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School of Drama

Peter Cooke, Head of School
Office: Purnell Center for the Arts, 221
http://www.drama.cmu.edu

The information contained in this section is accurate as of July 31, 2016 and is subject to change. Please contact the School of Drama with any questions.

The School of Drama at Carnegie Mellon University is the oldest drama program in the country. CMU Drama offers rigorous, world-class classical training in theater while providing thorough preparation for contemporary media.

As a member of the Consortium of Conservatory Theater Training Programs, the school chooses students to participate in the program based on their potential ability. Every Drama student is treated as a member of a theatrical organization and must acquire experience in all phases of the dramatic arts. Students are also asked to broaden their knowledge through courses in the other colleges of the university. The undergraduate Drama program, which incorporates approximately 200 students, leads to a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Drama. The options available are: Acting, Music Theater, Design, Production Technology and Management, Directing, Dramaturgy, and Theater Studies. The production of plays, a natural extension of demanding class work, is our lab, and constitutes one of the school's major activities. The choice of texts used is determined by the particular needs of current students. Each semester, 15 to 25 lab productions, directed by faculty, guest directors, and advanced students, are presented in our three theater spaces. The labs range from completely mounted, full-length dramatic and musical works to more simply produced directing projects and one-acts. The Drama program is rigorous and exacting, making demands on students that necessitate good health, a willingness to work and a commitment to professional discipline at all times. Because of full daytime class work and heavy production schedules, much production preparation takes place in the evening. Drama students, therefore, are advised to live in residence halls or in the immediate vicinity of the campus.

Acting Option

The Acting option is designed to prepare the student for immediate entry into the profession. It is a sequence-based training program with accumulative skills building upon each other over the course of four years. It is a conservatory training course, and the curriculum focuses primarily on the technique and craft of theater. At the same time it offers skills that are applicable to all media. Courses in acting, voice, speech, movement, and theater history are integral parts of the program at all four levels.

In addition to studio classes, Acting majors are required to take at least one liberal arts class each semester outside the school of drama to expand their intellectual curiosity and worldview.

All students must demonstrate a commitment to growth, show continued progress in their work and in the knowledge of their craft, and show a respect for professional standards in discipline, quality and ethics.

The freshman year is a discovery year and provides an introduction to basic skills-working from self, learning to play objectives and actions and the beginning of character exploration.

In the sophomore year these skills are solidified and deepened as more sophisticated, verbally complex material is introduced, through a focus on in-depth scene study, both contemporary and Shakespeare.

In the junior year students continue to develop their craft by investigating a variety of styles, including Greek, Brecht, and Restoration. Skills are now tested and strengthened through public performance.

The senior year provides a bridge from training to the professional world and offers the opportunity to appear on the School of Drama's main stage.

At the end of the senior year, students are introduced to the profession through Showcase performances in New York City and Los Angeles. The privilege to participate in Showcase is subject to the approval of the School of Drama faculty and as a rule is granted only to students who have obtained the necessary credits for graduation.

 

Music Theater Option

The students in the Music Theater program share the training philosophy and much of the same curriculum as others in the acting option. In addition, they take courses particular to the demands of Music Theater. These include private voice along with training in a variety of dance techniques (Ballet, Jazz, Tap and Broadway Styles) and music theater styles and skills.

Design Option

Design students are expected to develop artistic ability in the conception and execution of scene, lighting, sound and costume design for plays of all periods under varying theatrical conditions. Students may elect to have a focus on one or two areas but must have a solid background in all four. Freshmen in design receive instruction in drawing and painting, three-dimensional techniques, and in the application of basic design principles through courses in drawing and design. Sophomores learn to apply design principles to the theater through research, play analysis, and studies in the fundamentals of scene, lighting, sound and costume design. Design assignments cover various styles and periods and include the preparation of models, renderings, and working drawings, lighting storyboards, and light plots. Juniors and Seniors take specialized courses in two areas of stage design and are expected to head studio and main-stage production crews. As part of the degree work, juniors may design sets, lights, sound or costumes for a production in the Studio Theater and seniors may design sets, lights, sound or costumes for a Master's thesis show or a main-stage production. Designing for lab productions, both those that are highly resourced and those that are moderately resourced, requires a variety of creative approaches, preparing designers for a variety of real-world situations.

Directing Option

The John Wells Directing Program promotes creativity, intellectual curiosity, a broad and well-rounded understanding of the theater and leadership ability. It provides a detailed exploration of the technique of directing for stage and for camera. The curriculum is designed for those serious about the art of directing and intending to pursue a career in theater, film or television.

Course work in scene design, lighting and costume design develops the students' visual sophistication as well as an understanding of how these elements combine in practical production situations. Stage management skills are studied and practiced. Theater history, criticism, play-writing, play development and theater management classes introduce the student to the wide range of knowledge necessary for directing. There are many avenues open for practical application: scene work in class, a short film written and directed by the students, opportunities in multi-camera directing and a studio project. The broad scope of the directing curriculum encourages the director's interaction with all the theatrical disciplines. Collaboration in all forms, so necessary to the art, is the goal.

