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Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

David A. Dzombak, Head
Office: Porter Hall 119-D
http://www.cmu.edu/cee/

The role of civil and environmental engineers, in the broadest sense, is to apply technology to develop sustainable solutions to meet society's needs. Civil engineers plan, design, construct, and operate facilities used daily by the public and industry, such as buildings, transportation networks, and water and wastewater systems. They work at the intersection of the built, natural, and information environments. Today's civil and environmental engineers are also called upon by government and industry to provide leadership on complex technical and societal issues such as demands for infrastructure improvement, remediation of hazardous waste sites, energy production, transmission and use, climate change adaptation, provision of safe drinking water, and incorporation of environmental safeguards in new infrastructure designs.


Civil and environmental engineering requires broad technical training and strong communication skills because of the complexity of large projects and the interactions with engineers in other fields, lawyers, public officials, and stakeholders. Carnegie Mellon's curriculum provides this versatility for professional practice in civil and environmental engineering and as a strong foundation for other professional pursuits.


The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers a wide spectrum of opportunities for entry into the engineering profession, for graduate education in engineering, or entry into various other graduate and professional fields, including business, law, and medicine. While maintaining its emphasis on the fundamental understanding of the behavior of constructed facilities through the application of the physical sciences, biology, mathematics, and computing, the curriculum has continually evolved in directions that exploit advances in technology. The curriculum introduces the methods of engineering design in the first year and continues to emphasize them throughout the curriculum in both traditional and open-ended project-oriented courses. The basic undergraduate degree program leads to a B.S. in Civil Engineering. Students with a specific interest in Environmental Engineering are advised to complete the Minor in Environmental Engineering and Sustainability.


Central to the evolution of technology and its impact on engineering practice is the increased emphasis on the use of computers in engineering. Several courses on computer methods are required in the curriculum, and most courses offered by the department require the use of computers in applications of either analysis or design.


Our curriculum emphasizes the development of scientific inquiry in the context of applications in civil and environmental engineering. For B.S. graduates who wish to enter the engineering profession directly in such specialties as structural engineering, construction engineering, or environmental engineering, this approach to teaching allows application of the most advanced technological developments. Others who wish to pursue graduate study are prepared to engage in research on the highest level, either in traditional specialties or in emerging fields such as smart infrastructure, climate change adaptation, and micromechanics.


The Civil Engineering curriculum is intended to allow ample opportunity for students to pursue areas of personal interest. A student may choose to concentrate in a specialty area in civil engineering, to pursue a minor in one of the designated minor programs offered in the College of Engineering, or to pursue an additional major. Information on these options follows the description of the curriculum in this section. Students are encouraged to participate in research with department faculty members, explore their chosen field through internships, and take advantage of opportunities to study abroad and be exposed to other cultures.


In addition to providing a solid technical foundation, the program emphasizes the development of professional skills. We incorporate design and team experiences at regular intervals in the curriculum, and provide appropriate hands on experience in laboratory courses and projects. Students also get multiple opportunities to practice and improve their communication skills through written and oral reports.


Two common double-major options chosen by students in Civil Engineering are dual degrees in Biomedical Engineering or Engineering and Public Policy.  Both programs are described in their departments' sections of the catalog. Other double-major programs selected by recent graduates include architecture, business, computer science, economics, history, mathematics, and foreign languages. Each student should have well-defined objectives in selecting courses leading to a specialty, a minor, or a double major. Faculty mentors and the Director of Undergraduate Programs are available to discuss students' educational goals and help define the path to reach them.

Educational Objectives

The objectives of the Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering curriculum are to develop graduates who embody the following definitions:

  • Graduates distinguish themselves within their organizations as individuals able to complete both conventional and cutting-edge professional challenges related to one or more of the areas of the built, natural, and information environments;
  • Graduates work for a wide range of engineering and non-engineering organizations located both in the U.S. and internationally, and work on a wide range of activities, such as academic research, government service and private sector activity; and
  • Graduates are innovative, proactive, and adaptive professionals, highly engaged in their professional communities.

The Civil Engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

By the end of the B.S. program, students should have achieved the following student outcomes: 

    A.  an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering

    B. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data

    C. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic     constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety,     manufacturability, and sustainability

    D. an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams

    E. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems

    F. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility

    G. an ability to communicate effectively

    H. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a     global, economic, environmental, and societal context

    I. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning

    J. a knowledge of contemporary issues relevant to engineering practice

    K. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for       engineering practice

The curriculum has been designed, and is periodically evaluated and refined, to provide students instruction and experiences that lead to the development of these abilities and skills.

Students entering the College of Engineering declare a major near the end of the first year. First-year students take two introductory engineering courses as well as some restricted technical electives within the common foundation specified for first-year engineering students. By the end of the sophomore year, a Civil Engineering major is expected to have completed the Restricted Technical Electives in the following list and 12-100 Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering.

