Douglas C. Sicker, Head
Deanna H. Matthews, Associate Department Head for Undergraduate Affairs
Office: Baker Hall 129
http://www.cmu.edu/epp

The Department of Engineering and Public Policy (EPP) is a unique department that works on problems at the interface between technology and society. Society is largely responsible for setting the goals and framing the problems that engineers and scientists work on. However, technologies designed by engineers and scientists profoundly change the societies in which they operate. Technology has enabled a healthier, richer, and more productive society. At the same time, technology has contributed to the creation of many of the more serious problems our society faces.

Technology can help us build a happier, freer, and more fulfilling life, while maintaining risks and undesirable impacts at acceptable levels. But that does not happen automatically. It takes careful hard work by people who understand both technology and the society in which they live. In order to do their jobs responsibly and well in today's world, engineers and scientists must develop an understanding of the interface between technology and society and a command of the skills necessary to work at that interface. The undergraduate degree programs of the Department of Engineering and Public Policy (EPP) have been designed to allow undergraduate students at Carnegie Mellon University to add this important dimension to their traditional engineering or science education. EPP additional major graduates, for the most part, will enter traditional engineering or science careers, but will carry with them a set of insights and skills that will help them to better deal with issues in technology and policy, and better exercise their ethical and social obligations as practicing professionals.

Overview of the Undergraduate Programs in EPP

The undergraduate additional major programs in EPP combine the strong foundation in mathematics and physical sciences, and the development of engineering or science skills with a rigorous preparation in the analysis of social and political problems. The curriculum includes subject matter which is not part of traditional technical or social science curricula, but which contains elements of each. Students complete courses in four core areas: economics, statistics, decision-making, and communication. Breadth is achieved through EPP Technology-Policy elective courses. Finally, students apply their skills in a project preparatory course and two interdisciplinary problem-solving projects. Problem areas for these projects are chosen from local, state, and national situations, and include such topics as climate change, energy systems, technological innovation, telecommunication issues, computer security and privacy, risk analysis and communication, among others.  Students from several CMU colleges enroll in these projects courses exposing EPP additional majors to working in truly interdisciplinary situations. Examples of past project course topics and final reports are available.

Additional Major in Engineering and Public Policy

The EPP department offers an additional major in Engineering and Public Policy (EPP) with each of the five traditional engineering departments in the engineering college. The engineering additional major leads to a fully accredited engineering degree that prepares students for traditional technical careers. EPP additional major engineers are not educated to be a different kind of engineer. Rather, their education is intended to enable them to be better, more socially responsible engineers in the traditional technical fields.

Additional Major in Science, Technology, and Public Policy

The EPP department offers an additional major in Science, Technology and Public Policy (STPP) for students outside of the engineering college who are earning a B.S. degree. This includes students in the Mellon College of Science, the School of Computer Science, Tepper School of Business, and select majors in the Dietrich College. Similar to the additional major in Engineering and Public Policy, the additional major in Science, Technology and Public Policy is meant to broaden the perspectives on a student’s primary major and provide additional skills for future careers.

Minor in Technology and Policy

The department also offers a minor in Technology and Policy for non-engineering majors. The Technology and Policy minor exposes students to issues at the interface of science, technology, and society, and how interdisciplinary approaches are needed to solve complex problems.

Career Options with EPP Additional Majors

Students who select one of the EPP additional majors graduate with a regular accredited engineering degree or complete science degree, and thus have all of the options for traditional technical careers as their single major classmates. A large portion of our additional major students pursue traditional technical careers after graduation in areas such as product development, consulting, project management, etc.

The advantage of the additional major is the added set of skills and perspectives, which allow a graduate of the program to improve the quality, sensitivity, and social responsiveness of their work, and the work of their colleagues. Employers recognize these skills and often view our graduates as more attractive for a traditional engineering or technical position. Firms contact the EPP department every year to recruit EPP graduates because of their satisfaction with the knowledge and skills acquired by EPP students.

The additional major also opens up a collection of other options that are not available to most technical graduates. These include jobs in policy analysis in federal, state, and local government or in public policy consulting firms. Alumni also pursue careers in companies to deal with issues like government regulation, environmental control, worker health and safety, product liability and safety, telecommunications policy, energy systems, and the social impact of large technological systems.

Students also choose to continue their formal education, doing graduate work in engineering, the social sciences, law, or interdisciplinary programs.

Faculty Advisors

Faculty in several departments serve as advisors and information resources to students selecting the EPP undergraduate programs. Given the interdisciplinary perspective of EPP, students may find that a faculty member outside their traditional major can provide support and guidance with EPP-related courses and career paths.  The EPP Associate Department Head for Undergraduate Affairs is Deanna Matthews. Dr. Matthews can provide general academic advice and guidance for all EPP undergraduates.  Other faculty affiliated with the undergraduate programs in EPP are:   

  • Civil Engineering:  Peter Adams, Jared Cohon, Scott Matthews, Meagan Mauter, Mitch Small
  • Chemical Engineering: Neil Donahue
  • Computer Science: Lorrie Cranor
  • Electrical and Computer Engineering: Jon Peha, Marvin Sirbu
  • Engineering and Public Policy: Daniel Armanios, Ines Azevedo, Liz Casman, Alex Davis, Erica Fuchs, Paulina Jaramillo, Deanna Matthews, Granger Morgan
  • Mechanical Engineering: Jeremy Michalek, Edward Rubin, Kate Whitefoot
  • Material Science and Engineering: Jay Whitacre
  • Social and Decision Sciences: Paul Fischbeck, Baruch Fischhoff

EPP Program Educational Objectives

Students who earn an additional major in Engineering and Public Policy at the undergraduate level do so in conjunction with a traditional engineering major. The elements of the EPP undergraduate program broaden the traditional scope of technical analysis to encompass an engineering solution’s potential impact on society. Thus, our graduates have all of the skills as their peers in traditional engineering majors, but with a broader societal perspective and additional analysis skills. This enables our graduates to understand the interface between technology and society and to help solve the complex, interdisciplinary systems problems facing our world.

EPP Student Outcomes

By the end of the combined B.S. programs in a traditional engineering program and the EPP program, students should have attained the following:

  1. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering;
  2. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data;
  3. 

an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability; 


  4. an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams;
  5. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems;
  6. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility; 


  7. an ability to communicate effectively; 


  8. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context; 


  9. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning;


  10. a knowledge of contemporary issues; 


  11. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice;

plus these additional skills:

  1. an ability to demonstrate that engineering analysis alone is not sufficient to solve a “real world” societal need or problem;
  2. an ability to complete an analysis of a problem that involves technical, social science/behavioral, and policy dimensions and components;
  3. an ability to characterize the scale and systems level impacts of technology and public policy solutions;
  4. an ability to structure unstructured problems as part of a multi-disciplinary team;
  5. an ability to recognize they are appropriately trained for careers beyond traditional engineering.

Course Requirements for the Additional Major in EPP

Minimum units for the additional major106

Students pursuing an additional major in EPP must complete three sets of requirements: courses for the EPP additional major, courses for their traditional disciplinary major, and general education courses.  The student should referr to the relevant sections of this catalog for the required courses in the traditional disciplinary major.  The EPP additional major is designed to be completed with a traditional disciplinary major in the standard four-year time frame. However, additional units or course work may be required. Some courses for the EPP additional major may also satisfy requirements for traditional disciplinary majors or for general education courses.

Overview

Course Units
19-101Introduction to Engineering and Public Policy12
19-201EPP Sophomore Seminar1
73-102Principles of Microeconomics9
36-220Engineering Statistics and Quality Control
(or other approved statistics course)
9
19-301Decision Making Methods for Engineers and Scientists9
or 88-223 Decision Analysis
or 88-302 Behavioral Decision Making
(or other approved decision science course)
19-325Technology and Policy Writing for Lay Audiences9
or 76-270 Writing for the Professions
(or other approved writing course)
19-351Applied Methods for Technology-Policy Analysis9
19-451EPP Projects12
19-452EPP Projects12
Three EPP Technology-Policy Electivesmin. 24
 

Introductory Courses

Units
19-101Introduction to Engineering and Public Policy12
19-201EPP Sophomore Seminar1

The two introductory courses prepare students for the additional major experience through discussion and assessment of technology-policy interactions. 19-101 Introduction to Engineering and Public Policy may be taken as the second introductory engineering course during the first year for engineering students. 19-201 EPP Sophomore Seminar is required in addition to any corresponding seminar course in a student’s traditional degree program.

Core Area Courses

73-102Principles of Microeconomics9
36-220Engineering Statistics and Quality Control9
EPP Decision Science elective - one of the following, or other approved course:
19-301Decision Making Methods for Engineers and Scientists9
88-223Decision Analysis9
88-302Behavioral Decision Making9
EPP Writing and Communications elective - one of the following, or other approved course
19-325Technology and Policy Writing for Lay Audiences9
76-270Writing for the Professions9
 

The four core area courses provide the foundational skills in the social sciences that are needed for robust analysis of policy problems. 73-102 Principles of Microeconomics should be taken as a CIT General Education course. 

