Terry Irwin, Head
Office: Margaret Morrison Carnegie Hall 110
http://design.cmu.edu

Design at Carnegie Mellon

Design is the thoughtful activity that humanizes our environment through visual communication and the shaping of products that help us in our daily lives. Whether in magazines and books, posters and exhibitions, video and film, human-computer interactions, or any of the myriad of everyday products such as furniture, consumer goods, vehicles, or medical equipment, designers play an important role in shaping the form and content of our experience.

Designers are concerned with aesthetics, but they are equally concerned with serving people. This requires more than skill in the fine arts. It also requires knowledge about the needs, desires, expectations, and capabilities of human beings. It requires skills of observation and interpretation that help us understand the people that we want to serve. More than this, however, designers must also understand the technological issues that stand behind effective products. They must understand the materials, tools, and production processes of the modern world. An education in design is an education for the mind as well as the eye and hand.

The undergraduate program enables students to develop specialized skills in the areas of Product (Industrial) Design, Communication (Graphic) Design and Environments (design for physical and digital environments), while providing them with a solid foundation in design studies. Students study systems thinking; the ability to see and solve problems at multiple levels of scale, and situate their work within larger social and environmental contexts.

The over-arching theme of the curricula is design for interactions, which acknowledges that ‘ecologies’ of products and communications often come together within complex physical and digital environments. Coursework balances making and theory with the integration of new, emergent technologies. Students are encouraged to explore the scope of design as well as the responsibility and ethics involved in the design of interactions between people, the built world, and the environment.

The curriculum is one that provides students with the ability to customize their degree: they may choose to specialize in one of three areas offered (Products, Communications, Environments), but also have the option of combining any two, to create a unique, interdisciplinary design degree.

The undergraduate curriculum also introduces students to three important areas of design focus: design for service, design for social innovation and transition design. These represent both new and established design approaches to framing and solving problems. In their senior year, students bring their disciplinary specialty (communications, products or environments) to projects that are situated within the areas of design for service and/or design for social innovation.

The School offers a Bachelor of Design with tracks in Communications, Products, or Environments.

Communications

The ability to communicate and shape meaning is one of the most powerful and ubiquitous forms of design in today’s world. Students learn to design effective communications across a wide variety of media that always exist within complex webs of interactions between people, products, and environments. Areas of study include narrative and storytelling, information design, and a variety of analog and digital visualization techniques. Students develop the ability to identify specific audiences and communicate to them through effective visual, verbal and aural communications that educate, inform and delight. 

They study the dynamic and ‘emergent’ characteristics of communications in a globally networked society where technologies and modes of individual and mass communication are constantly changing. Students learn systems thinking and engage in an iterative, multi-disciplinary and collaborative design process that involves research, observation, prototyping and rigorous evaluation. Students develop the ability to identify and communicate to specific audiences through effective visual and verbal communications that educate, inform, delight and invite participation.

Products

Students learn to design products and their interactions within the context of human needs and they develop a deep understanding of the ways in which products shape behavior. Our curriculum acknowledges that no product exists in isolation—it is always part of a larger system comprised of people, communications and environments. Within the context of design for service, products exist as ‘touchpoints’ in a service ecology. For this reason, students learn systems thinking and engage in an iterative, multi-disciplinary and collaborative design process that involves research, observation, modeling/prototyping and rigorous evaluation. 

Students are introduced to current production and manufacturing processes as well as sustainable approaches, such as cradle-to-cradle, lifecycle analysis and the use of new, more environmentally friendly materials. The School has a well-equipped analog and digital prototyping facility where students work with traditional materials such as wood and metal and learn to design and prototype using CAD software and 3D digital printers.

Environments

Students learn to design for complex environments that exist in the digital, physical and multi-modal realms. Most of the products and communications we interact with are situated within complex physical spaces (our homes, classrooms, places of business, shopping malls, even amusement parks). We also interact with complex online environments such as large websites, social networking and virtual reality environments. And increasingly we interact in ‘smart’ physical spaces with multi-modal communications in a combination of the analog and the digital. 

In our curriculum, environments are seen as integrated and dynamic systems that require the design of interactions at multiple levels of scale. Students acquire a diverse set of skills that includes a deep understanding of spatial relationships, designing with and for emerging, multi-media technologies and an understanding of the cognitive challenges presented by multi-modal spaces. 

Students who focus on the design of environments delve deep into systems thinking and systems dynamics and spend time learning to collaborate and lead within multi-disciplinary teams (solving large problems involving complex spaces almost always involves teams of people from different disciplines).

Design Minor Program

The School also offers a minor in Design for well-qualified students. Further information on the minor program is provided earlier in the catalog.

The Design Curriculum

Minimum units required for Bachelor of Design360

The design curriculum is for students who are interested in full-time undergraduate study leading to entry-level professional employment or advanced graduate study in the areas of Communication Design, Product Design, or Design for Environments.  The first year is a period of discovery, where students explore studio projects and supporting courses in the ideas and methods of design practice as well as courses in design studies. The second and third years are a period of concentration and development primarily within the student's area(s) of specialization. The fourth year is a period of integration and advanced study, with studio projects involving teams of students from all areas of design. There are studio courses throughout all four years, supported by departmental electives in the ideas and methods of design practice and other courses in the history, theory, and criticism of design. In addition, the School also requires all students to take a substantial number of general education courses offered by other departments throughout the university. General education is an essential part of the education of a professional designer.

Foundation Year

In their freshmen year, students are introduced to all three areas of design specialty: Product (Industrial), Communication (Graphic) and digital and physical Environments. Here, they explore these unique and complementary areas of design and gain a wide range of skill sets such as systems thinking, iterative process, collaboration and visualization, and work in both two and three dimensional materials as well as digital media. 

At the end of their freshman year, students are given the opportunity to begin to focus their interests in two of three design areas (products/communications/environments) and will eventually decide upon a single area of focus or a dual path of study.

This is the first-year curriculum for all design students.

First Year

Fall
Studio Units
51-101Studio: Survey of Design9
51-103Design Workshop I3
Ideas and Methods Units
51-121Visualizing9
Design Studies Units
51-171Placing9
General Education Units
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
85-102Introduction to Psychology9
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
Spring
Studio Units
51-102Design Lab9
51-104Design Workshop II3
Ideas and Methods Units
51-122Collaborative Visualizing9
51-132Introduction to Photo Design
1st mini
4.5
51-134Photo Design II
2nd mini
4.5
Design Studies Units
51-172Systems9
General Education Units
79-104Global Histories9

Second Year

Following the first-year program, students select two out of three areas of interest: Products[P], Communications[C], Environments[E]. In the fourth semester students select one of the two areas to study more deeply. Students investigate the relationships people form with designed artifacts and the roles that physical, visual, and digital forms play in our lives. They apply what they learn to the design of products, communications, and environments that facilitate interactions. Students are also required to take general education courses to gain a broad vision of many disciplines and fields of knowledge that are relevant to design.

Second Year

Fall
Studio Units
51-225Communications Studio I: Understanding Form & Context
(Pick two)
4.5, 4.5
or 51-245 Products Studio I: Understanding Form & Context
or 51-265 Environments Studio I: Understanding Form & Context
Ideas and Methods Units
51-227Prototyping Lab I: Communications
(Pick two corresponding labs)
4.5, 4.5
or 51-247 Prototyping Lab I: Products
or 51-267 Prototyping Lab I: Environments
51-2xxDesign Selective (choose from list)9
Design Studies Units
51-271How People Work9
General Education Units
xx-xxxAcademic Elective9
Spring
Studio Units
51-228Communications Studio II: Designing Communications for Interactions9
or 51-248 Products Studio II: Designing Products for Interactions
or 51-268 Environments Studio II: Designing Environments for Interaction
Ideas and Methods Units
51-208Research Methods4.5
51-239Prototyping Lab II: Communications9
or 51-249 Prototyping Lab II: Products
or 51-269 Prototyping Lab II: Environments
Design Studies Units
51-272Cultures4.5
General Education Units
xx-xxxAcademic Elective9

Third Year

In the fifth and sixth semesters, students may choose to continue their fourth semester area of focus, or they may choose to study their second area of study from the third semester. Students study how design functions at various levels of scale and degrees of complexity situated in specific contexts. They design products, communications, and environments that function as cohesive systems that live within the built and social worlds.

Third Year

Fall
Studio Units
51-323Communications Studio III: Designing for Complex Communication Systems9
or 51-343 Products Studio III: Designing for Complex Products Systems
or 51-363 Environments Studio III: Designing for Complex Environment Systems
Ideas and Methods (Select one Design Elective) Units
51-321Photographic Narrative9
51-231Calligraphy I9
51-257Introduction to Computing for Creative Practices10
51-349Visual Notation/Journaling9
51-322Advanced Digital Imaging4.5
51-335Mapping and Diagraming9
51-359Tools for UX Design9
51-355Experimental Sketching4.5
51-399Junior Independent StudyVar.
Design Studies Units
51-371Futures9
General Education Units
xx-xxxAcademic Elective9
xx-xxxFree Elective9

Spring
Studio Units
51-330Communications Studio IV: Designing Communications for Social Systems9
or 51-350 Products Studio IV: Designing Products for Social Systems
or 51-360 Environments Studio IV: Designing Environments for Social Systems
Ideas and Methods (Select one Design Elective) Units
51-322Advanced Digital Imaging4.5
51-328Advanced Web Design9
51-334Photography, Community & Change9
51-344Advanced Digital Prototyping6
51-346Production Prototyping6
51-376Semantics & Aesthetics4.5
51-380Experiential Media Design9
51-388Sharing Economies9
Design Studies Units
51-372Persuasion9
General Education Units
xx-xxxAcademic Elective9
xx-xxxFree Elective9

 

Fourth Year

In the senior year, students work to identify their next steps in professional practice, entrepreneurship, or in academia. They apply their design skills and knowledge to client-based and/or self-defined projects that focus on the design of services or social innovation.

The fall semester features the Design Research Studio, a semester-long project where students work in teams applying skill and knowledge learned in Products, Communications, and/or Environments.  In the spring the Capstone Project challenges students to work independently on a semester-long project, deepening their understanding of service or social innovation design principles.

Fourth Year

Fall
Studio Units
51-481Design Research Studio12
Ideas and Methods (Select one Design Elective) Units
51-379Information+Interaction+Perception9
51-423Pieces 2.0: Social Innovation: Desis Lab9
51-441Foundation of BME Design6
51-451Fundamentals of Joinery & Furniture Design
(I)
9
51-455DeXign the Future: Human Centered Innovation for Exponential Times9
51-499Senior Independent StudyVar.
General Education Units
xx-xxxAcademic Elective9
xx-xxxFree Elective9
xx-xxxFree Elective9
Spring 
Studio Units
51-480Design Capstone Project: Service Design4.5
or 51-490 Design Capstone Project: Social Innovation
 4.5
Ideas and Methods (Select one Design Elective) Units
51-374Understanding Perception through Design9
51-427Advanced Book Arts Workshop9
51-434Experimental Form9
51-442BME Design Project9
51-452Furniture Design II
(II)
9
51-478Speculative Critical Design9
51-499Senior Independent StudyVar.
General Education Units
xx-xxxAcademic Elective9
xx-xxxFree Elective9
 

Other Requirements

General education courses should be selected from other departments throughout the university. Students are strongly advised to select a balanced set of general education electives-in addition to Interpretation and Argument, Global Histories and Introduction to Psychology - from three broad areas of study: arts and humanities, social and behavioral sciences, and natural sciences and engineering, including mathematics. While free electives may include studio courses in other departments, academic electives are non-studio (lecture) courses in other departments. Specific recommendations (and general requirements) for electives in all of these areas are available from advisors in the School of Design. The School places strong emphasis on the value of general education for personal growth as well as professional development. General education electives allow a student to obtain a minor in another department or program, such as business, human-computer interaction, IDEATE, engineering, professional and technical writing, or architecture.

