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Department of Mechanical Engineering

Allen Robinson, Raymond J. Lane Distinguished Professor and Department Head
Scaife Hall 401
http://www.cmu.edu/me

General Overview

Mechanical engineers design, analyze, and manufacture new products and technologies. They address society’s needs by combining mechanical engineering fundamentals with innovative ideas. We structure our curriculum by emphasizing engineering theory, hands-on experience and technical skills. By doing so, our students learn how to solve practical problems and analyze situations by converting concepts into reliable and cost-effective devices and processes.

Mechanical engineers work in a variety of sectors: small start-up companies, multi-national corporations, government agencies, national laboratories, consulting firms, and universities. Specializing in research, design, manufacturing, or management, they design and implement devices that affect our daily lives. For example:

  • Jet Engines
  • Automobiles
  • Aircraft and Spacecraft
  • Acceleration and Pressure Sensors
  • Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning Systems
  • Power Generations Systems
  • Biomedical and Biomechanical Devices (such as artificial hip implants)
  • Mechanical and Electronic Systems (such as robots)

Through our curriculum, students receive a solid scientific foundation from the start. During their first year, students take courses in mathematics, physics, computer programming, and chemistry. In addition, students also take two introductory engineering courses which expose them to the different engineering departments. Our mechanical engineering introductory course is project-oriented; students learn about the various disciplines of mechanical engineering through lectures, laboratories, and hands-on projects.

In their sophomore and junior years, students take core engineering courses to develop strong engineering fundamentals. These course topics include:

  • Solid and Fluid Mechanics
  • Thermodynamics
  • Heat Transfer
  • Dynamics
  • Systems and Controls
  • Design Methods and Skills
  • Experimentation and Numerical Methods

During their senior year, students complete a capstone course in engineering design. In this course, students work on teams to develop prototype hardware for new products. These projects expose students to the design process, from concept to product, and emphasize effective communication and presentations skills. Past design projects include:

  • low-squeal disk brakes
  • high efficiency engines
  • neck gear to minimize spinal injury in sports
  • stabilizer support arm for movie cameras

Additionally, students can utilize our flexible elective structure to pursue individual interests. We recognize the broad role mechanical engineers play in society—as leaders in business, government, and law. Therefore, we offer elective options that enable students to:

  • begin taking elective courses during their junior year
  • specialize in a particular area of mechanical engineering
  • emphasize a technical area within another engineering or science department
  • pursue interests in another Carnegie Mellon department (such as foreign language, design, music, or business) to earn a double major or minor

We offer advanced courses that students can choose as electives, depending on their interests. Electives include:

  • energy conversion
  • controls
  • vibrations
  • dynamics
  • manufacturing
  • robotics
  • internal combustion engines
  • mechatronics
  • fluid and solid mechanics
  • engineering design

As mentioned, students can also take technical and non-technical electives from other Carnegie Mellon departments. Students can use these courses to pursue a double major or minor, or develop an individual concentration with a faculty advisor.

Students can also tailor their undergraduate experiences through study abroad, research, or the Integrated Master's/Bachelor's Program. In today’s global society, a study abroad experience is crucial and should serve as an integral part of an undergraduate engineering education, including a possible college Global Engineering minor. An academic experience abroad is encouraged and assistance provided for course choices, but students may also participate in research, complete an internship, or partake in an international service-learning engineering project abroad. Exceptional students are eligible to participate in departmental or college senior honors research under faculty supervision, which students find enriching. In the Integrated Master's/Bachelor's program, students take graduate courses during their senior year, accumulating credit toward their Master’s degrees. Students can then complete all the requirements for the M.S. degree (course-work option) in the fall following their B.S. degree.

Students use the latest computer-based design and analysis methods for their courses and project work, including industry-standard design tools aided by computers. We provide an undergraduate computer lab where students can complete design work, structural analyses, thermal/fluid finite element analyses, and dynamic system simulations. Using computer tools, students can visualize a product’s performance before they fabricate it.

We also provide students with a variety of resources including MIG welding, rapid prototyping, and a fully equipped student shop (includes lathes, drill presses, milling machines, band saws, and other hand and power tools). Our Thermal Fluids and Mechanical Systems laboratories contain state of-the-art experimentation hardware and software.
Our faculty performs research sponsored by industry and government agencies. Faculty often use their research results as specific examples, case studies, and projects in undergraduate courses, allowing students to see firsthand the recent advances in mechanical engineering.

