Research & Writing9
III. Philosophy Core36 units

Choose one 9-unit course from each category below. No more than 9 units at the 100 level may be counted toward this requirement.

Ethics (9 units)

80-130Introduction to Ethics9
80-230Ethical Theory9

Political Philosophy (9 units)

80-135Introduction to Political Philosophy9
80-334Social and Political Philosophy9

Foundations of Social Science (9 units)

80-221Philosophy of Social Science9
80-321Causation, Law, and Social Policy9
80-324Philosophy of Economics9
80-337Philosophy, Politics & Economics9

Applied Philosophy (9 units)

80-136Social Structure, Public Policy & Ethics9
80-244Environmental Ethics9
80-245Medical Ethics9
80-247Ethics and Global Economics9
80-335Deliberative Democracy: Theory and Practice9
80-348Health Development and Human Rights9
80-447Global Justice9
IV. Senior Capstone Project Course12 units
79-449EHPP Project Course
[cross-listed]
12
80-449EHPP Project Course12

The Ethics, History and Public Policy Project Course is required for the Ethics, History and Public Policy major and is taken in the fall semester of the senior year. In this capstone course, Ethics, History and Public Policy majors carry out a collaborative research project that examines a compelling current policy issue that can be illuminated with historical research and philosophical and policy analysis. The students develop an original research report based on both archival and contemporary policy analysis and they present their results to a client organization in the community.

V. Elective Courses27 units

Choose any three courses from any category or categories shown below.  Substitution of elective courses that cohere with a student's interest or concentration may be allowed after consultation with and approval from the Director.

Engineering and Public Policy (some courses have prerequisites; see EPP catalog listing)
19-424Energy and the Environment9
Business
70-311Organizational Behavior9
70-321Negotiation and Conflict Resolution9
70-332Business, Society and Ethics9
70-364Business Law9
70-365International Trade and International Law9
70-430International Management9
Economics (some courses have prerequisities; see Economics catalog listing)
73-148Environmental Economics9
73-310Evolution of Economic Ideas and Analysis9
73-352Public Economics9
73-358Economics of the Environment and Natural Resources9
73-359Benefit-Cost Analysis9
73-365Firms, Market Structures, and Strategy9
73-372International Money and Finance9
73-375History of Money and Monetary Policy9
73-408Law and Economics9
73-476American Economic History9
English
76-492Rhetoric of Public Policy9

History

Courses from the EHPP History Core (above) may be taken as electives only if they are not being used to fulfill the core requirement. Double counting is not permitted.

79-217The War in Vietnam9
79-221Development and Democracy in Latin America9
79-231American Foreign Policy: 1945-Present9
79-233The United States and the Middle East since 19459
79-242African American History: Reconstruction to the Present9
79-250Running for President: Campaigns & Elections in History of American Presidency9
79-253American Massacres in History and Memory6
79-267The Soviet Union in World War II: Military, Political, and Social History9
79-288Bananas, Baseball, and Borders: Latin America and the United States9
79-298Mobile Phones & Social Media in Development & Human Rights: A Critical Appraisal6
79-299From Newton to the Nuclear Bomb: History of Science, 1750-19509
79-301History of Surveillance: From the Plantation to Edward Snowden6
79-302Drone Warfare: Ethics, Law, Politics, History, and Strategy6
79-303Pittsburgh and the Transformation of Modern Urban America6
79-305Moneyball Nation: Data in American Life9
79-310Modern U. S. Business History: 1870 to the Present9
79-315The Politics of Water: Global Controversies, Past and Present9
79-320Women, Politics, and Protest9
79-325U.S. Gay and Lesbian History6
79-331Body Politics: Women and Health in America9
79-336Oil & Water: Middle East Perspectives9
79-338History of Education in America9
79-339Juvenile Delinquency and Film (1920 to "The Wire")9
79-340Juvenile Delinquency and Juvenile Justice9
79-342Introduction to Science and Technology Studies9
79-349The Holocaust in Historical Perspective9
79-358Nazi Ghettos: From Spatial Segregation to Killing Zones6
79-370Disasters in American History (2):Epidemics & Fires6
79-371African American Urban History9
79-374American Environmental History: Critical Issues9
79-381Energy and Empire: How Fossil Fuels Changed the World9
79-389Stalin and Stalinism9

Philosophy

Courses from the EHPP Philosophy Core (above) may be taken as electives only if they are not being used to fulfill the core requirement. Double counting is not permitted.