Students may enroll for no more than 18 units of independent study courses, and no more than one independent study per semester. A minimum 3.0 GPA is required for independent study. Independent study is permitted only in the third and fourth years of the program. Proposals for independent study courses must be developed jointly by the student and a faculty advisor. Guidelines are available from the School.

A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required to maintain Professional Program status. Grades lower than “C” in required Design courses will result in academic probation, suspension, or drop from the School of Design.

Full-time students are required to enroll for a minimum of 36 units per semester, with 45 units required for expected degree progress (typically five courses per semester). The minimum number of units required for graduation in Design is 360.

Academic Standards

The design curriculum adheres closely to the fundamental professional entry-level standards established by the two leading national design organizations: the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) and the Industrial Designers Society of America (IDSA).

Applications 

The School of Design accepts applications from students who are completing secondary education or who wish to transfer from within Carnegie Mellon University. The School also accepts applications from students who wish to transfer from other institutions. Students applying for the program are asked to either 1) submit a portfolio or 2) complete a design project (available as a PDF on the Design web site) as evidence of design ability. This is considered in balance with evidence of academic ability, based on secondary school grades, SAT scores, class rank, and letters of recommendation. The School also accepts applications for the design minors program for a limited number of spaces. Details are available from the design office.

Course Descriptions

Note on Course Numbers

Each Carnegie Mellon course number begins with a two-digit prefix which designates the department offering the course (76-xxx courses are offered by the Department of English, etc.). Although each department maintains its own course numbering practices, typically the first digit after the prefix indicates the class level: xx-1xx courses are freshmen-level, xx-2xx courses are sophomore level, etc. xx-6xx courses may be either undergraduate senior-level or graduate-level, depending on the department. xx-7xx courses and higher are graduate-level. Please consult the Schedule of Classes each semester for course offerings and for any necessary pre-requisites or co-requisites.