We also sponsor frequent seminars and invite nationally and internationally reputed speakers to give lectures. We encourage all students to attend these seminars to learn about broad perspectives on mechanical engineering.

You can find additional information about the Mechanical Engineering program on our website, http://www.cmu.edu/me/. Additionally, we describe our resources and policies in more detail in our Undergraduate Student Handbook, available online.
 

Educational Objectives

According to ABET (http://www.abet.org/) which evaluates applied science, computing, engineering and technology programs for accreditation, “program educational objectives are broad statements that describe what graduates are expected to attain within a few years of graduation.” In view of this definition, the Mechanical Engineering program at Carnegie Mellon has the two following program educational objectives:

  • Graduates distinguish themselves as innovative problem solvers and leaders in multidisciplinary settings, making use of a high quality and rigorous technical education that is enriched by a flexible curriculum and interdisciplinary research opportunities.
  • Graduates excel in diverse career paths in either the engineering profession or an alternative field, or succeed in graduate studies.

The undergraduate curriculum in the Department of Mechanical Engineering offers students significant opportunities to pursue directions of personal interest, including minors, double majors, participation in research projects, and study abroad. Design and teamwork experiences occur at regular intervals in the curriculum, and graduates have significant hands-on experience through laboratories and projects. The faculty of the Department has endorsed the following set of skills, or outcomes that graduates of the program are expected to have:

A.  an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering

B.  an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data

C.  an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within     realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability

D.  an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams

E.  an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problem

F.  an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility

G.  an ability to communicate effectively

H.  the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context

I.  a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning

J.  a knowledge of contemporary issues

K.  an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

The Mechanical Engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET,http://www.abet.org.
 

Curriculum

The following template outlines the four-year B.S. program through the standard and recommended course sequence. To ensure that prerequisites are completed and to prevent scheduling conflicts, students should discuss any changes to this sequence with the department academic advisor.

Freshman Year
Fall Units
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
24-101Fundamentals of Mechanical Engineering12
33-106Physics I for Engineering Students12
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
76-101Interpretation and Argument9
 46
Spring Units
21-122Integration and Approximation10
xx-xxxSecond Introductory Engineering Course12
xx-xxxRestricted Technical Elective 10-1310
xx-xxxGeneral Education Course9
 41
 Sophomore Year 
Fall Units
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
24-221Thermodynamics I10
24-261Statics10
xx-xxxRestricted Technical Elective 10-1313
xx-xxxGeneral Education Course9
24-200Machine Shop Practice
*Preferred sophomore year, required by senior year *
1
39-210Experiential Learning I0
 52
Spring Units
21-260Differential Equations9
24-231Fluid Mechanics10
24-262Stress Analysis12
xx-xxxRestricted Technical Elective 10-1312
xx-xxxGeneral Education Course9
24-202Introduction to Computer Aided Design
*Required sophomore year *
1
39-220Experiential Learning II0
 53
Junior Year 
Fall Units
24-302Mechanical Engineering Seminar I- taken either fall or spring2
24-322Heat Transfer10
24-370Engineering Design I: Methods and Skills12
24-351Dynamics10
36-220Engineering Statistics and Quality Control9
xx-xxxGeneral Education Course9
39-310Experiential Learning III0
 52
Spring Units
24-321Thermal-Fluids Experimentation12
24-311Numerical Methods12
24-352Dynamic Systems and Controls12
xx-xxxGeneral Education Course9
 45
Senior Year
Fall Units
24-441Engineering Design II: Conceptualization and Realization- required either fall or spring; alternate with xx-xxx 9 unit elective12
24-452Mechanical Systems Experimentation9
xx-xxxElective9
xx-xxxElective9
xx-xxxGeneral Education Course9
 48
Spring Units
24-441Engineering Design II: Conceptualization and Realization
OR xx-xxx Elective
12
24-xxxMechanical Engineering Technical Elective9-12
xx-xxxElective9
xx-xxxElective9
xx-xxxGeneral Education Course9
 39

Notes on the Curriculum

1.  Students need a minimum of 382 units to complete the B.S. degree.

2.  During the first year, students complete 24-101 Fundamentals of Mechanical Engineering and another introductory engineering course.  If students did not take 24-101 during their first year, they should take 24-101 during their fall semester of their sophomore year in place of the General Education Course.  They can then replace that General Education Course in their junior or senior years.

