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Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
T.E. (Ed) Schlesinger, Head
James Hoe, Associate Head

http://www.ece.cmu.edu/

The field of electrical and computer engineering encompasses a remarkably diverse and fertile set of technological areas, including analog and digital electronics, computer architecture, computer-aided design and manufacturing of VLSI/ULSI circuits, intelligent robotic systems, computer-based control systems, telecommunications and computer networking, wireless communication systems, signal and information processing and multimedia systems, solid state physics and devices, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), electromagnetic and electromechanical systems, data storage systems, embedded systems, distributed computing, mobile computing, real-time software, digital signal processing, and optical data processing. The extraordinary advances in the field during the last fifty years have impacted nearly every aspect of human activity. These advances have resulted not only in advanced computer systems but also in consumer products such as “smart” cars, programmable dishwashers and other home appliances, cell phones and mobile computing systems, video games, home security systems, advanced medical systems for imaging, diagnosis, testing and monitoring. Systems and products such as these serve to enhance our quality of life and have also served as the basis for significant economic activity. In short, the field of electrical and computer engineering has become central to society as we know it.

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon is actively engaged in education and research at the forefront of these new technologies. Because of the diverse and broad nature of the field and the significant growth in knowledge in each of its sub areas, it is no longer possible for any single individual to know all aspects of electrical and computer engineering.  Nevertheless, it is important that all electrical and computer engineers have a solid knowledge of the fundamentals with sufficient depth and breadth. Society is placing increasing demands on our graduates to try their skills in new contexts.  It is also placing increasing value on engineers who can cross traditional boundaries between disciplines, and who can intelligently evaluate the broader consequences of their actions.  Our curriculum is designed to produce world-class engineers who can meet these challenges.

Educational Outcomes and Objectives

The B.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering is a broad and highly flexible degree program structured to provide students with the smallest set of constraints consistent with a rich and comprehensive view of the profession. It is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org. Students are encouraged and stimulated to explore multiple areas of theory and application.  The Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering have adopted the following outcomes from ABET and have established the following objectives for the B.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering curriculum:

Educational Outcomes

  1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering.
  2. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  3. An ability to design a system, component or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability and sustainability.
  4. An ability to function in multi-disciplinary teams.
  5. An ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems.
  6. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities.
  7. An ability to communicate effectively.
  8. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental and societal context.
  9. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
  10. A knowledge of contemporary issues.
  11. An ability to use the techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

ECE Education Objectives

The ECE program objectives are shown below. They represent our vision for what our students will be doing in their engineering careers five years after they have graduated. The principal behaviors we seek to foster in our students are expertise, innovation and leadership.

Our graduates will be:

 

Experts
  • They will solve problems by applying ECE fundamentals
  • Their solutions will reflect depth of understanding in their sophistication.
  • Their solutions will reflect breadth of understanding by drawing on multiple disciplines.
Innovators
  • They will demonstrate creativity in their engineering practice.
  • They will consider holistic systems-oriented approaches in their designs.
  • They will think strategically in their planning and execution.
Leaders
  • They will take initiative, and demonstrate resourcefulness.
  • They will collaborate in multidisciplinary teams.
  • They will be leaders in their organizations, their profession and in society.
Three dimensions of objectives for our graduates: Leaders, Experts, and Innovators

 

Three dimensions of objectives for our graduates.

 

Curriculum Overview

Minimum number of units required for degree: 379 units.

In addition to the Carnegie Institute of Technology general education and freshman year requirements (143 units), the B.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering requires 15-122 Principles of Imperative Computation (10 units), Physics II (12 units), two math or science electives (18 units), a Probability and Statistics course (9 units), 109 units of Electrical and Computer Engineering coursework, and 2 math co-requisites (21 units). The remaining units needed to reach the 379 required to graduate are Free Electives (57 units).

The Electrical and Computer Engineering coursework is divided into the categories of Core, Area Courses, Coverage, and Capstone Design.  The Core consists of five courses (18-100 Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering, 18-220 Electronic Devices and Analog Circuits, 18-240 Structure and Design of Digital Systems, 18-213 Introduction to Computer Systems, and 18-290 Signals and Systems).  There are also two math co-requisites (18-202 and 21-127) and Physics II that are required co-requisites for the core.  These courses provide the fundamental knowledge-base upon which all other electrical and computer engineering courses are built.  18-100 is generally taken during the freshman year, while the remaining courses in the Core are started in the sophomore year.  The core courses are ideally completed by the end of the junior year (The department strongly recommends that students not take more than two core courses in the same semester).  Although the core courses (and their co-requisites) may be taken in any order, students generally first take the course in their primary area of interest. This gives added flexibility to later course selection in related areas.