51-101 Studio: Survey of Design
Fall: 9 units
Students will conduct activities that will help them notice design in the world, investigate how it works, and describe their thinking about design, through photography, video capture, sketching, note-taking and modeling. They will work through projects in various ways as a means of 'testing-out' and reflecting on command design approaches. This course is for undergraduate design majors only.
51-102 Design Lab
Spring: 9 units
Introduce concepts and methods to familiarize students with a range of analog and digital modes of working across products, communications, and environments. Students will use desktop modeling and comping methods to familiarize them with a range of basic materials to build confidence in using and manipulating material to represent ideas. This course is for freshman Design majors only.
Prerequisite: 51-101
51-103 Design Workshop I
Fall: 3 units
Design Workshop is a special course created for first year design students and serves as a supplement to primary studio and elective courses. In this course, students will explore design activities related to their core studio courses, receive special skills training, engage with guest lecturers, and attend field trips. Each class meets once per week.
51-104 Design Workshop II
Spring: 3 units
A recitation style course that is conducted in service of the primary design courses during the semester to provide further instruction or engage in activities that support themes and issues related to these other courses. May include work days for students to spend in studio with teaching assistants.
51-121 Visualizing
Fall: 9 units
This course introduces basic drawing and sketching techniques including figure-ground translation, 2 pt perspective construction, storyboarding for explanation, diagramming for clarification, field notation for recording through guided exercises, demonstrations, and short projects.
51-122 Collaborative Visualizing
Spring: 9 units
This course introduces frameworks of notational, exploratory and explanatory sketching using collaborative methods and exercises to cooperatively communicate design ideas. This course is for undergraduate design majors only.
Prerequisite: 51-121
51-132 Introduction to Photo Design
Spring: 4.5 units
Using a digital camera, students learn how to extend their 'seeing' with the camera, both in the world and in a shooting studio. Through shooting assignments student will understand how to: deconstruct image meaning and aesthetical choices, construction of photographic meaning and aesthetics, an understanding of color and how color delivers meaning, how a photographic studio works, proper digital photographic workflow and contemporary trends in photography. Intended for Design Majors, or permission of the instructor.
Prerequisite: 51-101
51-134 Photo Design II
Spring: 4.5 units
A continuation of Introduction to Photo Design Prerequites: Introduction to Photo Design; 51-132
51-171 Placing
Fall: 9 units
This course will explore the context in which students study design. Using primarily photography, students compare where they are from to the bioregion of the Ohio Valley of Western Pennsylvania and the history of the steel town, Pittsburgh. Students also learn about the modern Western emergence of design as a profession and discipline, and map the edges of current design practice by interacting with local professionals.
51-172 Systems
Spring: 9 units
Explore how to understand complex phenomena by creating models of the interrelations between components. Students learn soft systems diagramming as well as the systems thinking associated with ecologies, integrative science and sociotechnical regimes. Students also learn how to see design as a way of making interventions into a leverage point in a system in order to transform how it functions elsewhere in the system.
51-173 Human Experience in Design
Intermittent: 9 units
This course introduces the central themes of design and the design professions, and the human centered focus in all aspects of design thinking and practice. We will begin by exploring the nature of having an experience, followed by the broad philosophy of design in relationship to other areas of human activity, the sciences and the arts. We will explore design through its orders of activity: first in communication and second the creation of physical objects. But design has a far greater reach into the intangible and more complex areas of human activity: interaction, systems, environments, and culture. These are the topics of inquiry for design and, unlike what the patchwork of professions would have you believe, are not fixed by boundaries. Design is enormously broad and something everybody participates in as we create the artificial world in which we live. Those who call themselves designers have greater power in shaping this world and for that reason we will end the course with a discussion of ethics. Non-Design majors are welcome.
51-201 CD Studio I: Communicating with Type
Fall: 9 units
As the first studio course in the communication design program, students explore fundamental principles of typography, where type is regarded as image, serving a range of communication goals. Projects allow students to explore form and meaning, hierarchy, legibility and readability, structure and composition, with and without images, in print and on screen. Learning to design across media, in static and dynamic formats, is critical for communication designers, as well as becoming proficient with software tools. The co-required 51-203 Computer Lab will focus on learning software relevant to projects being worked on in studio. While typography is a focused branch of communication design, this introduction to the subject opens a path for students to study all facets of communication in subsequent courses. Providing context to the subject, the course covers basic typography history, relevant typographers and their work, and technologies that have shaped typography. A guided visit to the Hunt Library's Rare Book Room provides added context. This course is for undergraduate Communication Design majors only, or permission of instructor for non-majors.
Prerequisite: 51-102
51-202 CD Studio II: Organizing Information
Spring: 9 units
In this course students participate in a range of exercises, projects, discussions, and readings that are geared towards deepening their understanding of communication design and improving their skills. Course activities require students to consider and propose ways to inform, convince, question, and engage their audiences by clarifying and organizing information. Students deconstruct existing pieces of communication design, studying how their composition, type and image usage, and hierarchy reflects the content being communicated and the order in which it is read. Working in print and digital media, students study the similarities and differences among mediums and explore methods for effectively communicating information in each area. Students analyze design examples from the perspective of the maker and the receiver(s). This facilitates discussions that focus on the role of the designer in the communication of information (Should a designer's voice be evident?) and the need for user-centered design solutions. This course is for undergraduate Communication Design majors only.
Prerequisite: 51-201
51-203 Communication Design Computer Lab
Fall: 3 units
This sophomore-level Communication Design lab introduces students to various software that designers use when creating communication pieces. Software is introduced in support of project work in 51201 CD Sudio 1, providing students with best practices that help them work efficiently and effectively. Software includes InDesign, Illustrator, and AfterEffects. CD majors only, or permission of the instructor.
51-208 Research Methods
Spring: 4.5 units
Learn how to select, conduct, and develop appropriate research methods for understanding and discovering contextual information and behaviors of human participants.
51-211 Generation of Form: Industrial Design I
Fall: 9 units
Generation of Form is the first studio for students in the industrial design program. Students explore product aesthetics and basic formal issues as they pertain to industrial design. This course integrates the principles of three dimensional design, drawing and prototyping as they apply to the generation of product form. Emphasis is placed on issues that dictate the form of products and their creation. Students develop basic prototyping, conceptual drawing, and presentation skills for the purpose of exploring, analyzing, refining and communicating design concepts. Required of ID students; lab fee. Due to space constraints, this course is only offered to undergraduate Industrial Design majors.
Prerequisite: 51-101
51-212 ID Studio II: Meaning of Form
Spring: 9 units
This studio course introduces students to the functional and expressive meaning of product form through creative exploration and decision-making in design. Functional product attributes include those that guide intuitive, safe, and comfortable use; expressive attributes include aesthetic, cultural, and contextual variables. Students are exposed to various methods of conceptual sketching, prototyping, and documentation to realize and communicate ideas in a process that anticipates human interpretation and response to design. Lab fee applies. This course is restricted to undergraduate Industrial Design majors only.
Prerequisite: 51-211
51-221 Color for Communications & Environments
Fall: 9 units
This course will explore the fundamentals of color through the implementation of various media as they apply to their use in communication and expression in design. While this course does not deal with color theory per se we will spend time on the causes and effects of color interaction, color contrasts, color harmonies and color strategies for the effective use of color in our visual design work. We will use both nature and man made constructs to discuss how color affects what we see and its effect on our visual world. Short exercises and longer- term projects will be the vehicles of our explorations. This course is for Sophomore Design Majors.
Prerequisite: 51-122
51-222 Decoding Place
Spring: 9 units
This course will explore ways to decode, see, think and interpret the visual language of 'place'. Through the intersection of found symbols, signs, images and color we will bring to light the function and purpose of our surroundings, and how they speak to natural and the built environment. During the course we will investigate the following question; How do we design visual systems which are understood by everyone, regardless of their language or culture but also work in harmony with natural systems? Students will work with traditional materials and tools as well as computers to understand the strengths and limitations of each, comparing their similarities and differences in the context of theoretical and applied projects. This course is for Communication Design majors only, or by permission of the instructor.
Prerequisites: 51-201 or 51-211
51-223 Color for Communications & Products
All Semesters: 9 units
This course will explore the fundamentals of color through the implementation of various media as they apply to their use in communication and expression in design. While this course does not deal with color theory per se we will spend time on the causes and effects of color interaction, color contrasts, color harmonies and color strategies for the effective use of color in our design work. We will use both nature and man made constructs to discuss how color affects what we see and its effect on our visual world. Short exercises and longer- term projects will be the vehicles of our explorations. This course is for Sophomore Design Majors.
51-224 CD: Web Design
Spring: 9 units
This class will introduce the basics of designing and building websites, the fundamentals of HTML5 and CSS3, and responsive design approaches to assist students in creating semantically sound web pages that can be viewed across a variety of platforms, devices and browsers. The class will help students understand the constraints and advantages of working with the web as compared to traditional print media. Students will also be exposed to content management systems and topics such as responsive web design, research, and information architecture. Upon completion, students will be capable of designing, creating, launching and managing their own web sites. Your own laptop is required, with the following software installed: Adobe CS 5 or later. This course is for Communication Design Majors only.
Prerequisite: 51-201
51-225 Communications Studio I: Understanding Form & Context
Fall: 4.5 units
Giving form to messages and information using type, color, and images will be the focus of this introductory studio in Communication Design. Understanding the connection between content, intent, and form will be the goal of every project and exercise. Principles of hierarchy, chunking, sequence, clarity, and visual voice will guide work for the screen and the printed page, in dynamic and static forms.
Prerequisite: 51-122
51-227 Prototyping Lab I: Communications
Fall: 4.5 units
Learn the basics of the CS suite, particularly InDesign (style sheets), Illustrator, and Photoshop; learn basics of HTML 5.0; the learning of software ideally will align with the activities conducted in the Communications Studio. This is a requirement for Design sophomores studying Communications.
51-228 Communications Studio II: Designing Communications for Interactions
Spring: 9 units
This design studio focuses on designing communications for interactions. Through projects that vary in scale and complexity, students explore ways of inciting interaction and providing feedback in print and digital mediums to recognize the dynamic attributes of communication design. Communication structuresboth traditional and emergentserve as the backbone of the course, as they provide opportunities for students to seek and discover patterns in communication design conventions and apply what they learn to their own work to illicit specific types of interaction. Course projects specifically emphasize the importance of narrative structures to communication design. They prompt students to sketch, diagram, and visually weave together layers of information as a means of moving audiences through a sequence of dense content. This process helps students investigate narrative structures as frameworks that shape interactions with communications and impact audience experiences. The course concludes with an introduction to systems design, where students explore designing for interactions across a set of communication pieces. Prerequisite course includes Communications Studio I.
Prerequisite: 51-225
51-229 Digital Photographic Imaging
Fall: 9 units
The objective of this course is to provide students with a practical, technical and theoretical foundation in digital imaging. The primary software for this course is Adobe Photoshop, with which students will explore construction, combination, manipulation, input, and output of image as a means of narrative creation. Through project critique and other discussion, we will also consider the aesthetic and political implications of the emergence of this and other new electronic imaging technologies.
51-231 Calligraphy I
All Semesters: 9 units
Working with pure unadorned Roman letterforms, this course introduces students to the theory and practice of hand-generated letters, employing a variety of mark-making tools. This course provides an in-depth understanding of the basic principles and techniques of the art of formal writing. Rhythm, texture and composition are achieved through routine, elementary exercises using geometric forms, demanding concentration and manual discipline with the development of hand-eye coordination. The function, use, and harmonious sequencing of letterforms is taught through weekly projects. Awareness of rhythm, texture and letterform structure is achieved through routine exercises. Drills, demonstrations, discussions, individual and class critiques are on-going. Additional related topics and activities introduced in class include books: binding and design. A brief introduction to the historical development of our Western alphabet is provided through film, slides, demonstrations, with discussion of twentieth-century type designs. Students also gain exposure to letter vocabulary, paleography, monoprints, words and punctuation, classical page design, publication design-past and present, and calligraphy's role in design today. Thinking with hands and eyes, the manual placement and spacing of letters practiced in this course awakens sensitivity and judgment in the designer.
51-232 Calligraphy II
All Semesters: 9 units
This course serves as a continuation and deeper investigation of topics explored in Calligraphy I, where students tackle advanced problems in calligraphy and lettering. The introduction of new hands is to be decided by the student and instructor. Prerequisites: 51231
Prerequisite: 51-231
51-236 Information Design
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This undergraduate IDEATE design course focuses on teaching a basic visual design process from start to finish. Students will work individually and in teams to gain proficiency in applying specific design methods to information design challenges at each stage of the design process.
51-239 Prototyping Lab II: Communications
Spring: 9 units
Program simple websites as a means of learning basic HTML 5.0 and CSS; prepare documents for digital and print production using Adobe InDesign, Illustrator, Acrobat
Prerequisite: 51-227
51-241 How People Work
Fall: 9 units
51241 How People Work: Human Factors (ID/CD Lab I) This course is a general introduction to the field of human-centered design and applied human factors. It centers on the understanding of physical, cognitive, and emotional human needs and desires, including methods employed to acquire this information and translate it into useful criteria for the design and evaluation of products. Lecture, discussion, lab exercises, and projects are employed. Required of all sophomore design students. Others admitted by permission of instructor only.
51-242 How Things Work: Mechanics and Electronics
Intermittent: 9 units
This course investigates the basic principles of mechanics and electronics. Through the combination of lectures, investigations, and lab experiments, students develop simplified representations of complex systems. The skills of freehand drawing, mechanical drawing and three-dimensional models are employed and developed during the project sequence. Instructor permission required for non-Design majors.
51-243 Prototyping
Fall: 4.5 units
A half-semester laboratory mini-course introducing a range of materials, methods, and workshop techniques by which designers prototype designs in three dimensions. Basic competence in shop techniques is established by bringing to realization a series of simple artifacts. Studio and model shop tools are required; lab fee. This course is for ID majors only.
51-245 Products Studio I: Understanding Form & Context
Fall: 4.5 units
Learn basic design processes for understanding the scope of the project, brainstorming, defining the problem, and how interactions aid in developing solutions in relation to a human and user centered activities.
51-246 Visual Communication Fundamentals
Spring: 4.5 units
Design elements are powerful tools for reaching your audience. The objective of this course is to help you understand how to use the fundamental visual tools of communication in your work, and to learn how to evaluate visual communication pieces you encounter in everyday life. Examples of design elements that we will explore are: type, color, format, images, text, pacing and sequencing. We will learn how to use these together to successfully communicate a portfolio of documented design work. This course is required for all ID sophomores.
