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Department of Biomedical Engineering

Campus Office for Student Affairs and Graduate Admissions
Doherty Hall 2100

Ph: (412) 268-2521
Fax: (412) 268-1173

Department Head
Professor Yu-li Wang
yuliwang@andrew.cmu.edu
412 268 4442

Associate Department Head
Professor Conrad M. Zapanta
czapanta@cmu.edu
412 268 9061
http://www.bme.cmu.edu/

Biomedical Engineering Overview

Biomedical engineering education at Carnegie Mellon reflects the belief that a top biomedical engineer must be deeply trained in both a traditional engineering practice and biomedical sciences. The unique additional major program leverages extensive collaborations with sister departments in the College of Engineering and with major medical institutions in Pittsburgh. This collaborative approach, combined with a rigorous engineering education, confers unique depth and breadth to the education of Biomedical Engineering graduates.

Students who elect Biomedical Engineering as a major must also declare a major in one of the traditional engineering disciplines: Chemical Engineering, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Materials Science & Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering.

The curriculum, demanding but readily feasible to complete in four years, is highly rewarding to motivated students.

Common Requirements for the Additional Major

The Biomedical Engineering additional major program takes advantage of curricular overlaps between Biomedical Engineering and traditional engineering majors, such that the dual major can be completed in four years with only a modest increase in course requirements. The requirements for Biomedical Engineering consist of the core, the tracks, and the capstone design course. The core exposes students to basic facets of biomedical engineering to lay a foundation. The tracks allow students to build depth in a specific aspect of biomedical engineering. The capstone design engages students in team work to develop real-world applications.

While most tracks are designed to parallel a traditional engineering discipline, a General Biomedical Engineering track is available for students intending on pursuing graduate studies or medical school, and a self-designed track allows students to pursue specific areas not covered by the pre-defined tracks. The additional major in Biomedical Engineering should be declared at the same time when declaring a traditional engineering major.

Course Requirements for the Additional Major Degree

Student majoring in Biomedical Engineering must meet three sets of requirements:  1) Biomedical Engineering (BME), 2) a traditional engineering discipline, and 3) CIT General Education sequence.  The Quality Point Average (QPA) for courses that count toward the additional major must be 2.00 or better. No course taken on a pass/fail or audit basis may be counted toward the additional major. 

The course requirements for the BME portion of the additional major are as follows:

Core Courses (all required)

Units
42-101Introduction to Biomedical Engineering- Fall and Spring12
42-201Professional Issues in Biomedical Engineering- Fall and Spring3
42-202Physiology- Fall and Spring9
42-203Biomedical Engineering Laboratory- Fall and Spring #9
03-121Modern Biology- Fall and Spring9
42-401Foundation of BME Design6
42-402BME Design Project- Spring9

# Also known as 03-206 for Health Professions Program students.

* 42-401 serves as the precursor/pre-requisite for 42-402 BME Design Project.

Tracks (Completion of one track is required)

  • Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering (BMTE)
  • Biomechanics (BMEC)
  • Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (BSIP)
  • Cellular and Molecular Biotechnology (CMBT)
  • General Biomedical Engineering (GBME)
  • Self-Designed Biomedical Engineering (SBME)

Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering (BMTE) Track

Overview

The BMTE track addresses issues at the interface of materials science, biology and engineering. The topics include the interactions between materials and cells or tissues, the effects of such interactions on cells and tissues, the design of materials for biological applications, and the engineering of new tissues.

Targets

The BMTE track is ideal for students interested in combining the education of Biomedical Engineering with Materials Science & Engineering or with Chemical Engineering.  Both provide the necessary foundation in chemistry and/or materials science. Students of this track may develp careers in biotechnology, tissue engineering, biopharmaceuticals, and medical devices that leverage materials properties.

In addition to the Biomedical Engineering core courses, students in the BMTE Track must take the following combination of courses:

  • One (1) BMTE Gateway course
  • One (1) Required BMTE elective
  • Two (2) other Electives (either one of the two options)
    1.    One (1) BMTE Elective (either Required or Additional) and one (1) Restricted Elective
    2.    Two (2) Additional BMTE Electives

BMTE Gateway Course#

03-231Biochemistry I- Fall9
03-232Biochemistry I- Spring #9


Note that only 03-232 satisfies Chemistry Engineering course requirements. Either 03-231 or 03-232 satisfies Materials Science & Engineering requirements.