36-220 Engineering Statistics and Quality Control is required for all CE, ME, and MSE students in their traditional engineering majors. ChE students will substitute 36-220 for 03-232 Biochemistry I. ECE students, who take 36-217 Probability Theory and Random Processes for their traditional engineering major, may take 36-220 or 36-226 Introduction to Statistical Inference. Students should complete the statistics requirement by the end of sophomore year. A statistics course is a prerequisite for the EPP Decision Science elective.

The EPP Decision Science elective fulfills either the CIT General Education Social Analysis and Decision Making requirement or a CIT General Education free elective. The EPP Writing and Communications course fulfills the CIT General Education Writing and Expressions requirement.

Technology-Policy Electives

  • At least 3 courses of EPP Technology-Policy electives (24 units minimum)

EPP Technology-Policy Electives include courses that belong to three categories. First, EPP Technology-Policy Electives include courses that synthesize engineering analysis and social analysis perspectives and apply them to problems with substantial societal and technological components. Specific areas of interest for these courses are (1) energy, resources, and the environment, (2) risk assessment, (3) forensic engineering, (4) urban engineering, (5) information and communication technology, and (6) product engineering and design, among others. Second, EPP Technology-Policy Electives include courses that teach methods or analysis skills necessary for solving complex problems. Examples include mathematical or statistical courses related to optimization or estimation, or economics courses related to economic analysis. Finally, EPP Technology-Policy Electives include courses that provide technical background for policy relevant issues. These courses are fundamental for understanding our current engineering systems and how proposed changes can be implemented. Examples include courses on electricity systems, engine design, or atmospheric systems. 

Qualifying courses for EPP Technology-Policy Electives are determined each semester. The majority of 19-xxx EPP departmental courses are considered EPP Technology-Policy Electives. Exceptions will be identified when the courses are offered. 19-301 and 19-351 are required courses for the EPP additional major and may not be used as EPP Technology-Policy electives. Courses from other departments also are acceptable as electives. Students should work with their advisors to define areas of concentration or a selection of breadth courses for the EPP Technology-Policy Electives.

Students are required to take at least three EPP Technology-Policy electives for a minimum of 24 units. Units may be added in any combination, but a maximum of one 3-unit course is permitted. Up to 9 units of research may be used with approval. Students may not use a required course from their traditional disciplinary major for these elective units. However, students may use an elective course from their traditional major requirements to meet the requirements of both their traditional engineering major and an EPP Technology-Policy elective, but the units for the course will not be double-counted toward units required for their degree. Some EPP Technology-Policy elective courses may fulfill requirements for CIT General Education categories (e.g., 19-411 Global Competitiveness: Firms, Nations and Technological Change is an I&I course), otherwise students use Free Elective units to complete this requirement.

Capstone Courses

Units
19-351Applied Methods for Technology-Policy Analysis9
19-451/452EPP Projects12
19-451/452EPP Projects
(taken twice)
12

The capstone courses synthesize the technical skills and knowledge from a student’s traditional major with the social science skills and broad perspective of the EPP major. 

19-351 Applied Methods for Technology-Policy Analysis is a preparatory course for the EPP Projects. 19-351 may be completed as a co-requisite of 19-451/19-452 EPP Projects. The course fulfills CIT General Education free elective units.

19-451/19-452 EPP Projects is taken twice by all students. EPP Projects are technology/policy projects which deal with research and development of recommendations for solving actual and critical problems currently affecting society. The students, faculty, and graduate student managers for the project are drawn from EPP, Social and Decision Sciences, and the Heinz College, and other CMU departments, and hence bring different areas of expertise to the structuring and solution of the problem. The topics for EPP Projects are drawn from diverse areas such as environmental systems and resources, public transportation, urban engineering problems, energy and fuel utilization, the interaction of law and technology, strategic materials and vulnerability of supply, technical issues in national security, and problems in automation, robotics, and communication technology. Students use Free Elective units to complete this requirement.

Notes on EPP double major requirements 

Students should follow the suggested curriculum timelines for completing the math, science, and engineering course requirements of the traditional major with the exception of 36-220 which should be taken as early as possible and no later then the end of sophomore year. 

All students must complete 76-101 Interpretation and Argument. Some courses as noted above may be used to fulfill requirements of general education courses. Acceptable courses for the CIT General Education requirements are maintained by the CIT Dean's Office. Students must submit a plan during their first-semester as an EPP student (usually Fall sophomore year) for these general education courses demonstrating their relevance to EPP.

Students must complete the minimum number of units as required by their traditional major for graduation. In some cases, students completing the EPP additional major may need to complete additional units to meet all requirements for the traditional major and EPP additional major. 

In addition to any other graduation requirements (e.g., regarding course work, minimum QPA, pass/fail course work, etc.) of the student's traditional disciplinary major, students must earn a minimum QPA of 2.0 in all courses required for the EPP major. 

Side-by-side curriculum charts of the curricula for the traditional engineering majors alone versus the traditional engineering majors with the EPP additional major can assist students in determining the course requirements and scheduling needed to complete the degree requirements.

A proposed semester plan is below. Students work with their faculty advisors to determine the best sequence of courses given the varied requirements in the traditional majors.

CourseSemester
19-101 Introduction to Engineering and Public PolicyFirst-year Spring
73-102 Principles of MircoeconomicsFirst-year Fall or Spring
19-201 EPP Sophomore SeminarSophomore Fall
36-220 Engineering Statistics and Quality ControlSophomore Fall or Spring
EPP Writing and Communications ElectiveSophomore Fall or Spring
EPP Decision Science ElectiveJunior Fall
19-351 Applied Methods for Technology-Policy AnalysisJunior Spring
3 EPP Technology-Policy ElectivesJunior and/or Senior year
19-451/19-452 EPP ProjectsSenior Fall and Spring

Course Requirements for the Additional Major in STPP

Minimum units required for additional major106

The requirements for the Science, Technology and Public Policy additional major are similar to those for the Engineering and Public Policy additional major. Some courses may fulfill some major requirements or "general education" requirements in other colleges. Other courses will use students' elective spaces or free elective units. Core courses required for a student's major will not be allowed to double-count for Technology Policy electives, but elective courses can be selected that fulfill both major elective requirements and Technology Policy electives. Students pursuing the STPP additional major should work with their advisors to determine how best to fit the additional major requirements into their course load.

Introductory Courses

Units
19-101Introduction to Engineering and Public Policy12
19-201EPP Sophomore Seminar1

Core Area Courses

73-102Principles of Microeconomics9
Statistics course — one of the following:
36-220Engineering Statistics and Quality Control9
36-226Introduction to Statistical Inference9
or other approved statistics course
EPP Decision Science course — one of the following:
19-301Decision Making Methods for Engineers and Scientists9
88-223Decision Analysis9
88-302Behavioral Decision Making9
or other approved decision science course
EPP Writing and Communications course — one of the following:
19-325Technology and Policy Writing for Lay Audiences9
76-270Writing for the Professions9
76-271Introduction to Professional and Technical Writing9
or other approved writing and communications course

Technology-Policy Electives

3 courses, at least 24 units24 minimum units

Capstone Courses

19-351Applied Methods for Technology-Policy Analysis9
19-451/452EPP Projects12
19-451/452EPP Projects
(taken twice)
12

Fifth Year M.S. program in Engineering and Public Policy

Students, regardless of whether they complete an undergraduate additional major or not, may apply for the fifth year masters program that will lead to the additional degree of Master of Science in Engineering and Public Policy.  This course of study will ordinarily require two additional semesters of study beyond that required for the undergraduate degrees in the primary major and EPP/STPP additional major.  Some coursework towards the MS may be able to be completed during the student's senior year, however no courses taken may count for both a BS program and the MS in EPP.   Students interested in the program must have a minimum 3.0 QPA and should contact their advisor for details on the application process and course requirements.  

Bachelor of Science in Engineering and Public Policy and Master of Science in Public Policy and Management

Highly motivated and talented students can earn the EPP additional major bachelor's degree, and a master's degree in the H. John Heinz College of Public Policy and Management in a five-year course of study. Students interested in the combined degree program should enroll in a standard additional major program in an engineering specialty and EPP. During the third year of study, the student applies to the Heinz College for admission to the master's program; an academic record of B average or better is normally a prerequisite for admittance.

The five-year course of study is possible because of specific course load overlaps between the EPP and Heinz College programs: (1) some social analysis requirements in EPP, usually four semester courses, can be satisfied with Heinz College common core courses in economics and social science; (2) at least one project course is common and applicable to both curricula; (3) at least one additional EPP technical elective, engineering option, or project course will be accepted for Heinz College credit following the usual request to the master's committee.

Students desiring this option should seek faculty advice and counsel in their sophomore year so that a curriculum satisfying all the degree requirements can be ensured. Contact the Associate Department Head for Undergraduate Affairs in EPP for more information. For general information on Heinz 3-1-1 programs please contact the Heinz College or refer to their website.

Minor in Technology and Policy

The department also offers a minor in Technology and Policy to non-CIT majors.  This minor allows students outside of engineering to sample the EPP requirements and develop exposure and awareness to issues at the interface of science, technology, and society.  

Pre-requisites: Students should have prerequisite knowledge in economics (73-102 Principles of Microeconomics or higher level economics course) and statistics (36-202 Methods for Statistics and Data Science or higher level statistics course) in order to pursue the Technology and Policy Minor.