Prerequisite: 51-211
51-247 Prototyping Lab I: Products
Fall: 4.5 units
Work in various 2D and 3D mediums to represent ideas and solutions; introduce students to digital fabrication methods and output; utilize Adobe CS suite - Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign to communicate 2D representations.
51-248 Products Studio II: Designing Products for Interactions
Spring: 9 units
Introduce student to 3D semantics, how form communicates meaning, and how to make meaningful objects through appropriate material choices and mechanical manipulation; utilize a range and combination of analog and digital tools for higher fidelity output.
Prerequisite: 51-245
51-249 Prototyping Lab II: Products
Spring: 9 units
Introduce students to high fidelity modeling techniques through a series of machines, processes, and or methods to simulate desired form, scale, and proportions
Prerequisite: 51-247
51-251 Digital Prototyping
Fall: 4.5 units
A half-semester laboratory mini-course introducing 3D modeling software. Each class meeting consists of an introduction to and demonstration of specific aspects and functions of SolidWorks software. At the end of each class session, work related to the covered topic(s) will be assigned for completion by the next class meeting. This course is a requirement for all ID majors. Instructor permission required for non-ID majors. Corequisites: 51-211
51-257 Introduction to Computing for Creative Practices
Intermittent: 10 units
This course is an introduction to Java programming for designers, architects, artists and other visual thinkers, using the popular "Processing" Java toolkit for interactive graphics. Intended for students with little or no prior programming experience, the course uses interaction and visualization as a gateway for learning the traditional programming constructs and the fundamental algorithms typically found in a first course in programming. Students will become familiar with essential programming concepts (types, variables, control, user input, arrays, files, and objects) through the development of interactive games, information visualizations, and computationally-generated forms. Because of limited space, only Design majors may take this course. Students following an IDEATE concentration or minor should register for 15-104.
51-261 Communication Design Fundamentals: Design for Interactions for Communications
Fall: 9 units
A one-semester course that introduces non-majors to the field of communication design. Through studio projects, lectures, and demonstrations, students become familiar with the visual and verbal language of communication designers, the design process, and the communicative value of word and image. Macintosh proficiency required. This course is required for HCI double majors and Design minors. Section W - Qatar campus only
51-262 Communication Design Fundamentals: Design for Interactions for Communications
Spring: 9 units
A one-semester course that introduces non-majors to the field of communication design. Through studio projects, lectures, and demonstrations, students become familiar with the visual and verbal language of communication designers, the design process, and the communicative value of word and image. Macintosh proficiency required.
51-264 Product Design Fundamentals: Design for Interactions for Products
Spring: 9 units
A one-semester course that introduces non-majors to product development from the product designer's point of view. Through studio projects, lectures, and discussions, students will gain experience in visualizing a product for mass production. Case histories and the analysis of existing products will supplement hands-on experience in developing product concepts. This course is required for all Design minors. This course replaces the course previously listed as Industrial Design Fundamentals.
51-265 Environments Studio I: Understanding Form & Context
Fall: 4.5 units
Learn the basic design processes for experience-driven multi-modal environments, making meaningful physical and virtual experiences through planning, structuring, and explaining/visualizing; utilize a range and combination of analog and digital tools for high fidelity output.
51-267 Prototyping Lab I: Environments
Fall: 4.5 units
Learn methods for designing interactions in environments through experiencing the space, low-fi prototyping, rapid making, 3D CAD software and video sketching. Express multi-modal aspects of integrated physical-digital-hybrid environments.
51-268 Environments Studio II: Designing Environments for Interaction
Spring: 9 units
Introduce students to the concept of resonant environments that provide meaningful physical and virtual experiences; utilize a range and combination of analog and digital tools for high fidelity output.
Prerequisite: 51-265
51-269 Prototyping Lab II: Environments
Spring: 9 units
Explore simple reactive and interactive programming as a means to support virtual and hybrid digital/physical environments.
Prerequisite: 51-267
51-271 How People Work
Fall: 9 units
Exposure to holistic/emotional, cognitive, and physical factors of people, as approached by designers and interpreted by user/audience, delivered through lectures, readings, and hands-on lab activities; apply principles in team project utilizing human centered field research and design response.
51-272 Cultures
Spring: 4.5 units
Explore the many often-unbridgeable differences between people. These differences may be not only ethnic, but also related to gender, age, class. The course will survey critical theories that are useful for warning of these kinds of differences. Studetns will also explore strategies for negotiating these differences, many of which require time and working at multiple levels.
51-301 CD III: Type, Form, Meaning and Context
Fall: 9 units
This course develops advanced skills in typography and communication design, including the study of type and motion. Students learn to conceptualize and visualize more complex bodies of information for a variety of communicative purposes. Projects encourage students to develop a deeper understanding of the expressive potential of type and image and to develop critical and creative thinking skills with which to assess the effectiveness of their own work and that of their peers. Course objectives are to encourage an active exchange of ideas and information which allow students to develop the ability to clearly articulate their ideas and thought processes in relation to their work. This leads to a more focused method for developing and expressing ideas effectively. Instructor permission required for non-CD majors. Prerequisites: 51202
Prerequisite: 51-202
51-302 CD Studio IV: Designing with Systems
Spring: 9 units
This course is the final studio in a sequence of communication design courses for Design majors. It builds on skills and knowledge acquired in the prior three studios. The course focuses on creating a system of designed pieces using large amounts of content, either self-generated or found, in print and digital platforms, at varying levels of scale. The differences and similarities between existing and emerging platforms of delivery provide students opportunities to investigate the future direction of communication design. Data-driven methods are utilized as a means of research and communication. Projects are situated in social contexts, where student study design systems using type, sound, and images. This course is required of Communication Design majors in the School of Design. Prerequisite courses include Type III, Type II, and Type I.
Prerequisite: 51-301
51-311 Product Design ID III
Fall: 9 units
Students participate in a range of exercises, projects, discussions, and readings that are geared towards deepening their understanding of product design. The activities they engage in will require them to understand and consider the user as the key motivator for new and intelligent concepts that address identified problems/needs. To assist them, systematic processes will be introduced (or built upon) to guide inquiry, ideation, conceptual development, and presentation of products that are useful, usable, desirable, and more feasible than their work to date.
Prerequisite: 51-212
51-312 Products in Systems: ID IV
Spring: 9 units
This course introduces the themes of product planning and the development of products within systems and as systems. The projects are broad in scope and require students to develop products that reflect an understanding of the entire development cycle. Tools and skills for the studio and model shop are required; lab fee. Instructor permission required for non-ID majors.
Prerequisite: 51-311
51-319 Digital Photography in the Real World
Intermittent: 4.5 units
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE REAL WORLD Photographers are active observers. They look until they see what they want others to see -then they compose and click the shutter. In this course students will walk streets with their cameras. They will learn how to use their cameras to better understand what they believe is important, beautiful, and/or intriguing in the world. They will also learn how to communicate their imagery to others through screen-based and print output. Assignments range from accurately describing reality, to showing aspects of life that should be improved, to making images for purely aesthetic reasons. There are two main goals to this course: learning the fundamentals of operating a digital camera and producing digital output; and, learning to become better 'seers' in the world. Students must own a camera but no prior photographic experience is necessary.
51-321 Photographic Narrative
Intermittent: 9 units
Most photographs tell stories. We see photographs in newspapers, magazines, snapshot albums, on the web, in books, and in posters. In these contexts photographs often work with words to convey meaning, whether they are shown with captions, news stories, or just with titles. Photographs can work without words, too, to create purely visual narratives. In this course, students will make a photo narrative and determine how it will be seen. Students may make photo books, for example, or decide that their images will be seen digitally on screen. While students are making photographs, we will explore the rich traditions of photographic story-telling that range from the world-oriented work of photo-journalist W. Eugene Smith to the documentarians such as Walker Evans, Nicholas Nixon, and Alec Soth. We will look at photographers, too, who construct fictional worlds, such as Duane Michals, Cindy Sherman, and Gregory Crewdson. As students make their own narratives, we will look at the interplay between words and photographic images; how images are paced and scaled to create rhythm; how photographs are sequenced to tell stories; and other formal elements involved in creating visual narratives. 12-15 students. Prerequisite-a college level photography course.
51-322 Advanced Digital Imaging
Intermittent: 4.5 units
Building on the technical skills and methods of communicating narrative learned in Digital Imaging Advanced Digital Imaging takes communication to the next level of resolution with particular concern in artifact creation. Students explore historical and groundbreaking means of content delivery.
51-323 Communications Studio III: Designing for Complex Communication Systems
Fall: 9 units
Gain a greater understanding of how to craft communications that resonate with specific people by researching topics/audiences/contexts, by developing/iterating/testing concepts, and by investigating deeply the nuances of typographic form/image/sequencing of interactions; learn how to craft graphic form to express ideas that are not dependent on the reading of words themselves; continue to develop communication systems
Prerequisite: 51-225
51-324 Basic 3D Prototyping
Spring: 4.5 units
A half-semester laboratory mini-course introducing a range of materials, methods, and workshop techniques by which designers prototype designs in three dimensions. Basic competence in shop techniques is established by bringing to realization a series of simple artifacts. Studio and model shop tools are required; lab fee. Instructor permission required for non-CD majors.
51-326 Photography & Family
Intermittent: 9 units
Picturing Families at Sojourner's House In this course we will partner with Sojourner's House to tell photo-based stories of the residents. Sojourner's House (SH), located in East Liberty, is a home for women and families who have faced obstacles of addiction and homelessness. Those at SH have lived through hard times. The women, some of whom are mothers, are now 'clean and sober' but before they came to SH, they were addicts who lived strained lives. As a class we will be working with women and families who now are creating positive change in their lives through Sojourner's House supportive environment. Students, working in pairs, will team with individuals or families. Through weekly sessions, students will explore how the camera can be used to tell a range of different stories, which may range from a traditional photo documentary, to a narrative that is 'directed' by a student with photographs made by Sojourner's House residents. Students may work with children to show their day-to-day life; they may work with an individual woman to tell the story of her dreams; or they may choose to work with staff at Sojourner's House to explore why someone goes into this line of work, to name a range of examples. Students will learn how to sensitively work with people who have experienced extreme difficulty while they are learning about addiction through readings and first hand accounts. While they are getting to know their subjects, students will explore the various ways to create an in-depth photo narrative. Most important, students will learn how the camera can be used to create connections and trust between people. Prerequisite: A college level photography course 12 students - sophomores to grads Familiarity with digital photography
51-327 Introduction to Web Design
Fall: 9 units
This class will introduce the basics of designing and building websites, the fundamentals of HTML5 and CSS3, and responsive design approaches to assist students in creating semantically sound web pages that can be viewed across a variety of platforms, devices and browsers. The class will help students understand the constraints and advantages of working with the web, with this course focused on technically pragmatic solutions for making websites. Students will also be exposed to content management systems and topics such as responsive web design, research, and information architecture. Upon completion, students will be capable of designing, creating, launching and managing their own web sites. Your own laptop is required, with the following software installed: Adobe CS6 or later, as well as other open-sourced software. This course is for Design Majors only, or by special permission of the instructor.
51-328 Advanced Web Design
Intermittent: 9 units
Advanced Web Design builds off of the fundamentals of Introduction to Web Design to make students more sophisticated web designers. Focusing on furthering skills beyond basic HTML5 and CSS3 and responsive design approaches, this course will also delve more deeply into web research and strategy; content development; hierarchy; design thinking; search engine optimization; and introduce students to the basics of PHP and javascript. Students will also gain a basic understanding of databases, work with content management systems, and design and develop for divergent platforms such as phones, tablets, and desktop computers. With an interdisciplinary, team-based approach, students will develop advanced websites while mastering HTML5 and CSS3, looking at what is viable for implementation today as well as looking forward at what technology is reasonable in the near future of web design. Your own laptop is required, with the following software installed: Adobe CS6 or later, as well as other open-sourced software. Students are required to be competent with building responsive web pages to take this course.
51-330 Communications Studio IV: Designing Communications for Social Systems
Spring: 9 units
As the final course in a sequence of studio courses for Communication Design majors, this one builds on everything learned previously. Apply skills/knowledge learned in researching, developing, evaluating, refining communications to multi-facetted communication challenges that warrant the design of multiple communication pieces that span diverse mediums (in print and digital platforms) and function as a system; learn how to design for futuring (parts of the system yet to be determined) and for co-design where parts of the system are made for growth through contributions from audiences. This course is required of Communication Design majors in the School of Design.
51-331 Advanced Calligraphy I
All Semesters: 9 units
This course serves a continuation of study in the discipline of calligraphy. (It meets at the same time as Calligraphy I.) Students may take one of two directions in the course. (1) Enlarging their repertoire of scripts, contemporary or traditional, for use in limited areas of work such as book or display work, or (2) Concentrating on more intensive problem solving using a limited repertoire of scripts such as Roman, Italic, Sans Serif. Prerequisites: 51232
Prerequisite: 51-232
51-332 Advanced Calligraphy II
All Semesters: 9 units
This course serves a continuation of study in the discipline of calligraphy. (It meets at the same time as Calligraphy II.) Students are encouraged to tackle advanced problems or work with the instructor to determine new directions of study. Prerequisites: 51331
Prerequisite: 51-331
51-334 Photography, Community & Change
Intermittent: 9 units
In this course we will partner with Sojourner?s House to tell photo-based stories of the residents. Sojourner?s House (SH), located in East Liberty, is a home for women and families who have faced obstacles of addiction and homelessness. Those at SH have lived through hard times. The women, some of whom are mothers, are now ?clean and sober? but before they came to SH, they were addicts who lived strained lives. As a class we will be working with women and families who now are creating positive change in their lives through Sojourner?s House supportive environment. Students, working in pairs, will team with individuals or families. Through weekly sessions with SH residents, students will explore how the camera can be used to tell a range of different stories, which may range from a traditional photo documentary, to a narrative that is ?directed? by a student with photographs made by Sojourner?s House residents. In all cases, the residents at SH are going through significant change in their lives and we will see how the camera can be used to support individuals during a time of growth. Students will learn how to sensitively work with people who have experienced extreme difficulty while they are learning about addiction through readings and first hand accounts. While they are getting to know their subjects, students will explore the various ways to create an in-depth photo narrative. Most important, students will learn how the camera can be used to create connections and trust between people. Prerequisite: A college level photography course 15 students ? sophomores to grads Familiarity with digital photography
51-335 Mapping and Diagraming
Fall: 9 units
This course explores the different ways in which we communicate complex information, through maps and diagrams. Students will design maps and diagrams using subject matter of their choice. Instructor permission required for non-Design majors.
51-336 The Non-Selfie
Intermittent: 9 units
