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School of Music

Denis Colwell, Head
Office: The College of Fine Arts 105
http://music.cmu.edu/

The School of Music at Carnegie Mellon University offers the best aspects of conservatory training within a great university, combining preparation for a lifetime in performance, composition or music and technology with the advantages of learning in an intense academic environment. Every student in the School of Music is a performance, composition or music and technology major. The School of Music is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music.

Each performance major is challenged to develop through individual instruction with master teachers. The School’s relationship with the renowned Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra is among the strongest conservatory–symphony orchestra relationships in the United States, and Pittsburgh’s uniquely strong sense of musical community fosters close relationships with the Pittsburgh Opera, Opera Theater of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, Pittsburgh Chamber Music Society, and a host of other professional musical organizations.

Regular performing ensembles include the Carnegie Mellon Philharmonic, Wind Ensemble, Baroque Ensemble, Contemporary Ensemble, Jazz Orchestra, Jazz Vocal Ensemble, Chorus, and Opera. Some of the School’s ensembles are instrument specific: Chamber Music ensembles and the Percussion Ensemble, among others. Opportunities for performance are stressed – undergraduate performance majors perform junior and senior recitals, chamber music is publicly presented, frequent performance opportunities on and off campus are provided, and community outreach is vigorously supported.

The School of Music has an intense commitment to new music, led by composition faculty, conductors who devote fully rehearsed cycles of the Philharmonic to works by student composers, and studio faculty whose own performing careers regularly feature new works, and including regular performances of student works in almost every Contemporary Ensemble Program, frequent opportunities with the Wind Ensemble and Chorus, and inclusion on student recitals. The School’s state-of-the-art recording facilities are an especially important resource for composers beginning their public careers. 

All teaching is entrusted to professional faculty — there are no assistant studio teachers or doctoral teaching fellows — and specialists in Musicology, Theory, Counterpoint, Analysis, Composition, Computer Music, Eurhythmics, Solfege, Music Education, Pedagogy, Collaborative Piano and Coaching, Acting and Movement, Diction, Literature and Repertoire, Baroque Music, Chamber Music, Jazz, Conducting, and Recording Science provide a broad and rich platform for comprehensive musical preparation. At the same time, the university provides the greatest possible support for students combining their majors with minors in all disciplines, unique joint degree programs, and double major programs. These opportunities significantly increase a student’s career options and marketability in the changing professional world of music.

Facilities

The teaching facilities of the School of Music are located on the ground, main, and mezzanine floors of the College of Fine Arts, on the first floor of Margaret Morrison Hall, and in Skibo Gymnasium.  Teaching, rehearsal, and practice rooms are equipped with Steinway pianos.  Music students also have access to a state-of-the-art recording studio and music technology cluster.  Performances take place in Kresge Recital Hall, Carnegie Music Hall, Alumni Concert Hall, and Mellon Institute Auditorium. The Hunt Library houses a fine collection of books, records, and scores.  Listening and conference rooms are also available in the library.

School of Music Options

The School of Music offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts in the following areas:

  • Performance (Instrumental, Voice, Piano, Organ)
  • Composition

To earn a Bachelor’s degree in either of these options, a candidate must satisfactorily fulfill all the requirements of the School of Music.

The School of Music jointly with the School of Computer Science and the Carnegie Institute of Technology offers a Bachelor of Science in the following area:

  • Music and Technology

Within the options listed above eligible students may elect specializations in the following areas:

  • Dalcroze Eurhythmics Certificate
  • Piano Pedagogy Certificate
  • Collaborative Piano Minor
  • Conducting Minor
  • Music Education Certification Minor
  • Music Technology Minor
  • Music Theory Minor
  • Sound Design Minor 

Dalcroze Eurhythmics Certificate

This program is designed to prepare teachers in the Dalcroze approach to music learning.  The course of study includes eurhythmics, piano improvisation, and Dalcroze pedagogy. Carnegie Mellon undergraduates may enter the Dalcroze Training Program during their junior year. However, the certificate will be granted only upon completion of their undergraduate degree. This program is recommended particularly to students who would like to incorporate Dalcroze principles into their teaching and to those who want to obtain more experience in this field. 

Piano Pedagogy Certificate

A two-year program leading to certification in piano pedagogy is open to current Carnegie Mellon keyboard majors. Piano and organ majors learn to teach piano in a closely supervised environment of class piano instruction. This program has received national acclaim as a model of excellence, with Carnegie Mellon children consistently capturing prestigious awards in national piano competitions. 

Collaborative Piano Minor

The collaborative piano minor consists of a six-semester sequence of courses designed to give the students experience with vocalists and instrumentalists. There are individual coaching sessions as well as practical experience in vocal and instrumental studios. 

Conducting Minor

This program is designed for students who are interested in acquiring conducting skills, in anticipation of either graduate study in conducting or a music education career.  It includes required courses in basic conducting techniques for both choral and instrumental ensembles, orchestration, score reading/keyboard harmony, and elective courses in instrumental and vocal methods, diction, and literature and repertoire. 

Music Education Certification Minor

Music Education Certification is a five-year program, with courses starting in the sophomore year.  Bachelor of Fine Arts candidates who complete this program and pass the Praxis tests will receive Pennsylvania state certification in music (K-12), which is recognized in almost all other states.

Music Technology Minor

The student will take a series of courses which may include electronic and computer music, recording technology, the physics of sound, and computer programming.  A rich computer music research environment enables talented students to work as programmers with outstanding faculty researchers, whose current projects are gaining international recognition in the areas of computer music and artificial intelligence. 

Music Theory Minor

This program is designed for students who are interested in advanced theory and analysis skills, in anticipation of either graduate study in theory or graduate study that requires a substantial level of theory knowledge.  The student will take advanced theory and analysis courses and also support courses in the physics of musical sound and the psychology of music.

Sound Design Minor

Students in the Sound Design concentration will explore the processes and products of digital sound and music. They will receive basic training in key component areas: principles of computer music, hybrid instrument building, concepts in sound design. Combining this training with courses that bring together experts from many disciplines, they will create experimental music or explore new, technology-enabled, applications and markets for sound design, music creation, and performance.

Performances and Activities of the School of Music

The School of Music sponsors performances, master classes, and lectures by outstanding national and international guest artists. Announcements of faculty, student, and guest performances are released every month to the students and the community. 