3.  Students must pass the following three courses before they begin the core Mechanical Engineering courses in the fall of their sophomore year:
21-120 Differential and Integral Calculus (10 units)
21-122 Integration and Approximation (10 units)
33-106 Physics I for Engineering Students (12 units)*
*33-106 / 33-107 is the recommended sequence for engineering students, although 33-111 / 33-112 or 33-131 /33-132 would also meet the CIT Physics requirement.

Mechanical engineering undergraduates must satisfy a Science Laboratory requirement to graduate. Normally the Science Laboratory requirement is satisfied by passing 09-101 Introduction to Experimental Chemistry (3 units). Students can also satisfy the Science Laboratory requirement by passing one of the following courses:

03-124Modern Biology Laboratory9
33-100Basic Experimental Physics6
33-104Experimental Physics9
42-203Biomedical Engineering Laboratory9

These courses may have prerequisites and tight enrollment limits that students should consider in their planning.

4.  Students are required to complete 36-220 Engineering Statistics and Quality Control, which may be scheduled in any semester. The sequence of calculus courses (21-120 , 21-122 , 21-259) and 21-260 Differential Equations should be scheduled as indicated, due to Mechanical Engineering Core class prerequisites.

5.  The communications requirement can be satisfied by completing at least one of the following options:

Units
24-302Mechanical Engineering Seminar I- either fall or spring2
70-340Business Communications9
76-270Writing for the Professions9

6. Students must enroll in 24-452 Mechanical Systems Experimentation in the fall of their senior year.
7. 24-441 Engineering Design II: Conceptualization and Realization may be taken in either fall or spring of senior year.

Restricted Technical Electives

Students should have the following courses completed by the end of their sophomore year.  These courses are listed as “Restricted Technical Electives” in the example course sequence.  Students do have some flexibility in how they sequence these courses during their freshman and sophomore years:

33-107Physics II for Engineering Students12
09-101Introduction to Experimental Chemistry3
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
15-110Principles of Computing10

Mechanical Engineering Technical Electives

We require students to take at least one elective labeled as “Mechanical Engineering Technical Elective” in the example course sequence.  Students must take at least one non-core 24-xxx course (9-unit minimum) to fulfill the technical elective requirement. Options include:

Design and Manufacturing
24-341Manufacturing Sciences9
24-674Design of Biomechatronic Systems for Humans12
24-681Computer-Aided Design12
24-682Computer-Aided Engineering12
24-683Design for Manufacture and the Environment12
24-688Introduction to CAD and CAE Tools12
Mechanical Systems
24-355Kinematics and Dynamics of Mechanisms9
24-361Intermediate Stress Analysis10
24-451Feedback Control Systems12
24-655Cellular Biomechanics9
24-657Molecular Biomechanics9
Thermal-Fluid Systems
24-332Potential Flow Aerodynamics9
24-421Internal Combustion Engines12
24-424Energy and the Environment9
24-425Combustion and Air Pollution Control9
24-615Microfluidics12
24-616Tribology-Friction, Lubrication and Wear12
24-623Molecular Simulation of Materials12
24-642Fuel Cell Systems12

We regularly offer these courses and/or new options according to our teaching schedule.  However we cannot guarantee to offer a particular course in a given semester.

Students can also take certain mechanical engineering graduate courses to fulfill the technical elective requirement.  However, students must have the appropriate prerequisites and the instructor must approve taking the course.  Students can find a list of graduate courses we offer on our website.

Students cannot use the research or project courses to fulfill the technical elective requirement.  However, they can use these courses to fill the remaining five elective slots.  Courses that do not fulfill the technical elective requirements are:

24-391/ 24-392 Mechancial Engineering Project
24-491/ 24-492 Department Research Honors
39-xxx CIT series courses

Electives

Students must complete five elective courses, as indicated in the example course sequence. Students can take either technical or non-technical courses to fill these five slots from either the mechanical engineering department, College of Engineering, or any other Carnegie Mellon department. However, students may only use one elective slot for a physical education course or for ROTC. We offer these electives so students can pursue individual interests or obtain a minor or double major.
 

Constructing a Program of Study

In order to properly plan their course sequence, students should select their six elective courses with the department academic advisor.  If students are pursuing minors, double majors, or double degrees, they should choose electives that meet requirements of these programs.  We provide more information on selecting courses and electives in the Undergraduate Student Handbook. We offer the following options to students for tailoring our program to fit their needs and interests.