The Non-Selfie: using the camera to record, probe, and understand one's own and another's behavior This course is the opposite of the selfie, but it uses the camera to record human behavior, both your own and another's. Designers need to be good human observers in order to design for human needs. Designers also need empathy. This course aims to deepen sensitivity to others by first better understanding ourselves. Informed by Manfred Max-Neef's classification of fundamental needs and other relevant materials, we will create two in-depth photo-essays, the first being a study of ourselves, the second being a study of someone who is unfamiliar to us. In the first half of this course, while looking at the tradition of self-portraiture in photography and other media, we will be making in-depth photographic stories of ourselves. In addition to photographs, we may make scans of objects, include personal artifacts and anything else that may contribute to building an in-depth self-portrait. In the second part of the semester, we will apply what we learned to a person who we do not know, in hopes of bringing new insights and methods to understanding for another. In addition, we will look at the rich literature that exists in documentary photography about representing "the other." By the end of the semester, each student's work will be made into a hand-made Japanese stab book of two volumes: a volume on oneself, and one on another. The skills learned in this course are immediately relevant to becoming a good designer.
51-337 Letterpress in a Digital World
Intermittent: 9 units
What value does the antiquated process of letterpress printing have in our current digital world? What can we learn from the process that was used as the primary form of reproducing the printed word for nearly 500 years? As designers and artists, we have the opportunity to re-examine an obsolete mode of commercial printing, and explore how these techniques and technologies can add to our experience, expand our repertoire, and invigorate our working process. Our goal in this course is to seek out new opportunities in expression, resulting from the harmonious merger of new and old technologies. Intended for design juniors and seniors
51-338 Documentary Photography
Intermittent: 4.5 units
Documentary Photography: the Social and Built Landscape Documentary photography explores issues, often social, humanistic and/or political, in man-made culture. This course examines the work of nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first century documentarians while students photographically investigate their own topics. Among the many ethical areas of a documentarian's concern, the course examines (through looking at the documentary tradition and through the student's own work) the following: the photographer's relationship to the subject; the choices involved in representing the subject; the act of selectivity in framing the subject; the reasons for making documentary photographs; the intended audience for documentary photography; and the appropriate final display of the photographs? Extensive shooting, printing, and library research. Prerequisite: A beginning photography course, or by the permission of the instructor.
51-341 How Things are Made
Fall: 9 units
This course will provide a breadth of knowledge for current manufacturing, materials, and processes encountered in the industrial design field. There will be an emphasis on actual production/manufacture methods and not rapid prototyping methods. The class will consist of various lectures, media, electronic tools, and on-site visits to enable an understanding of how mass production affects design and design decisions. Industrial Design Juniors & Seniors or permission of the instructor.
51-343 Products Studio III: Designing for Complex Products Systems
Fall: 9 units
Provide a framework for understanding core practices of the product design profession by placing it in relation to other disciplines and their influences on mass manufacture of goods; students will use a design process to identify problem/s, map a process in which tangible artifacts are made to learn more about the interaction between object, person, space, and context
Prerequisite: 51-245
51-344 Advanced Digital Prototyping
Spring: 6 units
This course is an advanced course using SolidWorks computer modeling. It is a prerequisite for Production Prototyping.
51-345 Pragmatics of Color for Non-CD Majors
Intermittent: 9 units
Pragmatics of Color for non-CD majors Throughout the course, we will explore the application of color and its' use through many different medium, products and environments. We will use a variety of source materials like pigment, colored paper, and photography. These exercises will help us to explore how the different medium affect color perception. Because color is extremely dynamic and interactive, a good deal of emphasis will be placed on your ability to iterate many variations so that comparison becomes the point of discussion and learning. Equally important, is increasing your sensitivity to the nuances of color through direct observation and experimentation. The class exercises are distinctly different in nature from one to the next; they are organized in order to build upon each other. Prerequisites: you must own a digital camera and have previous experience with Photoshop and Illustrator.
51-346 Production Prototyping
Spring: 6 units
This course is the 2nd half of Advanced Digital Prototyping, using your work in SolidWorks to produce hard models.
51-347 Drawing from Nature
Intermittent: 4.5 units
Drawing From Nature This course is about observing and making images of things growing, crawling, flying, swimming etc. Observations will be made firsthand in the field, supported with relevant research in topic areas with the aim of deepening personal understanding of all things biological. Issue surrounding natural forms such as behavior, locomotion, adaptation, the environment and systems will also be investigated. We will work in tandem on refining our abilities in communicating what we discover through the process of drawing. A variety of visualization methods will be covered i.e. analytical drawing, visual notes, and diagramming to name a few. We will be using a variety of basic drawing and digital media to develop our work as we uncover aspects of form, structure and surface. Guest speakers will present work they have done in areas such as botany, biology, and environmental studies to name a few. A majority of the work will be done in the field and will then be developed in the studio. A final project will be assigned that will challenge you to develop a concept along with a compelling form(s) that communicates what you have uncovered about nature to a variety of audiences. This course builds on your experiences from First Year drawing and introduces several more advanced visualization methods. This course is intended for Junior and Senior Design Majors.
51-349 Visual Notation/Journaling
Intermittent: 9 units
Visual notation is the graphic equivalent of taking written notes. While the camera is a valuable and at times indispensible tool for recording what we see, the camera cannot make visible mental concepts. Nor can it discover and display underlying structures, create hierarchies, explain organizational schema or concepts that are not easily seen or understood. This course is about making visual notes in order to become fluent in your abilities to observe, record and interperate. Through daily entries in a journal you will work in several content areas i.e. mapping, natural and built environments and systems to name a few. A good portion of the work in this class will be conducted in the field using the resources available to us such as the museum, zoo and architectural sites. You will also be challenged to incorporate your notes as tools for communicating design concepts, implementing project development and presentations. The course will rely on the use of a variety of simple drawing tools and electronic media. Several visualization methods will be introduced and the work will build on the drawing experiences from First Year drawing. This course is intended for Junior and Senior Design Majors.
51-350 Products Studio IV: Designing Products for Social Systems
Spring: 9 units
Challenge students to build their own design and research process to identify and frame the scale and scope of a problem/opportunity, and place it in relation to the wider system (environment, social, cultural contexts); projects will require synthesizing a range of inputs to develop proposals for future working and living.
51-352 Cardboard Modeling II: Exploring expressive product behavior
Intermittent: 6 units
State-of-the-art interactive products express themselves through their screens. This behavior is mostly ?digital? in nature. In the human-computer interaction community there are many examples of interaction-styles that offer a more physical/tangible experience. In order to design products that offer such experiences new skills and tools are necessary: not only do we need to explore aspects of expressive form and interaction; we also need to explore expressive (physical) product behavior with an emphasis on sensing and actuating. While there are tools such as arduino, phidgets or gadgeteer available to do this there is little integration with the simultaneous exploration of form. This course aims to offer this integration. This course is open to Industrial Design juniors, seniors and grads ? others by permission of the instructor. Cardboard Modeling I is a prerequisite, unless approved by the instructor. Materials and tools need to be acquired in advance, a list will be provided; LAB FEE
51-355 Experimental Sketching
Intermittent: 4.5 units
Experimental Forms of Sketching fall 2011 Advancing design drawing philosophy and application This 7 week mini course seeks to expand our experiences with interpreting forms of drawing quality within the process of sketching. This approach will explore semantics of rendering with mixed media, sensitivity of representational perspective, form building, and sequence evolution, within drawing developments that stimulate emotional connections with a viewer. Through exploring and testing variables, we will use the nature of drawing behavior processes to expand the interpretive significance of abstract idea forms. These "drawing idea forms" will be represented throughout a range of abstract levels from literal to highly figurative. Interpretations will derive from a variety of themes involving design, life, and nature and expressed on paper as objects, scenes, and story persuasions.
51-357 Stuff That's Optional: People at Play
Intermittent: 9 units
Stuff that's optional: People at play Unlike our necessary work that provides sustenance for self and dependants, our recreation is optional and chosen. Products that support recreation are, likewise, an option. Soccer balls, kayaks, daypacks, fly reels, chess sets, running shoes; for that matter, the entire recreational industry is based on election. Our lives are better off for it; play is good for us. In this studio/ project course we will investigate play as an aspect of human endeavor. There are readings, discussions, and sessions aimed at gaining an understanding of the field. We will then respond by searching out and framing design opportunities, ideate and propose, refine and test. We will make stuff as teams and individuals that help us further define what it means to be humans at play. This course is intended for Junior and Senior Design Majors.
51-359 Tools for UX Design
Intermittent: 9 units
The course intent is to develop appropriate user experience of tools and technology for a projected time frame or context of use. The need to understand people's stories, their lives, and how they want to live determines what interfaces, products, and systems should be developed. Student teams will work together to create appropriate user interactions and experiences which are supported by the design of tools and/or technology. This integrated course will utilize rapid prototyping as the basis for the creation of these proposed tools and products. This course is intended for junior, senior, graduate level students, Non-Disclosure Agreement and other legal agreements may be part of the requirements. Proficiency in one or more of these visualization methods: freehand sketching, computer visualization in 2D graphics, motion graphics and/or 3D solid or surface modeling. By Instructor Approval if NOT in Design. Please forward statement of intent to Instructor.
51-360 Environments Studio IV: Designing Environments for Social Systems
Spring: 9 units
Develop high fidelity proposals and demonstrations of multi-modal hybridized physical-digital environments based on rich information content and principles of user experience design.
51-363 Environments Studio III: Designing for Complex Environment Systems
Fall: 9 units
Provide a framework and tools for designing for environments using experience design methods as a means to address the plurality of digital/physical hybrid environments
Prerequisite: 51-265
51-364 Drawing Spaces
Intermittent: 4.5 units
The natural and built environment will comprise the subjects of inquiry in this course. We will investigate systems of spatial and physical organization as found in the landscape in various forms and structures from forest to farm and from tent to tenement as examples. The intersection of these systems found in accessible locals will be investigated in the field through on site drawings using simple media and sketchbooks. These studies will then form the basis for the iteration of more developed images depicting environments both existing and imagined. Some time will be spent on observing people and various life forms as they populate and interact within these spaces to various ends.
51-365 Information & Space
Intermittent: 9 units
In this course, we will take computational approaches to explore information design in space. Students will consider the interactivity and readability of information when creating data-driven systems. They will learn Javascript programming and use P5.js for their interactive systems. There will be three projects: 1) Speech-responsive Kiosk; 2) Immersive Space using Projection; and 3) Data Visualization using Holo Lens. There is no prerequisite for this course, but basic understanding of typography and information design is expected.
51-366 Designing with Community
Intermittent: 9 units
This course will utilize social innovation principles and practices while striving to bring sustainable solutions to a grassroots community space through a series of integrated strategies. The initiative strives to build new types of services and social enterprises by addressing the unmet basic needs of residents. We aim to do that by focusing on the intersection of food, community health, and education. Students will examine Social Design case studies, with a focus on Problem Reframing processes (Dorst), and Solution Amplification (Manzini), and various design-enabled Theories of Change. For the project students will move the vision for Latham St. Commons forward through social experimentation and listening to the needs of an array of people within the neighborhoods of Garfield and Friendship. This type of active participation with the community will help students see the challenges of the community from an insiders point of view, in order for them to design appropriate responses to some of those challenges.
51-367 Computational Design Thinking
Intermittent: 9 units
In this course, we will take computational approaches to consider form, content and context for building design systems with computation. We will take a close look at the relation between input and output, and the effects on user experience on both analog and digital platforms. The aims of the course include learning to use procedural literacy and reflecting on decision-making. Students will integrate Design Thinking and Computational Thinking (CT) to construct conceptual and computational models for communication. They will use Processing and Basil.js for three projects: 1) Generative Typography; 2) Autonomous Poster Machine; and 3) Data-driven Publication. There is no prerequisite for this course, but basic understanding of typography and grid-system is expected.
51-371 Futures
Fall: 9 units
Cover different approaches to interpreting the future: from the extrapolations of trend forecasting, through the risk assessments of scenario planning, to attempts to steering the present through backcasting. Students explore the future through utopian and dystopian fictions that are created by authors, filmmakers and themselves. Students also attempt to evaluate futures in terms of their longer term consequences.
51-372 Persuasion
Spring: 9 units
Examine written argumentation, oral presentations, artifact exhibitions, but also branding and social media. Students learn how to position their design ideas and connect them to the people and organizations that will increase their perceived value to target audiences. A focus of the course is on argument by precedent, where students build the significance of their innovations by situating them historically.
51-373 Design for Good
Intermittent: 9 units
This seminar-in-action will investigate and explore the responsibility of the designer as an agent for social change and development. We will critically examine theoretical readings, case studies, institutions and initiatives from a diversity of interdisciplinary perspectives encompassing economic, socio-cultural, political, ethical, technical and aesthetic factors. These broad survey investigations will then inform the rapid creation of design interventions, artifacts and provocations in response to our collective discoveries. Structured as one seminar and one action lab per week, students will throughout, closely document their thinking and designing in action, as a meta-lens on their own emergent role as a designer, researcher and change-maker.
51-374 Understanding Perception through Design
Intermittent: 9 units
Understanding Perception Through Design 51-374/51774 This course emphasizes audience expectations, also known as schemas, as a major influence on the artifacts we produce. For example, we read marble Corinthian columns as an entrance to a courthouse rather than to a home. The manner we use to communicate, either following or deviating from expectations, affects the way people perceive and process the information we present. Through lectures, discussions, readings, and projects, we will study the use of schemas in both print and digital mediums. We will also explore the bearing of expectations on the types of interactions and experiences we produce, answering the question: Can information become concrete and experiential versus abstract and readerly? Instructor permission required for non-Design majors.
Prerequisites: 51-311 or 51-301
51-375 Meaning in Images
Intermittent: 4.5 units
Images abound in our culture. This course takes a critical look at many different kinds of photographic images to understand how they operate in our culture to inform, persuade, and entertain various audiences. The content for this course will be generated from looking at, thinking about and discussing issues discovered while studying well-known to lesser-known images that range from photographs used in ad campaigns, to photographs that are used in scientific representation, to snapshots in family photo albums, to photographs that are used to show social injustices, to photographs that exist in museum collections. Readings will be assigned and short writing exercises will be required throughout the semester. In addition, photography assignments will be given. Design majors will have preference. Requirement: a digital camera. 15 students, junior and senior Design Majors.
51-376 Semantics & Aesthetics
Intermittent: 4.5 units