BMTE Electives
Required BMTE Electives (must take one of the following)

42-411Engineering Biomaterials- Fall9
42-699Special Topics- Tissue Engineering - Spring12


Additional BMTE Electives

03-240Cell Biology- Spring9
09-217Organic Chemistry I- Fall 2,#9
or 09-218 Organic Chemistry II
42-620Engineering Molecular Cell Biology- Fall12
42-624Biological Transport and Drug Delivery- Spring9
42-643Microfluids- Intermittent12
42-698Special Topics-B Stem Cell Engineering - Intermittent9
42-698Special Topics-G Molecular and Micros-Scale Polymeric Biomaterials in Medicine - Spring, every other year9
42-699Special Topics-N Nanoscience and Nanotechnology in Biomedical Engineering - Spring12

2 Note that either 09-217 or 09-218 (offered in the Spring), but not both, may be counted as a BMTE Elective.

Chemical Engineering requirement

Restrictive Elective Courses (choose at most one)

42-660Surgery for Engineers- Fall / Spring12
42-662Basic Statistics for Biomedical Research- Fall9
42-698Special Topics-A Bioinstrumentation - Spring9
42-698Special Topics-C Introduction to Biomedical Signal Processing - Fall9
42-698Special Topics-D Engineering in Medicine - Fall9
42-698Special Topics-F Technological Innovation in Biomedical Engineering - Fall9
42-699Special Topics-G Computational Methods in Biomedical Engineering - Spring12
42-x00BME Research *Var.
39-500Honors Research Project *Var.

* The 42-x00 research project (42-200/300/400 Sophomore/Junior/Senior Biomedical Engineering Research Project OR 39-500 Honors Research Project) must be on a BME topic supervised or co-supervised by a BME faculty member and conducted for 9 or more units of credit. 

Some Special Topics and newly offered or intermittently offered courses may be acceptable as BMTE track electives. Students should consult with their BME advisors and petition the BME Undergraduate Affairs Committee for permission to include such courses as BMTE track electives.

Sample schedules can be found on the BMTE page on the BME website.


Biomechanics (BMEC) Track

Overview

The BMEC track addresses the application of solid or fluid mechanics to biological and medical systems. It provides quantitative understanding of the mechanical behavior of molecules, cells, tissues, organs, and whole organisms. The field has seen a wide range of applications from the optimzation of tissue regeneration to the design of surgical and rehabilitation devices. 

Targets

The BMEC track is ideally suited to the combined education of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering or Civil & Environmental Engineering.  Both provide the necessary foundation in the underlying physical principles and their non-Biomedical Engineering applications. This track may also appeal to students of Electrical & Computer Engineering who are interested in biomedical robotics. Education in biomechanics enables students to pursue careers in medical devices or rehabilitation engineering.

In addition to the Biomedical Engineering core courses, students in the BMEC Track must take must take the following combination of courses:

  • One (1) BMEC Gateway Course
  • One (1) Required BMEC Elective
  • Two (2) other Electives (either one of the two options)
    1.    One (1) BMEC Elective (either Required or Additional) and one (1) Restricted Elective 2.    Two (2) BMEC Electives (either Required or Additional)


BMEC Gateway Course1
24-231 Fluid Mechanics
06-261 Fluid Mechanics
12-355 Fluid Mechanics
1Note that 24-231 Fluid Mechanics satisfies Mechanical Engineering course requirements, 06-261 Fluid Mechanics satisfies Chemical Engineering course requirements, and 12-355 Fluid Mechanics satisfies Civil & Environmental Engineering course requirements.
 