Course Requirements Units
19-101Introduction to Engineering and Public Policy12
19-301Decision Making Methods for Engineers and Scientists
(or other approved Decision Science course)
9
or 19-351 Applied Methods for Technology-Policy Analysis
19-451EPP Projects12
or 19-452 EPP Projects
xx-xxxTwo EPP Technology-Policy Electives18

EPP Technical Electives include courses in CIT, MCS, or SCS that address problems at the society-technology interface and the means of analyzing these issues.  A list of qualifying Technology-Policy electives is assembled each semester and is available from the EPP Department. Example Technology-Policy electives include:

19-211Ethics and Policy Issues in Computing9
19-365Water Technology Innovation and Policy9
19-402Telecommunications Technology, Policy & Management12
19-411Global Competitiveness: Firms, Nations and Technological Change9
19-424Energy and the Environment9

Students must earn a cumulative QPA of 2.0 in all courses taken for the minor. Required courses taken for a student’s primary major may not be counted toward the Technology and Policy Minor. Elective courses for a student’s primary major or courses fulfilling general education requirements may be counted, however. 

Details of this program are provided in the discussion of CIT minors; see Technology and Policy Minor Description.

Notes on EPP Undergraduate/Graduate Level Courses 

Many courses taught by the department (19-XXX courses) are offered to undergraduate and graduate students. These “dual level” courses are offered in two formats:

  • Some courses are taught under both an undergraduate and graduate number. An example is Telecommunications Technology, Policy & Management (19-402) and 19-722 Telecommunications, Technology Policy & Management.  In these types of courses, students who sign up under the 700-level (graduate) course number may be expected to perform the same coursework at a higher level, and/or complete additional coursework, compared to 400-level students. Undergraduates who choose to take the course under the graduate number will be also be expected to work at the higher expectation/coursework level.
  • Other courses are taught under a 600 level number. An example is 19-626 Climate Science and Policy. These courses may be taken by undergraduates as a senior level course, or by graduate students as a graduate level course. As with dual number courses, graduate level students or undergraduates taking the course for graduate credit may be required to perform coursework at a higher level and/or complete additional coursework. Undergraduates who are taking a 600 level course for graduate credit should identify this fact to both the course instructor and to their EPP department advisor.

Students who have questions about the requirements of a specific EPP 400/700, or 600 level course, should contact the course instructor. Some courses have pre-requisites which may be waived for students given prior background. 

Other departments may have different policies regarding courses offered under both an undergraduate and graduate number, and courses offered under numbers other than the 100, 200, 300, 400, or 700 levels. Students who wish to take these courses should check with those departments for their specific policies.

Course Descriptions

Note on Course Numbers

Each Carnegie Mellon course number begins with a two-digit prefix which designates the department offering the course (76-xxx courses are offered by the Department of English, etc.). Although each department maintains its own course numbering practices, typically the first digit after the prefix indicates the class level: xx-1xx courses are freshmen-level, xx-2xx courses are sophomore level, etc. xx-6xx courses may be either undergraduate senior-level or graduate-level, depending on the department. xx-7xx courses and higher are graduate-level. Please consult the Schedule of Classes each semester for course offerings and for any necessary pre-requisites or co-requisites.

19-101 Introduction to Engineering and Public Policy
Fall and Spring: 12 units
This course examines the processes of public and private decision making and of policy formation, which shape the evolution of a technology and its impact on our society. Technology plays an important role in shaping our worlds. At the same time, social forces often play a central role in the evolution of a technology. A particular technology such as an automobile or computer is chosen to study technology and policy in context. Specific topics covered in the case of the automobile includes automotive design and manufacture, safety, pollution, fuel economy and their interactions. In each area, we discuss the technological and institutional issues, their interaction, the possible need for public policy and the factors that govern the policy. The course will involve several group problem-solving sessions.
19-201 EPP Sophomore Seminar
Fall: 1 unit
The Sophomore Seminar has the objective of introducing the student to the interdisciplinary nature of Engineering and Public Policy problems. This is achieved through the use of case studies dealing with aspects of decision-making and ethics in policy issues which have a technological basis. Students are introduced to the technical and policy dimensions of these problems as well as to skills such as data collection and analysis, group work, and oral and written presentations. A few seminars by EPP graduates and faculty are occasionally included to give the student an idea of careers and EPP problems.
19-211 Ethics and Policy Issues in Computing
Spring: 9 units
Should autonomous robots make life and death decisions on their own? Should we allow them to select a target and launch weapons? To diagnose injuries and perform surgery when human doctors are not around? Who should be permitted to observe you, find out who your friends are, what you do and say with them, what you buy, and where you go? Do social media and personalized search restrict our intellectual horizons? Do we live in polarizing information bubbles, just hearing echoes of what we already know and believe? As computing technology becomes ever more pervasive and sophisticated, we are presented with an escalating barrage of decisions about who, how, when, and for what purposes technology should be used. This course will provide an intellectual framework for discussing these pressing issues of our time, as we shape the technologies that in turn shape us. We will seek insight through reading, discussion, guest lectures, and debates. Students will also undertake an analysis of a relevant issue of their choice, developing their own position, and acquiring the research skills needed to lend depth to their thinking. The course will enhance students' ability to think clearly about contentious technology choices, formulate smart positions, and support their views with winning arguments.
19-301 Decision Making Methods for Engineers and Scientists
Fall: 9 units
This course covers various economic, statistical, and decision analysis techniques used for examining complex decisions where technology, society, and policy interconnect. Topics covered include: estimation techniques, benefit-cost analysis, decision trees, dealing with uncertainty, risk perception and analysis, survey design and implementation, utility theory, heuristics and biases in inference and prediction, methods for combining information from different sources and dealing with conflicting objectives.
Prerequisites: 36-220 Min. grade C or 36-217 Min. grade C

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-325 Technology and Policy Writing for Lay Audiences
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of persuasive, accurate writing about technical, highly specialized information for a general audience, based on an axiom attributed to Albert Einstein: If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. Readings will be selected from writing style guides, and from nonfiction and science fiction literature. Course work will include the translation of data and journal articles into prose for a sophisticated general audience, as well as original writing.
19-351 Applied Methods for Technology-Policy Analysis
Spring: 9 units
This course synthesizes concepts from economics, statistics, decision analysis, and other humanities and social science areas as they relate to analysis of technology and public policy issues. Students will focus on applying skills, tools, and techniques of social science to critically examine issues of current importance to society that have engineering systems at the core, and how public policy can be informed by the results of these analyses. Students will discover the relationship between formulating research questions considering a wide range of perspectives (e.g., political, ethical, social, economic, and legal aspects) and implementing the appropriate research methods for answering them. The course will emphasize interpretation and communication of analysis results in written and oral presentation, especially to non-technical audiences. As a precursor to the EPP Project courses, the course also prepares EPP juniors for structuring real-world problems into a feasible work plan, and to deal with revising work plans as work proceeds.
19-355 Special Topic: Cryptocurrencies, Blockchains, and Applications
Spring
Cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin have gained large popularity in recent years, in no small part due to the fantastic potential applications they could facilitate. This course will first provide an overview of the technological mechanisms behind cryptocurrencies and distributed consensus and distributed ledgers ("blockchains"), introducing along the way the necessary cryptographic tools. It will then focus on more advanced blockchain applications, such as "smart contracts," that is, contracts written as code. Finally, the course will also introduce some of the legal and policy questions surrounding cryptocurrencies. Units: 9 (without semester-long project) or 12 (with semester-long project) Prerequisites: 15-213 or equivalent strongly recommended