Production Technology and Management (PTM) Option

The Production Technology and Management program develops the technologists and managers of the future with an intensive curriculum designed to synthesize academic development and production experience. The curriculum focuses on the production requirements of live performance, in the form of traditional theatrical presentation, while also providing exposure to television, film and emerging technology-based art forms. Integrated in a world class research university environment, the School of Drama is uniquely positioned to contribute to the advancement of the collaborative arts. The goal of the PTM program is to prepare today's students to become tomorrow's leading professionals in the entertainment industry.

All undergraduate students begin with the development of visual and written communication skills. The first four semesters immerse the student in a range of collaborative and individual studies: scenery, costume, sound and lighting design fundamentals; dramatic structure and interpretation; manual and computer-based drafting; perspective and figure drawing, fundamentals of directing; production management and preparation, history of art and history of architecture and décor. The last four semesters focus in the student's analytical skills within their chosen area of concentration: technical direction or stage/production management.

Technical Directors are offered classes in: material applications, metal working techniques, structural design, scenic crafts, fabrication design and detailing, machinery design, rigging techniques, power system and electronic design fundamentals, introduction to sound design, automation system technology, technical management and production management. Technical Directors may take a single semester internship at an approved regional or commercial producing organization, in lieu of one semester of study. Student selected elective courses, outside the School of Drama, provide balance and breadth to the professional undergraduate education offered in the PTM program of study.

Stage Managers and Production Managers are offered classes in: stage management, production planning and scheduling, theater management, introduction to accounting, cash budgeting, producing for television and film, camera lab, computer applications, technical management, organizational behavior, principles of economics, business communications and production management workshop. Stage and Production Managers may take a single semester internship at an approved regional or commercial producing organization, in lieu of one semester of study. Student selected elective courses, outside the School of Drama, provide balance and breadth to the professional undergraduate education offered in the PTM program of study.

Dramaturgy Option

Dramaturgy is the number-one growth field in the entertainment industry. Dramaturgs are theater insiders who thrive on the process of being behind living theater events. They love reading, writing, and thinking and believe in the power of theater to enlighten, stimulate and entertain audiences. Through Carnegie Mellon University's new and innovative Dramaturgy Option you'll become an expert on historical practices and aesthetic theories behind any text, whether in production or waiting to come alive on stage. You will have the insights to reveal playwrights' intentions and the ability to communicate them to producers, directors, performers, and audiences.

The Dramaturg adapts traditional, historical, and classic texts for the modern stage; aids directors, designers, and performers in clarifying their insights; collaborates with artistic directors in choosing exceptional repertory; finds social relevance in every work; links audiences with the ideas behind the productions in program notes, lectures, and talk-backs.

You will receive rigorous, highly structured academic and artistic training; broad and deep historical research; intensive study of aesthetic and critical theories; practical, professional-level experience in full scale theater productions; opportunities to develop diversity by studying with Carnegie Mellon University professors in other arts as well as in the sciences and humanities; opportunities to study abroad; opportunities to work with professional companies in the US, Asia, Latin America, Africa, and Europe.

Your career possibilities include literary management; story editing for films and television; production dramaturgy; teaching: developing the talents and insights of students at educational institutions.

Theater Studies Option

The Theater Studies option offers students from any of the School's conservatory areas of specialized study the opportunity to continue developing their theater related skills while expanding their interests to other artistic and academic areas. This option will only be available to Drama students who have completed their sophomore year in the School of Drama (ie: two years of conservatory training). Students are required to write a proposal outlining their interests in the Theater Studies option, and the proposal must be approved by the Head of the School of Drama.

The goal of the Theater Studies option is to enable students to explore the diverse opportunities for which conservatory drama training can be a basis, and to examine the possibility of post graduate education in a new area of specialization after obtaining a BFA in Drama. As the intent of the Theater Studies option is to broaden your experiences, a semester studying abroad or participating in a recommended internship is required for one semester, either in the fall or spring.  Individualized courses of study are established for each student in consultation with an appropriate faculty advisor.

Curriculum

The School of Drama curriculum is continuously reviewed and modified in an effort to provide the best conservatory experience for undergraduate students in the School of Drama.  The following curriculum is subject to change. Not all requirements are listed, and units are often variable within each Option based on performances, production assignments, and individual projects.
 