BMEC Electives
Required BMEC Electives (must take at least one of the following)

42-341Introduction to Biomechanics- Fall9
42-642Biological Fluid Mechanics- Spring, every other year12
42-645/24-655Cellular Biomechanics- Spring, every other year9
42-646/24-657Molecular Biomechanics- Spring, every other year9
42-699Special Topics-M Cardiovascular Biomechanics - Spring12


Additional BMEC Electives

33-441/03-439Introduction to BioPhysics- Fall10
42-444Medical Devices- Fall and Spring9
42-447Rehabilitation Engineering- Fall9
42-640/24-658Computational Bio-Modeling and Visualization- Spring12
42-641/24-676Bio Inspired Robotics- Fall12
42-643/24-615Microfluids12
42-647Introduction to Continuum Biomechanics- Spring12


Restrictive Elective Courses (choose at most one)

42-660Surgery for Engineers- Fall / Spring12
42-662Basic Statistics for Biomedical Research-Fall9
42-698Special Topics-A Bioinstrumentation - Spring9
42-698Special Topics-C Introduction to Biomedical Signal Processing - Fall9
42-698Special Topics-D Engineering in Medicine - Fall9
42-698Special Topics-F Technological Innovation in Biomedical Engineering - Fall9
42-699Special Topics-G Computational Methods in Biomedical Engineering - Spring12
42-x00BME Research *Var.
39-500Honors Research Project *Var.

* The 42-x00 research project (42-200/300/400 Sophomore/Junior/Senior Biomedical Engineering Research Project OR 39-500 Honors Research Project) must be on a BME topic supervised or co-supervised by a BME faculty member and conducted for 9 or more units of credit. 

Some Special Topics, newly offered or intermittently offered courses may be acceptable as track electives.  Students should consult with their advisors and petition the BME Undergraduate Affairs Committee for permission to include such courses as track electives.

Sample schedules can be found on the BMEC page on the BME website.


Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (BSIP) Track

Overview

The BSIP track addresses bio/medical phenomena based on the information embedded in sensor-detected signals, including digital images and nerve electrical pulses. Students in this track will gain understanding of the technologies involved in acquiring signals and images, the mathematical principles underlying the processing and analysis of signals, and the applications of signal/image processing methods in basic research and medicine.

Targets

This track aligns most naturally with a combined education of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering, which lays a solid foundation in signal processing principles. This track prepares students for careers in medical imaging or smart prosthetics. It also interaces with many clinical practices including radiology, neurology/neurosurgery, and pathology.

In addition to the Biomedical Engineering core courses, students in the BSIP Track must take the following combination of courses:

  • One (1) BSIP Gateway course
  • One (1) Required BSIP elective
  • Two (2) other Electives (either one of the two options)

1.    One (1) BSIP Electives (either Required or Additional) and one (1) Restricted Elective 2.    Two (2) BSIP Electives (either Required or Additional)
 

BSIP Gateway Course

18-290 Signals and Systems – Fall/Spring
 

BSIP Electives

Required BSIP Electives (must take at least one of the following)

42-431/18-496Introduction to Biomedical Imaging and Image Analysis- Fall12
42-631Neural Data Analysis- Fall9
42-632Neural Signal Processing- Spring12

Additional BSIP Electives

03-534Biological Imaging and Fluorescence Spectroscopy- Spring9
15-386Neural Computation- Spring9
18-491Fundamentals of Signal Processing- Fall 112
or 18-792 Advanced Digital Signal Processing
42-426Biosensors and BioMEMS- Spring, every other year9
42-447Rehabilitation Engineering- Fall9
42-640/24-658Computational Bio-Modeling and Visualization- Spring12
42-698Special Topics- A : Bioinstrumentation - Spring9
42-735Medical Image Analysis- Spring12

1 Note that either 18-491 or 18-792 (offered in Spring), but not both, may be counted as a BSIP Elective.

Restrictive Elective Courses (choose at most one)

42-660Surgery for Engineers- Fall / Spring12
42-662Basic Statistics for Biomedical Research-Fall9
42-698Special Topics-D Engineering in Medicine - Fall9
42-698Special Topics-F Technological Innovation in Biomedical Engineering - Fall9
42-699Special Topics-G Computational Methods in Biomedical Engineering - Spring12
42-x00BME Research *Var.
39-500Honors Research Project *Var.

* The 42-x00 research project (42-200/300/400 Sophomore/Junior/Senior Biomedical Engineering Research Project OR 39-500 Honors Research Project) must be on a BME topic supervised or co-supervised by a BME faculty member and conducted for 9 or more units of credit. 