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-365 Water Technology Innovation and Policy
Spring: 9 units
Innovation in water technologies is necessary to confront profound water resource challenges facing countries around the world. Students successfully completing this course will be able to discuss the factors and conditions that drive innovation in the water sector. Students will begin by describing and classifying the historical drivers for innovation in water treatment, including technical, economic, and regulatory drivers. After an introduction to the fundamental principles of water treatment technologies, students will identify present day technology shortcomings and distill these into discrete design objectives. Students will then formulate and answer quantitative and qualitative questions that respond to these design objectives by leveraging their knowledge of engineering fundamentals, regulatory tools, and pricing policies. Comparing their own solutions with those proposed in the peer-reviewed academic literature in engineering and the social sciences, students will evaluate the technical feasibility, usability, and social desirability of proposed water innovations in developed and developing countries and summarize their findings in policy briefs.
Prerequisites: 19-101 or 19-201 or 12-100 or 06-100
19-402 Telecommunications Technology, Policy & Management
Intermittent: 12 units
Modern telecommunications is the nervous system of society. The Internet and wireless communications have transformed every aspect of our modern life. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to basic principles of telecommunications technology and the legal, economic, and regulatory environment of todays networks. Topics covered include the fundamentals of communication network technologies, including video, voice, and computer networks; principles behind telecommunications regulation from common carrier law and natural monopoly to information diversity, privacy and national security; traffic differentiation on the Internet and the debate over network neutrality; universal service and the digital divide; mergers, antitrust, and the changing industrial structure of the communications sector. We will explore current topical questions such as the future of competition in broadband access; the shift of entertainment video from cable and satellite to Internet delivery; how cloud computing concepts are transforming networks; and communications support for the Internet of Things. Comparison with European approaches to communications regulation. Special emphasis on how new technologies have altered, and are altered by, regulation. Junior or Senior standing required.
Prerequisite: 73-100
19-403 Policies of Wireless Systems
Intermittent: 12 units
This course will address public policy issues related to wireless systems. It investigates policies related to a wide variety of emerging wireless systems and technologies, including current and next-generation cellular systems, wifi and white space devices, emerging methods of accessing spectrum, communications systems for emergency responders (firefighters, police, emergency medical services), current and next-generation television, and satellite communications. This can include the government role in facilitating the creation of infrastructure, in advancing competition among broadcasters and communications service providers, in using scarce spectrum efficiently, in promoting public safety and homeland security, and in protecting privacy and security. Because these are inherently interdisciplinary issues, the course will include detailed discussions of technology, economics, and law, with no prerequisites in any of these areas. This course is cross-listed as 18-650, 19-403, 19-713, and 95-824. Senior or graduate standing required.
19-411 Global Competitiveness: Firms, Nations and Technological Change
Fall: 9 units
Global Competitiveness introduces students to the fundamental principles surrounding global competitiveness and technological change in the 21st century. The course is broken into three sections. The first section introduces students to competing economic, sociological, and political science theories on the structures supporting technological change. The second section presents the contemporary literature on technological change. The concluding section leverages lessons from the preceding two sections to evaluate national innovation systems, and the factors that lead to national comparative advantage. Students should leave the class able to reflect competently on what the existing literature tells us about the factors influencing global technology competitiveness, and on how modern changes in the structures supporting innovation as well as technology itself may be changing the rules of the game for firms and for nations. The course is open to undergraduate juniors, seniors & graduate students.
19-421 Emerging Energy Policies
Intermittent: 9 units
As the world moves toward shale gas, renewable energy, and alternative vehicle technologies, many interesting policy issues arise. These issues are the subject of discussion among engineers, scientists, policymakers, nongovernmental organizations such as environmental groups and the public. All influence public policy decision making. Focusing on current hot topics in energy policy, students will learn the basic principles of public policy analysis and underlying techniques such as program evaluation, cost benefit analysis, life cycle analysis, prince analysis, and risk analysis as well as the variety of policy mechanisms available. Class time will include a combination of faculty and guest speaker lectures, discussion of issues, videos, and problem solving. While the course has no prerequisites, students should feel comfortable with scientific and technical topics. Upon completion of this course, students should have a deeper and more strategic understanding of the opportunities and challenges associated with emerging energy policies. Open to seniors. Open to juniors with permission only.

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-424 Energy and the Environment
Intermittent: 9 units
This course will explore the relationships between environmental impacts and the utilization of energy through a series of case studies on topics of current interest. Such topics might include the use of renewable and non-renewable fuels for electric power generation; energy use for automobiles and other transportation systems; energy use for buildings and industrial processes; and environmental issues such as urban air pollution, ozone formation, acid rain, and global warming. The emphasis will be on analysis of energy-environmental interactions and tradeoffs, and their dependency upon engineering design choices, economic variables, and public policy parameters. Junior or Senior standing in CIT or permission of instructor.
19-425 Sustainable Energy for the Developing World
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course examines the current state of the energy system in developing countries and the challenges these countries will face in sustainably meeting their energy needs in the 21st century. The following are examples of questions and issues we will cover throughout the semester. What is the current status of the energy system in the developing world? What is the role of energy in supporting economic growth and alleviating poverty? What are the future energy needs of developing countries? What are the challenges developing countries will face as they build/improve their energy systems? What technologies are available to meet the energy challenges in the developing world?

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-427 Special Topics: Energy Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Fall: 9 units
In this class, students will learn the fundamentals of energy innovation and entrepreneurship, how innovation and entrepreneurship in energy differs from that in other fields, and practice these skills by either developing a business and non-market strategy for an idea of their own, or build upon energy technological innovations developed by CMU faculty or scientists and engineers in federal laboratories. The resulting strategy can, if students wish, be submitted for competitions that typically take place each spring at CMU, Pittsburgh, and throughout the United States.

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-432 Special Topics: Bitcoin and Cryptocurrencies
Spring: 6 units
Provides an understanding of the technology, usability, business, and regulatory issues of digital currencies in the context of the cryptocurrency, Bitcoin. How does it work? How do people use it? Can I make money with it? Is it safe? Is it legal? To address these questions, we investigate Bitcoin's underlying technology; digital wallets; Bitcoin mining; cybersecurity; and regulatory issues.
19-440 Combustion and Air Pollution Control
Intermittent: 9 units
Formation and control of gaseous and particulate air pollutants in combustion systems. Basic principles of combustion, including thermochemical equilibrium, flame temperature, chemical kinetics, hydrocarbon chemistry, and flame structure. Formation of gaseous and particulate pollutants in combustion systems. Combustion modifications and postcombustion technologies for pollutant control. Relationship between technology and regional, national, and global air pollution control strategies. The internal combustion engine and coal-fired utility boiler are used as examples.

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-443 Special Topics in EPP: Climate Change Science and Adaptation
Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course consists of four parts. The first part will provide a primer for those who are curious about the physical mechanisms by which climate is determined, and by which climate change occurs. The treatment of these mechanisms will not be overly quantitative, and no knowledge of meteorology or atmospheric science is needed. College-level physics, as well as basic calculus and basic chemistry is, however, needed. The second part will describe the projected consequences of climate change, as well as those that are already occurring. This part will also familiarize students with how societies might adapt to these changes. The third part will explore (and critique) some of the tools that decision-makers use to quantify and compare the damages caused by these consequences. The final part of the course will discuss some of the technologies that could be used to prevent dangerous climate change.

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-451 EPP Projects
Spring: 12 units
Interdisciplinary problem-solving projects in which students work as leaders or members of project teams. Problem areas are abstracted from local, state and national situations and involve the interaction of technology and public policy, with different projects being chosen each semester. Oral and written presentations concerning the results of project studies are required. NOTE: All students will enroll in section A at first. During the 1st class, students will choose either project A or B. Those choosing B, will be moved into that section.
19-452 EPP Projects
Fall: 12 units
Interdisciplinary problem-solving projects in which students work as leaders or members of project teams. Problem areas are abstracted from local, state and national situations and involve the interaction of technology and public policy, with different projects being chosen each semester. Oral and written presentations concerning the results of project studies are required.
19-458 Special Topics: Organizational Theory for Engineers
Spring: 9 units
Why do so many technical problems of global importance persist even when there exists engineering solutions? This course will explore the organizational challenges that can hinder the deployment of engineering solutions towards solving some of our most critical global technical challenges. We will explore a variety of organizational theories such as institutional theory, network theory, social movement theory, and actor-network theory and then see how they are applied to a variety of engineering systems such as those around energy, mechanical design, water, information and communication technology, and other such civil infrastructure. By the end of the course, students will be able to a) learn how to read and synthesize organizational research from a variety of theoretical lenses, b) understand how such research can apply to a variety of engineering systems, and c) learn how to advance and conduct engineering research that incorporates an organizational perspective. Intended for graduate students; seniors and juniors with permission.

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-461 Invention & Innovation for Materials Intensive Technologies Part 1
Fall: 4.5 units
Two 4.5 unit classes that can be taken in sequence or as stand-alone mini's. Courses will be cross-listed between EPP and MSE. This course is intended to instill a sense of how technologies are conceived and brought to market. The students will be exposed to a variety of formalized invention and innovation processes/concepts and will be asked to complete projects that will pull from the full range of their engineering training. It is intended for seniors who are eager to creatively apply their learned knowledge skills, and who are interested in invention, innovation, and entrepreneurship. The first half (part 1 (19461), mini 1) will focus on the process of invention for devices and technologies that are enabled by materials functionality. This will start by providing historical context and addressing the questions "What is invention?" This will be followed by an assessment of various systematic methods by which the process of invention is practiced, with a specific focus on materials intensive devices and products. The second half of the course (part 2 (19462), mini 2) will examine innovation theory in the context of materials intensive technologies. Specifically, the concepts of incumbency, disruption, value chain, supply chain, funding models and paths to market will be addressed. In this class, significant time will be dedicated to covering the impact of international market and technology development.

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-462 Invention Innovation for Materials Intensive Technologies Part 2
Fall: 4.5 units
Note: students must take and pass 27-501/19-461 to take 27-502/19-462.Two 4.5 unit classes that can be taken in sequence or as stand-alone mini's. Courses will be cross-listed between EPP and MSE. This course is intended to instill a sense of how technologies are conceived and brought to market. The students will be exposed to a variety of formalized invention and innovation processes/concepts and will be asked to complete projects that will pull from the full range of their engineering training. It is intended for seniors who are eager to creatively apply their learned knowledge skills, and who are interested in invention, innovation, and entrepreneurship. The first half (part 1 (19461), mini 1) will focus on the process of invention for devices and technologies that are enabled by materials functionality. This will start by providing historical context and addressing the questions "What is invention?" This will be followed by an assessment of various systematic methods by which the process of invention is practiced, with a specific focus on materials intensive devices and products. The second half of the course (part 2 (19462), mini 2) will examine innovation theory in the context of materials intensive technologies. Specifically, the concepts of incumbency, disruption, value chain, supply chain, funding models and paths to market will be addressed. In this class, significant time will be dedicated to covering the impact of international market and technology development.