Acting Option

Freshman Year
Fall Units
54-011Warmup1
54-101Acting I10
54-103Speech I6
54-105Voice/Alexander I5
54-107Movement I4
54-110Text for Actors2
54-159Production Practicum6
54-175Conservatory Hour1
54-177Foundations of Drama I6
79-104Global Histories9
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon
(usually taken over the summer)
3
 53
Spring Units
54-012Warmup1
54-102Acting I10
54-104Speech I6
54-106Voice/Alexander I5
54-108Movement I4
54-176Conservatory Hour1
54-159Production Practicum6
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
 48-51
Sophomore Year
Fall Units
54-201Acting II12
54-203Voice and Speech II5
54-207Movement II5
54-211Actor Dance II3
54-281Foundations of Drama II
or H&SS Approved Elective *
6
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
54-213Singing for Actors II
(Optional)
3
 40-43
Spring Units
54-202Acting II12
54-204Voice and Speech II6
54-208Movement II3
54-212Actor Dance II3
54-242Improvisation2
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
54-281Foundations of Drama II
or H&SS Approved Elective
6
54-214Singing for Actors II
(Optional)
3
54-159Production Practicum6
 47-50
Junior Year
Fall Units
54-301Acting III10
54-305Voice/Alexander III5
54-307Movement III5
54-309Dialects and Accents6
54-311Rehearsal and Performance III16
54-325Actor Dance III2
54-409Theatre Lab for Undergraduates I4
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
54-317Singing for Actors III
(Optional)
2
54-327Auditioning for the Stage
(Optional)
2
 58-61
Spring Units
54-302Acting III10
54-310Dialects and Accents6
54-306Voice/Alexander III5
54-308Movement III5
54-312Rehearsal and Performance III16
54-326Actor Dance III2
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
54-318Singing for Actors III
(Optional)
2
54-327Auditioning for the Stage
(Optional)
2
 54-57
Senior Year
Fall Units
54-285Alexander Technique Tutorials
(Optional)
1.5
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism6
54-401Through the Lens : Storytelling with the Camera3
54-407Movement IV4
54-411Rehearsal and Performance IV16
54-413Showcase4
54-493Business of Acting4
54-519Acting for the Camera6
54-405Undergraduate Future Stages6
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
54-403Advanced Speech Techniques3
 59.5-62.5
Spring Units
54-285Alexander Technique Tutorials
(Optional)
1.5
54-402Camera Lab3
54-412Rehearsal and Performance IV16
54-414Showcase9
54-421Directing: Text to Stage3
54-520Acting for the Camera6
54-xxxBack to Basics: Acting6
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
 50.5-53.5
NON-DRAMA ELECTIVES:
Actors take a minimum of seven Non-Drama Electives, 6-9 units each.

Notes:

* Foundations of Drama II will be taken only one semester in the sophomore year.  Sophomore Actors will be required to take an approved Humanities & Social Sciences (HSS) course in the Deitrich College during the semester they are not taking Foundations of Drama II.  This H&SS course counts as one of the seven required Non-Drama Electives.

Music Theater Option

Freshman Year
Fall Units
54-101Acting I10
54-103Speech I6
54-105Voice/Alexander I5
54-107Movement I4
54-110Text for Actors2
54-123Ballet I5
54-125Music Skills I4
54-159Production Practicum6
54-175Conservatory Hour1
54-500Voice Lab5
79-104Global Histories9
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon
(usually taken over the summer)
3
 60
Spring Units
54-102Acting I10
54-104Speech I6
54-106Voice/Alexander I5
54-108Movement I4
54-124Ballet I5
54-126Music Skills II4
54-176Conservatory Hour1
54-159Production Practicum6
54-500Voice Lab5
54-177Foundations of Drama I6
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
 61
Sophomore Year
Fall Units
54-201Acting II12
54-203Voice and Speech II5
54-205Ballet II3
54-207Movement II4
54-217Jazz II2
54-219Music Theatre Literature and Repertoire4
54-223Tap II2
54-281Foundations of Drama II
or H&SS Approved Elective *
6
54-500Voice Lab5
 43
Spring Units
54-202Acting II12
54-204Voice and Speech II6
54-206Ballet II3
54-208Movement II3
54-218Jazz II2
54-224Tap II2
54-220Acting A Song4
54-159Production Practicum6
54-281Foundations of Drama II
or H&SS Approved Elective *
6
54-500Voice Lab5
 49
Junior Year
Fall Units
54-301Acting III10
54-305Voice/Alexander III5
54-309Dialects and Accents6
54-311Rehearsal and Performance III16
54-313Ballet III3
54-315Jazz III2
54-319Cabaret6
54-323Tap III2
54-500Voice Lab5
 55
Spring Units
54-302Acting III10
54-306Voice/Alexander III5
54-310Dialects and Accents6
54-312Rehearsal and Performance III16
54-314Ballet III3
54-316Jazz III2
54-324Tap III2
54-410Theatre Lab for Undergraduates II4
54-500Voice Lab5
 53
Senior Year
Fall Units
54-285Alexander Technique Tutorials
(Optional)
1.5
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism6
54-401Through the Lens : Storytelling with the Camera3
54-411Rehearsal and Performance IV16
54-413Showcase4
54-419Voice & Speech IV2
54-418Songs for Showcase2
54-415Broadway Dance Styles5
54-493Business of Acting4
54-500Voice Lab5
54-519Acting for the Camera6
xx-xxxScientific and Quantitative Reasoning Elective **6
54-407Movement IV
(Optional)
4
 64.5
Spring Units
54-285Alexander Technique Tutorials
(Optional)
1.5
54-402Camera Lab3
54-412Rehearsal and Performance IV16
54-414Showcase9
54-416Broadway Styles5
54-xxxBack to Basics: Singing2
54-xxxBack to Basics: Acting6
54-500Voice Lab5
54-520Acting for the Camera6
 53.5

Notes:

* Foundations of Drama II will be taken only one semester in the sophomore year.  Sophomore Music Theater students will be required to take an approved Humanities & Social Sciences (H&SS) course in the Deitrich College during the semester they are not taking Foundations of Drama II.

** Music Theater students are required to take an approved Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning elective.  Students usually take FM-111 Art & Science at Pittsburgh Filmmakers to fulfill this requirement.