The course will explore the principles of visual composition, proportioning systems and the rules of order as it relates to art, architecture and design. The class will involve extensive reading and discussion of these topics in class. Some project work will also be required but minimal to the reading. A reading list will be provided. Instructor permission required for non-Design majors.
51-377 Sensing Environments
Intermittent: 9 units
Whereas UX Design is typically described as shaping the immediate environment between a user and an object/interface, this course will instruct you in techniques, methods, and vocabularies to expand the scale of your design. Course content will give students experience integrating and shaping their current work into 2-3 other levels of scale, such as a single room, building, campus, and neighborhood. Students will walk away with an understanding of environments that will expand their range of capability, fitting for interdisciplinary application within fields such as social innovation, community development, public policy, architecture, and urban design.
51-378 History of the Book and Printing
Intermittent: 6 units
History of Books and Printing 51378 A survey of the materials and techniques used to make books covering manuscripts, calligraphy, printing, presses, type design, readers, illustrators, graphic techniques, and even e-books examined using a variety of tools: real rare books, readings, discussion, in-class exercises, essays & quizzes.
51-379 Information+Interaction+Perception
Intermittent: 9 units
As a society, we're inundated with enormous amounts of dense information on a daily basis. In fact, many of us have grown so accustom to the abundance of information in our lives that we expect and need it to be accessible virtually anywhere and anytime. Technological advancements, which seem to develop at lightning speed, continuously provide us with tools that make it easy for us to access information quickly. However, little is being done to aid people's understanding of information that is increasing in complexity. Why? Our addiction to accessible and thorough information has caused many of us to turn a blind eye to the perceptual problems associated with its speedy delivery. In this course we will investigate contemporary visualizations of information and the bearing of their forms on the quality of communication. We will also study how peoples' perception of content, interaction with others, belief systems, and mental and physical well being can be affected by the visual communication of information. Thus, although we CAN represent information various ways we will ask how SHOULD it be designed to aid people's understanding of it. Your explorations will take the form of analyses of existing artifacts; class discussions and exercises; short, relevant readings that originate in various disciplines such as cognitive science, architecture, learning science, and design; and corresponding projects that enable you to illustrate what you're learning.
51-380 Experiential Media Design
Intermittent: 9 units
Experiential Media Design focuses on the theory, methodology and history behind the design, development and interpretation of experiential media systems. The class incorporates a multidisciplinary approach to the study of complex media systems as technological, political, economic, socio-cultural and personal experiences. Topics covered include media and communications theory, cultural studies, qualitative and quantitative methodology, design principles, human-computer-interaction, information visualization and representation, user studies and evaluation. Students will create and critique a variety of integrated media systems demonstrating technical competence, aesthetic knowledge, analytic rigor and theoretical relevance. This class is open to Junior & Senior Design Majors, and others by permission of the instructor.
51-382 Introduction to Design for Social Innovation
Intermittent: 4.5 units
This course serves as an introduction to design for social innovation and better prepares students for 51384 Principles & Methods for Design for Social Innovation.
51-383 Topics: Conceptual Models
Intermittent: 9 units
As design problems become more complex, conceptual modeling becomes critical in design process, especially when designing for the abstract concepts such as interaction, experience, service, and systems. Creating conceptual models are often an important step for making the creative leap from user research findings to design implications, which is one of the core challenges in design process. Conceptual models are also effective tool to bring in shared understanding for different stakeholders in teams with multidisciplinary team members, user-participants, and clients. Moreover, these conceptual models often directly lead to final information products to support users to learn how to use complex systems. Conceptual Models is a full semester course that provides students with the opportunity to explore theories related to conceptual models and to improve skills in using them as a means of design. Being primarily developed for graduate and undergraduate students in Design, this course consists of two parts. The seminar part of the course will provide students with readings, examples, and in-class discussions to help them understand the nature of conceptual models. The project part of the course will provide an opportunity to apply these theories to actual projects. Students will work in individuals and teams to create conceptual models for different needs and goals in design process.
51-384 Principles, Approaches & Methods for Social Innovation
Intermittent: 4.5 units
Service, social innovation, transition: all involve engagement with shifting social patterns. This course addresses theory, approaches, methods and skills needed to address social systems challenges, with an emphasis on equipping students for practice. Through a mix of lecture, readings, classroom activities and short projects, the course covers three scales: system, team, and individual. Topics include theories of change, the nature of social system complexity, current approaches and methods for working toward social system shifts, and the skills needed to apply those methods and approaches. Both classroom activities and homework assignments deal not only with the externals of this work, but also with the "inner game" — developing the personal stance and capacities necessary to work in uncertainty, in conflict, and in the midst of sometimes difficult social challenges.
51-385 Design for Service
Intermittent: 9 units
Technology has drastically changed society, and how we design needs to respond, too. Consider the experience of buying shoes. In past decades, before the advent of technology, customers went to a shoe store, were fitted by a clerk, and purchased shoes based on the stock in the store. Fast forward to today, where hundreds of brands and thousands of styles can be browsed online, shipped in 24 hours, and returned if less than perfect for free. The shoe purchase experience relies on system of services and products to satisfy one's needs and desires for new shoes. In this course, we will collectively define and study services and product service systems, and learn the basics of designing them. We will do this through lectures, studio projects, and verbal and written exposition. Classwork will be done individually and in teams. In some instances, we work with an external client to re-envision their core service offering.
51-387 Introduction to DeXign Futures
Intermittent: 9 units
As corporations, governmental organizations, and civil associations face accelerating change in uncertain times, increasingly they are looking to designers for new ways of thinking and acting. Designers today are engaged as thought leaders, strategists, activists, and agents of change in complex socio-technical problems throughout private, public, civil and philanthropic sectors worldwide. For designers trained to shape futures defined by uncertainty and change, these exponential times represent unprecedented creative opportunities for innovation. In this course, students learn the basic design skills necessary explore the forces that drive change in the future and learn to align innovation strategically with the trajectories of those forces.
51-388 Sharing Economies
Intermittent: 9 units
This topic course explores the nature and practice of sharing. The course is s a survey of cultural theories about why and how we do and don't share and the difference design can make to systems of sharing. It explores philosophies and anthropologies of sharing, distinguishing sharing from giving, lending and exchanging. It interrogates psychologies and histories of ownership, and notions of privacy. The course also explores the range of new systems that promote sharing in the contexts of the new sociality enabled by the social media and cosmopolitan urban living. It investigates the role of politics, such as concerns about ecological sustainability, and the role of perceived autonomy and convenience. By the end of the course, you will have a more comprehensive understanding of what facilitates and constrains sharing, and so be in a better position to design systems that promote increased resource productivity. Open to Sophomore - Graduate from across the university - no prior design capacities necessary, though they will help.
51-390 Social Interaction Design in Community
Intermittent: 9 units
The course looks at Design for Social Innovation principles and practices, Documentary Photography, and Design Research while walking the streets, talking to residents, and working with organizations in a Pittsburgh neighborhood to understand its challenges. Students will examine Social Design case studies, with a focus on Problem Reframing processes (Dorst), and Solution Amplification (Manzini), and various design-enabled Theories of Change. They will also explore histories and theories of Documentary Photography. For the project/ethnographic portion of the class, students will work in teams of two within a neighborhood, and partner with residents and organizations. These collaborations will help students see the challenges of the community from an insiders point of view, in order for them to design appropriate responses to some of those challenges.
51-392 Images and Communication
Intermittent: 4.5 units
No one doubts the value of photography as a means of recording life. Even if we don't think of ourselves as photographers, digital cameras make it easy to photograph our families, our trips, and aspects of our life that we want to remember. But beyond snapshots, can photography also teach us how to see? And how do they teach us about the world? And, what are the qualities inherent in photographs that make them effective as artifacts of communication? Does looking through the camera's viewfinder sensitize us to world and help us see more? Or, as some writers suggest, does the camera interfere with experiencing the world fully. This course explores seeing with the camera and the many issues that arise when one snaps the shutter. We will be looking at a range of different kinds of photographic images, understanding their contexts, and how to read them. Designers and other visual people use photographs extensively in their work. This course endeavors to make students more aware of their decisions and actions when making photographs as well as how to judge a photograph's effectiveness. The issues that we discuss using photographs, relate to other kinds of visual images, as well. We will be making photographs as we are discussing critical issues in photography that come out of readings. Students must own a digital camera but no prior photographic experience is necessary.
51-393 Object Lessons: Design History at the Museum
Intermittent: 4.5 units
Students meet with the Design Curator at the Carnegie Museum of Art to examine and discuss designed objects.
51-396 Design Ethos & Action
Intermittent: 9 units
Increasingly, designers have the potential to operate as agents of change in a broad range of areas including corporate, government, non-profit, social innovation start-ups, and sustainability projects. With so much choice on the horizon, some designers may wonder, What value do I bring to the world through design? Values often are implicit and may vary across contexts (e.g., profit, efficiency, effectiveness, fairness, social impact, environmental impact). This course focuses on exploring and identifying the potential for positive and negative impact that design can have in the world around us. For example, how might a designer embed values related to sustainability, gender equality, or race relations into his or her design projects and design practice?
51-399 Junior Independent Study
All Semesters
Guidelines for independent study in the Design office. Proposals must be approved by faculty before registration.
51-401 Senior Design Lab
Fall: 12 units
The Fall semester senior year focuses on design agility and helping students develop new ways of addressing the complexity of design problems. Through a series of three independent labs, students explore three kinds of designerly behaviors - wondering, playing, and speaking. These behaviors are not methods to be learned; they are ways of being agile as a designer that frees and empowers you to be both creative and responsive to the situations in which you are working. These labs serve as the requisite precursor to the Spring capstone project. This course is reserved for senior Design majors only.
51-403 Independent Senior Project n
Fall: 12 units
The senior year offers Design majors the opportunity to explore a variety of advanced topics through project-oriented courses. These project courses typically require an integration of skills and knowledge gained throughout the entire design program. Senior projects are often funded by outside companies or organizations, providing real world clients. This project highlights the role that visual interface designers play in the multi-disciplinary attempt to bridge the gap between functionality and usability and to introduce students to some of the unique challenges of designing within the realm of a digital, interactive medium.
51-404 Senior Project
Spring: 12 units
The senior year offers Design majors the opportunity to explore a variety of advanced topics through project-oriented courses. These project courses typically require an integration of skills and knowledge gained throughout the entire design program. Senior projects are sometimes funded by outside companies or community organizations, providing real world experiences.
51-405 Senior Project: Communication Design
Fall: 12 units
The senior year offers Design majors the opportunity to explore a variety of advanced topics through project-oriented courses. These project courses typically require an integration of skills and knowledge gained throughout the entire design program. Senior projects are often funded by outside companies or organizations, providing real world clients. This project varies from one semester to the next, providing various opportunities in areas such as exhibit design, branding, and web design.
51-406 Senior Project II
Spring: 12 units
The senior year offers Design majors the opportunity to explore a variety of advanced topics through project-oriented courses. These project courses typically require an integration of skills and knowledge gained throughout the entire design program. Senior projects are often funded by outside companies or organizations, providing real world clients.
51-407 Senior Project: Social Impact by Design
Fall: 12 units
The senior year offers Design majors the opportunity to explore a variety of advanced topics through project-oriented courses. These project courses typically require an integration of skills and knowledge gained throughout the entire design program. Senior projects are often funded by outside companies or organizations, providing real world clients. This project focuses on new product development.
51-414 Senior Project III (IPD)
Spring: 12 units
This course provides an integrated perspective on the many processes by which new products are designed, manufactured, and marketed. Under the direction of faculty from Design, Engineering, and Industrial Administration, students will work together in interdisciplinary groups on the development of real products. In addition to the product development project, the course includes lectures on innovation strategy, opportunity identification, designing products, object representation and manufacturability rules, computer-assisted design and prototyping, concept testing and protocol analysis, redesign issues, market testing, manufacturing and production, and product introduction and management. Open to graduate and senior-level engineering students, industrial administration students, and design students.
51-421 Basic Interaction Design
Fall: 9 units
This course highlights the role that visual interface designers play in the multi-disciplinary attempt to bridge the gap between functionality and usability and to introduce sutdents to some of the unique challenges of designing within the realm of a digital, interactive medium.
51-422 Interaction Design Studio
Spring: 9 units
Intended for HCI double majors, this is the spring offering of 51-421 Introduction to visual interface design. This course highlights the role that visual interface designers play in the multi-disciplinary attempt to bridge the gap between functionality and usability and to introduce students to some of the unique challenges of designing within the realm of a digital, interactive medium.
51-423 Pieces 2.0: Social Innovation: Desis Lab
Intermittent: 9 units
In this class, students will identify a social problem and take a holistic design approach to solving it. They will design a product/product line-anything from a set of tools to help older adults lead a more active lifestyle, to re-envisioned collateral for the Lupus Foundation Pennsylvania. After or in tandem with the creation of this product, the student will construct an image, which will entail print media, a Web presence, packaging, and photography. By creating the product and its "marketing" effort from top-to-bottom, the student will gain a diverse set of skills in design as well as a richer understanding of the product. In the end, all the pieces will come together to create a well-refined image.
51-424 Web Portfolio
Intermittent: 4.5 units
This course will provide an opportunity for students to design and code their online portfolio. The course covers basic elements of Web design along with the foundations of HTML, CSS, Javascript and Flash as components of the design process. Prior experience with HTML is encouraged but tutorials will be provided if necessary. This is not an Actionscript programming course.
51-425 Beginning Book Arts Lab
Fall and Spring: 6 units
Beginning Book Arts Lab Class. 6units. (This class is a prerequisite for the Advanced Book Arts Workshop Lab Class). This is a class of basic issues regarding hand bookbinding and letterpress printing. It's purpose is to develop a basic structural sense of book forms, of flat format work and of three dimensional forms. Learning hand craft techniques, developing hand skills and the sensitivity to materials are also a goal. Binding projects assigned will target the unique nature of papers, fabrics and archival card-boards. Structural procedures and techniques will be identified with each assigned binding project. The binding projects will be: A hardcover for a paper back book, a single signature book, a multi-signature book with flat spine, and a box construction. The box project is designed and crafted to contain a small letterpress printed class edition, either in book form, or as a set of un-bound pages. The letterpress component teaches the standard issues, unique to the relief process, in press work, handset procedure of cast metal type, page form spacing, lock-up of pages in press, proofing, and production printing. Each semester a small class edition project of text content and image, in two-color registration, is designed, hand set and printed. Image generation can be by hand cut block, assembled type-high forms, or digital process to polymer plate. This class is not to be repeated.