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-466 Spec Topic: Stochastic Discrete Choice Models: Estimation and Behavioral Theory
Fall: 9 units
This course will cover the rational and behavioral foundations of discrete choice models, current behavioral theories, and estimation methods. Content will include an overview of the history of thinking about discrete choice models, rational foundations, behavioral theories, signal detection theory, multinomial logit, mixed logit using restricted MLE and monte-carlo simulation, and experimental design. If time permits we will cover item-response models and Bayesian methods.
19-486 Special Topics: New Technology Commercialization: Public Policy Strategies
Spring: 9 units
During this project-based class, students will develop non-market strategies for real-world clients. As defined, by David Baron, "The nonmarket environment consists of the social, political, and legal arrangements that structure interactions among companies and their public." This class will focus on non-market strategies at the intersection of new technologies, public policies, and business. Entrepreneurs and innovators interested in commercializing technology in the biomedical, energy, transportation, information technology, robotics, aerospace, food, healthcare, and other industries require more than knowing whether a technology works and the potential market. Non-market factors such as regulations, standards, and grants influence product, price, location, research, development, and testing, and other decisions. As a result, public policies provide both opportunities and challenges for the commercialization of an invention. Only by recognizing these opportunities or overcoming these challenges can an invention become a commercialized innovation.

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-500 Directed Study in EPP: Undergraduate
All Semesters
Students may do undergraduate research as one course for EPP technical elective credit, with an EPP faculty member, or on an approved project with a faculty member from another department. The research credits must be pre-approved by your advisor, and should result in a written product, one copy of which should be sent to EPP.
19-534 Usable Privacy Security
Spring: 9 units
There is growing recognition that technology alone will not provide all of the solutions to security and privacy problems. Human factors play an important role in these areas, and it is important for security and privacy experts to have an understanding of how people will interact with the systems they develop. This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of usability and user interface problems related to privacy and security and to give them experience in designing studies aimed at helping to evaluate usability issues in security and privacy systems. The course is suitable both for students interested in privacy and security who would like to learn more about usability, as well as for students interested in usability who would like to learn more about security and privacy. Much of the course will be taught in a graduate seminar style in which all students will be expected to do a weekly reading assignment and each week different students will prepare a presentation for the class. Students will also work on a group project throughout the semester. The course is open to all graduate students who have technical backgrounds. The 12-unit course numbers (19734, 08-734 and 5-836) are for PhD students and masters students. Students enrolled in these course numbers will be expected to play a leadership role in a group project that produces a paper suitable for publication. The 9-unit 500-level course numbers (19534, 08-534 and 05-436) are for juniors, seniors, and masters students. Students enrolled in these course numbers will have less demanding project and presentation requirements.
19-624 Emerging Energy Policies
Intermittent: 12 units
As the world moves toward shale gas, renewable energy, and alternative vehicle technologies, many interesting policy issues arise. These issues are the subject of discussion among engineers, scientists, policymakers, nongovernmental organizations such as environmental groups and the public. All influence public policy decision making. Focusing on current hot topics in energy policy, students will learn the basic principles of public policy analysis and underlying techniques such as program evaluation, cost benefit analysis, life cycle analysis, prince analysis, and risk analysis as well as the variety of policy mechanisms available. Class time will include a combination of faculty and guest speaker lectures, discussion of issues, videos, and problem solving. While the course has no prerequisites, students should feel comfortable with scientific and technical topics. Upon completion of this course, students should have a deeper and more strategic understanding of the opportunities and challenges associated with emerging energy policies. Open to graduate students and seniors. Open to juniors with permission only.

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-625 Sustainable Energy for the Developing World
Fall and Summer: 12 units
This course examines the current state of the energy system in developing countries and the challenges these countries will face in sustainably meeting their energy needs in the 21st century. The following are examples of questions and issues we will cover throughout the semester. What is the current status of the energy system in the developing world? What is the role of energy in supporting economic growth and alleviating poverty? What are the future energy needs of developing countries? What are the challenges developing countries will face as they build/improve their energy systems? What technologies are available to meet the energy challenges in the developing world?

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-626 Climate Science and Policy
Intermittent: 12 units
This course will survey both scientific and policy issues associated with climate change. We will begin by surveying important factors governing the Earth's climate including solar and terrestrial radiative equilibrium and ocean heat storage and transport. Next, we will discuss the several perturbations or "forcings" that industrial society has imposed on Earth's climate: changes in greenhouse gas concentrations, ozone, and aerosols. The course will examine how complex climate feedbacks lead to significant uncertainty regarding the response of the Earth to these forcings. Decision-making strategies that policy makers can use to deal with these uncertainties will be discussed. We will outline major impacts of climate change on society as well as natural systems and strategies for mitigating climate change.

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-627 Special Topics: Energy Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Fall: 12 units
In this class, students will learn the fundamentals of energy innovation and entrepreneurship, how innovation and entrepreneurship in energy differs from that in other fields, and practice these skills by either developing a business and non-market strategy for an idea of their own, or build upon energy technological innovations developed by CMU faculty or scientists and engineers in federal laboratories. The resulting strategy can, if students wish, be submitted for competitions that typically take place each spring at CMU, Pittsburgh, and throughout the United States.

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-639 Policies of the Internet
Fall: 12 units
This course will address public policy issues related to the Internet. This may include policy issues such as network neutrality and the open Internet, Internet governance and the domain name system (and the role of the United Nations), copyright protection of online content, regulation of indecency and pornography, universal access to Internet and Internet as a "human right", government surveillance of the Internet, Internet privacy and security, and taxation of electronic commerce. It will also teach some fundamentals of Internet technology. Because these are inherently interdisciplinary issues, the course will include detailed discussions of technology, economics, and law, with no prerequisites in any of these areas. Senior or graduate standing required.
19-648 Special Topics: International Climate Adaptation & Infrastructure Innovation
Spring: 6 units
Although an international problem, climate change will affect each country's critical infrastructure in diverse ways. This course will focus on understanding how international communities are adapting and innovating to reduce critical infrastructure risk. Students will be able to list and describe natural hazards affected by climate change, focusing on their impacts on natural and built critical infrastructure systems in physically, socially, and economically diverse countries. Students will then use cost-benefit analysis, the triple bottom line approach (physical, social, economic), and robust decision making to analyze, compare, and contrast different countries' responses. The class will culminate in a final paper and presentation on one country's approach to decision-making under uncertainty for adaptation. Learning Objectives: By the end of the semester, you should be able to: · Understand risk. o Define risk, hazard, vulnerability, exposure, adaptation, hazard mitigation, greenhouse gas mitigation. o Explain the link between some natural hazards and climate change o List 10 natural hazards and their impacts on the international community. · Analyze outcomes/impacts. o Predict how physically, socially, and economically detrimental a given natural hazard will actually be in different critical infrastructure systems. o Compare and contrast different adaptations to reduce risk. · Create recommendations for improving adaptation in an international community
19-653 Climate Change Mitigation
Intermittent: 12 units
Assessment of technological and policy options for responding to the threat of climate change. Overview of climate-change science: sources, sinks and atmospheric dynamics of greenhouse gases. Current systems for energy supply and use. Technological options for low-carbon energy supplies: fossil fuels with sequestration and renewable sources. Technological options for improving end-use energy efficiency in buildings and in transportation. Geo-engineering the climate. Policy frameworks for implementing reductions of greenhouse gas emissions. 4 hours lecture
19-665 Environmental Politics and Policy
Fall: 6 units
Engineers, scientists, policymakers, industry, environmental groups, and the public all influence environmental policy making, and should have an understanding of past and current environmental issues, technologies, policies, programs, and politics. Using a case study approach, students will learn how to how to use program evaluation to analyze the effectiveness of past policies (e.g., CFCs, DDT) and apply the lessons learned to conduct policy analysis of current environmental challenges (e.g., nanotechnology, climate change). Students will gain an understanding of the variety of policy mechanisms available to attain environmental goals including the use of voluntary standards. Student interest will guide topic selection for both issues discussed in class and for project work. Class time will include a combination of faculty and guest speaker lectures, discussion of issues, videos, and problem solving time. While the course has no prerequisites, students should feel comfortable with scientific and technical topics.
19-666 Energy Policy and Economics
Intermittent: 6 units
This course will review how past and future energy technology trajectories are intertwined with pathways of economic development, business investment decisions, social needs, and political priorities. Emphasis will be placed on clean energy and promising technological trajectories for the future. This course will explore how a wide variety of policy mechanisms- technology policy, utility regulation and restructuring, emissions policies, multilateral interventions and agreements, and corporate strategies-can shape energy use and the environmental impacts of energy systems. Study examples will draw from both developed and developing countries.