Some Special Topics, newly offered or intermittently offered courses may be acceptable as track electives.  Students should consult with their advisors and petition the BME Undergraduate Affairs Committee for permission to include such courses as track electives.

Sample schedules can be found on the BSIP page on the BME website.


Cellular and Molecular Biotechnology (CMBT) Track

Overview

The CMBT track emphasizes fundamentals and applications of biochemistry, biophysics, and cell biology, and processes on the nanometer to micrometer size scale. Students in this track acquire understanding of the molecular and cellular bases of life processes, and build skills in quantitative modeling of live cell-based biotechnologies and in technologies that exploit the unique properties of biomolecules in non-biological settings.

Targets

The CMBT track is ideally suited for the combined education of Biomedical Engineering and Chemical Engineering, which provides a strong core of chemistry and molecular processing principles. The track may also interest students of Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science & Engineering, or Civil & Environmental Engineering who have an interest in molecular aspects of Biomedical Engineering. The CMBT track prepares students for careers in bio/pharmaceutical, medical diagnostics, biosensors, drug delivery, and biological aspects of environmental engineering.

In addition to the Biomedical Engineering core courses, students in the CMBT Track must take the following combination of courses:

  • One (1) CMBT Gateway course
  • One (1) Required CMBT Elective
  • Two (2) other Electives (either one of the two options)
    1.    One (1) CMBT Elective (either Required or Additional) and one (1) Restricted Elective 2.    Two (2) CMBT Electives (either Required or Additional)

CMBT Gateway Course

03-231 Biochemistry I (9 units) – Fall
03-232 Biochemistry I (9 units) # – Spring
#Note that only 03-232 satisfies Chemistry Engineering course requirements, either 03-231 or 03-232 satisfies Materials Science & Engineering requirements.


CMBT Electives
Required CMBT Electives (must take at least one of the following)

42-623Cellular and Molecular Biotechnology9
42-624Biological Transport and Drug Delivery9

Additional CMBT Electives

03-240Cell Biology- Spring9
42-426Biosensors and BioMEMS- Intermittent9
42-620Engineering Molecular Cell Biology- Fall12
42/06-622Bioprocess Design- Spring, intermittent9
42-643Microfluids- Spring, intermittent12
42-645/24-655Cellular Biomechanics- Spring, every other year9
42-646/24-657Molecular Biomechanics- Spring, every other year9
42-698Special Topics-B Stem Cell Engineering - Spring, every other year9
42-699Special Topics-N Nanoscience and Nanotechnology in Biomedical Engineering - Spring12

Some Special Topics, newly offered or intermittently offered courses may be acceptable as track electives.  Students should consult with their advisors and petition the BME Undergraduate Affairs Committee for permission to include such courses as track electives.


Restrictive Elective Courses (choose at most one)

42-660Surgery for Engineers- Fall / Spring12
42-662Basic Statistics for Biomedical Research-Fall9
42-698Special Topics-A Bioinstrumentation - Spring9
42-698Special Topics-C Introduction to Biomedical Signal Processing - Fall9
42-698Special Topics-D Engineering in Medicine - Fall9
42-698Special Topics-F Technological Innovation in Biomedical Engineering - Fall9
42-699Special Topics-G Computational Methods in Biomedical Engineering - Spring12
42-x00BME Research *Var.
39-500Honors Research Project *Var.

* The 42-x00 research project (42-200/300/400 Sophomore/Junior/Senior Biomedical Engineering Research Project OR 39-500 Honors Research Project) must be on a BME topic supervised or co-supervised by a BME faculty member and conducted for 9 or more units of credit. 

Sample schedules can be found on the CMBT page on the BME website.


General Biomedical Engineering (GBME) Track

The GBME track provides broader education in biomedical engineering than other tracks. It is aimed at students who intend on pursuing medical or graduate school and desire a general coverage of biomedical engineering with maximal flexibility in course selection. Students are strongly encouraged to consult the advisor(s) and tailor the electives according to their career plan.

In addition to the Biomedical Engineering core requirements, students must fullfill the following requirements.

  • One (1) Gateway Course listed for BMEC, BMTE, BSIP, or CMBT track.
  • Three (3) Electives from BMEC, BMTE, BSIP, or CMBT track, or from other 42-6xx courses.