 

Students are also required to complete a seminar course during the fall semester of the sophomore year.  This course, 18-200 Emerging Trends in Electrical and Computer Engineering, introduces students to the many areas within ECE and helps them decide which areas are of primary interest to them.

To satisfy the ECE Area Courses Requirement, at least two Area courses must be completed from one of the following five principal areas in ECE (24 units): 

  • Device Sciences and Nanofabrication: Solid State Physics, Electromagnetic Fields and Waves, Magnetics, Optics, etc.;
  • Signals and Systems: Digital Signal Processing, Communication Systems, Control Systems, etc.;
  • Circuits: Analog and Digital Circuits, Integrated Circuit Design, etc.;
  • Computer Hardware: Logic Design, Computer Architecture, Networks, etc.; and
  • Computer Software: Programming, Data Structures, Compilers, Operating Systems, etc. 

One additional course from a second area must be taken (12 units)

For Coverage any additional ECE course(s) can be taken or an approved Computer Science course (see the ECE website for the list of approved Computer Science courses) totaling at least 12 units.

Finally, all students are required to take a Capstone Design course.  In the Capstone Design courses, numbered 18-5XX, students participate in a semester-long design project with teams of other students.  Students learn project management skills, make oral presentations, write reports, and discuss the broader social and ethical dimensions of ECE.  Current Capstone Design courses are listed on the ECE Department website.

 

B.S. Curriculum

Minimum number of units required for degree: 379

For detailed information and regulations of the curriculum along with the degree requirements and the most recent version of the ECE curriculum primer and course descriptions, please refer to the ECE Home Page:  http://www.ece.cmu.edu/

University Requirement
99-101Computing @ Carnegie Mellon3
or 99-102 Computing @ Carnegie Mellon
CIT Requirements (see CIT section of the catalog for specifics):
CIT General Education 72
Two semesters of calculus20
33-106Physics I for Engineering Students 112
One other introductory engineering course (generally taken during the freshman year)12

 133-106/107 is the recommended sequence for engineering students, although 33-111/112 or 33-131/132 would also meet the CIT Physics requirement.
 

Specific ECE requirements:
One Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering course (generally taken during the freshman year)
18-100Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering12
One ECE Seminar, taken during the fall of the sophomore year
18-200Emerging Trends in Electrical and Computer Engineering1
Four ECE core courses, three with math co-requisites
18-220Electronic Devices and Analog Circuits12
33-107Physics II for Engineering Students
(co-requisite to 18-220)
12
18-290Signals and Systems12
18-202Mathematical Foundations of Electrical Engineering
(co-requisite to 18-220 and 18-290)
12
18-240Structure and Design of Digital Systems12
21-127Concepts of Mathematics
(co-requisite to 18-240)
10
18-213Introduction to Computer Systems12
Two Area Courses from 1 of the 5 Areas within ECE24
One additional Area Course from a second Area12
One Coverage Course (any additional ECE course or Approved CS course as listed on the ECE web site) 12
One Capstone Design Course (any 18-5xx course)12
Other ECE Requirements:
15-112Fundamentals of Programming and Computer Science12
15-122Principles of Imperative Computation10
Two Math/Science electives18
36-217Probability Theory and Random Processes9
or 36-225 Introduction to Probability Theory
Free Electives57

The math/science requirement can be satisfied with any course from The Mellon College of Science or The Department of Statistics except for: 100-level courses in Mathematics or Statistics, and courses designed for non-science or engineering majors, such as (but not limited to) 09-103, 09-104, 21-257, 33-124, 36-201, 36-202, 36-207 or 36-208.  Although shown in the Fall of the Junior and Senior years, these courses may be taken at any time.  Mathematics courses of particular interest to students in ECE are:

21-228Discrete Mathematics9
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
21-260Differential Equations9

 

[57 units]Free Electives

A Free Elective is defined as any graded course offered by any academic unit of the university (including research institutes such as the Robotics Institute and the Software Engineering Institute).  A total of at least 60 units of Free Electives must be taken.