Design Option

Freshman Year
Fall Units
54-151Stagecraft15
54-157Basic PTM 16
54-169Studiocraft 113
54-171Basic Design 16
54-175Conservatory Hour1
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon
(Usually completed in summer)
3
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
54-177Foundations of Drama I
OR
6
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective
 59
Spring Units
54-152Stagecraft11
54-158Basic PTM 26
54-170Studiocraft 28
54-172Basic Design 26
54-176Conservatory Hour1
79-104Global Histories9
54-177Foundations of Drama I6
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
 53-56
Sophomore Year
Fall - ALL DESIGN Units
54-229Valiant Hindenburg9
54-231Design for the Stage9
54-249Stagecraft II14
54-271Technical Management6
54-281Foundations of Drama II
or H&SS Approved Elective *
6-9
54-284Fundamentals of Directing6
 50-53
Spring - ALL DESIGN Units
54-361Production PreparationVar.
54-281Foundations of Drama II
OR H&SS Approved Elective *
6
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism Pre-req of Foundations of Drama II6
Spring - SOUND DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-166Introduction to Sound Design for Theatre6
54-666Production Audio6
Spring - COSTUME DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-162Introduction to Costume Design6
54-230Make-Up for Designers6
54-346Introduction to Costume Construction6
54-447Figure Drawing3
Spring - SCENIC DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-250Introduction to Scenic Design6
54-386Scenic Design Skills: 3D Model Making4
54-392Scenic Design Skills: 2D Drawing and Rendering4
Spring - LIGHTING DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-252Introduction to Lighting Design6
54-368Lighting Management I6
Spring - VIDEO & MEDIA DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
60-110Electronic Media Studio: Introduction to the Moving Image
This is not a non-Drama elective.
10
54-297VMD Systems Studio6
54-XXXDesign "Co-Option"
XX-XXXVMD Interdepartmental Course
Junior Year
Fall - ALL DESIGN Units
54-361Production PreparationVar.
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism
(if needed)
6
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
Fall - SOUND DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-267Conceptual Sound Design9
54-389Composition for Theatrical Sound Design 16
54-505Ear Training1
54-509Theatrical Sound System Design 29
Fall - COSTUME DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-245History of Clothing 16
54-341Fundamentals of Costume Design9
54-373Draping for the Costume Designer 16
54-511Millinery I
OR
9
54-539Fabric Dyeing I9
54-473Drawing for Theatrical Designers9
54-239History of Architecture and Decor 1: Ancients to GothicVar.
Fall - SCENIC DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-237Scenic Painting I6
54-239History of Architecture and Decor 1: Ancients to GothicVar.
54-331Scenic Design: Explorations9
54-379Scenic Design Skills: Drafting4
54-383Scenic Design Skills: Digital Drawing4
Fall - LIGHTING DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-349Automated Lighting Technology6
54-351Theatrical Lighting Design9
54-367Lighting Design Skills6
Fall - VIDEO & MEDIA DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-399Decoding Media6
54-405Undergraduate Future Stages6
xx-xxxVMD Interdepartmental Course6-12
54-xxxDesign "Co-option" (for co-option students)6-9
Spring - ALL DESIGN Units
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism
(if needed)
6
54-361Production PreparationVar.
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
Spring - SOUND DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-390Composition for Theatrical Sound Design 29
54-398Film Sound Design9
54-505Ear Training1
54-509Theatrical Sound System Design 29
Spring - COSTUME DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-246History of Clothing 26
54-442Costume Design for the Classics5
54-467Costume Design with Music5
54-447Figure Drawing3
54-450Painting for the Theatrical Designer
OR
9
54-470Costume Rendering9
54-xxxCostume Crafts Mini (varies each semester)6
54-444Draping for the Costume Designer II6
54-240History of Architecture and Decor 2: Renaissance to the 21st CenturyVar.
Spring - SCENIC DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-238Scenic Painting II6
54-240History of Architecture and Decor 2: Renaissance to the 21st Century6
54-332Scenic Design: Boot Camp9
54-450Painting for the Theatrical Designer
(offered every other year) or approved substitute
9
Spring - LIGHTING DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-352Musical and Opera Lighting Design4
54-527Automated Lighting Workshop
(optional)
Var.
Spring - VIDEO & MEDIA DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-400Staging Media9
xx-xxxVMD Interdepartmental class
54-xxxDesign "Co-Option" (for co-options students)
Senior Year
Fall - ALL DESIGN Units
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism
(if needed)
6
54-445Professional Preparation 13
xx-xxxNon- Drama Elective6-9
54-361Production PreparationVar.
Fall - SOUND DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-268Organized Sound9
54-328Advanced Digital Sound Design Skills6
54-505Ear Training1
54-275History of Sound Design6
Fall - COSTUME DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-431Scenography9
54-447Figure Drawing3
54-511Millinery I
OR
9
54-539Fabric Dyeing I9
54-405Undergraduate Future Stages
(optional)
6
Fall - SCENIC DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-473Drawing for Theatrical Designers
(if needed)
9
54-431Scenography9
54-405Undergraduate Future Stages
(optional)
6
Fall - LIGHTING DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-469Dance Lighting Design 13
54-478Lighting for the Camera3
54-491Concert Lighting Design9
54-527Automated Lighting Workshop
(optional)
Var.
Fall - VIDEO & MEDIA DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-498Expanded Theater Fusion Studio10
54-xxxDesign "Co-Option" (for co-option students)6
54-405Undergraduate Future Stages6
Spring - ALL DESIGN Units
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism
(if needed)
6
54-446Professional Preparation 24
54-361Production PreparationVar.
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
Spring - SOUND DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-372Theatre for the Ear6
54-397Sound Design For Interactive Environments9
54-505Ear Training1
Spring - COSTUME DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-342Costume Design for TV and Film9
54-450Painting for the Theatrical Designer
OR
9
54-470Costume Rendering9
54-xxxCostume Crafts Mini (varies each semester)
Spring - SCENIC DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-432Scenic Design: Modern Classical9
54-450Painting for the Theatrical Designer
(or approved substitute) if not taken in junior year
9
Spring - LIGHTING DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-452Architectural Lighting Design9
54-524Dance Lighting Design 23
54-527Automated Lighting Workshop
(optional)
Var.
Spring - VIDEO & MEDIA DESIGN (consult with advisor) Units
54-xxxDesign "Co-Option" (for co-option students)
54-521Video Media Design Senior ThesisVar.
NON-DRAMA ELECTIVES:
Designers take a minimum of seven Non-Drama Electives, 6-9 units each.