Some Special Topics, newly offered or intermittently offered courses may be acceptable as track electives.  Students should consult with their advisors and petition the BME Undergraduate Affairs Committee for permission to include such courses as track electives.

** The 42-x00 research project (42-200/300/400 Sophomore/Junior/Senior Biomedical Engineering Research Project OR 39-500 Honors Research Project) must be on a BME topic supervised or co-supervised by a BME faculty member and conducted for 9 or more units of credit.  Students may count EITHER 42-x00 BME Research OR 39-500 Honors Research Project (with BME supervision) OR 42-660 Surgery for Engineers as a track elective.  Students may count EITHER Surgery for Engineers 42-660 OR Biomedical Engineering Research project, but not both, as one track elective.


Self-Designed Biomedical Engineering (SBME) Track

The SBME track is aimed at helping highly motivated students who have a strong sense of career direction that falls beyond the scope of regular Biomedical Engineering tracks. Students are allowed to design the "track" portion of the curriculum in consultation with the faculty. Example themes include medical robotics, neural engineering, or computational biomedical engineering.

The SBME track is fundamentally different from the GBME track. While the GBME track builds the breadth and may include only courses that are already associated with the four other defined tracks, the SBME track allows students to choose courses relevant to the theme from across the University.

Requirements

In addition to the Biomedical Engineering core requirements, students must take four elective courses of at least 9 units each. These elective courses must form a coherent theme that is relevant to biomedical engineering. In addition, at least one of the elective courses must be judged by the Biomedical Engineering Undergraduate Affairs Committee to have substantial biological or medical content.

Students may count EITHER Surgery for Engineers 42-660 OR Biomedical Engineering Research project, but not both, as one track elective. The research project (42-200/300/400 Sophomore/Junior/Senior Biomedical Engineering Research Project OR 39-500 CIT Honors Thesis) must be on a biomedical engineering topic supervised or co-supervised by a core or courtesy Biomedical Engineering faculty member and for 9 or more units.

Petition Procedure

1.  Students wishing to pursue a self-designed track should first consult with the Biomedical Engineering Undergraduate Affairs Committee. Contacts for the Committee are Prof. Robert Tilton (committee chair), and Prof. Conrad Zapanta (Biomedical Engineering Associate Head).

2.  A SBME track proposal must be submitted electronically as a Word document to Prof. Conrad Zapanta at least three weeks prior to Pre-Registration during the spring of the sophomore year. The proposal must include:

  • The four courses of the designed track, including catalog descriptions and when these courses are expected to be taken.
  • A justification of how these courses form a coherent theme relevant to biomedical engineering.
  • Two alternative courses that may substitute for one of the proposed courses, in case the original course is not available.

3.  Once approved, the student must sign an agreement listing the theme and the four courses comprising the SBME track.

4.  In the event that issues beyond the student's control, such as course scheduling or cancellation, prevent the student from completing the approved course plan, the student may petition the Biomedical Engineering Undergraduate Affairs Committee to

  • Substitute a course with another course that fits the approved theme, OR
  • Move to the GBME track. The student must complete one of the regular track Gateway courses, otherwise completed SBME courses may count toward GBME requirements.

Minor in Biomedical Engineering

Conrad M. Zapanta, Ph.D.
www.bme.cmu.edu
Campus Office for Student Affairs: Doherty Hall 2100

The minor program is designed for engineering students who desire exposure to biomedical engineering but may not have the time to pursue the Biomedical Engineering additional major. The program is open to students of all colleges and is popular among science majors. In conjunction with other relevant courses, the program may provide a sufficient background for jobs or graduate studies in biomedical engineering. Students interested in a medical career may also find this program helpful.

The Biomedical Engineering minor curriculum is comprised of three core courses and two or three electives. Students pursuing the minor may contact BME Associate Head for advice. Students interested in declaring Biomedical Engineering minor should contact either the Associate Department Head of Biomedical Engineering or the Biomedical Engineering Undergraduate Program Coordinator.