General Requirements for BFA Candidates

Candidates for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in composition are required to complete a composition for orchestra in their senior year.

Candidates for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in performance are required to give public performances in their junior and senior years.  Candidates for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in string performance are required to give public performances in their sophomore, junior, and senior years.

Candidates for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in performance are required to pass one semester (piano majors must pass two semesters) of a course that includes experience with pedagogy for their major studio area.                              

  • Instrumental majors must take the class for their area to fulfill the Pedagogy Course requirement on the Instrumental curriculum (57-023 Bassoon Studio Performance Class, 57-448 Brass Pedagogy 57-437 Literature and Repertoire, 57-022 Clarinet Studio Performance Class, 57-018 Double Bass Studio Performance Class, 57-020 Flute Studio Performance Class, 57-437 Literature and Repertoire, 57-449 Beginning Piano for Children, 57-021 Oboe Studio Performance Class, 57-030 Percussion Studio Performance Class, 57-016 Viola Studio Performance Class, 57-015 Violin Studio Performance Class). 
     
  •  Bagpipe, organ and saxophone majors must fulfill the pedagogy requirement as part of satisfying all demands outlined in their Major Studio syllabi, 57-522 Major Studio (Bagpipe), 57-502 Major Studio (Organ) and 57-514 Major Studio (Saxophone).
     
  • Piano majors must take 57-273 Piano Pedagogy I and 57-274 Piano Pedagogy II.
     
  • Voice majors must take 57-010 Voice Studio Performance Class.

Candidates for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in applied areas other than piano are required to pass a piano proficiency test.

Candidates for all School of Music degrees are required to pass four repertoire proficiency tests, and to pass a major choral ensemble or a major instrumental ensemble as assigned and to pass Convocation every semester of residence in the School of Music.

Music Curriculum

The music curriculum is based on the following five building blocks:

  1. Studio
  2. Theory
  3. History
  4. Ensemble
  5. Academics

1. Studio — This is the heart of the school. Students receive individualized instruction with senior faculty in their major area of study: performance or composition.

2. Theory — These courses are designed to help students develop listening skills, to acquire theoretical knowledge, to recognize structural techniques and manipulate technological resources. It includes courses in sight-reading, ear-training, eurhythmics, harmony, contrapuntal techniques, analysis of musical forms, 20th-21st century techniques, orchestration, score reading, and electronic and computer music for compositional and educational purposes. One music support course in the piano, organ, and instrumental curricula must be a theory course. 

3. History - These courses cover in depth the music of the western world and survey the styles and musical structures of non-western music.

4. Ensemble — This area includes student participation in some of the following ensembles: Carnegie Mellon Philharmonic, Wind Ensemble, Baroque Ensemble, Contemporary Ensemble, Jazz Orchestra, Jazz Vocal Ensemble, Chorus, Opera, Chamber Music ensembles, and Percussion Ensemble.

5. Academics — The School of Music requires one general studies course (outside of the School) each semester and six semesters of elective courses for graduation. These accumulated credits may be applied to minors or majors in other disciplines. Exceptional students in good academic and musical standing within the School are permitted to take additional courses beyond the number required for graduation. There is no charge for extra credits taken at Carnegie Mellon.  One elective course in the performance curricula must be a course that includes experience with pedagogy for the student's major studio area.

Credits — The total number of units required for graduation is 407 for voice majors; 392 for composition majors; 380 for instrumental, organ, and piano majors.  Three units equal one credit.

Piano

First Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-501Major Studio (Piano)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-193Collaborative Piano Skills I3
57-152Harmony I9
57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-181Solfege I3
57-189Introduction to Repertoire and Listening for Musicians3
57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
 55
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-501Major Studio (Piano)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-194Collaborative Piano Skills II3
57-153Harmony II9
57-162Eurhythmics II3
57-182Solfege II3
57-190Repertoire and Listening for Musicians I3
57-283Music History I9
79-xxxDesignated History Course9
 55
Second Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-501Major Studio (Piano)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-228Chamber Music: Woodwind and Mixed3
57-151Counterpoint in Theory and Application6
57-163Eurhythmics III3
57-183Solfege III3
57-289Repertoire and Listening for Musicians II3
57-284Music History II9
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 6
 49
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-501Major Studio (Piano)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-228Chamber Music: Woodwind and Mixed3
57-408Form and Analysis6
57-164Eurhythmics IV3
57-184Solfege IV3
57-290Repertoire and Listening for Musicians III3
57-285Music History III9
xx-xxxElective 6
 49
Third Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-501Major Studio (Piano)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-228Chamber Music: Woodwind and Mixed3
57-273Piano Pedagogy I6
57-xxxMusic Support Course (Theory/History) 12
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 9
xx-xxxElective 6
 52
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-501Major Studio (Piano)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-228Chamber Music: Woodwind and Mixed3
57-274Piano Pedagogy II6
57-xxxMusic Support Course (Theory/History) 12
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 9
xx-xxxElective 6
 52
Fourth Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-501Major Studio (Piano)9
57-xxxPerformance Elective 9
57-xxxMusic Support Course (Theory/History) 12
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 9
xx-xxxElective 3
 43
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-501Major Studio (Piano)9
57-xxxPerformance Elective 9
57-xxxMusic Support Course (Theory/History) 12
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 9
xx-xxxElective 3
 43

Organ

 First Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-502Major Studio (Organ)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-191Keyboard Studies3
57-152Harmony I9
57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-181Solfege I3
57-189Introduction to Repertoire and Listening for Musicians3
57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
 55
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-502Major Studio (Organ)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble6
57-191Keyboard Studies3
57-153Harmony II9
57-162Eurhythmics II3
57-182Solfege II3
57-190Repertoire and Listening for Musicians I3
57-283Music History I9
79-xxxDesignated History Course9
 55
Second Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-502Major Studio (Organ)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-191Keyboard Studies3
57-151Counterpoint in Theory and Application6
57-163Eurhythmics III3
57-183Solfege III3
57-289Repertoire and Listening for Musicians II3
57-284Music History II9
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 6
 49
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-502Major Studio (Organ)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-191Keyboard Studies3
57-408Form and Analysis6
57-164Eurhythmics IV3
57-184Solfege IV3
57-290Repertoire and Listening for Musicians III3
57-285Music History III9
xx-xxxElective 6
 49
Third Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-502Major Studio (Organ)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-459Score Reading/Keyboard Harmony6
57-xxxMusic Support Course (Theory/History) 12
57-xxxPedagogy Coursevar.
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 9
xx-xxxElective 3
 46
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-502Major Studio (Organ)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-xxxMusic Support Course (Theory/History) 12
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 9
xx-xxxElective 9
 46
Fourth Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-502Major Studio (Organ)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-xxxPerformance Elective 3
57-xxxMusic Support Course (Theory/History) 12
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 9
xx-xxxElective 3
 43
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-502Major Studio (Organ)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-xxxPerformance Elective 3
57-xxxMusic Support Course (Theory/History) 12
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 9
xx-xxxElective 3
 43