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-670 Quantitative Entrepreneurship: Analysis for New Technology Commercialization
Intermittent: 12 units
This course provides engineers with a multidisciplinary mathematical foundation for integrated modeling of engineering design, manufacturing, and enterprise planning decisions for commercializing new technologies and products. Topics include economics in product design, manufacturing and operations modeling and accounting, consumer choice modeling, survey design, conjoint analysis, optimization, model integration and interpretation, and professional communication skills. Students will apply theory and methods to a team project for a new product or emerging technology, developing a business plan to defend technical and economic competitiveness. This course assumes fluency with multivariable calculus, linear algebra, and probability theory.

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-671 Tech Startup: Tools and Techniques
Spring: 6 units
19671 (Session 1) - The first year or two of a tech start-up sets the trajectory and character of that company for years to come. Too few entrepreneurs appreciate this reality and, as a result, many carry forward misperceptions and misconceptions about creating and building a successful tech company that set it on the path for failure. This class remedies that challenge by exposing the student the practical reality of creating and evaluating business concept. This class should help the student answer (or know how to find the answer) to the following questions: When thing of Is my idea a real innovation? Is it also a business or a product or neither? How do I know how big the market is for my product? What are the technology market and competitive risks in my idea and how do I assess them? Can I compete with the big companies? Can I sell it? How? When? Where? Students will have the opportunity to apply their newfound practical skills gathered in part from lectures from experienced entrepreneurs and investors to case studies.

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-672 Special Topics: Tech Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Fall: 6 units
(Session 2) - The first year or two of a tech start-up set the trajectory and character of that company for years to come. Too few entrepreneurs appreciate this reality and, as a result, many carry forward misperceptions and misconceptions about creating and building a successful tech company that set it on the path for failure. This class attempts to remedy that challenge by exposing the student the practical reality of building a team and funding a start-up team. This class should help the student answer (or know how to find the answer) to the following questions: How do I find manage and evaluate a start-up team Do I have the skill motivation and ability to be a tech entrepreneur? Can I build a company from scratch (really?)? Should I be the CEO Sales Account Manager VP of Engineering or something else altogether? How much money do I raise and where and when do I raise it? Students will have the opportunity to apply their newfound practical skills gathered in part from lectures from experienced entrepreneurs and investors to case studies.

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-680 E&TIM Seminar on Innovation Management in Practice
Intermittent: 6 units
Innovation has been described as "the intersection of invention and insight, leading to the creation of social and economic value." Companies increasingly rely on innovation to establish and drive their success. Public policy makers see innovation as a critical driver for economic development. This course is an opportunity to learn about innovation management from those in the front lines. How are innovation opportunities identified? What are the challenges to realizing these opportunities, and how can the challenges be addressed? What roles are played by processes, technologies and the business environment, as well as by individuals in organizations? This course will feature speakers who drive innovation in a variety of settings, paired with readings from the innovation literature that will help frame the presentations and discussion.
19-681 Managerial and Engineering Economics
Intermittent: 12 units
The course emphasizes the application of economic principles (e.g., marginal analysis, supply and demand, competitive equilibrium, imperfect competition and monopoly) and fundamentals of engineering economics (e.g., quantifying costs and benefits, net present value, decision making under uncertainty) to managerial decision making. Topics include production and costs, elements of decision analysis, market mechanisms, pricing decisions, and information economics. The coverage of these topics fosters an understanding of the organization of firms and markets and firm decision making in the context of exploring, evaluating, and managing opportunities for technological innovation and diffusion.
19-682 The Strategy and Management of Technological Innovation
Intermittent: 12 units
Strategy is distinctive approaches executives use to realize firm performance goals. In this course, we will prepare you for analyzing how technology and innovation affects how executives formulate and execute strategies. This course teaches how incorporating technology and innovation into the corporate strategy of the firm can achieve profitable and sustainable competitive advantage. It addresses the role of technology management in both emerging and established firms, and examines how all of the firm's activities, assets, and relationships must complement one another in order to capture value from innovation. The course will progress in two parts. We will first cover how strategy is formulate through frameworks, models, and tools essential for those actively engaged in the innovation process within a firm and apply these to case studies illustrating their importance in technology industries. We will then cover the obstacles that prevent firms form executing the ideal strategy. In each framework we analyze during the class, we will have the following objectives: 1) Recognizing the performance metric targeted by each framework 2) Identifying the assumptions each framework makes about firm structure, the speed of market and technological change 3) Analyze the strengths and weakness of each framework 4) Apply tools suited for each framework to determine the appropriate strategy that the firm should undertake 5) Using organizational theory to recognize obstacles that prevent the firm from implementing the desired strategies and how to overcome such barriers to implementation

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-684 Engineering and Technology Innovation Management in Practice
Intermittent: 6 units
Innovation takes place inside organizations, whether it's a small company, a large corporation, a university or a government laboratory or agency. In this course, we will focus on the people who lead innovative organizations, what they do to promote and sustain innovation, and the skills and attributes they need to be successful. The instructor's experience as President of Carnegie Mellon, guest lecturers from industry and the literature will be the sources from which the course will draw. Students will gain insight into the roles they may play in contributing to and leading innovative organizations, and the skills and attributes they will need for success. 19684 is part of the Engineering and Technology Innovation Management (E&TIM) Masters Program. E&TIM students should register for the 6 unit course, reflecting the supplemental course requirements for E&TIM. Other students are welcome to enroll for the 3 unit course.
19-687 Principles and Practices of R&D Management
Intermittent: 6 units
This course considers key issues and trade-off in R&D strategy and organization, paying attention to dynamic competitive contexts where technology plays a key role. These topics are treated assuming the perspective of the decision maker. It addresses typical problems of large, medium and small firms having a structured R&D and operating businesses where R&D is the source of competitive advantages. Although we will heavily focus on R&D, emphasis is placed on viewing R&D as a part (although, a key part) of the process of technological innovation; therefore, as an activity to be strongly and appropriately integrated with other functions to make innovation successful.
19-691 Special Topics: Decision-Making Methods for Innovation Management
Fall: 6 units
In this course, there will be several main elements all focused around the decision-making process that corporations typically use in making decisions regarding innovation / R&D investments. This course will build upon the financial concepts that were initially discussed in Finance of Innovation Management (19-689). Specifically this course will build on the following: Basic concepts around an appropriate decision-making process that should be used for making investment decisions related to innovation management and other strategic decisions. Discussion around the framework of decision quality and how this framework is used to improve the decision-making process around innovation decisions and other strategic decisions. Discussion of decision-making under uncertainty and the use of decision analysis methods that are commonly used to make Innovation / R&D investment decisions to assess the value of potential innovation decisions. Introduction to real options theory to include discussion of various calculation methods including the Black Scholes model and the binomial model and to consider the practical issues of implementing such an evaluation methodology. Should have taken 19-689 or elementary accounting / financial management course or by permission of instructor.
Prerequisite: 19-689 Min. grade C
19-692 Special Topics: Strategic Marketing and Product Management for Tech Innovations
Intermittent: 12 units
The purpose of this master's level course is to develop the knowledge and skills needed to formulate marketing and product strategies for new technological product/service innovations in their market introductory phase. The course introduces the principles, concepts, frameworks and proven practices for analysis and strategic decision-making in an uncertain and constrained environment (i.e. when ample historical data and large budgets don't exist.) The course uses lectures, readings, group exercises, and an individual project with instructor feedback to achieve the learning objectives. The primary work in this course is hands-on application of the material by the student to create a strategic marketing plan for their own, approved product innovation idea with evaluation and feedback from the instructor. A customer-centric orientation is emphasized throughout the course. The course addresses strategic marketing decisions and activities including identifying value creation opportunities; generating and selecting innovation ideas; understanding the market, competition, customer needs and customer experience; segmenting, targeting markets; developing a positioning strategy and compelling customer value proposition; making marketing-mix decisions for product, pricing, route-to-market/distribution, and customer base development. The perspective of this course will be from a role of a strategic marketer, which is typically held by an entrepreneur/CEO, product manager, strategic marketing manager, product planning manager, new business development manager, or innovation manager. A syllabus and project description are available from the instructor.

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-693 Managing and Leading Research and Development
Intermittent: 12 units
This course will provide an insider's look at issues in industrial research and development laboratories that future industrial R&D personnel are likely to face.