Requirements

College of Engineering Students (5 courses):

03-121Modern Biology9
42-101Introduction to Biomedical Engineering
(co-req. or pre-req. 03-121)
12
42-202Physiology
(pre-req. 03-121 or permission of instructor)
9
xx-xxxElective I (>= 9 units) #
xx-xxxElective II (>= 9 units) +

Non-Engineering Students (6 courses)

03-121Modern Biology9
42-101Introduction to Biomedical Engineering
(co-req. or pre-req. 03-121)
12
42-202Physiology
(pre-req. 03-121 or permission of instructor)
9
xx-xxxElective I (>= 9 units) #
xx-xxxElective II (>= 9 units) +
xx-xxxA second Introductory Engineering Course* or Any 42-xxx Course Numbered 42-3xx or Higher and worth at Least 9 Units

Some Special Topics, newly offered or intermittently offered 42-xxx may be acceptable as electives.  Students should consult with their advisors and petition the Biomedical Engineering Undergraduate Affairs Committee for permission to include such courses.

Notes

# Elective I cannot be a required course in the student’s major. It may be

  1. Any track gateway, restricted elective, or track elective course selected from any of the four Biomedical Engineering tracks. See the online catalog for a listing of courses.
  2. Any 42-xxx course with a 42-300 or higher number and worth at least 9 units.
  3. 42-203 Biomedical Engineering Laboratory (or the cross-listed version 03-206 for students in the Health Professions Program). The course has a limited capacity and priority is given to students who have declared the Additional Major in Biomedical Engineering.**
  4. One semester of 42-200 Sophomore BME Research Project, 42-300 Junior BME Research Project, 42-400 Senior BME Research Project or 39-500 CIT Honors Research Project. The project must be supervised by a core or courtesy Biomedical Engineering faculty member and for 9 or more units.

+ Elective II must be a Biomedical Engineering track gateway, track elective, or restricted Elective course that is offered by one of the Engineering Departments (06-xxx, 12-xxx, 18-xxx, 19-xxx, 24-xxx, 27-xxx or 42-xxx). The only exception is that 03-232, the biotechnology-focused version of Biochemistry taught each Spring by the Department of Biological Sciences, is also acceptable. Organic Chemistry I 09-217 is a pre-requisite of 03-232.

* Selected from 06-100 Introduction to Chemical Engineering, 12-100 Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering, 18-100 Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering, 19-101 Introduction to Engineering and Public Policy, 27-100 Engineering the Materials of the Future, or 24-101 Fundamentals of Mechanical Engineering. Note that these courses may involve co-requisites.

** Priority for enrollment in 42-203 or 03-206 will be given to students who have declared the Additional Major in Biomedical Engineering.  If sufficient room in the course remains after all majors have been accommodated in a given semester, students who have declared the Biomedical Engineering Designated Minor will be given the next priority for enrollment.  If space still allows, other students will be enrolled.