Specialization Within Mechanical Engineering

Students can specialize in a specific area by taking additional mechanical engineering electives beyond the one required technical elective. Students can choose courses from the Mechanical Engineering Technical Electives list or take approved mechanical engineering graduate courses.

Research and Independent Study Projects

Students can work on a design or research project if supervised and coordinated by a faculty advisor.  Interested students should contact faculty members to identify potential projects of mutual interest.  Projects generally involve lab, analytical, field, design or computer work.

Students complete projects and research by taking either or both of the following courses for their electives.  As previously mentioned, students cannot use these courses to fulfill the technical elective requirement.

24-391/392Mechanical Engineering ProjectVar.
24-491/492Department Research HonorsVar.
*Students enrolled in 24-391/392 do not have an additional QPA (quality point average) requirement for this course.

Qualified students enrolled in 24-491/492 are recognized at commencement. To graduate with research honors, students must have a QPA of 3.2 or higher, complete 18 units of 24-491/492 with at least at least a "B" grade, and submit an approved thesis to their faculty research advisor.

Students who complete all requirements for CIT Honors Research will also graduate with research honors. These students must complete 18 units of (39-500) CIT Honors Research under the supervision of a mechanical engineering faculty member.

Developing a Concentration of Interdisciplinary Studies

Students can also take courses outside of mechanical engineering to fill elective slots.  Usually students select courses around a common theme; although courses span several departments, students choose courses to form a specific concentration.  Students can either construct an informal program of study based on their interests or they can pursue a minor or double major using these courses.

Pursuing a Minor or Double Major

The College of Engineering offers designated minors for students wishing to specialize in an engineering area.  Students can find a list of minors on the CIT website (www.cit.cmu.edu).  Students can generally complete a designated minor without increasing the number of units required for graduation, but they should plan early in order to complete a minor on time.

Students can also complete a double major within the College of Engineering. Students can earn double majors in Mechanical Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy, or Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering.

Additionally, students can pursue minors or double majors with other Carnegie Mellon departments.  Interested students should contact the main department of the minor/double major they seek to learn the requirements for that program.

Advising

The department academic advisors are assigned initially to all new students and will continue to assist with any curriculum questions and registration issues until they graduate. 

The department academic advisors will:

  • Verify progress toward degree requirements
  • Discuss course alternatives for CIT requirements and electives
  • Register research credit
  • Assist with pre-requisite waivers
  • Offer basic information regarding double major/minors, study abroad procedures, etc
  • Explain summer transfer credit policies

Faculty mentors will:

  • Explain technical content of coursework
  • Suggest appropriate concentrations that match students' career objectives
  • Discuss research opportunities
  • Offer graduate school and employment advice
  • Offer general advice and mentoring

Students should attend the fall sophomore lunch to meet professors, utilize introductions during sophomore core classes and check the website for additional faculty information.  Faculty appointments as needed, may also be arranged through the academic advising office.  The academic advisor will assign a faculty mentor to students that have not indicated a selection at the end of the sophomore year. 

As a regular part of monitoring progress toward completion of the degree, students should compare their transcripts with the department's degree requirements. Academic Audit - the HUB website- www.cmu.edu/hub.

Integrated Master's/Bachelor's Degree (IMB)

An integrated program is available to Carnegie Mellon engineering undergraduate students who also wish to complete a master's degree in mechanical engineering (MSC option).

As reflective of the CIT Integrated Master’s/Bachelor’s Degree Program policy, effective Fall 2012, students may complete their master’s degree with only one additional full-time semester after the bachelor’s degree. Student’s participating in IMB will be changed to graduate status during the 9th (and subsequent) semesters.

Students must complete at least 24 units of graduate coursework by the end of the Senior year. A QPA of 3.0 or better must be attained in those courses, and they cannot be used to satisfy the requirements of the bachelor’s degree. Students must also have a cumulative undergraduate QPA of a 3.0 or higher. During the summer immediately after the Senior year, students could complete up to 12 units of Graduate Supervised Reading or Graduate Master of Science Project. During the following Fall semester, students then complete all remaining coursework (a maximum of 60 units per semester). A total of 96 units are required for completion of the MSC option.
Interested students are required to complete the Integrated Master's/Bachelor's Degree Program Form.