Voice

A voice major must also complete an advanced language course of at least 9 units. Recommended: a domestic or international program, after the sophomore year, which includes intensive study for credit in the Italian, German, or French language.

 First Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-500Major Studio (Voice)9
57-417Major Vocal Performance Ensemble6
57-467Production: Crew3
57-191Keyboard Studies3
57-152Harmony I9
57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-181Solfege I3
57-221Italian Diction3
57-240Acting I6
57-111Movement and Dance I3
82-161Elementary Italian I12
 61
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-500Major Studio (Voice)9
57-417Major Vocal Performance Ensemble6
57-468Production: Crew3
57-191Keyboard Studies3
57-153Harmony II9
57-162Eurhythmics II3
57-182Solfege II3
57-431Italian Literature and Repertoire3
57-241Acting II6
57-112Movement and Dance II3
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
 61
Second Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-500Major Studio (Voice)9
57-417Major Vocal Performance Ensemble6
57-191Keyboard Studies3
57-163Eurhythmics III3
57-183Solfege III3
57-189Introduction to Repertoire and Listening for Musicians3
82-121Elementary German I12
57-223German Diction3
57-339Acting III6
57-211Movement and Dance III3
 52
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-500Major Studio (Voice)9
57-417Major Vocal Performance Ensemble6
57-191Keyboard Studies3
57-164Eurhythmics IV3
57-184Solfege IV3
57-190Repertoire and Listening for Musicians I3
57-283Music History I9
57-435German Literature and Repertoire3
57-340Acting IV6
57-212Movement and Dance IV3
 49
Third Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-010Voice Studio Performance Class0
57-500Major Studio (Voice)9
57-417Major Vocal Performance Ensemble6
57-xxxProduction Course 6
57-151Counterpoint in Theory and Application6
57-289Repertoire and Listening for Musicians II3
57-284Music History II9
82-101Elementary French I12
57-222French Diction3
 55
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-500Major Studio (Voice)9
57-417Major Vocal Performance Ensemble6
57-xxxProduction Course 6
57-408Form and Analysis6
57-290Repertoire and Listening for Musicians III3
57-285Music History III9
57-432French Literature and Repertoire3
57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
79-xxxDesignated History Course9
 58
Fourth Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-500Major Studio (Voice)9
57-417Major Vocal Performance Ensemble6
57-xxxProduction Course 6
57-220English Diction3
57-434Musical Theatre Literature and Repertoire3
xx-xxxElective 9
 37
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-500Major Studio (Voice)9
57-417Major Vocal Performance Ensemble6
57-xxxProduction Course 6
57-436English/Contemporary Literature and Repertoire3
57-434Musical Theatre Literature and Repertoire3
xx-xxxElective 9
 37

Instrumental

A string major must also complete two semesters of Chamber Music in the sophomore year.

 First Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-xxxStudio 9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble6
57-191Keyboard Studies3
57-152Harmony I9
57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-181Solfege I3
57-189Introduction to Repertoire and Listening for Musicians3
57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
 55
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-xxxStudio 9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-191Keyboard Studies3
57-153Harmony II9
57-162Eurhythmics II3
57-182Solfege II3
57-190Repertoire and Listening for Musicians I3
57-283Music History I9
79-xxxDesignated History Course9
 55
Second Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-xxxStudio 9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-191Keyboard Studies3
57-151Counterpoint in Theory and Application6
57-163Eurhythmics III3
57-183Solfege III3
57-289Repertoire and Listening for Musicians II3
57-284Music History II9
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 6
 49
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-xxxStudio 9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-191Keyboard Studies3
57-408Form and Analysis6
57-164Eurhythmics IV3
57-184Solfege IV3
57-290Repertoire and Listening for Musicians III3
57-285Music History III9
xx-xxxElective 6
 49
Third Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-xxxStudio 9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-229Chamber Music: Woodwind and Mixed3
57-xxxMusic Support Course (Theory/History) 12
57-xxxPedagogy Coursevar.
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 9
xx-xxxElective 6
 46
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-xxxStudio 9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-229Chamber Music: Woodwind and Mixed3
57-xxxMusic Support Course (Theory/History) 12
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 9
xx-xxxElective 6
 46
Fourth Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-xxxStudio9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-229Chamber Music: Woodwind and Mixed3
57-xxxMusic Support Course (Theory/History) 12
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 9
xx-xxxElective 3
 43
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-xxxStudio9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-229Chamber Music: Woodwind and Mixed3
57-xxxMusic Support Course (Theory/History) 12
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 9
xx-xxxElective 3
 43

Composition

One music support course is recommended to be Creative Orchestration.

First Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-521Major Studio (Composition)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-191Keyboard Studies3
57-152Harmony I9
57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-181Solfege I3
57-189Introduction to Repertoire and Listening for Musicians3
57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
 55
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-521Major Studio (Composition)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-191Keyboard Studies3
57-153Harmony II9
57-162Eurhythmics II3
57-182Solfege II3
57-190Repertoire and Listening for Musicians I3
57-283Music History I9
79-xxxDesignated History Course9
 55
Second Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-521Major Studio (Composition)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-191Keyboard Studies3
57-151Counterpoint in Theory and Application6
57-163Eurhythmics III3
57-183Solfege III3
57-289Repertoire and Listening for Musicians II3
57-284Music History II9
57-257Orchestration I6
xx-xxxElective 6
 55
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-521Major Studio (Composition)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-191Keyboard Studies3
57-408Form and Analysis6
57-164Eurhythmics IV3
57-184Solfege IV3
57-290Repertoire and Listening for Musicians III3
57-285Music History III9
57-271Orchestration II6
57-25820th-21st Century Techniques6
 55
Third Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-521Major Studio (Composition)9
57-234Performance for Composers3
57-332Introduction to Conducting6
57-347Electronic and Computer Music6
57-xxxMusic Support Course6
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 12
 43
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-521Major Studio (Composition)9
57-236Performance for Composers3
57-336Instrumental/Choral Conducting6
57-459Score Reading/Keyboard Harmony6
57-xxxMusic Support Course6
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 12
 43
Fourth Year
Fall Units
57-100Convocation1
57-521Major Studio (Composition)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-xxxMusic Support Course6
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 9
xx-xxxElective 12
 43
Spring
57-100Convocation1
57-521Major Studio (Composition)9
57-4xxMajor Ensemble 6
57-349Supervised Theory Teaching6
57-xxxMusic Support Course 6
xx-xxxGeneral Studies Course 9
xx-xxxElective 6
 43
Dalcroze Eurhythmics Certificate30 units
57-465Eurhythmics Applications for Performing and Teaching6
57-466Eurhythmics Applications for Performing and Teaching6
57-691Dalcroze Pedagogy/Practice Teaching3
57-692Dalcroze Pedagogy/Practice Teaching3
57-350Dalcroze Piano Improvisation6
xx-xxxCreative Movement/Choreography3
57-641Dalcroze Research Paper3
57-642Dalcroze Research Paper3
Piano Pedagogy Certificate30 units
57-273Piano Pedagogy I6
57-274Piano Pedagogy II6
57-275Piano Pedagogy III6
57-276Piano Pedagogy IV6
57-429Beginning Piano for Children6

Bachelor of Science in Music and Technology

The Bachelor of Science in Music and Technology is offered jointly by the School of Music, the School of Computer Science (SCS), and the Carnegie Institute of Technology (CIT).

This program consists of a set of courses that span both music and technology, as well as a capstone composition/design/performance project. Courses in all three areas of study are stipulated in the music and technology undergraduate curriculum and provide for students coming from any of the three areas. In other words, regardless of a student’s entry point — an interest in computer science, electrical engineering, or music — the coursework prescribed will allow the student to gain the requisite knowledge and experience in all three areas. Students will work closely with advisors and will be guided in both course selection and capstone projects.

General Requirements85 units

Seminar

57-570Sound and Music Computing Seminar
(8 semesters for a total of 8 units)
8
University
99-10xComputing @ Carnegie Mellon3
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
79-104Global Histories9

Humanities

xx-xxxCognition, Choice and Behavior course9
xx-xxxEnglish, History, Modern Languages, Philosophy, or Psychology course9

Mathematics

21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration and Approximation10

Science

33-114Physics of Musical Sound9
33-106Physics I for Engineering Students12
Electives33 units
Music Core87 units
57-152Harmony I9
57-153Harmony II9
57-408Form and Analysis6
57-151Counterpoint in Theory and Application6
57-25820th-21st Century Techniques6
57-257Orchestration I6
57-xxxMusic Support Course6
57-189Introduction to Repertoire and Listening for Musicians3
57-190Repertoire and Listening for Musicians I3
57-289Repertoire and Listening for Musicians II3
57-290Repertoire and Listening for Musicians III3
57-181Solfege I3
57-182Solfege II3
57-183Solfege III3
57-184Solfege IV3
57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-162Eurhythmics II3
57-173Survey of Western Music History9
Music and Technology Core120 units
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
15-322Introduction to Computer Music9
18-100Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering12
18-202Mathematical Foundations of Electrical Engineering12
18-290Signals and Systems12
57-101Introduction to Music Technology6
57-347Electronic and Computer Music6
57-337Sound Recording6
57-338Sound Editing and Mastering6
57-438Multitrack Recording9
57-571Music and Technology Project12
57-572Music and Technology Project12
Concentration

Students complete either the Music Concentration or the Technical Concentration:

Music Concentration60 units
57-5xxStudio (4 semesters)36
57-4xxMajor Ensemble (4 semesters)24
Technical Concentration57 or 55 units
21-127Concepts of Mathematics10
15/18-213Introduction to Computer Systems12

AND EITHER:

18-220Electronic Devices and Analog Circuits12
18-240Structure and Design of Digital Systems12
15-2xx/18-3xx Electives in ECE or CS12
or above

OR:

15-128Freshman Immigration Course1
15-210Parallel and Sequential Data Structures and Algorithms12
15-323Computer Music Systems and Information Processing9
15-2xx/18-3xx Electives in ECE or CS 12
or above
Total number of units required for major380

Minor in Collaborative Piano for Piano Majors in the School of Music

Admission Requirements:

The student must apply to enter the program in the office of the Director of Student Services (CFA 108).

36 unitsRequired Courses
57-381Collaborative Piano I6
57-382Collaborative Piano II6
57-383Collaborative Piano III6
57-384Collaborative Piano IV6
57-385Collaborative Piano V6
57-386Collaborative Piano VI6
18 unitsElectives

(choose from the following courses)

57-220English Diction3
57-221Italian Diction3
57-222French Diction3
57-223German Diction3
57-332Introduction to Conducting6
57-336Instrumental/Choral Conducting6
57-431Italian Literature and Repertoire3
57-432French Literature and Repertoire3
57-433Musical Theatre Literature and Repertoire3
57-434Musical Theatre Literature and Repertoire3
57-435German Literature and Repertoire3
57-436English/Contemporary Literature and Repertoire3
57-459Score Reading/Keyboard Harmony6
57-607Vocal Methods3
Minimum units required for Collaborative Piano Minor: 54