Up to 9 units of ROTC and Physical Education courses or other courses taken as Pass/Fail may also be used toward Free Electives.

Transfer of courses from other high-quality universities may be accepted through submission of the Transfer Credit Request form on the CIT web page.

The large number of units without categorical constraints provides the student, in consultation with their Faculty Advisor or Mentor, with the flexibility to design a rich educational program.

Sample Curriculum

The following table shows a possible roadmap through our broad and flexible curriculum:

Freshman YearSophomore Year
FallSpringFallSpring
18-100 Introduction to Electrical and Computer EngineeringIntroductory Engineering Elective18-200 Emerging Trends in Electrical and Computer Engineering18-2xx ECE Core Course 2
Calculus33-106 Physics I for Engineering Students18-2xx ECE Core Course 121-127 Concepts of Mathematics or 18-202 Mathematical Foundations of Electrical Engineering
15-112 Fundamentals of Programming and Computer ScienceCalculus18-202 Mathematical Foundations of Electrical Engineering or 21-127 Concepts of Mathematics15-122 Principles of Imperative Computation
76-101 Interpretation and ArgumentGeneral Education Course33-107 Physics II for Engineering StudentsGeneral Education Course
99-101 Computing @ Carnegie Mellon or 99-102 Computing @ Carnegie MellonGeneral Education Course36-217 Probability Theory and Random Processes

Junior YearSenior Year
FallSpringFallSpring
18-2xx ECE Core Course 318-2xx ECE Core Course 418-xxx ECE Coverage Course18-5xx ECE Capstone Course
18-3xx/4xx ECE Area Course 118-3xx/4xx ECE Area Course 218-3xx/4xx ECE Area CourseGeneral Education Course
General Education CourseMath/Science Elective 1Math / Science Elective 2Free Elective
Free ElectiveGeneral Education CourseGeneral Education CourseFree Elective
Free electiveFree ElectiveFree ElectiveFree Elective

 

Notes on the Curriculum

Policy on ECE Coverage Courses with Fewer than 12 Units

The basic curriculum requirements for Breadth, Depth, Coverage and Capstone Design are stated in terms of courses rather than units. The nominal total of 60 units for these categories is determined by assuming that each course is 12 units. In the event that courses with fewer than 12 units are used to satisfy some or all of these requirements, additional courses from the ECE coverage lists must be taken until the total units in ECE courses beyond the core meets or exceeds 60 units. Any ECE coverage course is acceptable, and any excess units may be counted as free elective credit.

QPA Requirement and Overload Policy

An overload is defined as any schedule with more than 54 units in one semester.  A student will only be permitted to overload by 12 units if he or she achieved a QPA of at least 3.5 out of 4.0 in the previous semester he or she is registering for, or if his or her overall QPA is at least a 3.5.

Pass/Fail policy

Up to 9 units of ROTC and Physical Education courses or other courses taken as Pass/Fail may be used toward Free Electives.  ECE core courses may not be taken as pass/fail.  ECE project-based courses (including capstone design courses) may not be taken pass/fail.  No ECE requirements may be fulfilled using a pass/fail course (except for 99-10x and 18-200)

Other Graduation Requirements

To be eligible to graduate, undergraduate students must complete all course requirements for their program with a cumulative Quality Point Average of at least 2.0 for all courses taken. For undergraduate students who enrolled at Carnegie Mellon as freshmen and whose freshman grades cause the cumulative QPA to fall below 2.0, this requirement is modified to be a cumulative QPA of at least 2.0 for all courses taken after the freshman year. Note, however, the cumulative QPA that appears on the student's final transcript will be calculated based on all grades in all courses taken, including freshman year. Students are encouraged to confirm all graduation requirements with their academic advisor.

CIT has the following requirement for graduation. “Students must complete the requirements for their specified degrees with a cumulative quality point average of 2.00 or higher for all courses taken after the freshman year (this is the CIT QPA on the Academic Audit).