Full-Time Faculty

ANTAKI, JAMES F. , Professor of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D, University of Pittsburgh, 1991; .ARMITAGE, BRUCE A. , Professor of Chemistry, Biological Sciences, and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Arizona, 1993; .BETTINGER, CHRISTOPHER J. , Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2008; .BRUCHEZ, MARCEL P. , Associate Professor of Biological Sciences, Chemistry, and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1998; .CAMPBELL, PHIL G. , Research Professor, Institute of Complex Engineering Systems, Biomedical Engineering, Biological Sciences, Materials Science & Engineering – Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 1985; .CHASE, STEVEN M., Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition – Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 2006; .CHOSET, HOWIE, Professor, Robotics Institute, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical & Computer Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology , 1996; .COHEN-KARNI, TZAHI , Assistand Professor of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Harvard, 2011; .COOK, KEITH, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Northwestern University, 2000; .DAHL, KRIS N., Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, and Materials Science & Engineering – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 2004; .DOMACH, MICHAEL M. , Professor of Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Cornell University, 1983; .FEDDER, GARY K., Howard M. Wilkoff Professor, Institute for Complex Engineering Systems, Biomedical Engineering, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1994; .FEINBERG, ADAM W., Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering – Ph.D., University of Florida, 2004; .GALEOTTI, JOHN, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D, Carnegie Mellon University, 2007; .GEYER, HARMUT, Assistant Professor, Robotics Institute and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Friedrich-Schiller-University of Jena, Germany, 2005 ; .HO, CHIEN , Professor of Biological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Yale University, 1961; .HOLLINGER, JEFFREY O. , Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Biological Sciences – D.D.S. and Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1973 & 1981; .JARAMAZ, BRANISLAV, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University, 1992; .KANADE, TAKEO , U.A. and Helen Whitaker University Professor, Robotics Institute and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Kyoto University, 1974; .KELLY, SHAWN, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2003; .KOVACEVIC, JELENA , Professor and Head of Electrical & Computer Engineering, and Professor of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Columbia University, 1991; .LEDUC, PHILIP R., Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, and Biological Sciences – Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1999; .LOESCHE, MATHIAS , Professor of Physics and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Technical University of Munich, 1986; .MANDAL, MAUMITA , Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Ctr for Cellular & Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, India, 2001; .MINDEN, JONATHAN S. , Professor of Biological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1985; .MCHENRY , MICHAEL E. , Professor of Materials Science & Engineering and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1988; .MOURA , JOSE M. F., Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1975; .MURPHY, ROBERT F., Ray and Stephanie Lane Professor of Computational Biology and Professor of Biological Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, and Machine Learning – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 1980; .OZDOGANLAR, BURAK , Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering – Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1999; .PEKKAN, KEREM, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Middle East Technical University, 2000; .PRZYBYCIEN, TODD M., Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Chemical Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 1989; .RABIN, YOED, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering – D.Sc., Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, 1994; .RIKAKIS, THANASSIS, Professor of Design and Biomedical Engineering – D.M.A., Columbia University, 1994; .RIVIERE, CAMERON N., Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1995; .ROHDE, GUSTAVO K., Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Maryland, 2005; .RUSSELL, ALAN J., Highmark Distinguished Career Professor, Institute of Complex Engineering Systems and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of London, 1987; .SCHNEIDER, JAMES W., Professor of Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1998; .SHIMADA, KENJI, Theodore Ahrens Professor in Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1993; .SITTI , METIN, Professor, Mechanical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Institute of Complex Engineering Systems, and Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Tokyo University, 1999; .STETTEN, GEORGE D., Research Professor, Robotics Institute and Biomedical Engineering – MD/Ph.D., State University of New York Syracuse Health Center, 1991, and University of North Carolina, 2000; .SURESH, SUBRA, Professor of Materials Science & Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Engineering & Public Policy, and Public Policy & Management President, Carnegie Mellon University – Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1981; .TILTON, ROBERT D. , Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Chemical Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University, 1991; .TRUMBLE, DENNIS, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering (on campus) – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University, 2010; .VANBRIESEN, JEANNE M., Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1998; .WAGGONER, ALAN S., Professor of Biological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Oregon, 1969; .WANG, YU-LI, Mehrabian Professor and Head of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Harvard University, 1980; .WASHBURN, NEWELL R. , Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Chemistry, and Materials Science & Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1998; .WEISS, LEE E., Research Professor, Robotics Institute, Biomedical Engineering, and Materials Science & Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University, 1984; .WHITEHEAD, KATHRYN A, Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara, 2007; .YANG, GE, Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering and Lane Center for Computational Biology – Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 2004; .YU, BYRON, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University, 2007; .ZAPANTA, CONRAD M., Teaching Professor and Associate Head of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 1997; .ZHANG, YONGJIE JESSICA, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 2005; .