Minor in Conducting for Students in the School of Music

Admission Requirements:
  1. The student must apply to enter the program in the office of the Director of Student Services (CFA 108) and have an interview with a member of the conducting faculty.
  2. A 3.0 cumulative overall QPA and good academic standing are required for acceptance into the minor in conducting. Note that only a limited number of students can be accepted into the program.
  3. In addition to the prerequisite courses listed below, the student must display superior solfege skills, by completing Advanced Solfege I and II with “A” or “B” grades or by demonstrating the equivalent level of skills.
  4. Introduction to Conducting and Instrumental/Choral Conducting must be completed during the sophomore year with “A” grades before the student can register for the advanced conducting courses.
  5. Conducting Practicum must be taken during the same semester as Independent Study in Conducting.
  6. A 3.0 cumulative overall QPA is required for graduation with the minor in conducting.
30 unitsPrerequisite Courses
57-152Harmony I9
57-153Harmony II9
57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-162Eurhythmics II3
57-189Introduction to Repertoire and Listening for Musicians3
57-191Keyboard Studies3
45 unitsRequired Courses
57-332Introduction to Conducting6
57-336Instrumental/Choral Conducting6
57-408Form and Analysis6
57-257Orchestration I6
57-459Score Reading/Keyboard Harmony6
57-xxxMusic Support Course6
57-364Conducting Practicum3
57-618Independent Study in Conducting6
12 unitsElectives

(choose from the following courses)

57-220English Diction3
57-221Italian Diction3
57-222French Diction3
57-223German Diction3
57-25820th-21st Century Techniques6
57-337Sound Recording6
57-338Sound Editing and Mastering6
57-360Brass Methods3
57-361Percussion Methods3
57-363String Methods3
57-362Woodwind Methods3
57-431Italian Literature and Repertoire3
57-432French Literature and Repertoire3
57-435German Literature and Repertoire3
57-607Vocal Methods3
57-227Jazz Orchestra3
57-229Chamber Music: Woodwind and Mixed3
Minimum units required for Conducting minor: 57

Minor in Music Education for Students in the School of Music

Admission Requirements:

The student should apply to the music education faculty no earlier than spring of the freshman year.

45 unitsCorequisite General Courses
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
21-xxxMathematics Course #19
21-xxxMathematics Course #29
76-xxxEnglish Literature Course9
85-xxxEducational Psychology Course9
18 unitsCorequisite Music Courses
57-391Keyboard Studies (Music Ed)3
57-392Keyboard Studies (Music Ed)3
57-393Keyboard Studies Test (Music Ed)0
57-332Introduction to Conducting6
57-336Instrumental/Choral Conducting6
General Education Courses                                                                                                          36 units

Also required are three classes offered at other Pittsburgh schools:  EDUC 333 Assessment & Adaptation: Students with Special Needs AND EDUC 634 Inclusion: Issues and Strategies, both at Chatham University; and IL 2257 Teaching English Language Learners, at the University of Pittsburgh (27 units).

57-331Principles of Education9
48 unitsMusic Education Methods Courses
General Methods Courses
57-375Music in the Elementary School6
57-356Elementary Guided Teaching3
57-376Music in the Secondary School6
57-355Secondary Guided Teaching3
Applied Area Methods Courses
57-207Secondary StudioVar.
57-360Brass Methods3
57-361Percussion Methods3
57-363String Methods3
57-362Woodwind Methods3
57-607Vocal Methods3
Band Methods Courses

Required is either Fundamentals of Marching Band or Stage Direction.

57-334Fundamentals of Marching Band3
57-370Stage Direction3
57-333Band and Choral Arranging6
15 unitsMusic Education Teaching Courses
57-608Observation3
57-603Practice Teaching (Elementary)6
57-604Practice Teaching (Secondary)6
Minimum units required for Music Education Minor: 99

Minor in Music Technology for Students in the School of Music

Admission Requirements:

The student must apply to enter the program in the office of the Director of Student Services (CFA 108).

18 unitsPrerequisite Courses
57-152Harmony I9
57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-181Solfege I3
57-189Introduction to Repertoire and Listening for Musicians3
21 unitsSound Recording Courses
57-337Sound Recording6
57-338Sound Editing and Mastering6
57-438Multitrack Recording9
21 units Music Technology/Sound Courses (Choose 3)

Choose three courses. One of the three courses must be either Introduction to Computer Music or Electronic and Computer Music. (Note that 15-112 is a prerequisite for 15-322; 57-101 or 57-171 is a prerequisite for 57-347.) Other courses may be taken with the permission of the music technology minor advisor.

15-322Introduction to Computer Music9
15-323Computer Music Systems and Information Processing9
18-090Twisted Signals: Multimedia Processing for the Arts10
33-114Physics of Musical Sound9
54-166Introduction to Sound Design for Theatre6
54-666Production Audio6
57-344Experimental Sound Synthesis9
57-345Hacking the Music World9
57-347Electronic and Computer Music6
60-1313D Media Studio II5
60-210Electronic Media Studio: Introduction to Interactivity10

Minimum units required: 67

Minor in Music Theory for Students in the School of Music

Admission Requirements:

The student must apply to enter the program in the office of the Director of Student Services (CFA 108).

18 unitsPrerequisite Courses
57-152Harmony I9
57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-181Solfege I3
57-189Introduction to Repertoire and Listening for Musicians3
21 unitsUpper Level Theory Courses (Choose 3)

See theory courses on the Music Support Courses Two-Year Rotation list.  It is available on the Inside Music website.  A graduate course may be taken with the permission of the instructor.

Graduate Theory Course (Choose 1)                                                                                          6-9 units

See graduate theory courses on the Music Support Courses Two-Year Rotation list.  It is available on the Inside Music website.  The course is to be chosen with the advisor's approval.

18 units Support Courses
33-114Physics of Musical Sound9
57-377Psychology of Music9
Minimum units required for Music Theory Minor: 70

Minor in Sound Design – IDeATe

The minor in Sound Design is offered by the School of Music as part of the Integrative Design, Arts and Technology (IDeATe) network. IDeATe offers students the opportunity to become immersed in a collaborative community of faculty and peers who share expertise, experience, and passions at the intersection of arts and technology. Students will engage in active “learning by doing” in state-of-the-art maker spaces. The program addresses current and emerging real-world challenges that require disciplinary expertise coupled with multidisciplinary perspectives and collaborative integrative approaches.

The IDeATe undergraduate curriculum consists of eight interrelated concentration areas, all of which can also be taken as minors. The themes of these areas integrate knowledge in technology and arts: Game Design, Animation & Special Effects, Media Design, Learning Media, Sound Design, Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Intelligent Environments, and Physical Computing. For more information about the IDeATe network, please visit http://coursecatalog.web.cmu.edu/servicesandoptions/undergraduateoptions/#ideate

In the Sound Design minor, students create experimental music or explore new, technology-enabled applications and markets for sound design, music creation, and performance.