In addition, a student is expected to achieve a cumulative quality point average of 2.00 in a series of core departmental courses.”  In ECE, this means that the student must complete 18-100 Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering, ECE Core, Area Courses, Coverage, and Capstone Design courses with a minimum QPA of 2.0 to graduate. When more than one possibility exists for meeting a specific requirement (e.g., Area Course), the courses used for calculating the ECE QPA will be chosen so as to maximize the QPA. Similarly, when an ECE course is retaken, the better grade will be used in the computation of the minimum QPA for the ECE QPA requirement.

 

Other Opportunities in ECE

ECE Cooperative Education Program

The ECE Co-Op is a unique 8-month contiguous extended internship experience in which ECE students with a minimum QPA of 3.0 may opt to participate in.  Students typically engage in this option in the spring semester of their junior year, from January through August. A May through December option is also available. Students who engage in this program typically graduate in 4.5 academic years (but still eight semesters). Eligible students interested in participating should contact their advisor in the ECE Undergraduate and Graduate Programs Office.  Students are required to submit a formal application consisting of a transcript, a resume, and a one-page statement of purpose including an academic plan. Students then work with the Career Center to find a Co-Op position.  Once a Co-Op position is found, a Co-Op job description is required from the employer, to be approved by the ECE Undergraduate Office.

While on the Co-Op assignment, the students are participating in a recognized CIT educational program, retaining their full-time student status, akin to our students who study abroad in established exchange programs (such as NCTU or EPFL) for one or two semesters.

Upon returning to Carnegie Mellon, the students are required to submit for approval the following two documents to the ECE Undergraduate Office: a three to five page technical report of the Co-Op work, and a one page assessment and evaluation of the Co-Op experience.
Students may obtain more detailed information through the department, the Career Center in the University Center, or online at http://www.ece.cmu.edu/undergrad/

Integrated M.S./B.S. Degrees Program

The Integrated Master’s/Bachelor’s program (otherwise known as the IMB program) is an exciting opportunity for students who excel academically to achieve not just a Bachelor’s degree in ECE, but also a Master’s degree- through our Professional MS degree program-without needing to apply separately.  This means no application fee, and no need to take the GRE (Graduate Record Exam). In order to be awarded the MS degree in the IMB program, the student must also earn their BS degree, either simultaneously with the MS degree or in a semester prior to the awarding of the MS degree. If a course is eligible for the MS degree but must be used to complete the BS degree, the BS degree takes priority over the MS degree.

If a student is at least a 2nd semester junior, has completed at least 270 units and has at least an overall 3.00 QPA, he or she is guaranteed admission into the Professional MS degree in ECE through the IMB program. To be officially admitted, the student must complete the IMB Program form.

If a student does not meet the exact overall 3.00 QPA requirement, he or she is eligible to petition for his or her admission into the IMB program during his or her senior year. Students may obtain the petition forms through a meeting with their assigned academic advisor.
 

Professional MS Degree Requirements:

Please see the ECE web site for the requirements for the Professional MS degree.  For students in the ECE IMB program, all requirements for the Professional MS degree are in addition to the requirements for the BS in ECE.  No requirements for the MS degree may be used in any way toward the BS degree, including minors, additional majors or dual degrees.
 

Residency requirements and financial impacts:

Once a student in the IMB program has completed all of the requirements for the BS degree, he or she may become a graduate (Masters) student.  To do this, the student’s undergraduate degree is certified, and that student officially graduates with the BS degree.  Once a student’s undergraduate degree has been certified, no more courses may then be applied toward the BS degree.  This includes courses toward minors and additional majors, although students pursuing an undergraduate dual degree  with another department may still continue to apply additional coursework toward that second degree.

If a student takes more than 8 semesters to complete both the BS and MS degrees, then he or she must be a graduate student for at least one semester before graduating.

To determine the most appropriate time for an undergraduate student to become a graduate student, he or she should consult with Enrollment Services to understand how becoming a graduate student will affect financial aid, and with his or her academic advisor to determine a course schedule.  When a student is a graduate student through the IMB program, the department is able to provide some financial assistance through Teaching Assistantships.  Please see the ECE web site for further information regarding this financial assistance.