Notes:

* Foundations of Drama II will be taken only one semester in the sophomore year. Sophomore Designers will be required to take an approved Humanities and Social Sciences (H&SS) elective in the Deitrich College during the semester they are not taking Foundations of Drama II. This course counts as one of the required seven Non-Drama Electives.

** All Designers are required to complete Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism. It may be taken at any time after Foundations II has been completed.  

Directing Option

Freshman Year
Fall Units
54-011Warmup1
54-167Acting for Directors I10
54-107Movement I4
54-109Dramaturgy 1: Approaches to Text9
54-110Text for Actors2
54-121Directing I: Sources9
54-159Production Practicum6
54-175Conservatory Hour1
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon
(usually taken over the summer)
3
54-517Director's Colloquium1
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
 55
Spring Units
54-012Warmup1
54-168Acting for Directors I10
54-122Directing I: Sources9
54-176Conservatory Hour1
54-159Production Practicum6
54-184Dramaturgy 2: Introduction to Production Dramaturgy9
54-518Director's Colloquium1
79-104Global Histories9
54-177Foundations of Drama I6
xx-xxx
Non-Drama Elective
 52
Sophomore Year
Fall Units
54-233Acting For Directors II12
54-221Directing II: Fundamentals9
54-257Directing: Production II6
54-281Foundations of Drama II6
54-517Director's Colloquium1
xx-xxxH&SS Approved Elective *9
54-271Technical Management
(Optional)
6
 49
Spring Units
54-234Acting For Directors II12
54-222Directing II: Fundamentals9
54-258Directing: Production II6
54-330Introduction to Stage Management6
54-518Director's Colloquium1
54-117Design Collaboration Project2
54-522Plays and Pitches3
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
 51-57
Junior Year
Fall Units
54-322Directing III: Future Stages6
54-331Scenic Design: Explorations9
54-357Directing: Production III12
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism6
54-517Director's Colloquium1
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
54-271Technical Management
(Optional)
6
 46-49
Spring - NYC TEPPER INTERNSHIP SEMESTER
54-xxxTepper Semester courses45
Senior Year
Fall Units
54-239History of Architecture and Decor 1: Ancients to Gothic
(Optional)
Var.
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism
(if needed)
6
54-401Through the Lens : Storytelling with the Camera9
54-409Theatre Lab for Undergraduates I9
54-431Scenography9
54-457Directing: Production IV **12
54-517Director's Colloquium1
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
 51-54
Spring Units
54-240History of Architecture and Decor 2: Renaissance to the 21st Century
(Optional)
4
54-410Theatre Lab for Undergraduates II9
54-422Directing IV6
54-458Directing: Production IV **Var.
54-518Director's Colloquium1
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
 25-28
NON-DRAMA ELECTIVES:
Directors take a minimum of seven Non-Drama Electives, 6-9 units each.

Notes:

* Sophomore Directors will be required to take an approved Humanities & Social Sciences (H&SS) elective in the Deitrich College.  This course will count as one of the seven required Non-Drama Electives.