Curriculum

Required Courses

  • One Portal Course
    • 18-090 Twisted Signals: Multimedia Processing for the Arts
    • 62-150 IDeATe: Introduction to Media Synthesis and Analysis
  • Four Collaborative or Supportive Courses
    • 57-344 Experimental Sound Synthesis
    • 57-345 Hacking the Music World
    • 15-322 Introduction to Computer Music
    • 33-114 Physics of Musical Sound
    • 54-166 Introduction to Sound Design for Theatre
    • 54-367 Lighting Design Skills
    • 57-337 Sound Recording
    • 57-347 Electronic and Computer Music
    • 60-352 NOISE: Toward a Critical Theory of Sound and Hearing
    • 60-439 Advanced SIS/CP: Hybrid Instrument Building

Electives

Students may take a collaborative or supportive course from one of the other IDeATe areas as one of their four collaborative or supportive courses toward the Sound Design minor.

Double-Counting Restriction

Students may double-count two of their Sound Design minor courses for other requirements.

Minor in Music Performance/Music (Composition) for Students in the School of Music

Admission Requirements:

1. The student must apply to enter the program in the office of the Director of Student Services (CFA 108).

2. The student must perform an acceptable audition. Requirements for the audition can be found in the Admission section of the Undergraduate Catalog.

18 unitsPrerequisite Courses
57-161Eurhythmics I3
57-181Solfege I3
57-152Harmony I9
57-189Introduction to Repertoire and Listening for Musicians3
24 unitsRequired Studio Courses (studio fee is charged)
57-496Minor Studio6
57-497Minor Studio6
57-498Minor Studio6
57-499Minor Studio6
18 unitsRequired Language Courses (voice minors)

Language Course (Choose 1)

82-101Elementary French I12
82-121Elementary German I12
82-161Elementary Italian I12

Diction Course (Choose 1)
An introductory course in the applicable language is a corequisite for each of these courses.

57-221Italian Diction3
57-222French Diction3
57-223German Diction3

Literature and Repertoire Course (Choose 1)
An introductory course in the applicable language is a prerequisite for each of these courses.

57-431Italian Literature and Repertoire3
57-432French Literature and Repertoire3
57-435German Literature and Repertoire3
Minimum Units Required for Music Performance/Music (Composition) Minor:24-42