09-101Introduction to Experimental Chemistry3
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
15-110Principles of Computing10
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
21-122Integration and Approximation10
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
21-260Differential Equations9
33-141Physics I for Engineering Students12
33-142Physics II for Engineering and Physics Students12
Notes on Math Requirements

1. All mathematics (21-xxx) courses required for the engineering degree taken at Carnegie Mellon must have a minimum grade of C in order to be counted toward the graduation requirement for the BS engineering degree.
2. A minimum grade of C must be achieved in any required mathematics (21-xxx) course that is a pre-requisite for the next higher level required mathematics (21-xxx) course.

Curriculum

This section shows the recommended four-year program of study for the BS in Civil Engineering following a typical path. The curriculum for transfer students, students with advanced placement credit, and students planning to study abroad will not follow the same path. Students need to consult the department for appropriate advising and formulation of a plan to complete the degree within eight semesters.

First Year
Fall Units
12-100Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering12
21-120Differential and Integral Calculus10
33-141Physics I for Engineering Students12
99-10xComputing @ Carnegie Mellon3
xx-xxxDietrich College or CFA Course9
 46
Spring Units
xx-xxxIntroduction to Engineering (other than CEE)12
21-122Integration and Approximation10
33-142Physics II for Engineering and Physics Students12
09-101Introduction to Experimental Chemistry3
xx-xxxDietrich College or CFA Course9
 46
Sophomore Year
Fall Units
12-212Statics9
21-259Calculus in Three Dimensions9
15-110Principles of Computing10
09-105Introduction to Modern Chemistry I10
39-210Experiential Learning I0
xx-xxxDietrich College or CFA Course9
 47
Spring Units
12-231Solid Mechanics9
12-232Solid Mechanics Lab3
12-271Introduction to Computer Application in Civil & Environmental Engineering9
21-260Differential Equations9
39-220Experiential Learning II0
xx-xxxDietrich College or CFA Course9
xx-xxxElective 19
 48
Junior Year
Fall Units
12-301Civil Environmental Engineering Projects9
12-335Soil Mechanics9
12-336Soil Mechanics Laboratory3
12-355Fluid Mechanics9
12-356Fluid Mechanics Lab3
39-310Experiential Learning III0
xx-xxxDietrich College or CFA Course9
xx-xxxElective 29
 51
Spring Units
12-351Environmental Engineering9
12-352Environmental Engineering Lab3
27-357Introduction to Materials Selection6
12-358Materials Lab3
36-220Engineering Statistics and Quality Control9
xx-xxxElective 39
xx-xxxElective 49
 48
Senior Year
Fall Units
12-401Civil & Environmental Engineering Design15
12-411Project Management for Construction9
12-421Engineering Economics6
xx-xxxDietrich College or CFA Course9
xx-xxxElective 59
 48
Spring Units
xx-xxxDietrich College or CFA Course9
xx-xxxDietrich College or CFA Course9
xx-xxxElective 69
xx-xxxElective 79
xx-xxxElective 89
 45
379Minimum number of units required for degree:
Notes on Electives

  1. One elective must be in the basic sciences, from the following list:

03-121Modern Biology9
12-201Geology9

Substitutions may be made only with the approval of the Department Head.

  2. One elective course is restricted to a 600-level Civil Engineering course of at least 9 units,
      except 12-648 and 12-690. This Civil Engineering elective is a co-requisite for 12-401.

Students are encouraged to take multiple 12-6xx courses to provide them with specific civil and environmental engineering domain depth in their field(s) of interest.

Specialty Areas in Civil Engineering

Students may select a set of civil engineering and technical electives in the junior and senior years that enable them to concentrate in a specialty area, if they so desire. Some examples for grouping electives into specialty areas, together with representative course selections, are indicated below. Other possible groupings may be discussed with a faculty mentor.

Structural Engineering
Units
12-600AutoCAD3
12-631Structural Design12
12-635Structural Analysis9
12-636Geotechnical Engineering9
12-638Special Topics: Behavior of Structural Systems9
12-676Special Topics: Fundamental Concepts and Methods of Structural Mechanics12
12-686Special Topics: Computational Materials Modeling for Structures12
21-241Matrices and Linear Transformations10
24-351Dynamics10
 86
Environmental Engineering - Air Quality
Units
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
12-651Air Quality Engineering9
12-679Special Topics: Intro to Meteorology12
24-425Combustion and Air Pollution Control9
 40
Environmental Engineering - Water Quality
03-121Modern Biology9
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
12-629Environmental Microbiology for Engineers9
12-702Fundamentals of Water Quality Engineering12
Environmental Engineering - Water Resources
12-636Geotechnical Engineering9
12-657Water Resource Systems Engineering9
Environmental Engineering - Energy
06-221Thermodynamics9
09-106Modern Chemistry II10
24-292Renewable Energy Engineering9
24-424Energy and the Environment9
Computing in Civil Engineering
12-600AutoCAD3
12-631Structural Design12
12-635Structural Analysis9
12-657Water Resource Systems Engineering9
12-659Special Topics: Matlab6
Construction Management
12-600AutoCAD3
12-631Structural Design12
12-635Structural Analysis9
12-636Geotechnical Engineering9

Double Majors and Minors

Civil Engineering students may pursue double majors and minors in a variety of subjects, taking advantage of the free elective courses to satisfy the requirements for the major or minor. The College of Engineering has added designated minors to promote flexibility and diversity among engineering students. Many Civil Engineering undergraduates pursue designated minors in such areas as Global Engineering or Environmental Engineering and Sustainability.