80-256Modern Moral Philosophy9
80-305Rational Choice9
80-405Game Theory9
Institute for Politics and Strategy
84-310International Political Economy and Organizations9
84-380Grand Strategy in the United States9
84-393Legislative Decision Making: US Congress9
84-402Judicial Politics and Behavior9
Social and Decision Sciences
88-223Decision Analysis9
88-281Topics in Law: 1st Amendment9
88-345Perspectives on Industrial Research and Development9
88-371Entrepreneurship, Regulation and Technological Change9
88-387Social Norms and Economics9
88-444Public Policy and Regulation9
VI. Bachelor of Science Option

Students may elect to earn a Bachelor of Science rather than a Bachelor of Arts degree by completing two courses from the list below, or by petitioning the Director of EHPP to accept equivalent courses as substitutions.

21-257Models and Methods for Optimization9
36-202Statistical Methods9
or 36-208 Regression Analysis
36-207Probability and Statistics for Business Applications9
36-303Sampling, Survey and Society9
36-309Experimental Design for Behavioral and Social Sciences9
80-305Rational Choice9
84-265Political Science Research Methods9
88-251Empirical Research Methods9
Additional Major

The B.A./B.S. in Ethics, History, and Public Policy may be scheduled as an additional major in consultation with the Director of Ethics, History, and Public Policy, Professor Alex John London, ajlondon@andrew.cmu.edu.

Ethics, History, and Public Policy Sample Curriculum
Junior YearSenior Year
FallSpringFallSpring
Core requirement in Economics Core requirement in History or PhilosophyCapstone CourseEHPP Elective Course
Core requirement in History or PhilosophyCore requirement in History or PhilosophyEHPP Elective CourseSecond Course (open)
Core requirement in History or PhilosophyCore requirement in History or PhilosophyEHPP Elective CourseThird Course (open)
Core requirement in History or PhilosophyCore requirement in History or PhilosophyFourth Course (open)Fourth Course (open)
Core requirement in History or PhilosophyFifth Course (open)Fifth Course (open)Fifth Course (open)

The above sample program is presented as a two-year (junior-senior year) plan for completing EHPP major requirements. Its purpose is to show that this program can be completed in as few as two years; not that it must be. Students may enter the EHPP major, and begin major course requirements, as early as the start of the sophomore year, or even in the first year. Students should consult their advisor when planning their program.

The Minor in Social & Political History (SPH)

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Professor Steven Schlossman; sls@cmu.edu, Baker Hall 236A, 412/268-2885
Academic Advisor: Dr. Naum Kats; kats@andrew.cmu.edu, Baker Hall 240, 412/268-2880
http://www.history.cmu.edu/undergraduate/history_major.html

The minor in Social & Political History involves a minimum of 54 units of History course work.

Curriculum (54 units)

I. Required History Survey Courses  (choose two -- 18 units)

Students must complete 18 units (typically 2 courses) from the following list of survey courses:

79-202Flesh and Spirit: Early Modern Europe, 1400-17509
79-203Social and Political Change in 20th Century Central and Eastern Europe9
79-20520th/21st Century Europe9
79-207Development of European Culture9
79-221Development and Democracy in Latin America9
79-222Between Revolutions: The Development of Modern Latin America9
79-223Mexico: From the Aztec Empire to the Drug War9
79-225West African History in Film9
79-226African History: Earliest Times to 17809
79-227African History: Height of Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade to the End of Apartheid9
79-229Origins of the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1880-19489
79-230Arab-Israeli Conflict and Peace Process since 19489
79-233The United States and the Middle East since 19459
79-240Development of American Culture9
79-241African American History: Africa to the Civil War9
79-242African American History: Reconstruction to the Present9
79-245Capitalism and Individualism in American Culture9
79-24920th/21st Century U.S. History9
79-251India/America: Democracy, Diversity, Development9
79-252Exploring the American Century: United States History After 19459
79-25620th Century Germany9
79-258French History: From the Revolution to De Gaulle9
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China9
79-265Russian History: From the First to the Last Tsar9
79-266Russian History: From Communism to Capitalism9
79-269London and the Birth of Modern Britain, 1800 to the Present9
II. Elective courses for the Minor in Social & Political History (36 units)

Students must complete 36 elective History units (typically 4 courses). Social & Political History minors have considerable flexibility in choosing their elective courses, but should feel free to consult with the Director of Undergraduate Studies in making their selections.