Faculty

JIM BAIN, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science Engineering; Associate Director, Data Storage Systems Center – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.RAY BAREISS, Director of Educational Programs – Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley; Professor of the Practice-ECE, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley - Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.LUJO BAUER, Assistant Research Professor of Cylab and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.VIJAYAKUMAR BHAGAVATULA, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Associate Dean of Faculty and Graduate Affairs, Carnegie Institute of Technology – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.RONALD P. BIANCHINI, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.SHAWN BLANTON, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Director, Center for Silicon System Implementation – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.DAVID BRUMLEY, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.RANDAL E. BRYANT, Dean, School of Computer Science; Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.L. RICHARD CARLEY, ST Microelectronics Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.DAVID P. CASASENT, Emeritus George Westinghouse Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Illinois; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.ZOLTAN J. CENDES, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Chairman of the Board, – Ansoft Corporation- Ph.D., McGill University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.STANLEY CHARAP, Emeritus Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Rutgers University; Carnegie Mellon, 1968–.TSUHAN CHEN, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.HOWIE CHOSET, Associate Professor of Robotics Institute and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.EDMUND M. CLARKE, JR., FORE Systems Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.JOHN DOLAN, Senior Systems Scientist, Electrical and Computer Engineering and Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.ANUPMAN DATTA, Research Professor of Cylab and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.CHRISTOS FALOUTSOS, Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.BABAK FALSAFI, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science; – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.GARY FEDDER, Howard M. Wilkoff Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Robotics; Director of ICES; Director of MEMS Laboratory – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1994–.RANDY FEENSTRA, Professor of Physics and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.FRANZ FRANCHETTI, Associate Research Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Vienna University of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.KAIGHAM J. GABRIEL, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Robotics – Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.RAJEEV GANDHI, Systems Engineer, Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.GREGORY R. GANGER, Jatras Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science; Director PDL – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.GARTH GIBSON, Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.PETER GILGUNN, Assistant Research Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.MADELEINE GLICK, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Principal Researcher, Intel Research Pittsburgh – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.VIRGIL GLIGOR, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Co-Director, Cylab – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.SETH C. GOLDSTEIN, Associate Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.DAVID W. GREVE, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Lehigh University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.MARTIN GRISS, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Director of the Disaster Management Inititative — Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley – Ph.D., University of Illinois; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.PULKIT GROVER, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.MOR HARCHOL-BALTER, Associate Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.FRED HIGGS, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.ALEX HILLS, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Distinguished Service Professor of Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.JAMES F. HOBURG, Emeritus Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1975–.JAMES HOE, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science; Associate Department Head, Electrical and Computer Engineering; Co – Director CALCM, ITRI Lab@ CMU - Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.RALPH HOLLIS, Research Professor Robotics and Electrical and Computer Engineering; Director, Microdynamics Systems Laboratory Carnegie – Ph.D., University of Colorado, Boulder; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.GABRIELA HUG, Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.MARIJA ILIC, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy – D.Sc., Washington University; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.MOHAMMAD ISLAM, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science Engineering – Ph.D., Lehigh University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.COLLIN JACKSON, Assistant Research Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cylab and Information Networking Institute, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.ANGEL G. JORDAN, Emeritus Keithley University Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1959–.TAKEO KANADE, U.A. and Helen Whitaker Professor of Computer Science and Robotics; Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Kyoto University; Carnegie Mellon, 1980–.SOUMMYA KAR, Assistant Research Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.PRADEEP KHOSLA, Philip and Marsha Dowd Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Robotics; Dean, Carnegie Institute of Technology; Co-Director, Carnegie Mellon Cylab – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.HYONG S. KIM, Drew D. Perkins (E’86) Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Director, Cylab Korea – Ph.D., University of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.PHILIP J. KOOPMAN, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.JELENA KOVACEVIC, Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering; Co-Director, Center for Bioimage Informatics – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.BRUCE H. KROGH, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.MARK H. KRYDER, University Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Chief Technical Officer and Vice President of Research, Seagate (Retired) – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.DAVID N. LAMBETH, Emeritus Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.DAVE LAUGHLIN, ALCOA Professor of Materials Science Engineering; Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.XIN LI, Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.JASON LOHN, Associate Research Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Senior Research Scientist, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley – Ph.D., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.YI LOU, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.KEN MAI, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.WOJCIECH MALY, U.A. and Helen Whitaker Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.DIANA MARCULESCU, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Southern California; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.RADU MARCULESCU, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Southern California; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.ROY MAXION, Principle Systems Scientist Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Colorado; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.TIMOTHY MCCOY, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Director, Research and Development Converteam North America – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.WILLIAM MESSNER, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.M. GRANGER MORGAN, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Lord University Professor and Head, Department of Engineering and Public Policy; Professor, H.J. Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.JAMES MORRIS, Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering; Dean, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.JOSÉ M. F. MOURA, University Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Professor of Biomedical Engineering – D.Sc., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.TODD MOWRY, Associate Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering; Co-Director CALCM – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.TAMAL MUKHERJEE, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.ONUR MUTLU, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science – Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.WILLIAM NACE, Assistant Teaching Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.PRIYA NARASIMHAN, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.ROHIT NEGI, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.CHARLES P. NEUMAN, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.DAVID O'HALLARON, Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering; Director Intel Research, Pittsburgh – Ph.D., University of Virginia; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.JEYANANDH PARAMESH, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Washington; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.JON M. PEHA, Professor of Engineering and Public Policy and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.ADRIAN PERRIG, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Engineering and Public Policy and Computer Science; Technical Director, Cylab – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.GIANLUCA PIAZZA, Associate Professor – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.LAWRENCE T. PILEGGI, Tanoto Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.MARKUS PüSCHEL, Adjunct Professor – Ph.D., University of Karlsruhe; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.RAGUNATHAN RAJKUMAR, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and computer Science; Co – Director - GM-CM CRL; Director , Real-Time and Multimedia Systems Laboratory, Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.MIKE REITER, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.DAVID RICKETTS, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.GUSTAVO ROHDE, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.RONALD ROHRER, Emeritus Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.ANTHONY ROWE, Assistant Research Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.ROB A. RUTENBAR, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science; Director, MARCO Focus Center for Circuit and System Solutions – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.ASWIN SANKARANARAYANAN, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.MAHADEV SATYANARAYANAN, Carnegie Professor of Computer Science; Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.MARIOS SAVVIDES, Associate Research Professor; Director, Cylab Biometrics Center – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.TUVIAH E. SCHLESINGER, David Edward Schramm Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Head, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.SRINIVASAN SESHAN, Associate Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.DANIEL P. SIEWIOREK, Buhl University Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science; Director, Human Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1972–.BRUNO SINOPOLI, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Robotics Institute and Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.MARVIN A. SIRBU, Professor of Engineering and Public Policy, Electrical and Computer Engineering and Tepper School of Business – D.Sc., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.METIN SITTI, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering and Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Toledo; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.ASIM SMAILAGIC, Research Professor of ICES and Electrical and Computer Engineering; Director, LINCS – Ph.D., University of Sarajevo and University of Edinburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.DAWN SONG, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.DANIEL D. STANCIL, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.PETER STEENKISTE, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.RICHARD M. STERN, JR., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Language Technologies Institute, Computer Science, and Biomedical Engineering; Lecturer, Music – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.ANDRZEJ J. STROJWAS, Keithley Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.THOMAS SULLIVAN, Associate Teaching Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering; Lecturer, Music – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.PATRICK TAGUE, Assistant Research Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cylab and Information Networking Institute, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley – Ph.D., University of Washington; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.SAROSH N. TALUKDAR, Emeritus Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Purdue University; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.DONALD E. THOMAS, JR., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.OZAN TONGUZ, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Rutgers University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.ELIAS TOWE, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Albert and Ethel Grobstein Memorial Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; Director, CNXT – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.PAULO VERISSIMO, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Professor of University of Lisboa, Portugal – Ph.D., IST of the Technical University of Lisboa; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.ANTHONY WASSERMAN, Professor of Software Engineering Practice, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley, Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.JEFF WELDON, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.ROBERT WHITE, Emeritus, University Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.JEANNETTE WING, President’s Professor of Computer Science; Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.ERIK YDSTIE, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Imperial College, London; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.BYRON YU, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.HUI ZHANG, Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.PEI ZHANG, Assistant Research Professor, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.JIAN-GANG ZHU, ABB Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Director, DSSC.; Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Physics – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.