51-426 Beginning Book Arts Lab
Spring: 6 units
Beginning Book Arts Lab Class. 6units. (This class is a prerequisite for the Advanced Book Arts Workshop Lab Class). This is a class of basic issues regarding hand bookbinding and letterpress printing. It's purpose is to develop a basic structural sense of book forms, of flat format work and of three dimensional forms. Learning hand craft techniques, developing hand skills and the sensitivity to materials are also a goal. Binding projects assigned will target the unique nature of papers, fabrics and archival card-boards. Structural procedures and techniques will be identified with each assigned binding project. The binding projects will be: A hardcover for a paper back book, a single signature book, a multi-signature book with flat spine, and a box construction. The box project is designed and crafted to contain a small letterpress printed class edition, either in book form, or as a set of un-bound pages. The letterpress component teaches the standard issues, unique to the relief process, in press work, handset procedure of cast metal type, page form spacing, lock-up of pages in press, proofing, and production printing. Each semester a small class edition project of text content and image, in two-color registration, is designed, hand set and printed. Image generation can be by hand cut block, assembled type-high forms, or digital process to polymer plate. This class is not to be repeated.
51-427 Advanced Book Arts Workshop
Intermittent: 9 units
Students will be required to plan and design projects that relate to binding, or digital printing, or letterpress printing, or hand-setting of cast metal type. Projects utilizing a combination of all processes can be planned as well. Experimental work, or Artists' Books are also encouraged. In this class structure students will be able to plan and design projects that are complete books, with printed content, or with out content. Other flat structures, and three dimensional containers are examples of general forms that will be categorized as binding work. Students who wish to enroll in this course must have already taken Beginning Book Arts, and must also speak to the instructor directly about project ideas. Emphasis for binding is working independently with a greater level of hand craft and a sensitivity to materials. Emphasis for letterpress printing is to learn in depth, and master, the general mechanical process for doing press work. Emphasis for hand typesetting is on gaining an understanding of the system of cast metal type, and to develop a sensitivity to typographic principles. Instruction will be given on an individual basis through consultation at strategic times throughout the semester. Project evaluation will be based on the success of the project work compared to each student's written project proposal at the start of the semester. The Advanced Workshop in Book Arts can be repeated. For more complex project work this class can be continued for the following semester.
Prerequisites: 51-426 or 51-425
51-428 Time, Motion and Communication
Intermittent: 9 units
This course focuses on designing and presenting time-based messages on screen. The differences between paper-based and screen-based communication are discussed and become departure points for projects. Working with word, image, sound, and motion — in Adobe AfterEffects — students develop responses to a variety of project briefs. Brief histories of animation, experimental films, and title sequences, as well as experimental music provide conceptual models to our discussions. An attitude of exploration is stressed, with an emphasis on visual voice, performance, and communication. Content will include personal messages and timely information. Proficiency with AfterEffects is a firm requirement. Preference will be given to junior and senior Design students.
51-431 Revealing Place
Intermittent: 9 units
Revealing Place is a documentary photography class where students will use their cameras to explore a group, idea, and/or location and tell its story. Students will use photography as a way to engage community, document social phenomenon, and define what's happening at that moment in the history of their chosen setting.
51-434 Experimental Form
Intermittent: 9 units
The Experimental Form Studio looks broadly at the discipline of industrial design with an emphasis on creating new paradigms for interactive objects. This course encourages an exploratory study of physical objects and artifacts and provides a creative and intellectual forum to re-imagine our relationship with objects. Each independently-themed project presents opportunities to consider embedded mechanics & technology, objects as interactive media, and experience-driven design. Experimental Form, at its most basic, is a process that blends play and inquiry in an open-ended way finding the unexpected through tinkering and trying something you don't quite know how to do, guided by imagination and curiosity. In this sense, Experimental Form complements the core ID Studio sequence by providing a playground for intellectual discourse, experimental trial and error, and refining individual processes for designing. This is your sandbox. Prerequisites: Junior standing in industrial design. Junior level communication design with instructor permission.
Prerequisites: 51-248 or 51-343 or 51-311
51-435 Presentation & Pitch Design
Intermittent: 4.5 units
Presentation & Pitch Design: The premise of the course is to provide design students with the fundamental tools to effectively present and pitch their designs. The foundation of the course is best explained by Dick Buchanan he states, "The designer, instead of simply making an object or thing, is actually creating a persuasive argument that comes to life whenever a user considers or uses a product as a means to some end." (Buchanan, R. 1985) I am looking to enter into a dialogue with undergraduate and graduate design students based on the notion of creating a "persuasive argument" to their design presentations. More importantly, I am looking to facilitate skill development using narratives as a medium for design students to present and pitch the intent of their designs based on five core principles. intentional positioning (empathize with your audience) restraint in preparation (concise structure) simplicity in design (visual congruence with design artifact) clarity in rhetoric (know your message) naturalness in delivery (be yourself) Upon completion of this class, students will have mastery in the Five Core Principles mentioned. They will be able to: Identify and cater to their audience's needs Empathize with their audience and adjust accordingly Craft a narrative that captures their design intention(s) Visually compliment their design in their presentation Clearly develop their message (pitch) Develop and present in their own style
51-439 Design for Service Studio
Intermittent: 9 units
Services constitute more than 79.2% of the US economy. The service sector has been increasing substantially while the commodities and manufacturing sectors have experienced a steep decline. Yet, service providers have historically under-utilized design in its business strategy and development. During this project course, intended to work in conjunction with Designing for Service Seminar, we will extend the idea of design as more than aesthetics and provide the opportunity for students to practice embodying its perspective and process, mapping design theory to project process. Students will spend the semester in teams, working with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette to deeply understand their users and stakeholder's experiences, needs, and desires. We will explore the role of journalism and news in society, the volatile sector as a whole, and the challenges facing newspapers in America. The human-centered design approach will employ ethnographic research methods, allowing for teams to uncover insights and observations about patterns. Students will in turn learn to synthesize these findings into appropriate models, prototype concepts, and look for opportunities. The design solutions are intended to inform elements of the paper's competitiveness, creativity, development and future service innovations. The final deliverable will be refined solutions as illustrated in a presentation and process document.
51-441 Foundation of BME Design
Fall: 6 units
This course focuses on the Product Development scope and framing of a new medical device. Students will work together in an interdisciplinary team with Biomedical Engineering students to identify medical professional or patient needs through behavioral research and participatory research methods. This course deliverable requires the team to propose the problem space and develop a design brief and plan for the following Spring semester to implement. Prerequisite: Junior level design or higher with studio training. Solid modeling or surface modeling recommended.
51-442 BME Design Project
Spring: 9 units
This course is the second in sequence of prototyping and testing a proposed medical device product. The course consists of modules for the development of a project plan, background research, hazard analysis, setting product specifications based on user requirements, detailed design and analysis, prototype development and final documentation and presentation. All products developed will respond to the needs of appropriate market segments; resulting products will be deemed safe, effective, useful, usable and desirable by those segments. Students will produce a form model, functional prototype, marketing plan, and manufacturing plan of their product. Prerequisite: 51-441 (3 units, Fall) Foundations of Biomedical Engineering Design (or permission of the instructor). Junior level design or higher with studio training. Solid modeling or surface modeling recommended.
51-451 Fundamentals of Joinery & Furniture Design
Fall: 9 units
Intensive introduction to traditional joinery techniques and the properties of wood through the use of textbook studies and lab experiments. Emphasis placed on how these techniques and properties influence design decisions. Students will learn how to set up, sharpen and use traditional hand powered tools. This acquired knowledge will be applied in the design and realization of a piece of wooden furniture. Limited enrollment. Lab fee and material purchases required.
51-452 Furniture Design II
Spring: 9 units
A continuation of 51-451, this course explores a much broader range of issues related to furniture design. Students will identify and define in a proposal the area of furniture design they intend to investigate and then produce one or more furniture pieces developed from their findings. Materials and processes applied to the project are limited only by the resources the student can bring to bear. Assigned readings and a series of in-class discussions will focus on the influence of workmanship in design, and on how the behavior of the user is influenced by the form or esthetic language of the artifact. Lab fee & material purchases required.
Prerequisite: 51-451
51-455 DeXign the Future: Human Centered Innovation for Exponential Times
Intermittent: 9 units
DEXIGN THE FUTURE: Human Centered Innovation for Exponential Times As corporations, governmental organizations, and civil associations face accelerating change in uncertain times, increasingly they are looking to designers for new ways of thinking and acting. Designers today are engaged as thought leaders, strategists, activists, and agents of change in complex socio-technical problems throughout private, public, civil and philanthropic sectors worldwide. For designers trained to shape futures defined by uncertainty and change, these exponential times represent unprecedented creative opportunities for innovation. In this course, students explore methods and tools for design in exponential times to shape uncertain futures. Students will explore the forces that drive change in the future (i.e., social, economic, political, environmental, technological), and learn to align innovation strategically with the trajectories of those forces. The design project that drives everything else is the future of mega-metropolitan regions, the hubs of innovation where 70% of people in the world and 75% of Americans will live in 2050. In the semester long project, students create scenarios for Life 2050 in Metro 3.0, using Pittsburgh as a locus and focusing on a project within urban systems such as Sustainable Production & Consumption, Lifelong Learning, Human Development and Resilient Community.
51-471 Practicing Design
Fall: 9 units
This is a lecture course covering all aspects of design practice. Students learn to formulate a plan for professional practice, market creative services, manage projects, and understand the legal and ethical issues associated with design practice. This course will also address the changing role of the design professions. Visiting professionals, case studies, and supplementary readings provide resources for class discussion. This course is required for all senior design majors.
51-478 Speculative Critical Design
Intermittent: 9 units
This praxis-based course will actively engage futures research through the integration of findings from critical readings, ethnographic research, mediated storytelling and hybrid prototyping. Using techniques of inversion, defamiliarization, uncertainty scenarios, everyday practice and good old-fashioned humor, we will create objects, systems and experiences that stimulate conversation, debate and understanding. The course seeks to produce a diversity of 'what will?' and 'what if?' cultural provocations that deeply examine possible, unwanted and seductive futures. This course is open to Junior and Senior Design majors, or by permission of the instructor.
51-479 Design for Improved Understanding of Health Information
Intermittent: 9 units
During the course students will use a design framework and proven methodologies to create health communications that aid low health literate individuals to better understand their role in the system of care, evaluate where, when and how to access care and communicate with peers and experts when they need help. Students will work closely with the Regional Health Literacy Coalition and various social institutions to insure relevance, context, and access.
51-480 Design Capstone Project: Service Design
Spring: 4.5 units
Learn how to work independently, applying skills/knowledge in Products, Communications, Environments to the research/definition/development/testing of a project that focuses on the design of a service that warrants investigation; deepen understanding of service design principles and how they are put into practice.
51-481 Design Research Studio
Fall: 12 units
Learn how to work with a group of designers, applying skills/knowledge in Products, Communications, Environments to the research/definition/development/testing of a project that focuses on the design of a service that warrants investigation; gain an understanding of service design & design for social innovation principles and how they are put into practice; learn how to manage a semester-long project, preferably working with a local client.
51-483 Debating the Roles & Responsibilities of the Designer
Intermittent: 9 units
Designers are expected to play a role in creating aspirational lifestyles through products and services, and informing and influencing human behavior on small and large scales. However what impact does or should the designer have on our lives, our society, and culture? Through readings, discussions, and team activity, students will construct pro and con arguments and debate the role and responsibility of the designer in a critical and fun way.
51-486 Learner Experience Design
Intermittent: 9 units
This course focuses on designing experiences that engage people in educational activities that enhance their learning through meaningful, memorable, and enjoyable interactions with information. Throughout the course, students investigate the intersection of design thinking, UI/UX design, cognitive studies, social sciences, instructional design, and educational pedagogy as a way of developing knowledge and skills in designing experiences for learners. Students study topics that are often difficult to grasp and collaboratively build a taxonomy of content types based on common and differentiating characteristics to identify design opportunities. Through readings, projects, and class exercises, students explore how people perceive and process information, what motivates them to learn, and what constitutes an experience. The course introduces students to traditional and emergent learning tools and methods as a means of defining affordances and limitations of various learning approaches and mediums. It also provides students the opportunity to apply what they learn through the design, testing, and assessment of learning experiences that they create.
51-490 Design Capstone Project: Social Innovation
Spring
Learn how to work independently, applying skills/knowledge in Products, Communications, Environments to the research/definition/development/testing of a project that focuses on the design of social innovation that warrants investigation; deepen understanding of social innovation design principles and how they are put into practice.
51-491 Design Research Studio: Designing for Social Innovation
Fall: 12 units
Learn how to work with a group of designers, applying skills/knowledge in Products, Communications, Environments to the research/definition/development/testing of a project that focuses on design of a social innovation that warrants investigation; gain an understanding of social innovation design principles and how they are put into practice; learn how to manage a semester-long project, preferably working with a local client.
51-499 Senior Independent Study
All Semesters
Guidelines for independent study in the Design Office. Proposals must be approved by faculty before pre-registration.
51-667 Computational Design Thinking
Fall and Spring: 12 units
In this course, we will take computational approaches to consider form, content and context for building design systems with computation. We will take a close look at the relation between input and output, and the effects on user experience on both analog and digital platforms. The aims of the course include learning to use procedural literacy and reflecting on decision-making. Students will integrate Design Thinking and Computational Thinking (CT) to construct conceptual and computational models for communication. They will use Processing and Basil.js for three projects: 1) Generative Typography; 2) Autonomous Poster Machine; and 3) Data-driven Publication. There is no prerequisite for this course, but basic understanding of typography and grid-system is expected.
51-880 Experiential Media Design
Intermittent: 12 units
Experiential Media Design focuses on the theory, methodology and history behind the design, development and interpretation of experiential media systems. The class incorporates a multidisciplinary approach to the study of complex media systems as technological, political, economic, socio-cultural and personal experiences. Topics covered include media and communications theory, cultural studies, qualitative and quantitative methodology, design principles, human-computer-interaction, information visualization and representation, user studies and evaluation. Students will create and critique a variety of integrated media systems demonstrating technical competence, aesthetic knowledge, analytic rigor and theoretical relevance