The Minor in Anthropology

Faculty Advisor: Paul Eiss; pke@andrew.cmu.edu, Baker Hall 242D, 412-268-3239
Academic Advisor: Emily Half; ehalf@andrew.cmu.edu, Baker Hall A60C, 412-268-7082

The Minor in Anthropology is offered by the Department of History to train students in ethnographic methods and in theoretical understandings of culture. Students examine the evolution, depth, and complexities of ethnography, and explore notions of "culture" in diverse settings, over time and across space. In today's world, students are increasingly aware of the importance of developing a sophisticated approach to culture and its articulation with changes in the domains of the arts, technology, economics, and politics. The Minor in Anthropology, which may be taken alone but especially complements the majors in Global Studies and in Social & Political History, provides students with the tools to link diverse kinds of cultural practices to various aspects of globalization.

The Minor in Anthropology requires that students complete two "Introductory and Methods" courses (18 units) and four "Anthropological Perspectives" courses (36 units). In addition,  79-104 Global Histories is required (9 units), but it may be taken at any time during the student's coursework. Including this course, the Minor in Anthropology totals 63 units.

The minor in Anthropology involves a minimum of 54 units of History Department course work (not including 79-104 Global Histories), as described below.

Curriculum (63 units)
I. Required General Education Course (9 units)

This requirement need not be satisfied before beginning any minor in the History Department.

79-104Global Histories9
II. Introductory and Methods Courses  (18 units)

Students must complete 18 units (typically 2 courses) for the Introductory and Methods Courses, selecting from the list below.

79-201Introduction to Anthropology9
79-297Dilemmas and Controversies in Anthropology9
79-380Ethnographic Methods9
III. Anthropological Perspectives  (36 units)

Students must complete 36 units (typically 4 courses) for Anthropological Perspectives Courses, selecting from the list below.

79-203Social and Political Change in 20th Century Central and Eastern Europe9
79-221Development and Democracy in Latin America9
79-222Between Revolutions: The Development of Modern Latin America9
79-223Mexico: From the Aztec Empire to the Drug War9
79-224Mayan America9
79-235Caribbean Cultures9
79-261The Last Emperors: Chinese History and Society, 1600-19009
79-262Modern China9
79-264Tibet in History and Imagination9
79-275Introduction to Global Studies9
79-276Beyond the Border9
79-295Race Relations in the Atlantic World9
79-314The Politics and Culture of Memory9
79-317Art, Anthropology, and Empire9
79-332Medical Anthropology9
79-333Sex, Gender & Anthropology9
79-342Introduction to Science and Technology Studies9

Senior Honors Thesis: Dietrich College 

The Dietrich College Honors Program may be undertaken by students completing the  major in Social & Political History, the major in Global Studies, or the interdepartmental major in Ethics, History, and Public Policy. An Honors Thesis requires two semesters of work. Eligibility requirements are set by the College; contact the Associate Dean of Dietrich College for details.

Senior Thesis: History Department

Seniors may write a one- or two-semester Senior Thesis in History (which differs from the “Honors Thesis” option, described above) with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies and a designated History faculty member who will supervise its completion.

Study Abroad

Study abroad is especially encouraged for all  students in the History Department; this experience can help students better understand the relationship between cultural heritage and modern political processes in a host country. To make study abroad successful and to find how study abroad fits into requirements, History majors should prepare study abroad proposals in consultation with a relevant faculty member.

Faculty

JAY D. ARONSON, Associate Professor of History – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.
ALLYSON F. CREASMAN, Associate Professor of History – Ph.D., University of Virginia; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.
LAURIE Z. EISENBERG, Teaching Professor of History – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.
PAUL EISS, Associate Professor of Anthropology and History – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
EDDA FIELDS-BLACK, Associate Professor of History – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.
WENDY Z. GOLDMAN, Paul Mellon Distinguished Professor of History – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.
EMANUELA GRAMA, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and History – Ph.D, University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.
DONNA HARSCH, Professor of History; Department Head – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.
RICKY W. LAW, Assistant Professor of History – Ph.D., University of North Carolina; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.
KATHERINE A. LYNCH, Professor of History; Director of Graduate Studies – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1980–.
CHRISTOPHER J. PHILLIPS, Assistant Professor of History – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.
BENJAMIN REILLY, Associate Teaching Professor of History, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.
SCOTT A. SANDAGE, Associate Professor of History – Ph.D., Rutgers University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.
STEVEN SCHLOSSMAN, Professor of History; Director of Undergraduate Studies – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.
NICO SLATE, Associate Professor of History – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.
JOHN SOLURI, Associate Professor of History; Director of Global Studies – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.
JOEL A. TARR, Richard S. Caliguiri University Professor of History and Policy – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.
LISA M. TETRAULT, Associate Professor of History – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.
JOE WILLIAM TROTTER, Giant Eagle Professor of History and Social Justice – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.
BENNO R. WEINER, Assistant Professor of History – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.