Faculty

DOUGLAS AHLSTEDT, Professor of Voice – M.M., Eastman School of Music; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.
CHRISTOPHER ALLEN, Artist Lecturer in Percussion.
ALBERTO ALMARZA, Associate Professor of Flute – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.
DONNA AMATO, Artist Lecturer in Piano and Staff Pianist – B.M., University of Arizona; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.
JENNIFER AYLMER, Assistant Professor of Voice.
LEONARDO BALADA, University Professor of Composition – Diploma, The Juilliard School of Music; Carnegie Mellon, 1970–.
NEAL BERNTSEN, Artist Lecturer in Trumpet – M.M., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
RAYMOND BLACKWELL, Vocal Coach and Staff Pianist – M.M., SUNY Binghamton; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
JEREMY BRANSON, Artist Lecturer in PercussionCarnegie Mellon, 2009–.
WILLIAM CABALLERO, Associate Teaching Professor in Horn – B.M., New England Conservatory; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.
JUDITH CAGLEY, Artist Lecturer in Solfege – M.S.Ed., Duquesne University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.
CHRISTOPHER CAPIZZI, Artist Lecturer in Jazz Piano – M.A.M., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.
ANDRES CARDENES, Dorothy Richard Starling and Alexander Speyer, Jr. University Professor of ViolinCarnegie Mellon, 1989–.
ANDREW CARLISLE, Director of Piping.
L. MARK CARVER, Associate Teaching Professor in Collaborative Piano – M.M., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.
REBECCA CHERIAN, Artist Lecturer in TromboneCarnegie Mellon, 1993–.
ALEC CHIEN, Artist Lecturer in Piano Literature and Repertoire.
DENIS COLWELL, Head and Associate ProfessorCarnegie Mellon, 1980–.
MURRAY CREWE, Artist Lecturer in Bass TromboneCarnegie Mellon, 2001–.
DANIEL CURTIS, Resident Conductor.
MICHELE DE LA REZA, Assistant Teaching Professor of Dance – M.S., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.
CYNTHIA DEALMEIDA, Associate Teaching Professor in Oboe – M.M., Temple University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.
ERIC DEFADE, Director of Jazz EnsembleCarnegie Mellon, 2002–.
ROBERT DELL, Artist Lecturer in Music Education.
MARK DOMENCIC, Artist Lecturer in Music Theory – M.M., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.
THOMAS DOUGLAS, Teaching Professor of Voice – M.M., Duquesne University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.
PAUL EVANS, Artist Lecturer in Percussion – MM, Temple University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.
JAMES FERLA, Artist Lecturer in Guitar – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.
CYRUS FOROUGH, Professor of ViolinCarnegie Mellon, 2001–.
NANCY GALBRAITH, Professor of Composition – M.M., West Virginia University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.
PAUL GERLACH, Artist Lecturer in Music Education – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.
NANCY GOERES, Artist Lecturer in Bassoon – B.M., Boston University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.
PETER GUILD, Artist Lecturer in Double Bass.
DAVID HARDING, Associate Professor in Viola and Chamber Music.
MICAH HOWARD, Artist Lecturer in Double BassCarnegie Mellon, 2010–.
ROSEANNA IRWIN, Associate Teaching Professor of Coaching and Accompanying – M.M., Duquesne University; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.
JOHN PAUL ITO, Assistant Professor of Music TheoryCarnegie Mellon, 2011–.
ANNE JACKOVIC, Artist Lecturer in Solfege.
CURTIS JOHNSON, Artist Lecturer in Saxophone.
PAUL JOHNSTON, Artist Lecturer in Music HistoryCarnegie Mellon, 2005–.
ANNABELLE JOSEPH, Professor of Music – D.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.
KENNETH KEELING, Associate Head and Professor Emeritus of Music – D.M.A., Catholic University of America; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.
SUNG-IM KIM, Staff PianistCarnegie Mellon, 2011–.
CRAIG KNOX, Artist Lecturer in TubaCarnegie Mellon, 2005–.
PETER KOPE, Assistant Teaching Professor of DanceCarnegie Mellon, 2007–.
STEPHEN KOSTYNIAK, Artist Lecturer in French Horn.
CARLA LAROCCA, Associate Teaching Professor of Keyboard Studies – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.
LANCE LADUKE, Artist Lecturer in Euphonium – B.M., Michigan State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
ELIZABETH LAWRENCE, Artist Lecturer in Jazz Voice and Director of Jazz Vocal Ensemble – M.M., Manhattan School of Music; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.
GREGORY LEHANE, Professor of Drama and Music – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.
HANNA WU LI, Professor of Piano and Piano Pedagogy – M.M., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.
LUZ MANRIQUEZ, Associate Teaching Professor in Collaborative Piano – M.M., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.
JOHN MARCINIZYN, Artist Lecturer in Guitar and Composition – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.
JOHN MCCARTHY, String Methods Instructor.
LORNA MCGHEE, Artist Lecturer in FluteCarnegie Mellon, 2015–.
MONIQUE MEAD, Director of Music Entrepreneurial Studies.
STEPHEN NEELY, Artist Lecturer in Eurhythmics – M.M., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.
RODRIGO OJEDA, Staff PianistCarnegie Mellon, 2011–.
BENJAMIN OPIE, Artist Lecturer in Music Technology – M.M., Duquesne University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.
NATALIE OZEAS, Professor of Music Education and Director of Graduate Studies – Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.
ROBERT PAGE, University Professor Emeritus of Music – M.M., Indiana University; Carnegie Mellon, 1976–.
MILDRED MILLER POSVAR, Artist Lecturer in Voice – BM, Cleveland Institute of Music; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.
DAVID PREMO, Artist Lecturer in CelloCarnegie Mellon, 1994–.
RICHARD RANDALL, Assistant Professor of Music Theory – Ph.D., Eastman School of Music; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.
MICHAEL RUSINEK, Artist Lecturer in ClarinetCarnegie Mellon, 1998–.
CHRISTOPHER RUTH, Artist Lecturer in Music History.
VAHAN SARGSYAN, Staff Pianist.
SERGEY SCHEPKIN, Associate Professor of Piano – D.M.A., New England Conservatory; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
STEPHEN SCHULTZ, Associate Teaching Professor of Music History and Flute – M.M., San Francisco State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.
RICCARDO SCHULZ, Associate Teaching Professor and Director of Recording Activities – M.A., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.
FRANCO SCIANNAMEO, Associate Teaching Professor of Film Musicology and CFA Associate Dean.
MARIA SPACAGNA, Associate Professor of Voice.
STEPHEN STORY, Associate Conductor of Wind Ensemble.
PETER SULLIVAN, Artist Lecturer in TromboneCarnegie Mellon, 2000–.
DANIEL TEADT, Artist Lecturer in Voice.
MARILYN TAFT THOMAS, Professor of Music – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.
THOMAS THOMPSON, Associate Teaching Professor of Clarinet and Co-Director of Wind Ensemble – M.M., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.
KELLY TRUMBULL, Artist Lecturer in ActingCarnegie Mellon, 2015–.
REZA VALI, Professor of Composition – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.
GRETCHEN VAN HOESEN, Artist Lecturer in Harp – M.M., The Juilliard School; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.
GEORGE VOSBURGH, Artist Lecturer in Trumpet and Co-Director of Wind Ensemble – B.A., University of Rochester; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
JAMES WHIPPLE, Artist Lecturer in Music Theory – BA, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.
COLETTE JOUSSE WILKINS, Artist Lecturer in Solfege – First Prize, Conservatoire National de Versailles, France; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.
ANNE MARTINDALE WILLIAMS, Artist Lecturer in Cello – Diploma, Curtis Institute of Music; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.
ALEXA WOLOSHYN, Assistant Professor of MusicologyCarnegie Mellon, 2016-–.
CHRISTOPHER WU, Artist Lecturer in ViolinCarnegie Mellon, 2009–.
LENNY YOUNG, Artist Lecturer in SolfegeCarnegie Mellon, 2015–.
ISAIAS ZELKOWICZ, Artist Lecturer in Viola – M.M., The Juilliard School; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.