Courtesy Appointment

BOB IANNUCCI, Associate Dean and Director of Silicon Valley Campus, Distinguished Service Professor – PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; .

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Faculty

JIM BAIN, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science Engineering; Associate Director, Data Storage Systems Center – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.RAY BAREISS, Director of Educational Programs – Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley; Professor of the Practice-ECE, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley - Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.LUJO BAUER, Assistant Research Professor of Cylab and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.VIJAYAKUMAR BHAGAVATULA, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Associate Dean of Faculty and Graduate Affairs, Carnegie Institute of Technology – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.RONALD P. BIANCHINI, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.SHAWN BLANTON, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Director, Center for Silicon System Implementation – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.DAVID BRUMLEY, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.RANDAL E. BRYANT, Dean, School of Computer Science; Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.L. RICHARD CARLEY, ST Microelectronics Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.DAVID P. CASASENT, Emeritus George Westinghouse Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Illinois; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.ZOLTAN J. CENDES, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Chairman of the Board, – Ansoft Corporation- Ph.D., McGill University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.STANLEY CHARAP, Emeritus Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Rutgers University; Carnegie Mellon, 1968–.TSUHAN CHEN, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.HOWIE CHOSET, Associate Professor of Robotics Institute and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.EDMUND M. CLARKE, JR., FORE Systems Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.JOHN DOLAN, Senior Systems Scientist, Electrical and Computer Engineering and Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.ANUPMAN DATTA, Research Professor of Cylab and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.CHRISTOS FALOUTSOS, Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 1998–.BABAK FALSAFI, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science; – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.GARY FEDDER, Howard M. Wilkoff Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Robotics; Director of ICES; Director of MEMS Laboratory – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1994–.RANDY FEENSTRA, Professor of Physics and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.FRANZ FRANCHETTI, Associate Research Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Vienna University of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.KAIGHAM J. GABRIEL, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Robotics – Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.RAJEEV GANDHI, Systems Engineer, Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.GREGORY R. GANGER, Jatras Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science; Director PDL – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.GARTH GIBSON, Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.PETER GILGUNN, Assistant Research Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.MADELEINE GLICK, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Principal Researcher, Intel Research Pittsburgh – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.VIRGIL GLIGOR, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Co-Director, Cylab – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.SETH C. GOLDSTEIN, Associate Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.DAVID W. GREVE, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Lehigh University; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.MARTIN GRISS, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Director of the Disaster Management Inititative — Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley – Ph.D., University of Illinois; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.PULKIT GROVER, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.MOR HARCHOL-BALTER, Associate Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.FRED HIGGS, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.ALEX HILLS, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Distinguished Service Professor of Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.JAMES F. HOBURG, Emeritus Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1975–.JAMES HOE, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science; Associate Department Head, Electrical and Computer Engineering; Co – Director CALCM, ITRI Lab@ CMU - Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.RALPH HOLLIS, Research Professor Robotics and Electrical and Computer Engineering; Director, Microdynamics Systems Laboratory Carnegie – Ph.D., University of Colorado, Boulder; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.GABRIELA HUG, Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.MARIJA ILIC, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy – D.Sc., Washington University; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.MOHAMMAD ISLAM, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science Engineering – Ph.D., Lehigh University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.COLLIN JACKSON, Assistant Research Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cylab and Information Networking Institute, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.ANGEL G. JORDAN, Emeritus Keithley University Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1959–.TAKEO KANADE, U.A. and Helen Whitaker Professor of Computer Science and Robotics; Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Kyoto University; Carnegie Mellon, 1980–.SOUMMYA KAR, Assistant Research Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.PRADEEP KHOSLA, Philip and Marsha Dowd Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Robotics; Dean, Carnegie Institute of Technology; Co-Director, Carnegie Mellon Cylab – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.HYONG S. KIM, Drew D. Perkins (E’86) Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Director, Cylab Korea – Ph.D., University of Toronto; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.PHILIP J. KOOPMAN, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.JELENA KOVACEVIC, Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering; Co-Director, Center for Bioimage Informatics – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2003–.BRUCE H. KROGH, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.MARK H. KRYDER, University Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Chief Technical Officer and Vice President of Research, Seagate (Retired) – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.DAVID N. LAMBETH, Emeritus Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.DAVE LAUGHLIN, ALCOA Professor of Materials Science Engineering; Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.XIN LI, Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.JASON LOHN, Associate Research Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Senior Research Scientist, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley – Ph.D., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.YI LOU, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Columbia University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.KEN MAI, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.WOJCIECH MALY, U.A. and Helen Whitaker Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.DIANA MARCULESCU, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Southern California; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.RADU MARCULESCU, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Southern California; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.ROY MAXION, Principle Systems Scientist Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Colorado; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.TIMOTHY MCCOY, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Director, Research and Development Converteam North America – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.WILLIAM MESSNER, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.M. GRANGER MORGAN, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Lord University Professor and Head, Department of Engineering and Public Policy; Professor, H.J. Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.JAMES MORRIS, Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering; Dean, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.JOSÉ M. F. MOURA, University Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Professor of Biomedical Engineering – D.Sc., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.TODD MOWRY, Associate Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering; Co-Director CALCM – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.TAMAL MUKHERJEE, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.ONUR MUTLU, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science – Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.WILLIAM NACE, Assistant Teaching Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.PRIYA NARASIMHAN, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.ROHIT NEGI, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.CHARLES P. NEUMAN, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 1969–.DAVID O'HALLARON, Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering; Director Intel Research, Pittsburgh – Ph.D., University of Virginia; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.JEYANANDH PARAMESH, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Washington; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.JON M. PEHA, Professor of Engineering and Public Policy and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1991–.ADRIAN PERRIG, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Engineering and Public Policy and Computer Science; Technical Director, Cylab – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.GIANLUCA PIAZZA, Associate Professor – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.LAWRENCE T. PILEGGI, Tanoto Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.MARKUS PüSCHEL, Adjunct Professor – Ph.D., University of Karlsruhe; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.RAGUNATHAN RAJKUMAR, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and computer Science; Co – Director - GM-CM CRL; Director , Real-Time and Multimedia Systems Laboratory, Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.MIKE REITER, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science – Ph.D., Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.DAVID RICKETTS, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.GUSTAVO ROHDE, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.RONALD ROHRER, Emeritus Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.ANTHONY ROWE, Assistant Research Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.ROB A. RUTENBAR, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science; Director, MARCO Focus Center for Circuit and System Solutions – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1984–.ASWIN SANKARANARAYANAN, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., University of Maryland; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.MAHADEV SATYANARAYANAN, Carnegie Professor of Computer Science; Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.MARIOS SAVVIDES, Associate Research Professor; Director, Cylab Biometrics Center – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2005–.TUVIAH E. SCHLESINGER, David Edward Schramm Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Head, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.SRINIVASAN SESHAN, Associate Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.DANIEL P. SIEWIOREK, Buhl University Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science; Director, Human Computer Interaction Institute – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1972–.BRUNO SINOPOLI, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Robotics Institute and Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2007–.MARVIN A. SIRBU, Professor of Engineering and Public Policy, Electrical and Computer Engineering and Tepper School of Business – D.Sc., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.METIN SITTI, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering and Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of Toledo; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.ASIM SMAILAGIC, Research Professor of ICES and Electrical and Computer Engineering; Director, LINCS – Ph.D., University of Sarajevo and University of Edinburgh; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.DAWN SONG, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.DANIEL D. STANCIL, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1986–.PETER STEENKISTE, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1987–.RICHARD M. STERN, JR., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Language Technologies Institute, Computer Science, and Biomedical Engineering; Lecturer, Music – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.ANDRZEJ J. STROJWAS, Keithley Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1983–.THOMAS SULLIVAN, Associate Teaching Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering; Lecturer, Music – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1996–.PATRICK TAGUE, Assistant Research Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cylab and Information Networking Institute, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley – Ph.D., University of Washington; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.SAROSH N. TALUKDAR, Emeritus Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Purdue University; Carnegie Mellon, 1974–.DONALD E. THOMAS, JR., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 1977–.OZAN TONGUZ, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Rutgers University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.ELIAS TOWE, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Albert and Ethel Grobstein Memorial Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; Director, CNXT – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.PAULO VERISSIMO, Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Professor of University of Lisboa, Portugal – Ph.D., IST of the Technical University of Lisboa; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.ANTHONY WASSERMAN, Professor of Software Engineering Practice, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley, Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.JEFF WELDON, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 2011–.ROBERT WHITE, Emeritus, University Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 1993–.JEANNETTE WING, President’s Professor of Computer Science; Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1985–.ERIK YDSTIE, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Imperial College, London; Carnegie Mellon, 1992–.BYRON YU, Assistant Professor – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2009–.HUI ZHANG, Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering – Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon, 1995–.PEI ZHANG, Assistant Research Professor, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley – Ph.D., Princeton University; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.JIAN-GANG ZHU, ABB Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Director, DSSC.; Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Physics – Ph.D., University of California, San Diego; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.

Courtesy Appointment

BOB IANNUCCI, Associate Dean and Director of Silicon Valley Campus, Distinguished Service Professor – PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; .