Special Faculty

NAUM KATS, Undergraduate Advisor, Department of History – Ph.D., University of Saint Petersburg, Russia; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.

Affiliated Faculty

JOSEPH E. DEVINE, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies, Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences – D.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.
CARRIE SETTLE HAGAN, Associate Director and Academic Advisor, BXA Intercollege Degree Programs – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.
TIMOTHY HAGGERTY, Director of the Humanities Scholars Program – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
LAUREN HERCKIS, Research Scientist, Simon Initiative – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.
JEFFREY HINKELMAN, Special Faculty, English Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.

Visiting Faculty

MICHAL R. FRIEDMAN, Visiting Assistant Professor of History – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.
LANSINE KABA, Distinguished Visiting Professor of History, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.
ABIGAIL E. OWEN, Visiting Assistant Professor of History – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.

Emeriti

CAROLINE JEAN ACKER, Associate Professor Emeritus of History – Ph.D., University of California, San Francisco; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
EDWIN FENTON, Professor Emeritus of History – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1954–.
DAVID H. FOWLER, Professor Emeritus of History – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1959–.
RICHARD MADDOX, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology and History – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
DAVID W. MILLER, Professor Emeritus of History – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.
JOHN MODELL, Professor Emeritus of History – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.
DANIEL P. RESNICK, Professor Emeritus of History – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1966–.
JUDITH SCHACHTER, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology and History – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.
DONALD S. SUTTON, Professor Emeritus of History and Anthropology – Ph.D., Cambridge University, England; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.

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Faculty

JAY D. ARONSON, Associate Professor of History – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.
ALLYSON F. CREASMAN, Associate Professor of History – Ph.D., University of Virginia; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.
LAURIE Z. EISENBERG, Teaching Professor of History – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.
PAUL EISS, Associate Professor of Anthropology and History – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
EDDA FIELDS-BLACK, Associate Professor of History – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.
WENDY Z. GOLDMAN, Paul Mellon Distinguished Professor of History – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.
EMANUELA GRAMA, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and History – Ph.D, University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.
DONNA HARSCH, Professor of History; Department Head – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.
RICKY W. LAW, Assistant Professor of History – Ph.D., University of North Carolina; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.
KATHERINE A. LYNCH, Professor of History; Director of Graduate Studies – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1980–.
CHRISTOPHER J. PHILLIPS, Assistant Professor of History – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.
BENJAMIN REILLY, Associate Teaching Professor of History, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.
SCOTT A. SANDAGE, Associate Professor of History – Ph.D., Rutgers University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.
STEVEN SCHLOSSMAN, Professor of History; Director of Undergraduate Studies – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.
NICO SLATE, Associate Professor of History – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.
JOHN SOLURI, Associate Professor of History; Director of Global Studies – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.
JOEL A. TARR, Richard S. Caliguiri University Professor of History and Policy – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.
LISA M. TETRAULT, Associate Professor of History – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.
JOE WILLIAM TROTTER, Giant Eagle Professor of History and Social Justice – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.
BENNO R. WEINER, Assistant Professor of History – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.

Special Faculty

NAUM KATS, Undergraduate Advisor, Department of History – Ph.D., University of Saint Petersburg, Russia; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.

Affiliated Faculty

JOSEPH E. DEVINE, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies, Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences – D.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1979–.
CARRIE SETTLE HAGAN, Associate Director and Academic Advisor, BXA Intercollege Degree Programs – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.
TIMOTHY HAGGERTY, Director of the Humanities Scholars Program – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
LAUREN HERCKIS, Research Scientist, Simon Initiative – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.
JEFFREY HINKELMAN, Special Faculty, English Department – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.

Visiting Faculty

MICHAL R. FRIEDMAN, Visiting Assistant Professor of History – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.
LANSINE KABA, Distinguished Visiting Professor of History, Carnegie Mellon-Qatar – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.
ABIGAIL E. OWEN, Visiting Assistant Professor of History – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.

Emeriti

CAROLINE JEAN ACKER, Associate Professor Emeritus of History – Ph.D., University of California, San Francisco; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
EDWIN FENTON, Professor Emeritus of History – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1954–.
DAVID H. FOWLER, Professor Emeritus of History – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1959–.
RICHARD MADDOX, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology and History – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
DAVID W. MILLER, Professor Emeritus of History – Ph.D., University of Chicago; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.
JOHN MODELL, Professor Emeritus of History – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.
DANIEL P. RESNICK, Professor Emeritus of History – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1966–.
JUDITH SCHACHTER, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology and History – Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.
DONALD S. SUTTON, Professor Emeritus of History and Anthropology – Ph.D., Cambridge University, England; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.