** One semester of Directing Production IV: Senior Thesis Play is required. Second semester is optional.

Production Technology and Management (PTM) Option

Freshman Year
Fall Units
54-151Stagecraft15
54-157Basic PTM 16
54-169Studiocraft 113
54-171Basic Design 16
54-175Conservatory Hour1
54-177Foundations of Drama I
OR Non-Drama Elective *
6
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon
(usually taken over the summer)
3
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
 59
Spring Units
54-152Stagecraft11
54-158Basic PTM 26
54-170Studiocraft 28
54-172Basic Design 26
54-176Conservatory Hour1
79-104Global Histories9
54-177Foundations of Drama I
OR Non-Drama Elective
6
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
 53-56
Sophomore Year
Fall Units
54-229Valiant Hindenburg9
54-231Design for the Stage9
54-271Technical Management6
54-249Stagecraft II14
54-281Foundations of Drama II
(or HSS Approved Course) **
6
54-284Fundamentals of Directing6
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
 56-59
Spring - ALL PTM Units
54-361Production PreparationVar.
54-272Scenic Fabrication and Installation6
54-330Introduction to Stage Management6
54-334Production Resource Management6
54-281Foundations of Drama II
OR approved HSS course
6
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
xx-xxxDirected Drama Elective
Spring - PTM TECHNICAL DIRECTION Units
54-264Welding4
54-265Advanced Fabrication 16
Spring - PTM STAGE & PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT (SPM) Units
54-666Production Audio6
Junior Year
Fall - ALL PTM Units
54-273Technical Direction I6
54-333Production Personnel Management6
54-361Production PreparationVar.
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism ***6
xx-xxxDirected Drama Elective3-12
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
Fall - PTM TECHNICAL DIRECTION Units
54-353Structural Design I ~9
or 54-366 Physics of Stage Machinery
54-295Advanced Fabrication 26
Fall - PTM SPM Units
54-266Stage Management: Cue Lab3
54-274Seminar in Costume Management4
54-339Stage Management Seminar3
54-380Music Reading for Production3
Spring - ALL PTM Units
54-361Production PreparationVar.
54-468Theater Management offered every other year3-6
or 54-355 30 Hour OSHA
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism ***6
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
xx-xxxDirected Drama Elective
Spring - PTM TECHNICAL DIRECTION Units
54-354Structural Design II ~9
or 54-365 Machine Design I
54-378Technical Direction II6
Spring - PTM SPM Units
54-339Stage Management Seminar3
54-453Production Management Workshop3
54-454Advanced Topics in Stage Management I- Mini 33
54-454Advanced Topics in Stage Management I- Mini 43
54-368Lighting Management I4
Senior Year
Fall - ALL PTM Units
54-361Production PreparationVar.
54-464PTM Professional Practice3
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism ***6
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
Fall - PTM TECHNICAL DIRECTION Units
54-477Technical Direction III6
54-353Structural Design I ~9
or 54-366 Physics of Stage Machinery
xx-xxxDirected Elective
Fall - PTM SPM Units
54-339Stage Management Seminar3
54-453Production Management Workshop3
54-455Production Data Manipulation6
54-277Negotiation and Conflict Management3
Spring - ALL PTM Units
54-361Production PreparationVar.
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism ***6
54-35530 Hour OSHA offered every other year6
or 54-468 Theater Management
xx-xxxNon-Drama Elective6-9
Spring - PTM TECHNICAL DIRECTION Units
54-354Structural Design II9
or 54-365 Machine Design I
54-376Entertainment Rigging3
54-480Technical Direction IV6
Spring - PTM SPM Units
54-456Production Management Workshop3
54-339Stage Management Seminar3
54-475Advanced Topics in Stage Management II- Mini 33
54-475Advanced Topics in Stage Management II- Mini 43
54-360Leadership Workshop: Ethics & Innovation6
xx-xxxDirected Drama Elective
NON-DRAMA ELECTIVES:
PTM students take a minimum of seven Non-Drama Electives, 6-9 units each.
SPM Students must complete 4 Directed Drama Electives.

Notes:

*

Foundations of Drama I will be taken only one semester in the freshman year. Half of the freshmen PTM students will take it in the fall, the rest will take it in the spring.  PTM students take a Non-Drama Elective in the semester they are not taking Foundations of Drama I.

**

Foundations of Drama II will be taken only one semester in the sophomore year. Sophomore PTM students will be required to take an approved Humanities and Social Sciences (H&SS) elective in the Deitrich College during the semester they are not taking Foundations of Drama II. This course counts as one of the required seven Non-Drama Electives.

***

All PTM students are required to complete Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism. It may be taken at any time after Foundations II has been completed.

~

Classes offered in alternating years.