Internships and Co-Operative Education Program

Students in Civil Engineering are encouraged to undertake professional internships during summer breaks. In addition, a cooperative internship program is possible for either Jan-Aug or May-Dec in the junior year. Students undertaking these 8-month professional internships would ordinarily graduate after an additional semester of study.

Integrated B.S./M.S. Program

Interested undergraduates may plan a course of study that leads to both the BS in Civil Engineering and the MS in Civil and Environmental Engineering. This course of study will ordinarily require ten semesters of study, although advanced placement or other study may reduce this time. Students can apply appropriate units earned as undergraduates for their MS program as long as they are beyond the 379 units required for the BS in Civil Engineering degree. In the ninth semester of study, students must register in graduate status. Interested students should consult their academic advisor or the CEE Department office for information about admission to the MS program.

Faculty

AMIT ACHARYA, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
PETER ADAMS, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy – PhD., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.
BURCU AKINCI, Paul P. Christiano Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
MARIO BERGES, Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon Univesity; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.
JACOBO BIELAK, P.E., Hamerschlag University Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, , P.E.; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.
SARAH J. CHRISTIAN, P.E., Assistant Teaching Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.
JARED L. COHON, President Emeritus, Carnegie Mellon University, University Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, P.E.; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.
KAUSHIK DAYAL, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.
DAVID A. DZOMBAK, Department Head and Hamerschlag University Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, P.E.; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.
SUSAN FINGER, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.
JAMES H. GARRETT, P.E., JR., Dean, College of Engineering and Thomas Lord Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University, P.E.; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.
KELVIN GREGORY, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., University of Iowa; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.
CHRIS T. HENDRICKSON, Hamerschlag University Professor Emeritus of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.
ATHANASIOS KARAMALIDIS, Associate Research Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Democritus University of Thrace; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.
XUESONG (PINE) LIU, Assistant Research Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.
GREGORY LOWRY, Walter J. Blenko, Sr. Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., University of Illinios; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.
H. SCOTT MATTHEWS, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.
MEAGAN S. MAUTER, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.
HAE YOUNG NOH, Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.
IRVING J. OPPENHEIM, P.E., Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture – Ph.D., Cambridge University, P.E.; Carnegie Mellon, 1972–.
MATTEO POZZI, Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., University of Trento, Italy; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.
ZHEN (SEAN) QIAN, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Davis; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.
CONSTANTINE SAMARAS, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.
MITCHELL J. SMALL, H. John Heinz Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.
JAMES M. THOMPSON, P.E., Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Lehigh University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.
JEANNE VANBRIESEN, P.E., Duquesne Light Company Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.

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Faculty

AMIT ACHARYA, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
PETER ADAMS, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy – PhD., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.
BURCU AKINCI, Paul P. Christiano Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2000–.
MARIO BERGES, Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon Univesity; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.
JACOBO BIELAK, P.E., Hamerschlag University Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, , P.E.; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.
SARAH J. CHRISTIAN, P.E., Assistant Teaching Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.
JARED L. COHON, President Emeritus, Carnegie Mellon University, University Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, P.E.; Carnegie Mellon, 1997–.
KAUSHIK DAYAL, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 2008–.
DAVID A. DZOMBAK, Department Head and Hamerschlag University Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, P.E.; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.
SUSAN FINGER, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1989–.
JAMES H. GARRETT, P.E., JR., Dean, College of Engineering and Thomas Lord Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University, P.E.; Carnegie Mellon, 1990–.
KELVIN GREGORY, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., University of Iowa; Carnegie Mellon, 2006–.
CHRIS T. HENDRICKSON, Hamerschlag University Professor Emeritus of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie Mellon, 1978–.
ATHANASIOS KARAMALIDIS, Associate Research Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Democritus University of Thrace; Carnegie Mellon, 2010–.
XUESONG (PINE) LIU, Assistant Research Professor – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.
GREGORY LOWRY, Walter J. Blenko, Sr. Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., University of Illinios; Carnegie Mellon, 2002–.
H. SCOTT MATTHEWS, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2001–.
MEAGAN S. MAUTER, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., Yale University; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.
HAE YOUNG NOH, Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon, 2013–.
IRVING J. OPPENHEIM, P.E., Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture – Ph.D., Cambridge University, P.E.; Carnegie Mellon, 1972–.
MATTEO POZZI, Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., University of Trento, Italy; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.
ZHEN (SEAN) QIAN, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Davis; Carnegie Mellon, 2015–.
CONSTANTINE SAMARAS, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon, 2014–.
MITCHELL J. SMALL, H. John Heinz Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy – Ph.D., University of Michigan; Carnegie Mellon, 1982–.
JAMES M. THOMPSON, P.E., Assistant Teaching Professor – Ph.D., Lehigh University; Carnegie Mellon, 2012–.
JEANNE VANBRIESEN, P.E., Duquesne Light Company Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering – Ph.D., Northwestern University; Carnegie Mellon, 1999–.