Faculty

ERIC ANDERSON, Associate Professor of Design – M.A., Ohio State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.

MARK BASKINGER, Associate Professor of Design – M.F.A., University of Illinois; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.

DANIEL BOYARSKI, Professor of Design – M.F.A., Indiana University School for Design, Kunstgewerbeschule, Basel, Switzerland; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.

CHARLEE MAE BRODSKY, Professor of Photography – M.F.A., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.

WAYNE CHUNG, Associate Professor of Design – MID, University of the Arts; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.

JODI FORLIZZI, Professor, joint faculty in Design and Human Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.

BRUCE HANINGTON, Associate Professor of Design of Environmental and Industrial Design – Master of Environmental and Industrial Design, University of Calgary; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.

KRISTIN HUGHES, Associate Professor of Design – M.F.A., Virginia Commonwealth University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.

AISLING KELLIHER, Associate Professor – M.S. & Ph.D, MIT; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.

MARK MENTZER, Professor of Drawing – B.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1975–.

THOMAS L. MERRIMAN, Teaching Professor in Design – B.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.

STACIE ROHRBACH, Associate Professor of Design – MGD, North Carolina State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.

PETER SCUPELLI, Assistant Professor – MDes & Ph.D, Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.

STEPHEN J. STADELMEIER, Associate Professor of Design – M.S., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.

CAMERON TONKINWISE, Associate Professor – Ph.D, University of Sydney; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.

ANDREW TWIGG, Assistant Teaching Professor – B.A., Allegheny College; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.

DYLAN VITONE, Associate Professor – M.F.A., Massachusetts College of Art; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.

JOHN ZIMMERMAN, Associate Professor, joint faculty in Design and Human Computer Interaction Institute – MDes, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.

MATT ZYWICA, Assistant Teaching Professor – B.F.A., University of Illinois; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.

Courtesy Appointments

LUIS VON AHN, Assistant Professor of Computer Science – Ph.D, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.

JONATHAN CAGAN, George Tallman Ladd Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of California Berkeley.; .

SUGURU ISHIZAKI, Associate Professor of Rhetoric and Visual Design – Ph.D., Masssachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.

DAVID S. KAUFER, Professor of English and Rhetoric – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Carnegie Mellon, 1980–.

GOLAN LEVIN, Associate Professor of Art – M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.

Special Faculty

JOSEPH M. BALLAY, IDSA, Professor of Design, Emeritus – M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1970-2002–.

ROBERT O. SWINEHART, Professor of Design, Emeritus – M.F.A., Northern Illinois University; Carnegie Mellon, 1974 - 2010–.