Dramaturgy Option

Freshman Year
Fall Units
54-109Dramaturgy 1: Approaches to Text9
54-121Directing I: Sources9
54-175Conservatory Hour1
54-177Foundations of Drama I6
54-200Dramaturgy Forum1
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
82-xxxForeign Language *9-12
79-104Global Histories9
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
 56-59
Spring Units
54-176Conservatory Hour1
54-159Production Practicum6
54-184Dramaturgy 2: Introduction to Production Dramaturgy9
or 54-109 Dramaturgy 1: Approaches to Text
82-xxxModern Language *9-12
54-281Foundations of Drama II6
xx-xxxDirected Elective6-9
xx-xxxNon-Dramaturgy Elective (54-122 Directing I recommended)6-9
54-117Design Collaboration Project2
 45-54
Sophomore Year
Fall Units
54-256Dramaturgy 3: New Play Dramaturgy9
54-299Dramaturgy Production:Assistant9
or 54-387 Dramaturgy : Production I
54-200Dramaturgy Forum1
54-245History of Clothing 1Var.
76-xxxDirected English theory course9
xx-xxxDirected Elective9
xx-xxxNon-Dramaturgy Elective6-9
82-xxxModern Language, if needed *9-12
 51-57
Spring Units
54-xxxDramaturgy 5/6 **9
54-299Dramaturgy Production:Assistant9
or 54-387 Dramaturgy : Production I
54-300Dramaturgy Research HoursVar.
54-240History of Architecture and Decor 2: Renaissance to the 21st Century
(in not 54-239 in fall)
Var.
54-522Plays and Pitches3
54-200Dramaturgy Forum1
54-209Lab Review Prep for Dramaturgs and Directors6
54-468Theater Management
(or 97-703 in Senior year)
6
xx-xxxDirected Elective9
xx-xxxNon-Dramaturgy Elective6-9
82-xxxForeign Language, if needed *9-12
 56-62
Junior Year
Fall Units
54-247Dramaturgy 4: In Company9
54-487Dramaturgy: Production II12
54-200Dramaturgy Forum1
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism ***6
54-463Dramaturgy Research Hours6
xx-xxxDirected Elective9
xx-xxxNon-Dramaturgy Elective6-9
 49-52
Spring Units
54-xxxDramaturgy 5/6 or 54-254 New Play Collaboration9
54-487Dramaturgy: Production II12
54-xxxIntro to Design (field of choice)6
54-300Dramaturgy Research Hours6
54-200Dramaturgy Forum1
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism ***6
xx-xxxDirected Elective9
xx-xxxDirected Elective9
xx-xxxNon-Dramaturgy Elective6-9
 64-67
Senior Year
Fall Units
54-247Dramaturgy 4: In Company
(in needed)
9
54-487Dramaturgy: Production II12
or 54-585 Dramaturgy Capstone Thesis
54-200Dramaturgy Forum1
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism ***6
54-489Dramaturgy: Internship ~9
54-300Dramaturgy Research Hours6
xx-xxxDirected Elective9
xx-xxxNon-Dramaturgy Elective6-9
54-449Dramaturgy Professional Prep 13
 61-64
Spring Units
54-xxxDramaturgy 5/6 OR 54-254 **9
54-200Dramaturgy Forum1
54-381Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism ***6
54-587Dramaturgy Production III
(in not in fall)
12
xx-xxxDirected Elective9
xx-xxxNon-Dramaturgy Elective6-9
54-446Professional Preparation 24
93-703Arts Enterprises
 47-50
DIRECTED ELECTIVES: ENGLISH Units
Dramaturgy students take 7 English courses (one theory course, four 200-300 level, two 400-level)54
Sample Recommended English Electives:
76-245Shakespeare: Tragedies and Histories9
76-247Shakespeare: Comedies and Romances9
76-330Medieval Literature9
76-33520th and 21st Century American Fiction9
76-431Chaucer9
76-432Advanced Seminar in African American Studies9
76-438The Wire: Crime, Realism, and Long-Form TV9
DIRECTED ELECTIVES: HISTORY Units
Dramaturgy students take at least 3 History courses (two 200-level and one 300-level). One course must focus on history pre-1900, and one must focus on African, Asian, Latin American, or Caribbean studies.27
DIRECTED ELECTIVES: EUROPEAN STUDIES Units
Dramaturgy students take one European Studies course (cannot be an English course, but can be a History course)9
DIRECTED ELECTIVES: FOREIGN LANGUAGE Units
Dramaturgy students take at least one Foreign Language course at the 200-level or above.12
DIRECTED ELECTIVES: DRAMA Units
Dramaturgy students take at least ONE of the following Drama courses:
54-101Acting I10
54-187Introduction to Playwriting9
54-330Introduction to Stage Management6
NON-DRAMATURGY ELECTIVES:
Dramaturgy students take a minimum of seven Non-Dramaturgy Electives, 6-9 units each.

Notes:

*

Dramaturgy students starting a modern language at the 100-level should begin in the fall of freshman year.

**

Dramaturgy 4, 5, 6 and New Play Collaboration are all required courses and may be taken in any order in the sophomore, junior, and senior year.

***

Dramaturgy students are required to take a total of 18 units of Special Topics in Drama: History, Literature and Criticism during their junior and senior year.

~

Dramaturgy Internship may be completed in the summer, fall, or spring semester of junior senior year.