Course Website: http://www.ece.cmu.edu/courses/items/18703.html
19-694 Special Topics: Leadership and Innovation Management
Fall: 6 units
The attributes and skills of the contributors to innovation are important elements in the effectiveness of the innovation process and the success of the outcome. In this course, we will focus on these skills and attributes, with an emphasis on the leaders of innovation and innovative organizations. Selected literature, case studies, and guest lectures by leaders, as well as the instructor's own experience as Carnegie Mellon's eighth president, will be the sources from which the course will draw. Students will gain insight into the roles they may play in contributing to and leading innovation and organizations and the skills and attributes they will need for success.
19-696 Sustainable Development and Innovation
Fall: 9 units
This course will explore how technology and business contribute to sustainable development. Course segments will include examining global megatrends in ten major sectors (e.g., food, water, energy, health, etc.), opportunities and risks in these key sectors, and developing key metrics for success in sustainable development. Solution pathways that use existing, transferable, and new models in both policy and innovation will be discussed and proposed by the class. Issues for both large multi-nationals and start-ups will be covered. Class time will include a combination of lectures, guest speakers from industry, and problem solving activities. Students will experience how to create a business in this climate of sustainable development. Instructor is former CTO of Alcoa, and Co-Chair of the Vision 2050 project of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development. He is also currently an Advisor & Board Member at a number of Venture Capital firms and a Adjunct Prof. at CMU. The course is intended for MS students. Upper-level undergraduates may enroll with permission.
19-697 Modern Prototyping Techniques
Spring: 12 units
Students in Modern Prototyping Techniques will explore a wide variety of tools and techniques for evaluating the feasibility of proposed new products, services, and solutions to business problems. They will work with an iterative process of: proposing solutions structuring tests to evaluate those solutions with prototypes creating the prototype efficiently and cost-effectively evaluating the effectiveness of the prototype learning from the experiment and iterating until an acceptable solution is found. There will be a strong focus on soliciting customer feedback as a basis for improvement and validation throughout the process. Students will learn prototyping techniques for addressing design, business, and technical problems. This will be a very hands-on course. Students will learn to use, and practice using, a diverse set of prototyping tools to complete their projects including computational, physical, visual design, and ethnographic tools.
19-698 Special Topics: "Principles and Practices of Corporate Entrepreneurship
Fall: 6 units
This course defines the key concepts of corporate entrepreneurship as part of the process for building new business within an established organization. Emphasis will be placed on viewing corporate entrepreneurship as a part of the overall growth strategy, paying specific attention to how to integrate corporate entrepreneurships key practices with other kinds of strategic growth initiatives. The topics will include corporate entrepreneurship strategies, structures and processes, and decision making (at both the team and organizational levels) to achieve commercial impact. Key challenges that companies face when pursuing corporate entrepreneurship will be addressed the lack of tools and systematic frameworks for designing new businesses, the fit of entrepreneurial efforts at the organizational level, and the transition of successfully validated new business concepts to business units in order to achieve meaningful growth. Specific attention will be given to the context of technology-driven enterprise and technological innovation, as well as to the role that Technology and R&D organizations should play in uncovering new substantial paths to growth.
19-699 Special Topics: Institutions Entrepreneurship and Inovation
Intermittent
Institutional environment and public policy greatly affect incentives determining the direction of entrepreneurial activity and innovation that are the engines of economic growth. In societies with poor institutions, entrepreneurial talent is mostly directed towards seeking rents rather than generating productive innovations. But even in modern capitalist economies entrepreneurial activity and innovation are strongly influenced by public policies, for example, those related to intellectual property rights. This course seeks to provide students with analytical frameworks that will enable them to understand how various formal and informal institutional arrangements and public policy decisions influence entrepreneurial activity and innovation and how this, in its turn, affects economic efficiency and growth potential of nations.
19-701 Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Policy Analysis
Intermittent: 12 units
This course reviews and critically examines a set of problems, assumptions and analytical techniques that are common to research and policy analysis in technology and public policy. Topics covered include the difference between science, trans-science and policy analysis, policy problems formulated in terms of utility maximization, issues in the valuation of intangibles, uncertainty in policy analysis, selected topics in risk analysis, limitations and alternatives to the paradigm of utility maximization, issues in behavioral decision theory, issues related to organizations and multiple agents, and selected topics in policy advice and policy analysis for the federal government. The objective is to look critically at the strengths, limitations and underlying assumptions of key policy research and analysis tools and problem framing and sensitize students to some of the critical issues of taste, professional responsibility, ethics, and values that are associated with policy analysis and research.
19-702 Quantitative Methods for Policy Analysis
Intermittent: 12 units
Economic framework for identifying and analyzing investment and operation options facing agencies and firms, (both in theory and in practice); economic efficiency, utilization, pricing, and investment; and multi-objective evaluation.
19-703 Special Topics: Applied Data Analysis 1
Intermittent: 6 units
Students will gain a basic understanding of the estimation, interpretation, and diagnostic assessment of the most widely used statistical models in the social sciences. This includes: graphical and inferential statistics, multiple regression with interactions, logistic regression, multi-level models, and panel data. Assignments include six data analysis projects in R. 19703 is part 1, 19704 is part 2.
19-704 Applied Data Analysis 2
Intermittent: 6 units
Students will gain a basic understanding of the estimation, interpretation, and diagnostic assessment of the most widely used statistical models in the social sciences. This includes: graphical and inferential statistics, multiple regression with interactions, logistic regression, multi-level models, and panel data. Assignments include six data analysis projects in R. 19703 is part 1, 19704 is part 2.
Prerequisite: 19-703
19-705 Workshop Applied Policy Analysis
Intermittent: 6 units
This workshop course is about learning how to structure messy un-structured policy problems. It is designed to provide experience in setting up, analyzing, and writing about policy problems of the type that are used in the EPP Part B qualifying exam. Over the course of the semester, the class works through six or seven policy case problems. Much of the work is done in small groups. The principal focus is on integrating the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the problems and on identifying and practicing general problem-solving strategies.
19-707 Special Topics: Multiple Criteria Decision Making
Fall: 6 units
Problems with multiple, conflicting objectives are ubiquitous in the private and, especially, the public sector. The objective of this course is to provide an overview of the techniques for the analysis and resolution of multiple criteria decision making (MCDM) problems. Topics will include multiobjective programming, multiattribute utility theory and several MCDM methods such as the Analytical Hierarchy Process. The emphasis will be on theory and technique, but there will be several applications to demonstrate the methods.
19-713 Policies of Wireless Systems
Intermittent: 12 units
This course will address public policy issues related to wireless systems, and to the Internet. It begins by investigating policies related to a wide variety of emerging wireless systems and technologies, including wifi computer networks, broadband to the home, broadcast radio and television, and satellite communications. This can include the government role in facilitating the creation of infrastructure, in advancing competition among broadcasters and communications service providers, in managing spectrum, and in protecting privacy and security. The course will then address Internet policy issues, which can include Internet governance and the domain name system, taxation, privacy and security, and intellectual property. Because these are inherently interdisciplinary issues, the course will include detailed discussions of technology, economics, and law, with no prerequisites in any of these areas. Note: ECE students must take this course under #18-650 only
19-714 Environmental Life Cycle Assessment
Spring: 12 units
Cradle-to-grave analysis of new products, processes and policies is important to avoid undue environmental harm and achieve extended product responsibility. This course provides an overview of approaches and methods for life cycle assessment and for green design of typical products and processes using the ISO 14040 family of standards. This includes goal and scoping definition, inventory analysis, life cycle impact assessment (LCIA), interpretation, and guidance for decision support. Process-based analysis models, input-output and hybrid approaches are presented for life cycle assessment. Example software such as MATLAB, Excel, and Simapro are introduced and used in assignments. A group life cycle assessment project consistent with the principles and tools of sustainability to solve real-world engineering problems is required.
Prerequisites: (12-706 or 12-421) and 12-712
Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-716 Special Topics Science and Technology Policy, Analysis and Processes
Spring: 6 units
Science and technology policy is concerned with the allocation of resources for and encouragement of scientific and engineering research and development, the use of scientific and technical knowledge to enhance the nation's response to societal challenges, and the education of Americans in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. This course will provide students with a better understanding of each of these areas and how decisions are made regarding science and technology at the national level and who influences those decisions. Upon completion of this course, students should have a deeper and more strategic understanding of how Washington works, how to analyze and present the results of science and technology policy analysis, and of long-term and emerging science and technology policy issues. Although the focus will be on the United States, these issues are as global as science and technology itself.
19-717 Introduction to Sustainable Engineering
Fall: 12 units
This course begins with an overview of the concept of sustainability, including changing attitudes and values toward technology and the environment through the twentieth century. Models for population growth, global food production, and global water resources are then presented, and current problems such as land use, urbanization, and energy and material resources are discussed. Models of industry based on life sciences are then explored, and tools for sustainable engineering are presented. These tools include metrics of sustainability, principles of design for the environment, methods for pollution prevention, and use of mass and energy balances in the design of sustainable systems. Prerequisite: senior/graduate standing in engineering or permission of the instructor.
19-718 Public Policy and Regulations
Spring: 6 units
Will provide an economic framework for identifying and analyzing investment and operation options facing agencies and forms (both in theory and practice); economic efficiency, utilization, pricing, and investment; and multi-objective evaluation. Intended for PhD's
19-722 Telecommunications, Technology Policy & Management
Intermittent: 12 units
Modern telecommunications is the nervous system of society. The Internet and wireless communications have transformed every aspect of our modern life. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to basic principles of telecommunications technology and the legal, economic, and regulatory environment of today¿s networks. Topics covered include the fundamentals of communication network technologies, including video, voice, and computer networks; principles behind telecommunications regulation from common carrier law and natural monopoly to information diversity, privacy and national security; traffic differentiation on the Internet and the debate over network neutrality; universal service and the digital divide; mergers, antitrust, and the changing industrial structure of the communications sector. We will explore current topical questions such as the future of competition in broadband access; the shift of entertainment video from cable and satellite to Internet delivery; how cloud computing concepts are transforming networks; and communications support for the Internet of Things. Comparison with European approaches to communications regulation. Special emphasis on how new technologies have altered, and are altered by, regulation. Junior or Senior standing required.
19-724 Materials for Energy Storage
Intermittent: 6 units
This course will examine functional materials used to store and release electrical energy. An overview of the thermodynamics of power, energy and energy storage will be used to motivate subsequent investigations into the dominant methods in use today: electrochemical, electrical, and electromechanical (chemical/combustion and nuclear processes will not be covered). For each sub-topic, the physical and chemical mechanisms exploited will be discussed, followed by a detailed exposition of specific materials functionality and device applications. Particular focus will be given to several relevant emerging technologies: Li-ion batteries, hydrogen-based fuel cells (polymer proton exchange membrane and solid-oxide based systems), and large capacitors (both electrolytic and dielectric).