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Faculty

DOUGLAS AHLSTEDT, Professor of Voice – M.M., Eastman School of Music; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.
CHRISTOPHER ALLEN, Artist Lecturer in Percussion.
ALBERTO ALMARZA, Associate Professor of Flute – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.
DONNA AMATO, Artist Lecturer in Piano and Staff Pianist – B.M., University of Arizona; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.
JENNIFER AYLMER, Assistant Professor of Voice.
LEONARDO BALADA, University Professor of Composition – Diploma, The Juilliard School of Music; Carnegie Mellon, 1970–.
NEAL BERNTSEN, Artist Lecturer in Trumpet – M.M., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
RAYMOND BLACKWELL, Vocal Coach and Staff Pianist – M.M., SUNY Binghamton; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
JEREMY BRANSON, Artist Lecturer in PercussionCarnegie Mellon, 2009–.
WILLIAM CABALLERO, Associate Teaching Professor in Horn – B.M., New England Conservatory; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.
JUDITH CAGLEY, Artist Lecturer in Solfege – M.S.Ed., Duquesne University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.
CHRISTOPHER CAPIZZI, Artist Lecturer in Jazz Piano – M.A.M., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.
ANDRES CARDENES, Dorothy Richard Starling and Alexander Speyer, Jr. University Professor of ViolinCarnegie Mellon, 1989–.
ANDREW CARLISLE, Director of Piping.
L. MARK CARVER, Associate Teaching Professor in Collaborative Piano – M.M., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.
REBECCA CHERIAN, Artist Lecturer in TromboneCarnegie Mellon, 1993–.
ALEC CHIEN, Artist Lecturer in Piano Literature and Repertoire.
DENIS COLWELL, Head and Associate ProfessorCarnegie Mellon, 1980–.
MURRAY CREWE, Artist Lecturer in Bass TromboneCarnegie Mellon, 2001–.
DANIEL CURTIS, Resident Conductor.
MICHELE DE LA REZA, Assistant Teaching Professor of Dance – M.S., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.
CYNTHIA DEALMEIDA, Associate Teaching Professor in Oboe – M.M., Temple University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.
ERIC DEFADE, Director of Jazz EnsembleCarnegie Mellon, 2002–.
ROBERT DELL, Artist Lecturer in Music Education.
MARK DOMENCIC, Artist Lecturer in Music Theory – M.M., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.
THOMAS DOUGLAS, Teaching Professor of Voice – M.M., Duquesne University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.
PAUL EVANS, Artist Lecturer in Percussion – MM, Temple University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.
JAMES FERLA, Artist Lecturer in Guitar – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.
CYRUS FOROUGH, Professor of ViolinCarnegie Mellon, 2001–.
NANCY GALBRAITH, Professor of Composition – M.M., West Virginia University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.
PAUL GERLACH, Artist Lecturer in Music Education – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.
NANCY GOERES, Artist Lecturer in Bassoon – B.M., Boston University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.
PETER GUILD, Artist Lecturer in Double Bass.
DAVID HARDING, Associate Professor in Viola and Chamber Music.
MICAH HOWARD, Artist Lecturer in Double BassCarnegie Mellon, 2010–.
ROSEANNA IRWIN, Associate Teaching Professor of Coaching and Accompanying – M.M., Duquesne University; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.
JOHN PAUL ITO, Assistant Professor of Music TheoryCarnegie Mellon, 2011–.
ANNE JACKOVIC, Artist Lecturer in Solfege.
CURTIS JOHNSON, Artist Lecturer in Saxophone.
PAUL JOHNSTON, Artist Lecturer in Music HistoryCarnegie Mellon, 2005–.
ANNABELLE JOSEPH, Professor of Music – D.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.
KENNETH KEELING, Associate Head and Professor Emeritus of Music – D.M.A., Catholic University of America; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.
SUNG-IM KIM, Staff PianistCarnegie Mellon, 2011–.
CRAIG KNOX, Artist Lecturer in TubaCarnegie Mellon, 2005–.
PETER KOPE, Assistant Teaching Professor of DanceCarnegie Mellon, 2007–.
STEPHEN KOSTYNIAK, Artist Lecturer in French Horn.
CARLA LAROCCA, Associate Teaching Professor of Keyboard Studies – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.
LANCE LADUKE, Artist Lecturer in Euphonium – B.M., Michigan State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
ELIZABETH LAWRENCE, Artist Lecturer in Jazz Voice and Director of Jazz Vocal Ensemble – M.M., Manhattan School of Music; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.
GREGORY LEHANE, Professor of Drama and Music – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.
HANNA WU LI, Professor of Piano and Piano Pedagogy – M.M., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.
LUZ MANRIQUEZ, Associate Teaching Professor in Collaborative Piano – M.M., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.
JOHN MARCINIZYN, Artist Lecturer in Guitar and Composition – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.
JOHN MCCARTHY, String Methods Instructor.
LORNA MCGHEE, Artist Lecturer in FluteCarnegie Mellon, 2015–.
MONIQUE MEAD, Director of Music Entrepreneurial Studies.
STEPHEN NEELY, Artist Lecturer in Eurhythmics – M.M., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.
RODRIGO OJEDA, Staff PianistCarnegie Mellon, 2011–.
BENJAMIN OPIE, Artist Lecturer in Music Technology – M.M., Duquesne University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.
NATALIE OZEAS, Professor of Music Education and Director of Graduate Studies – Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.
ROBERT PAGE, University Professor Emeritus of Music – M.M., Indiana University; Carnegie Mellon, 1976–.
MILDRED MILLER POSVAR, Artist Lecturer in Voice – BM, Cleveland Institute of Music; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.
DAVID PREMO, Artist Lecturer in CelloCarnegie Mellon, 1994–.
RICHARD RANDALL, Assistant Professor of Music Theory – Ph.D., Eastman School of Music; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.
MICHAEL RUSINEK, Artist Lecturer in ClarinetCarnegie Mellon, 1998–.
CHRISTOPHER RUTH, Artist Lecturer in Music History.
VAHAN SARGSYAN, Staff Pianist.
SERGEY SCHEPKIN, Associate Professor of Piano – D.M.A., New England Conservatory; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
STEPHEN SCHULTZ, Associate Teaching Professor of Music History and Flute – M.M., San Francisco State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.
RICCARDO SCHULZ, Associate Teaching Professor and Director of Recording Activities – M.A., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.
FRANCO SCIANNAMEO, Associate Teaching Professor of Film Musicology and CFA Associate Dean.
MARIA SPACAGNA, Associate Professor of Voice.
STEPHEN STORY, Associate Conductor of Wind Ensemble.
PETER SULLIVAN, Artist Lecturer in TromboneCarnegie Mellon, 2000–.
DANIEL TEADT, Artist Lecturer in Voice.
MARILYN TAFT THOMAS, Professor of Music – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.
THOMAS THOMPSON, Associate Teaching Professor of Clarinet and Co-Director of Wind Ensemble – M.M., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.
KELLY TRUMBULL, Artist Lecturer in ActingCarnegie Mellon, 2015–.
REZA VALI, Professor of Composition – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.
GRETCHEN VAN HOESEN, Artist Lecturer in Harp – M.M., The Juilliard School; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.
GEORGE VOSBURGH, Artist Lecturer in Trumpet and Co-Director of Wind Ensemble – B.A., University of Rochester; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
JAMES WHIPPLE, Artist Lecturer in Music Theory – BA, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.
COLETTE JOUSSE WILKINS, Artist Lecturer in Solfege – First Prize, Conservatoire National de Versailles, France; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.
ANNE MARTINDALE WILLIAMS, Artist Lecturer in Cello – Diploma, Curtis Institute of Music; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.
ALEXA WOLOSHYN, Assistant Professor of MusicologyCarnegie Mellon, 2016-–.
CHRISTOPHER WU, Artist Lecturer in ViolinCarnegie Mellon, 2009–.
LENNY YOUNG, Artist Lecturer in SolfegeCarnegie Mellon, 2015–.
ISAIAS ZELKOWICZ, Artist Lecturer in Viola – M.M., The Juilliard School; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.