Faculty

WENDY ARONS, Professor, Dramatic Literature – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.
NATALIE BAKER-SHIRER, Associate Professor, Voice & Speech – M.F.A., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.
CLAUDIA BENACK, Associate Teaching Professor, Music Theatre – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
DICK BLOCK, Teaching Professor, Design – M.F.A., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.
DAVID BOEVERS, Associate Professor, Production Technology and Management – M.F.A., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
C. TODD BROWN, Assistant Teaching Professor, Lighting – B.A., Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.
JAMES CATON, Associate Teaching Professor, Dance Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.
JUDITH CONTE, Teaching Professor, Dance – B.F.A., University of Wisconsin/ Milwaukee; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.
TOME COUSIN, Associate Professor, Dance Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.
THOMAS DOUGLAS, Teaching Professor, Voice – M.M., Duquesne University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.
JANET MADELLE FEINDEL, Professor, Voice/Alexander – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.
KYLE HADEN, Assistant Professor, Acting – MFA, Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.
ROB HANDEL, Associate Professor, Dramatic Writing – M.F.A., Brown University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.
HUGH HANSON, Associate Teaching Professor, Costume Production – M.F.A., University of Hawaii at Manoa; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.
JED ALLEN HARRIS, Associate Teaching Professor, Directing – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.
KEVIN HINES, Associate Teaching Professor, Production Technology & Management – M.F.A., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.
GARY KLINE, Teaching Professor, Voice – B.F.A., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.
GREGORY LEHANE, Professor, Directing – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.
CINDY LIMAURO, Professor, Lighting Design – M.F.A., Florida State; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.
GARY LOGAN, Associate Professor, Voice & Dialects – MFA, American Conservatory Theater; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.
BARBARA MACKENZIE-WOOD, Raymond W. Smith Professor, Acting – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.
CADEN MANSON, Associate Professor, Directing – B.A., University of Texas, Austin; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.
MOLLY MCCARTER, Assistant Teaching Professor, Stage Management – M.F.A., Yale School of Drama; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.
ANTHONY MCKAY, Associate Professor, Acting – B.F.A., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.
CATHERINE MOORE, Associate Teaching Professor, Movement – M.F.A., University of Cincinnati, College-Conservatory of Music; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
ANNE MUNDELL, Associate Professor, Design – M.F.A., Brandeis University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.
SARAH PICKETT, Assistant Professor, Sound Design – M.F.A., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.
JOE PINO, Associate Professor, Sound Design – M.F.A., University of Virginia; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.
MEGAN RIVAS, Associate Professor, Dramaturgy – M.F.A., University at Austin, Texas; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.
BRIAN RUSSMAN, Associate Teaching Professor, Costume Production – M.F.A., Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.
TINA SHACKLEFORD, Associate Teaching Professor – M.F.A., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.
LARRY SHEA, Associate Professor, Video and Media Design – M.F.A., Massachusetts College of Art; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.
NARELLE SISSONS, Associate Professor, Design – M.A., Central/St Martins and The Royal College of Art in London, UK; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.
ANDREW SMITH, Assistant Professor, Acting – M.F.A., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.
ROBERT THOMSON, Associate Professor, Lighting Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.
SUSAN TSU, Bessie F. Anathan Professor, Costume Design – M.F.A.,Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
DON WADSWORTH, Professor, Voice & Speech – M.F.A., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.
KAF WARMAN, Associate Professor, Movement – M.F.A., Goddard College, Ecole; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.

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Faculty

WENDY ARONS, Professor, Dramatic Literature – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.
NATALIE BAKER-SHIRER, Associate Professor, Voice & Speech – M.F.A., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.
CLAUDIA BENACK, Associate Teaching Professor, Music Theatre – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.
DICK BLOCK, Teaching Professor, Design – M.F.A., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.
DAVID BOEVERS, Associate Professor, Production Technology and Management – M.F.A., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
C. TODD BROWN, Assistant Teaching Professor, Lighting – B.A., Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.
JAMES CATON, Associate Teaching Professor, Dance Carnegie Mellon, 1988–.
JUDITH CONTE, Teaching Professor, Dance – B.F.A., University of Wisconsin/ Milwaukee; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.
TOME COUSIN, Associate Professor, Dance Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.
THOMAS DOUGLAS, Teaching Professor, Voice – M.M., Duquesne University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.
JANET MADELLE FEINDEL, Professor, Voice/Alexander – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.
KYLE HADEN, Assistant Professor, Acting – MFA, Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.
ROB HANDEL, Associate Professor, Dramatic Writing – M.F.A., Brown University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.
HUGH HANSON, Associate Teaching Professor, Costume Production – M.F.A., University of Hawaii at Manoa; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.
JED ALLEN HARRIS, Associate Teaching Professor, Directing – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.
KEVIN HINES, Associate Teaching Professor, Production Technology & Management – M.F.A., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.
GARY KLINE, Teaching Professor, Voice – B.F.A., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.
GREGORY LEHANE, Professor, Directing – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.
CINDY LIMAURO, Professor, Lighting Design – M.F.A., Florida State; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.
GARY LOGAN, Associate Professor, Voice & Dialects – MFA, American Conservatory Theater; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.
BARBARA MACKENZIE-WOOD, Raymond W. Smith Professor, Acting – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.
CADEN MANSON, Associate Professor, Directing – B.A., University of Texas, Austin; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.
MOLLY MCCARTER, Assistant Teaching Professor, Stage Management – M.F.A., Yale School of Drama; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.
ANTHONY MCKAY, Associate Professor, Acting – B.F.A., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.
CATHERINE MOORE, Associate Teaching Professor, Movement – M.F.A., University of Cincinnati, College-Conservatory of Music; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
ANNE MUNDELL, Associate Professor, Design – M.F.A., Brandeis University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.
SARAH PICKETT, Assistant Professor, Sound Design – M.F.A., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.
JOE PINO, Associate Professor, Sound Design – M.F.A., University of Virginia; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.
MEGAN RIVAS, Associate Professor, Dramaturgy – M.F.A., University at Austin, Texas; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.
BRIAN RUSSMAN, Associate Teaching Professor, Costume Production – M.F.A., Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.
TINA SHACKLEFORD, Associate Teaching Professor – M.F.A., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.
LARRY SHEA, Associate Professor, Video and Media Design – M.F.A., Massachusetts College of Art; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.
NARELLE SISSONS, Associate Professor, Design – M.A., Central/St Martins and The Royal College of Art in London, UK; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.
ANDREW SMITH, Assistant Professor, Acting – M.F.A., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.
ROBERT THOMSON, Associate Professor, Lighting Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.
SUSAN TSU, Bessie F. Anathan Professor, Costume Design – M.F.A.,Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.
DON WADSWORTH, Professor, Voice & Speech – M.F.A., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.
KAF WARMAN, Associate Professor, Movement – M.F.A., Goddard College, Ecole; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.