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-758 Special Topics: Organizational Theory for Engineers
Spring: 12 units
Why do so many technical problems of global importance persist even when there exists engineering solutions? This course will explore the organizational challenges that can hinder the deployment of engineering solutions towards solving some of our most critical global technical challenges. We will explore a variety of organizational theories such as institutional theory, network theory, social movement theory, and actor-network theory and then see how they are applied to a variety of engineering systems such as those around energy, mechanical design, water, information and communication technology, and other such civil infrastructure. By the end of the course, students will be able to a) learn how to read and synthesize organizational research from a variety of theoretical lenses, b) understand how such research can apply to a variety of engineering systems, and c) learn how to advance and conduct engineering research that incorporates an organizational perspective. Intended for graduate students and seniors; juniors with permission.

Course Website: https://cmu.box.com/s/zjvqn8ne12sjwqmtvev2w49s78ij5sm5
19-786 Spec Topic: Stochastic Discrete Choice Models: Estimation and Behavioral Theory
Fall: 12 units
This course will cover the rational and behavioral foundations of discrete choice models, current behavioral theories, and estimation methods. Content will include an overview of the history of thinking about discrete choice models, rational foundations, behavioral theories, signal detection theory, multinomial logit, mixed logit using restricted MLE and monte-carlo simulation, and experimental design. If time permits we will cover item-response models and Bayesian methods.
19-801 Special Topics in IT: IT Innovation and Business in Africa
Intermittent: 6 units
Africa is often called the global economy's last frontier. Although Africa remains by far the poorest continent, in recent years several African countries have enjoyed sustained political stability and economic growth. Information technology (IT) is playing a significant role in the development of these economies. This course will explore the underpinnings and prospects for the future of IT and its applications in sub-Saharan Africa. Focusing on the most recent literature and reports on economic and technology development in Africa, the aim will be to understand the critical factors that will determine how technology will develop in Africa and what business models are likely to succeed in creating economically viable IT enterprises in this rapidly changing part of the world. Student assignments will include readings, presentations, and projects on selected topics of relevance to the course goals and objectives. The course is intended for graduate students familiar with information technology and its current applications who are interested in Africa as a prospective place of employment and entrepreneurship in IT and its applications.
19-802 Special Topics: Bitcoin and Cryptocurrencies
Spring: 6 units
Provides an understanding of the technology, usability, business, and regulatory issues of digital currencies in the context of the cryptocurrency, Bitcoin. How does it work? How do people use it? Can I make money with it? Is it safe? Is it legal? To address these questions, we investigate Bitcoin's underlying technology; digital wallets; Bitcoin mining; cybersecurity; and regulatory issues.

Faculty

PETER ADAMS, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Caltech; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.

JAY APT, Professor of Technology of The Tepper School of Business / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., MIT; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.

DANIEL ARMANIOS, Assistant Professor of Engineering and Public Policy – PhD, Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.

INES LIMA AZEVEDO , Professor of Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D. , Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.

MICHEL BEZY, Distinguished Service Professor of Engineering and Public Policy; Associate Director, Carnegie Mellon University in Rwanda – Ph.D., Université Catholique de Louvain; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.

TRAVIS BREAUX, Associate Professor of Institute of Software Research / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., North Carolina State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.

TIMOTHY BROWN, Distinguished Service Professor of Engineering and Public Policy / Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.

KATHLEEN M. CARLEY, Professor of the Institute of Software Research / Social and Decision Sciences / The H. John Heinz III College / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.

ELIZABETH CASMAN, Associate Research Professor of Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.

NICOLAS CHRISTIN, Assistant Research Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., University of Virginia; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.

JARED L. COHON, University Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering / Engineering and Public Policy; President Emeritus – Ph.D., MIT; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.

LORRIE FAITH CRANOR, Professor of Computer Science / Engineering and Public Policy – D.Sc., Washington University in St. Louis; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.

ALEX DAVIS, Assistant Professor of Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.

NEIL M. DONAHUE, Professor of Chemical Engineering / Chemistry / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., MIT; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.

PEDRO FERREIRA, Assistant Professor of The H. John Heinz III College / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.

PAUL S. FISCHBECK, Professor of Social and Decision Sciences / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.

BARUCH FISCHHOFF, Howard Heinz University Professor; Professor of Social and Decision Sciences / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Hebrew University; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.

ERICA R. H. FUCHS, Associate Professor of Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., MIT; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.

MICHAEL GRIFFIN, Research Professor of Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., University of Rhode Island; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.

ALEX HILLS, Distinguished Service Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.

PAULINA JARAMILLO, Associate Professor of Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.

RAMAYYA KRISHNAN, Dean of The H. John Heinz III College; William W. and Ruth F. Cooper Professor of Management Science and Information Systems; Professor of Enginering and Public Policy – Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.

DEANNA MATTHEWS, Associate Teaching Professor of Engineering and Public Policy; Associate Department Head for Undergraduate Affairs – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.

H. SCOTT MATTHEWS, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.

MEAGAN MAUTER, Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.

JEREMY J. MICHALEK, Professor of Mechanical Engineering / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.

M. GRANGER MORGAN, Hammerschlag University Professor of Engineering; Professor of Engineering and Public Policy / Electrical and Computer Engineering / The H. John Heinz III College – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.

NICHOLAS MULLER, Lester and Judith Lave Associate Professor of Economics, Engineering, and Public Policy, Tepper School of Business / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 2017–.

SPYROS N. PANDIS, Research Professor of Chemical Engineering / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.

JON M. PEHA, Professor of Engineering and Public Policy / Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.

ALLEN ROBINSON, Raymond J. Lane Distinguished Professor; Head of Mechanical Engineering; Professor of Mechanical Engineering / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.

EDWARD S. RUBIN, Alumni Chair Professor of Environmental Engineering and Science; Professor of Engineering and Public Policy / Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.

DOUGLAS SICKER, Head of Engineering and Public Policy; Lord Chair Professor of Engineering and Public Policy / Computer Science – Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.

MARVIN A. SIRBU, Professor of Engineering and Public Policy / Industrial Administration / Electrical and Computer Engineering – Sc.D., MIT; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.

MITCHELL J. SMALL, The H. John Heinz III Professor of Environmental Engineering; Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering / Engineering and Public Policy; Associate Department Head for Graduate Affairs – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.

DEBORAH STINE, Professor of the Practice of Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., American Univeristy; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.

ESWARAN SUBRAHMANIAN, Research Professor of Institute for Complex Systems / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.

JOEL A. TARR, Richard S. Caliguiri Professor of Urban and Environmental History and Policy; Professor of History / Engineering and Public Policy / The H. John Heinz III College – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.

JEANNE VANBRIESEN, Duquesne Light Company Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.

JAY WHITACRE, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.

KATE WHITEFOOT, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering / Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 2016–.

JIMMY WILLIAMS, Distinguished Service Professor and Executive Director Engineering and Technology Innovation Management, Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Washington University; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.

GABRIELLE WONG-PARODI, Assistant Research Professor of Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.

HAIBO ZHAI, Associate Research Professor of Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., North Carolina State University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.

Emeriti Faculty

TUNG AU, University Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering / Engineering and Public Policy, Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Illinois; Carnegie Mellon, 1957–.

ALFRED BLUMSTEIN, J. Erik Jonsson University Professor of Urban Systems and Operations Research; Professor of The H. John Heinz III College / Engineering and Public Policy, Emeritus – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.

JAMES GOODBY, Distinguished Service Professor, Emeritus – A.B., Harvard ; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.

CHRIS T. HENDRICKSON, Emeritus University Professor – PhD, MIT; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.

DAVID A. HOUNSHELL, David M Roderick Professor of Technology and Social Change; Professor of Social and Decision Sciences / Engineering and Public Policy, Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Delaware; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.

FRANCIS MCMICHAEL, Walter J. Blenko, Senior Professor of Environmental Engineering; Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering / Engineering and Public Policy, Emeritus – Ph.D., California Insititue of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.

BENOÎT MOREL, Associate Teaching Professor of Engineering and Public Policy / Physics, Emeritus – Ph.D., University of Geneva; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.

INDIRA NAIR, Former Vice Provost for Education; Professor of Engineering and Public Policy, Emeritus – Ph.D., Northwestern University ; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.

HENRY R. PIEHLER, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering / Engineering and Public Policy / Biomedical Engineering, Emeritus – Sc.D. , MIT; Carnegie Mellon, 1967–.

SAROSH TALUKDAR, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering / Engineering and Public Policy, Emeritus – Ph.D., Purdue University; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.

ROBERT M. WHITE, University Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering / Engineering and Public Policy, Emeritus – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.