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Full-Time Faculty

ANTAKI, JAMES F. , Professor of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D, University of Pittsburgh, 1991; .ARMITAGE, BRUCE A. , Professor of Chemistry, Biological Sciences, and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Arizona, 1993; .BETTINGER, CHRISTOPHER J. , Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2008; .BRUCHEZ, MARCEL P. , Associate Professor of Biological Sciences, Chemistry, and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1998; .CAMPBELL, PHIL G. , Research Professor, Institute of Complex Engineering Systems, Biomedical Engineering, Biological Sciences, Materials Science & Engineering – Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 1985; .CHASE, STEVEN M., Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition – Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 2006; .CHOSET, HOWIE, Professor, Robotics Institute, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical & Computer Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology , 1996; .COHEN-KARNI, TZAHI , Assistand Professor of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Harvard, 2011; .COOK, KEITH, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Northwestern University, 2000; .DAHL, KRIS N., Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, and Materials Science & Engineering – Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 2004; .DOMACH, MICHAEL M. , Professor of Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Cornell University, 1983; .FEDDER, GARY K., Howard M. Wilkoff Professor, Institute for Complex Engineering Systems, Biomedical Engineering, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Robotics Institute – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1994; .FEINBERG, ADAM W., Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering – Ph.D., University of Florida, 2004; .GALEOTTI, JOHN, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D, Carnegie Mellon University, 2007; .GEYER, HARMUT, Assistant Professor, Robotics Institute and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Friedrich-Schiller-University of Jena, Germany, 2005 ; .HO, CHIEN , Professor of Biological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Yale University, 1961; .HOLLINGER, JEFFREY O. , Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Biological Sciences – D.D.S. and Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1973 & 1981; .JARAMAZ, BRANISLAV, Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University, 1992; .KANADE, TAKEO , U.A. and Helen Whitaker University Professor, Robotics Institute and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Kyoto University, 1974; .KELLY, SHAWN, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2003; .KOVACEVIC, JELENA , Professor and Head of Electrical & Computer Engineering, and Professor of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Columbia University, 1991; .LEDUC, PHILIP R., Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, and Biological Sciences – Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1999; .LOESCHE, MATHIAS , Professor of Physics and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Technical University of Munich, 1986; .MANDAL, MAUMITA , Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Ctr for Cellular & Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, India, 2001; .MINDEN, JONATHAN S. , Professor of Biological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1985; .MCHENRY , MICHAEL E. , Professor of Materials Science & Engineering and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1988; .MOURA , JOSE M. F., Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1975; .MURPHY, ROBERT F., Ray and Stephanie Lane Professor of Computational Biology and Professor of Biological Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, and Machine Learning – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 1980; .OZDOGANLAR, BURAK , Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering – Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1999; .PEKKAN, KEREM, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering – Ph.D., Middle East Technical University, 2000; .PRZYBYCIEN, TODD M., Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Chemical Engineering – Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 1989; .RABIN, YOED, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering – D.Sc., Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, 1994; .RIKAKIS, THANASSIS, Professor of Design and Biomedical Engineering – D.M.A., Columbia University, 1994; .RIVIERE, CAMERON N., Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1995; .ROHDE, GUSTAVO K., Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Maryland, 2005; .RUSSELL, ALAN J., Highmark Distinguished Career Professor, Institute of Complex Engineering Systems and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of London, 1987; .SCHNEIDER, JAMES W., Professor of Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1998; .SHIMADA, KENJI, Theodore Ahrens Professor in Engineering – Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1993; .SITTI , METIN, Professor, Mechanical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Institute of Complex Engineering Systems, and Robotics Institute – Ph.D., Tokyo University, 1999; .STETTEN, GEORGE D., Research Professor, Robotics Institute and Biomedical Engineering – MD/Ph.D., State University of New York Syracuse Health Center, 1991, and University of North Carolina, 2000; .SURESH, SUBRA, Professor of Materials Science & Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Engineering & Public Policy, and Public Policy & Management President, Carnegie Mellon University – Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1981; .TILTON, ROBERT D. , Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Chemical Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University, 1991; .TRUMBLE, DENNIS, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering (on campus) – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University, 2010; .VANBRIESEN, JEANNE M., Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1998; .WAGGONER, ALAN S., Professor of Biological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Oregon, 1969; .WANG, YU-LI, Mehrabian Professor and Head of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., Harvard University, 1980; .WASHBURN, NEWELL R. , Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Chemistry, and Materials Science & Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1998; .WEISS, LEE E., Research Professor, Robotics Institute, Biomedical Engineering, and Materials Science & Engineering – Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University, 1984; .WHITEHEAD, KATHRYN A, Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara, 2007; .YANG, GE, Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering and Lane Center for Computational Biology – Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 2004; .YU, BYRON, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering – Ph.D., Stanford University, 2007; .ZAPANTA, CONRAD M., Teaching Professor and Associate Head of Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 1997; .ZHANG, YONGJIE JESSICA, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering – Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 2005; .