Quality Point Average Requirements

To be eligible to graduate, undergraduate students must complete all course requirements for their program with a cumulative Quality Point Average of at least 2.00 for all courses taken.  For undergraduate students who enrolled at Carnegie Mellon as freshmen and whose freshman grades cause the cumulative QPA to fall below 2.0, this requirement is modified to be a cumulative QPA of at least 2.0 for all courses taken after the freshman year.  Note, however, the cumulative QPA that appears on the student's final transcript will be calculated based on all grades in all courses taken, including freshman year.  The Mechanical Engineering Department requires that students attain a quality point average of 2.00 or higher for all required Mechanical Engineering core courses.

Pursuant to university rules, students can repeat a course in which a grade below C was attained in order to achieve the QPA requirement. When a course is repeated, all grades will be recorded on the official academic transcript and will be calculated in the student's QPA. The highest grade so obtained will be used to calculate the quality point average for all required Mechanical Engineering courses.

Full-Time Faculty

SHELLEY ANNA, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.JACK LEE BEUTH, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.JONATHAN CAGAN, George Tallman and Florence Barrett Ladd Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.STEVEN COLLINS, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.MAARTEN P. DE BOER, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.NOÉ VARGAS HERNÁNDEZ, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, Arizona State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.C. FRED HIGGS III, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.B. REEJA JAYAN, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, University of Texas-Austin; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.LEVENT BURAK KARA, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.PHILIP R. LEDUC, William J. Brown Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.SHAWN LITSTER, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.CARMEL MAJIDI, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.JONATHAN A. MALEN, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.ALAN J.H. MCGAUGHEY, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.JEREMY J. MICHALEK, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.O. BURAK OZDOGANLAR, Ver Planck Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.ALBERT PRESTO, Assistant Research Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012-–.YOED RABIN, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – D.Sc., Technion-Israel Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.ALLEN L. ROBINSON, Raymond J. Lane Distinguished Professor & Department Head – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.EDWARD STEPHEN RUBIN, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.SHENG SHEN, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.KENJI SHIMADA, Theodore Ahrens Professor of Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.SATBIR SINGH, Assistant Teaching Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.METIN SITTI, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Tokyo; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.KOUSHIL SREENATH, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Michigan at Ann Arbor; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.PAUL SETH STEIF, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.RYAN SULLIVAN, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of California at San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.VENKAT VISWANATHAN, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.SHI-CHUNE YAO, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.YONGJIE ZHANG, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.

Emeriti

ADNAN AKAY, Lord Emeritus Professor of Mechanical Engineering – PhD, North Carolina State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.NORMAN CHIGIER, Emeritus Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Sc.D., University of Cambridge; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.JERRY HOWARD GRIFFIN, William J. Brown Emeritus Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.WILFRED THOMAS ROULEAU, Emeritus Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1954–.

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Full-Time Faculty

SHELLEY ANNA, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.JACK LEE BEUTH, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.JONATHAN CAGAN, George Tallman and Florence Barrett Ladd Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.STEVEN COLLINS, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.MAARTEN P. DE BOER, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, University of Minnesota; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.NOÉ VARGAS HERNÁNDEZ, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, Arizona State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.C. FRED HIGGS III, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.B. REEJA JAYAN, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, University of Texas-Austin; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.LEVENT BURAK KARA, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.PHILIP R. LEDUC, William J. Brown Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.SHAWN LITSTER, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.CARMEL MAJIDI, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.JONATHAN A. MALEN, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.ALAN J.H. MCGAUGHEY, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.JEREMY J. MICHALEK, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.O. BURAK OZDOGANLAR, Ver Planck Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2004–.ALBERT PRESTO, Assistant Research Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012-–.YOED RABIN, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – D.Sc., Technion-Israel Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.ALLEN L. ROBINSON, Raymond J. Lane Distinguished Professor & Department Head – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.EDWARD STEPHEN RUBIN, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.SHENG SHEN, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.KENJI SHIMADA, Theodore Ahrens Professor of Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.SATBIR SINGH, Assistant Teaching Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.METIN SITTI, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Tokyo; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.KOUSHIL SREENATH, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Michigan at Ann Arbor; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.PAUL SETH STEIF, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.RYAN SULLIVAN, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of California at San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.VENKAT VISWANATHAN, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.SHI-CHUNE YAO, Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.YONGJIE ZHANG, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.

Emeriti

ADNAN AKAY, Lord Emeritus Professor of Mechanical Engineering – PhD, North Carolina State University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.NORMAN CHIGIER, Emeritus Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Sc.D., University of Cambridge; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.JERRY HOWARD GRIFFIN, William J. Brown Emeritus Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1981–.WILFRED THOMAS ROULEAU, Emeritus Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1954–.